Berkeley Law Course Catalog

Law 200.2 Civil Procedure for LL.M.Students 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
Civil Procedure for LLM Students is the study of our civil (non-criminal) dispute resolution system, with an emphasis on litigation in the federal courts, as regulated by the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (FRCP). We will cover pleadings, subject matter jurisdiction, personal jurisdiction, joinder of parties and claims (including class actions), discovery, dispositive pre-trial and trial motions, the preclusive effect of prior litigation, settlement of disputes, and alternatives to civil litigation. At the surface, this is a survey of the U.S. litigation system, and will introduce students to many of the civil procedure issues tested on the New York, California, and Multi-State bar exams. It is NOT a bar review course, but it will introduce many of the civil procedure subjects covered by the bar. At a deeper level, this is a comparative law class that compares multiple systems of dispute resolution, with much of the material supplied by the students from their experiences studying and practicing in many disparate legal systems. And for many students (and the instructor) it is an exploration of how common law lawyers and judges apply a common law approach to reading a code. To place the course material in context, and provide opportunities for formative assessment, we will follow a simulated case over the course of the semester, and will conduct several advocacy exercises. There will be two take-home mid-term exams, and a take-home final exam.

Spring 2021 Description:
Civil Procedure for LLM Students is the study of our civil (non-criminal) dispute resolution system, with an emphasis on litigation in the federal courts, as regulated by the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (FRCP). We will cover pleadings, subject matter jurisdiction, personal jurisdiction, joinder of parties and claims (including class actions), discovery, dispositive pre-trial and trial motions, the preclusive effect of prior litigation, settlement of disputes, and alternatives to civil litigation. At the surface, this is a survey of the U.S. litigation system, and will introduce students to many of the civil procedure issues tested on the New York, California, and Multi-State bar exams. At a deeper level, this is a comparative law class that compares multiple systems of dispute resolution, with much of the material supplied by the students from their experiences studying and practicing in many disparate legal systems. And for many students (and the instructor) it is an exploration of how common law lawyers and judges apply a common law approach to reading a code. To place the course material in context, and provide opportunities for formative assessment, we will follow a simulated case over the course of the semester, and will conduct several advocacy exercises. There will be two take-home mid-term exams, and a take-home final exam.

Spring 2022 Description:
Civil Procedure for LLM Students is the study of U.S. civil (non-criminal) dispute resolution systems, with an emphasis on civil litigation in the United States federal courts. The course will provide a general introduction to U.S. civil procedure, but it will focus primarily on topics that illustrate the juridical difficulties flowing from the United States' organization as a federation rather than a unitary republic, and on procedural issues that generate or significant controversy in U.S. law and politics. While the course will cover various topics tested on the New York, California, and uniform bar exams, it is NOT a bar review course. Bar-tested topics that the course will cover include subject matter jurisdiction, territorial (personal) jurisdiction, state law in federal court, federal common law, joinder of claims and parties (including class actions), discovery, summary judgment, settlement, and civil jury trials (including post-trial motions).


Law 200F Civil Procedure 5 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
This course covers the main stages of civil litigation in the trial court, including pleading, discovery, summary judgment, jury trial, motions for judgment as a matter of law, joinder of parties and claims, and claim and issue preclusion. Constitutional limits on territorial jurisdiction, federal subject-matter jurisdiction, venue, and choice of federal vs. state law (the Erie doctrine) are also included.

Fall 2021 Description:
This course covers the main stages of civil litigation in the trial court, including pleading, discovery, summary judgment, jury trial, motions for judgment as a matter of law, joinder of parties and claims, and claim and issue preclusion. Constitutional limits on territorial jurisdiction, federal subject-matter jurisdiction, venue, and choice of federal vs. state law (the Erie doctrine) are also included.

Fall 2022 Description:
This course covers the main stages of civil litigation in the trial court, including pleading, discovery, summary judgment, jury trial, motions for judgment as a matter of law, joinder of parties and claims, and claim and issue preclusion. Constitutional limits on territorial jurisdiction, federal subject-matter jurisdiction, venue, and choice of federal vs. state law (the Erie doctrine) are also included.


Law 200S Civil Procedure 3 Units
Summer 2021: Hybrid
Summer 2022: In-Person
Description:
Summer 2021 Description:
This Civil Procedure course covers much of the standard JD Civil Procedure course (which focuses on U.S. federal civil procedure). In the summer quarter, we will cover the following topics in varying levels of detail: jurisdiction and venue, pleading, motion practice, discovery, joinder, class actions, summary judgment, juries, and preclusion. This course will meet in-person on campus on July 21st, 22nd, 23rd, 26th, and 27th in Warren (room 295).

Summer 2022 Description:
This Civil Procedure course covers much of the standard JD Civil Procedure course (which focuses on U.S. federal civil procedure). In the summer quarter, we will cover the following topics in varying levels of detail: jurisdiction and venue, pleading, motion practice, discovery, joinder, class actions, summary judgment, juries, and preclusion.


Law 201 Torts 5 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Spring 2022: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This course covers the law of civil injuries, including both intended and unintended interference with personal and property interests, as well as liability without fault.

Fall 2020 Description:
This course covers the law of civil injuries, including both intended and unintended interference with personal and property interests, as well as liability without fault.

Spring 2021 Description:
This course covers the law of civil injuries, including both intended and unintended interference with personal and property interests, as well as liability without fault.

Fall 2021 Description:
This course covers the law of civil injuries, including both intended and unintended interference with personal and property interests, as well as liability without fault.

Spring 2022 Description:
This course covers the law of civil injuries, including both intended and unintended interference with personal and property interests, as well as liability without fault.

Fall 2022 Description:
This course covers the law of civil injuries, including both intended and unintended interference with personal and property interests, as well as liability without fault.


Law 201S Torts 3 Units
Summer 2021: Hybrid
Summer 2022: In-Person
Description:
Summer 2021 Description:
Torts law is the common law mechanism for civil liability for all wrongs except breach of contract. Some torts involve minor disputes between individuals, others can involve tens or hundreds of millions of dollars in damage. Because it is a common law subject, the Torts class also provides an opportunity for a deeper understanding of common law decision-making, civil procedure, and the role of juries in U.S. law. The dramatic and often surprising events in torts cases make the subject ideal for the case method of teaching. Much of the course will focus on the law of negligence and liability for defective products. However, the course will also include some torts of particular interest to business and employment lawyers, as well as privacy torts relevant to social media and Internet firms.At a more abstract level, Torts also provides the opportunity to think about the roles of fairness, economic analysis, and litigation problems in designing legal rules. This course will meet in-person on campus on June 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 7th, and 8th in room 105.

