Awards

At Berkeley Law, there are two awards that students can receive for pro-bono work. The two awards are the Eleanor Swift Award and the Pro Bono Champion Award.


 

Eleanor Swift Award

Students may nominate themselves or others for the Eleanor Swift Award for Public Service. Each year, the award is given to an exceptional member of the Berkeley Law community (students, staff or faculty) who—like Professor Eleanor Swift—has performed outstanding work to strengthen Berkeley Law’s commitment to public service. Eligible candidates will have increased the law school’s commitment to public service through any or several of the following activities that enable Berkeley Law students to engage in public service legal work during law school or in their careers either as public interest and social justice lawyers or on a pro bono basis: exceptional leadership, administration and support, innovation, outreach, teaching, professional or public writing, mentoring, advocacy, advising, and/or participation in Berkeley Law’s public service programs and activities. Nomination Process: Anyone in the Berkeley Law community may nominate anyone else in the community. Nominations shall be made in the form of a memo of up to two pages on why the nominee should receive the award. Nominees will be asked for consent to be considered, and must submit a bio, CV or resume. Nominations will be accepted each year beginning February 1.

About Eleanor Swift

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

During her thirty-six-year teaching career at Berkeley Law (1979-2015), Professor Eleanor Swift engaged in every aspect of the school’s gradual embrace of experiential learning and its increasing support for public interest and social justice law practice. In 1990, working with Professor Stephen Sugarman, Professor Swift developed and taught the first companion class to the clinical program at the East Bay Community Law Center. In 1992, she was appointed by Dean Herma Hill Kay to lead a special committee to develop a blueprint for clinical education at the law school, advocating for a plan that led to the clinics and the skills and field placement programs that we now have today. In 1996, in the wake of Proposition 209, Professor Swift teamed with Professors Rachel Moran and Angela Harris to start the Center for Social Justice (now the Thelton E. Henderson Center for Social Justice). Since then, she has chaired or participated in almost every committee dealing with school support for experiential learning and our students’ public interest and social justice careers.


Pro Bono Champion Award

Beginning with the Class of 2019, students may nominate themselves or other students for the Pro Bono Champion Award. Each year, the award is given to the graduating student who best exemplifies a commitment to and the values of pro bono work. Factors that will be considered include but are not limited to hours spent on pro bono work during the academic year, leadership, and support for the Berkeley Law Pro Bono Program and Student-Initiated Legal Services Projects more generally. Nomination Process: Anyone in the Berkeley Law community may nominate any Berkeley Law student. Nominations shall be made in the form of a memo of up to two pages on why the nominee should receive the award. Nominees will be asked for consent to be considered, and must submit a bio, CV or resume. Nominations will be accepted beginning February 1, 2019.


Recording Hours

 


Summer Public Interest Fellowships (“Dean’s Grants”)

Every Berkeley Law JD student is guaranteed funding to pursue public interest or public sector summer work. These Summer Public Interest Fellowships (often called “Dean’s Grants”) are separate from the Pro Bono Pledge and administered by the Career Development Office, not the Pro Bono Program. Please visit the Finance Your Public Interest Career webpage or contact the Career Development Office for more information.