Summer 2022 Description:
Torts law is the common law mechanism for civil liability for all wrongs except breach of contract. Some torts involve minor disputes between individuals, others can involve tens or hundreds of millions of dollars in damage. Because it is a common law subject, the Torts class also provides an opportunity for a deeper understanding of common law decision-making, civil procedure, and the role of juries in U.S. law. The dramatic and often surprising events in torts cases make the subject ideal for the case method of teaching. Much of the course will focus on the law of negligence and liability for defective products. However, the course will also include some torts of particular interest to business and employment lawyers, as well as privacy torts relevant to social media and Internet firms.At a more abstract level, Torts also provides the opportunity to think about the roles of fairness, economic analysis, and litigation problems in designing legal rules.


Law 202 Torts for LLM Students 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
The course covers the basic rules, concepts and principles of US law governing liability for civil injuries, including intended and negligently inflicted harm to personal and property interests and liability without fault. The course also is a good introduction to the American civil litigation system.

Spring 2021 Description:
The course covers the basic rules, concepts and principles of US law governing liability for civil injuries, including intended and negligently inflicted harm to personal and property interests and liability without fault. The course also is a good introduction to the American civil litigation system.

Spring 2022 Description:
The course covers the basic rules, concepts and principles of US law governing liability for civil injuries, including intended and negligently inflicted harm to personal and property interests and liability without fault. The course also is a good introduction to the American civil litigation system.


Law 202.1A Legal Research and Writing 3 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
This course provides instruction in legal research, analysis, and writing.

Fall 2021 Description:
This course provides instruction in legal research, analysis, and writing.

Fall 2022 Description:
This course provides instruction in legal research, analysis, and writing.


Law 202.1B Written and Oral Advocacy 2 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This course involves preparation of a brief for a trial court motion on a hypothetical problem, and arguing that motion before a “judge,” usually a practicing lawyer from the Bay Area or a “real” judge from a Bay Area court.

Spring 2021 Description:
This course involves preparation of a brief for a trial court motion on a hypothetical problem, and arguing that motion before a “judge,” usually a practicing lawyer from the Bay Area or a “real” judge from a Bay Area court.

Spring 2022 Description:
This course involves preparation of a brief for a trial court motion on a hypothetical problem, and arguing that motion before a “judge,” usually a practicing lawyer from the Bay Area or a “real” judge from a Bay Area court.


Law 202F Contracts 5 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Spring 2022: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This course covers the law of contracts, including formation, performance, remedies, and termination.

Fall 2020 Description:
This course covers the law of contracts, including formation, performance, remedies, and termination.

Spring 2021 Description:
This course covers the law of contracts, including formation, performance, remedies, and termination.

Fall 2021 Description:
This course will be held in Booth Auditorium.

Spring 2022 Description:
This course covers the law of contracts, including formation, performance, remedies, and termination.

Fall 2022 Description:
This course covers the law of contracts, including formation, performance, remedies, and termination.


Law 202S Contracts 3 Units
Summer 2021: Hybrid
Summer 2022: In-Person
Description:
Summer 2021 Description:
This survey course explores the basic principles of U.S. common law that govern the formation of, limits on the ability to enter into, breach and enforcement of, and remedies relating to, contracts. Students will also study the related principles embodied in the Uniform Commercial Code, a model for the law shaping sales and other commercial transactions. Textbook: Barnett & Oman, Contracts: Cases and Doctrine (6th Ed.) This course will meet in-person on campus on June 21st, 22nd, 23rd, 24th, and 25th in room 110.

Summer 2022 Description:
This survey course explores the basic principles of U.S. common law that govern contracts, including issues of formation, breach, enforcement, and remedies. Students will also study the related doctrinal principles codified in the Uniform Commercial Code, a model for the law shaping sales and other commercial transactions, and the Restatement Second of Contracts. Textbook: Barnett & Oman, Contracts: Cases and Doctrine (7th Ed.) Note: June 16th and 17th class meetings will be held on Zoom.


Law 203 Property 4 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: Remote Instruction
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This course provides an introduction to the topics involved in the law of property, including adverse possession, possessory estates in land, future interests, marital property, landlord-tenant law, concurrent estates, easements and covenants, and land-use planning. Special attention is given to environmental and intellectual property issues.

Spring 2021 Description:
This is a basic survey of the law of property, examining the forms and methods by which property interests are acquired, transferred, used, and regulated. It will lay the groundwork for advanced courses in intellectual property, real estate transactions, trusts and estates, land use, and environmental law, among other topics. There is no printed casebook to buy for this class. We will be using a custom version of an open source property casebook, which will be posted on bCourses. Upon completion of the course, you should have achieved the following Berkeley Law Learning Outcomes: • Knowledge and understanding of substantive law • Legal analysis and reasoning, legal research, problem-solving, and written and oral communication in the legal context • Using the law to solve real-world problems and to create a more just society You should also achieve learning outcomes specific to this class. Namely, you should be able to articulate the key attributes that are commonly associated with “property”; to describe the rules and policies related to initial acquisition and subsequent transfer of property rights in land, personal property, and some forms of intellectual property; to identify and solve problems regarding different types of ownership interests (including basic estates, future interests, and co-ownership interests); and to understand and apply different legal regimes that govern how people can use resources to which they or others have property rights (including the laws of nuisance, zoning, servitudes, and eminent domain). As you master these topics, you should also become familiar with the modes of argument and policy concerns that are typical in debates about property. Throughout the class, we will be attentive to how property law shapes and is shaped by systemic racism and other hierarchies of power.

Spring 2022 Description:
This is a basic survey of the law of property, examining the forms and methods by which property interests are acquired, transferred, used, and regulated. It will lay the groundwork for advanced courses in intellectual property, real estate transactions, trusts and estates, land use, and environmental law, among other topics. There is no printed casebook to buy for this class. We will be using a custom version of an open source property casebook, which will be posted on bCourses. Upon completion of the course, you should have achieved the following Berkeley Law Learning Outcomes: • Knowledge and understanding of substantive law • Legal analysis and reasoning, legal research, problem-solving, and written and oral communication in the legal context • Using the law to solve real-world problems and to create a more just society You should also achieve learning outcomes specific to this class. Namely, you should be able to articulate the key attributes that are commonly associated with “property”; to describe the rules and policies related to initial acquisition and subsequent transfer of property rights in land, personal property, and some forms of intellectual property; to identify and solve problems regarding different types of ownership interests (including basic estates, future interests, and co-ownership interests); and to understand and apply different legal regimes that govern how people can use resources to which they or others have property rights (including the laws of nuisance, zoning, servitudes, and eminent domain). As you master these topics, you should also become familiar with the modes of argument and policy concerns that are typical in debates about property. Throughout the class, we will be attentive to how property law shapes and is shaped by systemic racism and other hierarchies of power. Depending on the public health situation, this class may be conducted via Zoom to accommodate the instructor's family health situation.


Law 206.4A Legal Research and Writing for LL.M. Students 2 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
Legal Research and Writing introduces international LL.M. students to U.S. legal reasoning and practice by examining court opinions, teaching legal research methods, and developing skills of legal writing and oral presentation in the United States. The course emphasizes understanding the U.S. legal system, common law legal reasoning, legal problem solving, and effective written and oral communication of legal analysis. The course includes several written assignments building up to a final writing project of 15 to 19 pages, which satisfies the Capstone Writing Requirement. Students will also make a short oral presentation. This course is two credits and graded. Much of the learning in this course involves experiential exercises done in groups during class time. The collaborative aspect of this process greatly enhances student learning. As such, we strongly encourage students to attend class in real-time to the greatest extent possible. Please choose a section that works best for your schedule.

Spring 2021 Description:
Legal Research and Writing introduces international LL.M. students to U.S. legal reasoning and practice by examining court opinions, teaching legal research methods, and developing skills of legal writing and oral presentation in the United States. The course emphasizes understanding the U.S. legal system, common law legal reasoning, legal problem solving, and effective written and oral communication of legal analysis. The course includes several written assignments building up to a final writing project of 15 to 19 pages, which satisfies the Capstone Writing Requirement. Students will also make a short oral presentation. This course is two credits and graded. Much of the learning in this course involves experiential exercises done in groups during class time. The collaborative aspect of this process greatly enhances student learning. As such, we strongly encourage students to attend class in real-time to the greatest extent possible. Please choose a section that works best for your schedule.

Fall 2021 Description:
Legal Research and Writing introduces international LL.M. students to U.S. legal reasoning and practice by examining court opinions, teaching legal research methods, and developing skills of legal writing and oral presentation in the United States. The course emphasizes understanding the U.S. legal system, common law legal reasoning, legal problem solving, and effective written and oral communication of legal analysis. The course includes several written assignments building up to a final writing project of 15 to 20 pages, which satisfies the Capstone Writing Requirement. Students will also make a short oral presentation. Much of the learning in this course involves experiential exercises done in groups during class time.

Fall 2022 Description:
Legal Research and Writing introduces international LL.M. students to U.S. legal reasoning and practice by examining court opinions, teaching legal research methods, and developing skills of legal writing and oral presentation in the United States. The course emphasizes understanding the U.S. legal system, common law legal reasoning, legal problem solving, and effective written and oral communication of legal analysis. The course includes several written assignments building up to a final writing project of 15 to 20 pages, which satisfies the Capstone Writing Requirement. Students will also make a short oral presentation. Much of the learning in this course involves experiential exercises done in groups during class time.


Law 206.5 Advanced Legal Writing for LL.M.s 2 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Hybrid
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This course develops sophisticated legal writing skills to prepare international LL.M. students to work alongside U.S. attorneys and serve U.S. clients. The tasks in the course are designed to replicate and train students in handling the real-life project assignments typically encountered in a U.S. practice. Problems are drawn from California and New York bar examination performance tests. Students will gain exposure to a variety of legal writing projects, learn to use the U.S style of legal rhetoric in their writing, improve legal analysis and writing skills, and prepare for the bar exam. This course is divided into a series of tasks of varying type, complexity, and length. The types of problems vary, and may include such things as: an advice letter to a client, a research memo as an associate to a supervising partner, a factual affidavit for trial, closing arguments for trial, or a persuasive brief written for a judge. Students will work individually on most assignments, and will collaborate on some of them as well.

Spring 2021 Description:
This course will be taught as a hybrid course for students who will be physically located in or near Berkeley during the spring semester. Most class meetings will occur remotely using Zoom but will be in person April 17 as public health officials allow. This course develops sophisticated legal writing skills to prepare international students to serve U.S. clients. The tasks in the course are designed to replicate and train students in handling the real-life project assignments typically encountered in a U.S. practice. Problems are drawn from California and New York bar examination performance tests. Students will improve legal analysis and writing skills, work on legal writing style, and prepare for the bar exam. The types of problems in this course include such things as: an advice letter to a client, a research memorandum as an associate to a supervising partner, and a persuasive brief written for a judge. Students will work individually on most assignments, and will collaborate on some of them as well. Much of the learning in this course involves experiential exercises done in groups during class time. The collaborative aspect of this process greatly enhances student learning. As such, we strongly encourage students to attend class in real-time to the greatest extent possible. Please choose a section meeting time that works best for your schedule.

Spring 2022 Description:
This course develops sophisticated legal writing skills to prepare international students to work alongside U.S. attorneys and serve U.S. clients. The tasks in the course are designed to replicate and train students in handling the real-life project assignments typically encountered in a U.S. practice. Problems are drawn from California and New York bar examination performance tests. Students will gain exposure to a variety of legal writing projects, learn to use the U.S style of legal rhetoric in their writing, improve legal analysis and writing skills, and prepare for the bar exam. This course is divided into a series of tasks of varying type, complexity, and length. The types of problems vary, and may include such things as: an advice letter to a client, a research memo as an associate to a supervising partner, a factual affidavit for trial, closing arguments for trial, or a persuasive brief written for a judge. Students will work individually on most assignments, and will collaborate on some of them as well.


Law 206.51S LRW: Advanced Scholarship 2 Units
Summer 2021: Remote due to COVID
Summer 2022: In-Person
Description:
Summer 2021 Description:
The course is primarily designed for Option A students with a U.S. or Canadian J.D. (common law course of study) to take in conjunction with the capstone workshop in the fall. It emphasizes high-level research and analysis. Students will prepare written work typical of legal scholarship, involving sophisticated analysis of legal and related materials, and they will receive written and oral feedback from the Instructor. They will also have the opportunity to hear presentations of cutting-edge scholarship by members of the Berkeley faculty. Written work will include a draft of the Capstone Project that will be completed in the Fall semester. Students interested in enrolling, must receive approval from Professor Farber.

Summer 2022 Description:
The course is primarily designed for remote + summer students with a U.S. or Canadian J.D. (common law course of study) to take in conjunction with the capstone workshop in the fall. Other students must receive approval from Professor Farber in order to enroll. The course emphasizes high-level research and analysis. Paper topics are selected by the students with guidance from the instructor. Students will prepare written work typical of legal scholarship, involving sophisticated analysis of legal and related materials, and they will receive written and oral feedback from the Instructor. Written work will include a draft of the Capstone Project that will be completed in the Fall semester. Students who are not remote + summer but interested in enrolling, must receive approval from Professor Farber (dfarber@berkeley.edu).


Law 206.5S LLM Legal Research and Writing LLM (Spring Start Executive Track Option) 2 Units
Summer 2021: Remote due to COVID
Summer 2022: In-Person
Description:
Summer 2021 Description:
Legal Research and Writing for LL.M. Students aims to provide a solid foundation in U.S. legal analysis and communication while teaching students the skills they need to maneuver skillfully through Berkeley Law and U.S. legal culture. This two-credit course teaches case analysis, research strategies, and effective written and oral communication methods. Students focus on predictive legal analysis and writing. The curriculum integrates research instruction with writing assignments. Students also learn basic U.S. legal citation requirements and form. Instruction takes place in small sections led by instructors with extensive legal practice experience. Over the course of the semester, students will prepare a series of research and writing assignments. They will receive extensive feedback on their writing, attend one-on-one conferences with the instructor, and develop revision skills. Much of the learning in this course involves experiential exercises done in groups during class time. The collaborative aspect of this process greatly enhances student learning. As such, we strongly encourage students to attend class in real-time to the greatest extent possible. By the end of this course, students will research and write a draft of their Capstone Project, which is a legal memorandum of 20 to 23 pages in length. In the fall Capstone Writing Workshop (online), students will revise and polish the Capstone Project. On Wednesday, August 4th, class will be held from 4:00-8:00pm.

Summer 2022 Description:
Legal Research and Writing for LL.M. Students aims to provide a solid foundation in U.S. legal analysis and communication while teaching students the skills they need to maneuver skillfully through Berkeley Law and U.S. legal culture. This two-credit course teaches case analysis, research strategies, and effective written and oral communication methods. Students focus on predictive legal analysis and writing. The curriculum integrates research instruction with writing assignments. Students also learn basic U.S. legal citation requirements and form. Much of the learning in this course involves experiential exercises done in groups during class time. The collaborative aspect of this process greatly enhances student learning. Instruction takes place in small sections led by instructors with extensive legal practice experience. Over the course of the semester, students will prepare a series of research and writing assignments. They will receive extensive feedback on their writing, attend one-on-one conferences with the instructor, and develop revision skills.


Law 206.76 J.S.D. Legal Scholarship Seminar 1 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
The seminar will provide students with a foundation for conducting in-depth legal research and support the students with developing their proposed dissertation project. We will explore the following: different types of research, how to plan a research project, research methodology, and review available organizational tools. Students will also gain a better understanding of what research resources are available on their chosen topics. Students will have opportunities to discuss their research projects and ideas with the group and participate in constructive discussion and feedback. At the end of the seminar, students will have made progress on developing an outline/prospectus on their proposed dissertation project. The seminar is required for all entering JSD students. Enrollment is limited to JSD students. This course will have 7 class meetings. To allow for a makeup class because of unforeseen circumstances this course has an automatic make-up class scheduled for the 8th week. Students must be able to attend all 8 scheduled meetings to earn credit.

Fall 2021 Description:
The seminar will provide students with a foundation for conducting in-depth legal research and support the students with developing their proposed dissertation project. We will explore the following: different types of research, how to plan a research project, research methodology, and review available organizational tools. Students will also gain a better understanding of what research resources are available on their chosen topics. Students will have opportunities to discuss their research projects and ideas with the group and participate in constructive discussion and feedback. At the end of the seminar, students will have made progress on developing an outline/prospectus on their proposed dissertation project. The seminar is required for all entering JSD students. Enrollment is limited to JSD students. This course will have 7 class meetings. To allow for a makeup class because of unforeseen circumstances this course has an automatic make-up class scheduled for the 8th week. Students must be able to attend all 8 scheduled meetings to earn credit. There will be an additional one-unit class (7 class meetings) in the Spring and it will build upon the themes from the Fall semester.

Fall 2022 Description:
The seminar will provide students with a foundation for conducting in-depth legal research and support the students with developing their proposed dissertation project. We will explore the following: different types of research, how to plan a research project, research methodology, and review available organizational tools. Students will also gain a better understanding of what research resources are available on their chosen topics. Students will have opportunities to discuss their research projects and ideas with the group and participate in constructive discussion and feedback. At the end of the seminar, students will have made progress on developing a research outline for their proposed dissertation project. The seminar is required for all entering JSD students. Enrollment is limited to JSD students. This course will have 7 class meetings. To allow for a makeup class because of unforeseen circumstances this course has an automatic make-up class scheduled for the 8th week. Students must be able to attend all 8 scheduled meetings to earn credit. There will be an additional one-unit class (7 class meetings) in the Spring and it will build upon the themes from the Fall semester.


Law 206.77 J.S.D. Scholarship Seminar II 1 Units
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2022 Description:
This seminar is open to all J.S.D. students and enrollment is limited to J.S.D. students. This course will build upon the Fall J.S.D. Legal Scholarship Seminar I and will cover topics not covered in that course. All J.S.D. students are encouraged to register. Most of the course will be interactive and have a series of guest speakers. Topics may include how to get published, using the Bluebook effectively, public speaking tips, and information sharing with other students in the program. This course will develop and evolve based on the interests and needs of the students.


Law 206C Note Publishing Workshop 1 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
The goal of the Note Publishing Workshop is to help students produce a publishable casenote or comment by the end of the term. Workshop participants will meet as a group for seven two-hour sessions (on scheduled weeks) in Spring 2020; as individuals, they will meet regularly with a faculty instructors on a mutually convenient schedule to be determined. The instructors will supervise and facilitate the workshop meetings and will provide individualized feedback on each participant’s draft. Workshop activities will include examination of published (sample) notes, presentation of work by each participant to the group, and detailed responses by all participants to the work of peers. In addition, workshops will focus on key components of note composition, including titles, abstracts, claims-making and/or the statement of hypotheses and research questions, general stylistic issues, obstacles to revision, and the finalizing of drafts. Students will receive credit for the workshop by producing a publishable note or comment, as determined by the instructors. Interested students must have completed a draft of a paper by the end of the Fall Semester, preferably in conjunction with a writing seminar or a Law 299 individual writing program. Interested students are strongly encouraged to meet with a research librarian and attend California Law Review events (open to all students) that are designed to answer your questions about note publishing. Reach out to the Senior Notes Editor of CLR at hanne.jensen@berkeley.edu for events happening this semester. To apply to this course, students should submit their draft paper to Professor Sugarman via email (sugarman@berkeley.edu) by the end of day on December 16th. Enrollment is limited to 12 students. If more apply by the deadline, students will be admitted based upon the instructors’ judgment about the promise of publishing of the submitted paper. The specific Thursday classes will be as follows: January 16th January 23rd February 6th February 13 February 20th March 5th March 19th April 9th April 23rd

Spring 2021 Description:
The goal of the Note Publishing Workshop is to help students produce a publishable casenote or comment by the end of the term. Workshop participants will meet as a group for seven two-hour sessions (on scheduled weeks) in Spring 2021; as individuals, they will meet regularly with faculty instructors on a mutually convenient schedule to be determined. The instructors will supervise and facilitate the workshop meetings and will provide individualized feedback on each participant’s draft. Workshop activities will include examination of published (sample) notes, presentation of work by each participant to the group, and detailed responses by all participants to the work of peers. In addition, workshops will focus on key components of note composition, including titles, abstracts, claims-making and/or the statement of hypotheses and research questions, general stylistic issues, obstacles to revision, and the finalizing of drafts. Students will receive credit for the workshop by producing a publishable note or comment, as determined by the instructors. Interested students must have completed a draft of a paper by the end of the Fall Semester, preferably in conjunction with a writing seminar or a Law 299 individual writing program. Interested students are strongly encouraged to meet with a research librarian and attend California Law Review events (open to all students) that are designed to answer your questions about note publishing. Reach out to the Senior Notes Editor of CLR at stephanietilden@berkeley.edu for events happening this semester. To apply to this course, students should submit their draft paper to Professor Ross via email (bross@law.berkeley.edu) by the end of day on December 18th. Enrollment is limited to 12 students. If more apply by the deadline, students will be admitted based upon the instructors’ judgment about the potential to publish the submitted paper. The course will meet these dates: 1/25, 2/1, 2/8, 2/22, 3/1, 4/12, and 4/19

Spring 2022 Description:
The goal of the Note Publishing Workshop is to help students produce a publishable casenote or comment by the end of the term. Workshop participants will meet as a group for seven two-hour sessions (on scheduled weeks) in Spring 2022; as individuals they will meet regularly with faculty instructors on a mutually convenient schedule to be determined. The instructors will supervise and facilitate the workshop meetings and will provide individualized feedback on each participant’s draft. Workshop activities will include examination of published (sample) notes, presentation of work by each participant to the group, and detailed responses by all participants to the work of peers. In addition, workshops will focus on key components of note composition, including titles, abstracts, claims-making and/or the statement of hypotheses and research questions, general stylistic issues, obstacles to revision, and the finalizing of drafts. Students will receive credit for the workshop by producing a publishable note or comment, as determined by the instructors. Interested students must have completed a draft of a paper by the end of the Fall Semester, preferably in conjunction with a writing seminar or a Law 299 individual writing program. Interested students are strongly encouraged to meet with a research librarian and attend California Law Review events (open to all students) that are designed to answer your questions about note publishing. Reach out to the Senior Notes Editor of CLR at amy-reavis@berkeley.edu for events happening this semester. To apply to this course, students should submit their draft paper to Faculty Assistant Thomas Tallerico via email (thomastallerico@berkeley.edu) by the end of day on December 16th. Enrollment is limited to 12 students. If more apply by the deadline, students will be admitted based upon the instructors’ judgment about the potential to publish the submitted paper. The course will meet these dates: January 24th January 31st February 14th February 28th March 14th March 28th April 11th


Law 207 Representing Spanish-Speaking Clients: Language, Culture, and Emotional Intelligence 1 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person Instruction
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
Representing Spanish-Speaking Clients: Language, Culture, and Emotional Intelligence is a one-unit class aimed at exposing students (who already have a working knowledge of spoken Spanish) to Spanish-language legal concepts, terminology, settings, and topics and will emphasize speaking and listening comprehension. The materials and topics will be based on law and procedure in such areas as employment, immigration, housing, and personal injury law. The class will also cover materials to strengthen cultural awareness and emotional intelligence as tools that are necessary to effectively represent Spanish-Speaking clients. Classroom presentations, activities, simulations, discussions, and readings will be in Spanish, with limited exceptions. Students will have the opportunity to practice their Spanish, with a view toward being comfortable communicating with clients who are monolingual or dominant in Spanish. Students are expected to participate and contribute to each bi-weekly session, and will conduct a final oral presentation in lieu of an exam or paper. Fernando Flores is an attorney, high performance coach, entrepreneur, speaker, podcaster, and author. In his current role he is the Founder of iMATER NOW. Fernando established iMATER NOW to foster and promote wellness in the legal profession and he supports and coaches attorneys and professionals in this regard. Prior to founding iMATER NOW Fernando worked for the California Labor Commissioner’s office, was the Director of the Wage and Hour Litigation Program at Legal Aid at Work, and was a Staff Attorney at Centro Legal de la Raza and the Legal Aid Foundation of Los Angeles. Fernando received his J.D. from the University of California, Davis School of Law in 2007 and his B.A. in Sociology and Rhetoric from the University of California, Berkeley in 2004.

Spring 2021 Description:
Representing Spanish-Speaking Clients: Language, Culture, and Emotional Intelligence is a one-unit class aimed at exposing students (who already have a working knowledge of spoken Spanish) to Spanish-language legal concepts, terminology, settings, and topics and will emphasize speaking and listening comprehension. The materials and topics will be based on law and procedure in such areas as employment, immigration, housing, and personal injury law. The class will also cover materials to strengthen cultural awareness and emotional intelligence as tools that are necessary to effectively represent Spanish-speaking clients. Classroom presentations, activities, simulations, discussions, and readings will be in Spanish, with limited exceptions. Students will have the opportunity to practice their Spanish, with a view toward being comfortable communicating with clients who are monolingual or dominant in Spanish. Students are expected to participate and contribute to each bi-weekly session, and will conduct a final oral presentation in lieu of an exam or paper. This course will meet every other week: 1/25, 2/8, 2/22, 3/8, 3/29, 4/12 and 4/26. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency. Fernando Flores is an attorney, high performance coach, entrepreneur, speaker, podcaster, and author. Currently, he is the Founder of Health and Wellness University. Fernando established Health and Wellness University to foster and promote wellness in the legal profession and he supports and coaches attorneys and professionals in this regard. Prior to founding Health and Wellness University Fernando worked for the California Labor Commissioner’s office, was the Director of the Wage and Hour Litigation Program at Legal Aid at Work, and was a Staff Attorney at Centro Legal de la Raza and the Legal Aid Foundation of Los Angeles. Fernando received his J.D. from the University of California, Davis School of Law in 2007 and his B.A. in Sociology and Rhetoric from the University of California, Berkeley in 2004.

Spring 2022 Description:
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Law 207.5 Advanced Legal Writing 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This is a litigation writing course. Writing is integral to most aspects of state and federal civil law practice including communicating effectively with attorneys, clients and judges. Advanced Legal Writing helps prepare students for the rigors of legal analysis and writing in general civil practice by providing in-depth writing experience. Using materials adapted from an actual lawsuit, students will use a case file throughout the semester to follow a typical litigation timeline. Students will produce several written assignments, including (but not limited to): a research email, an Answer or Complaint, several predictive memos, a client letter, and an Opposition or Reply Brief. Writing assignments will involve initial drafts, instructor feedback, peer review, and final revisions. Research skills will be reviewed and practiced. The course builds on the skills learned in the first year in Legal Research and Writing and Written and Oral Advocacy, by providing more challenging legal problems and expecting more independent work. The goal of the course will be to take students beyond basic competence to excellence in legal writing. Specifically, the course should help students hone the following skills: analyzing and conceptualizing legal issues, structuring legal arguments and documents, mastering objective v. persuasive techniques, and sharpening efficient writing and editing skills. There is no oral argument component to this course. All interested students ­­-- whether or not enrolled or placed on the wait list -- must attend the first class in order to be admitted. Any student who does not attend the first class may be dropped by the instructor.

Fall 2020 Description:
This is a litigation writing course. Writing is integral to most aspects of state and federal civil law practice including communicating effectively with attorneys, clients and judges. Advanced Legal Writing helps prepare students for the rigors of legal analysis and writing in general civil practice by providing in-depth writing experience. Using materials adapted from an actual lawsuit, students will use a case file throughout the semester to follow a typical litigation timeline. Students will produce several written assignments, including (but not limited to): a research email, an Answer or Complaint, several predictive memos, a client letter, and an Opposition or Reply Brief. Writing assignments will involve initial drafts, instructor feedback, peer review, and final revisions. Research skills will be reviewed and practiced. The course builds on the skills learned in the first year in Legal Research and Writing and Written and Oral Advocacy, by providing more challenging legal problems and expecting more independent work. The goal of the course will be to take students beyond basic competence to excellence in legal writing. Specifically, the course should help students hone the following skills: analyzing and conceptualizing legal issues, structuring legal arguments and documents, mastering objective v. persuasive techniques, and sharpening efficient writing and editing skills. There is no oral argument component to this course. All interested students ­­-- whether or not enrolled or placed on the wait list -- must attend the first class in order to be admitted. Any student who does not attend the first class may be dropped by the instructor.

Spring 2021 Description:
This is a litigation writing course. Writing is integral to most aspects of state and federal civil law practice including communicating effectively with attorneys, clients and judges. Advanced Legal Writing helps prepare students for the rigors of legal analysis and writing in general civil practice by providing in-depth writing experience. Using materials adapted from an actual lawsuit, students will use a case file throughout the semester to follow a typical litigation timeline. Students will produce several written assignments, including (but not limited to): a research email, an Answer or Complaint, several predictive memos, a client letter, and an Opposition or Reply Brief. Writing assignments will involve initial drafts, instructor feedback, peer review, and final revisions. Research skills will be reviewed and practiced. The course builds on the skills learned in the first year in Legal Research and Writing and Written and Oral Advocacy, by providing more challenging legal problems and expecting more independent work. The goal of the course will be to take students beyond basic competence to excellence in legal writing. Specifically, the course should help students hone the following skills: analyzing and conceptualizing legal issues, structuring legal arguments and documents, mastering objective v. persuasive techniques, and sharpening efficient writing and editing skills. There is no oral argument component to this course. All interested students ­­-- whether or not enrolled or placed on the wait list -- must attend the first class in order to be admitted. Any student who does not attend the first class may be dropped by the instructor.

Fall 2021 Description:
This is a litigation writing class with a focus on building and honing fundamental skills. Enrollment is limited to 16 students. If demand exceeds capacity, then I will focus on students who, for one reason or another, have struggled with legal writing and analysis. That reason could be related to demands external to school, the pressures of law school, past academic or personal experiences, or one of many other reasons. The application is available here: https://forms.gle/TyuD9EhkUgXb1j49A. I accept students on a rolling basis and the class typically fills up quickly. The course will prepare students for the rigors of general civil litigation by providing in-depth writing experience and individual feedback. The written assignments are designed to replicate and train students to handle real-life assignments typically encountered by junior litigators. Through the lens of legal writing, this course will enhance students' abilities to read and synthesize cases, formulate and organize effective legal arguments, and effectively edit written work. Students will produce several written assignments, including research emails, a client letter, and a persuasive brief. Writing assignments may involve initial drafts, instructor feedback, peer review, and final revisions. We will review and practice legal research skills, but that is not the focus of the course. There is no oral argument component to this course. Grades will be assigned based on the quality of the written work, attendance, and in-class participation.

Spring 2022 Description:
This is a written advocacy class with a focus on building and honing fundamental skills through the lens of a criminal law fact pattern. Writing assignments may involve initial drafts, instructor feedback, peer review, and final revisions. We will also discuss research skills. There is no oral argument component to grading. This course takes a hands-on approach by assigning all students to a new (hypothetical) criminal case as either the prosecution or the defense attorney -- your choice. Throughout the course of the semester, you will learn how great written advocacy can influence that case in many ways. We will build upon the foundational research and writing courses you took as a 1L. Whether you plan to enter a career in criminal law or not, this course will help you become a more confident, direct, and persuasive writer. The instructor, Natalie Winters, also serves as the Director of Berkeley Law's Advocacy Competitions Program. She previously worked as an attorney at the Colorado State Public Defender's Office handling misdemeanor and felony caseloads where she litigated over twenty jury trials, wrote appellate briefs, and supervised student interns.

Fall 2022 Description:
This is an application-based litigation writing class with a focus on building and honing fundamental skills. Enrollment is limited to 16 students. If demand exceeds capacity, then I will admit students who, for one reason or another, have struggled with legal writing and analysis. That reason could be related to demands external to school, the pressures of law school, past academic or personal experiences, or one of many other reasons. The application is available here: https://forms.gle/vBiH6rFq7FvCBHY7A. I accept students on a rolling basis and the class typically fills up quickly. The course will prepare students for the rigors of general civil litigation by providing an in-depth writing experience and individual feedback. The written assignments are designed to replicate and train students to handle real-life assignments typically encountered by junior litigators. Through the lens of legal writing, this course will enhance students' abilities to read and synthesize cases, formulate and organize effective legal arguments, and effectively edit written work. Students will produce several written assignments, including research emails, a client letter, and a persuasive brief. Writing assignments may involve initial drafts, instructor feedback, peer review, and final revisions. We will review and practice legal research skills, but that is not the focus of the course. There is no oral argument component to this course. Grades will be assigned based on the quality of the written work, attendance, and in-class participation. Due to a health-related accommodation for the instructor, face coverings will likely be required in this class even if the face covering requirement is otherwise lifted. Depending on the public health situation, it is also possible that this class will be conducted via Zoom instead of in-person.


Law 207.51 Survival Writing 1 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This workshop is for the student who wants measurable skill improvement but is unable to make a semester-long time commitment. Taught on two consecutive full-day Saturdays, this workshop's theme is “survival writing." You will learn to generate your best work in the shortest possible time. The same applies to the instructors: we aim to give maximum learning value for the smallest student time commitment. The program follows our core principles: NITA-style instruction, rotating instructors, high volume, and variable skills. As always, Bryan Garner is our lodestar. Each day is divided into hour-long segments. In the week between the two days the students will have take-home writing assignments that will cycle between instructors for editing and revision. We will cater breakfast, lunch, snacks, and coffee on both days. DAY ONE Hour 1 skills: framing, outlining, organization Hour 2 exercise: group IRAC writing exercise Hour 3 skills: authority, argument, counter-argument Hour 4 exercise: timed PT writing assignment BREAK (instructors edit assignments) Hour 5 skills: phrasing, clarity, simplicity Hour 6 review: timed assignments group review Hour 7 skill: how to edit Hour 8 exercise: editing DAY TWO Hour 1 review: homework group review Hour 2 skills: readability, translate, write like you’re five, finding your voice Hour 3 skills: executive summary intro para and deep issue Hour 4 exercise: timed PT writing assignment BREAK (instructors edit assignments) Hour 5 skills: polishing, strength, right word Hour 6 review: timed assignments group review Hour 7 exercise: coalescence Hour 8 exercise: editing No textbooks to purchase, but you will need to download the $25 Garner's Modern English Usage app.

Spring 2022 Description:
This workshop is for the student who wants a fast, intense, and rigorous crash course in writing skill improvement without a semester-long time commitment. We aim to give maximum learning value for a shorter student time commitment. We teach a system that applies equally to the law student in exams, the post-grad in the bar examination, and the practitioner. Our system is designed to build mental muscle memory through repetition; this enables you to consistently generate quality work in the shortest possible time, under any word or page limit. The program applies our core principles: NITA-style instruction, rotating instructors, and adaptable skills suited to variable assignments. As always, Bryan Garner is our lodestar. Each day is divided into distinct explanation, exercise, and project segments. Between class meetings students will have writing assignments that will cycle between instructors for editing and revision. Fair warning: this workshop is high-volume and fast-paced. We schedule it early in the semester to minimize conflict with your other courses. Still, you should not plan any other big projects during this workshop. No textbooks to purchase, but you will need to download the $25 Garner's Modern English Usage app. This course meets for four Wednesday evenings and four Saturday mornings.


Law 207.9 Language and Legal Interpretation 1 Units
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2022 Description:
The functioning of the law is based on how language is interpreted. This course focuses on the role language plays in the interpretation of legal texts, such as constitutions, statutes, and contracts. These formal scenarios involving the interpretation of texts will be contrasted with informal scenarios involving the interpretation of oral statements, such as in police/citizen interactions. Issues of interpretation are constantly before the courts, even in relatively homogeneous, monolingual cultures. We will consider how the heterogeneous, multilingual nature of our society should impact both formal and informal legal interpretation. Thus, for instance, what does it mean for an “ordinary person” to have “fair notice” of the law? Is that a value that courts should promote? Should a court interpret a legal text according to its “ordinary meaning”? Is there such a thing as “ordinary meaning,” and if so, how can an attorney or court identify it? How should the language of a law, such as a civil rights statute, be interpreted over time? Is it inevitable that such a law will be interpreted dynamically? We will also critically analyze new research methods that courts are increasingly embracing, such as corpus linguistics, that purport to turn legal interpretation into an empirical endeavor. Professor Brian Slocum has a JD and a PhD in Linguistics and writes extensively on issues of legal interpretation. Recent articles include, The Meaning of Sex: Dynamic Words, Novel Applications, and Original Public Meaning, 119 Mich. L. Rev. 1503 (2021) (with William N. Eskridge Jr. & Stefan Th. Gries), and Statutory Interpretation from the Outside, Colum. L. Rev. (forthcoming, 2022) (with Kevin Tobia & Victoria Nourse). Prior to joining legal academia, Professor Slocum was a Trial Attorney in both the Civil and Criminal Divisions of the Department of Justice.


Law 208 Advanced Legal Research 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
The primary goal of this course is to give an overview of the research universe that will make the transition from law school to law practice easier and more productive. In order to give students a framework for developing successful research strategies, we will be briefly exploring the history of legal materials and examining the structure and use of the various research tools. Students will be working with all types of research systems, from established print resources to the newest online research tools.

Spring 2021 Description:
The primary goal of this course is to give an overview of the research universe that will make the transition from law school to law practice easier and more productive. In order to give students a framework for developing successful research strategies, we will be briefly exploring the history of legal materials and examining the structure and use of the various research tools. Students will be working with all types of research systems, from established resources to the newest online research tools.

Spring 2022 Description:
The primary goal of this course is to give an overview of the research universe that will make the transition from law school to law practice easier and more productive. In order to give students a framework for developing successful research strategies, we will be briefly exploring the history of legal materials and examining the structure and use of the various research tools. Students will be working with all types of research systems, from established resources to the newest online research tools.


Law 208.1 Advanced Legal Research- Pathfinder 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
The primary goal of this course is to give an overview of the research universe that will make the transition from law school to law practice easier and more productive. In order to give students a framework for developing successful research strategies, we will be briefly exploring the history of legal materials and examining the structure and use of the various research tools. Students will be working with all types of research systems, from established print resources to the newest online research tools. Students will be in the regular Advanced Legal Research class and will do a number of research assignments. They will also write a pathfinder, which is a research guide to an area of law of their choosing, as their final class product.

Spring 2021 Description:
The primary goal of this course is to give an overview of the research universe that will make the transition from law school to law practice easier and more productive. In order to give students a framework for developing successful research strategies, we will be briefly exploring the history of legal materials and examining the structure and use of the various research tools. Students will be working with all types of research systems, from established resources to the newest online research tools. This course meets at the same time as Advanced Legal Research, with students in this course doing a number of research assignments. They will also write a pathfinder, which is a research guide to an area of law of their choosing, as their final class product.

Spring 2022 Description:
The primary goal of this course is to give an overview of the research universe that will make the transition from law school to law practice easier and more productive. In order to give students a framework for developing successful research strategies, we will be briefly exploring the history of legal materials and examining the structure and use of the various research tools. Students will be working with all types of research systems, from established resources to the newest online research tools. This course meets at the same time as Advanced Legal Research, with students in this course doing a number of research assignments. They will also write a pathfinder, which is a research guide to an area of law of their choosing, as their final class product.


Law 208.8 Foundation Seminar in the Sociology of Law 3 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
Sociological approaches to studying law focus on how legal institutions and actors relate to social structure, social inequality, and social change. This seminar covers classic and contemporary works that address law, rights and social change; law, inequality and power; the social construction of disputes and dispute resolution; organizations and law; legal pluralism; and social movements and law. Law students and graduate students in all disciplines are welcome.


Law 208.9 Fundamentals of U.S. Law 3 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: Hybrid
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
Fundamentals of U.S. Law introduces foreign law students to the fundamental principles of the American legal system and the common-law method of case analysis. In this course, students will focus on crucial doctrines that underpin American governance, including federalism and separation of powers. Students will also study the structure of the U.S. court system, the sources of U.S. law, the lawyer's role in the system, and the culture of the law in this country. The course will introduce students to techniques associated with the common law, particularly the close reading of legal opinions in the context of prior precedent, as well as organization of legal analysis. Throughout the course, students will practice skills that will help them succeed in law school, on the bar examination, and in practice. This course will meet remotely as follows: Saturday, August 8th 6:30AM-8:30AM Monday, August 10th 6:30AM-8:30AM Wednesday, August 12th 6:30AM-8:30AM Thursday, August 13th 6:30AM-8:30AM Friday, August 14th 6:30AM-8:30AM Then Mondays and Wednesdays, August 17th-October 28th 6:30AM-7:45AM

Spring 2021 Description:
Fundamentals of U.S. Law introduces foreign law students to the American legal system, common-law method of case analysis, and U.S. forms of governance. Orientation week classes focus primarily on (1) the structure of American court system and sources of law and (2) case analysis through the study of the development of one area of legal doctrine. Students will learn how to read cases, find and synthesize holdings, and predict outcomes based on common law development. Classes during the rest of the semester will focus on the principal Constitutional doctrines that underpin the American legal and political system, including federalism and separation of powers, with a focus on how American law interacts with global concerns. Throughout the course, students will practice skills that will help them succeed in law school, on the bar examination, and in practice. This course will meet as follows: Tuesday, January 12th: 5PM-8PM Wednesday, January 13th: 5PM-8PM Thursday, January 14th: 5PM-8PM Friday, January 15th: 5PM-7PM Then every Monday and Wednesdays 6:25PM-7:40PM (January 20th-April 7th) REVIEW SESSION: Monday April 12th 6:25PM-7:40PM

Fall 2021 Description:
Fundamentals of U.S. Law introduces foreign law students to the American legal system, common-law method of case analysis, and U.S. forms of governance. Orientation week classes focus primarily on (1) the structure of American court system and sources of law and (2) case analysis through the study of the development of one area of legal doctrine. Students will learn how to read cases, find and synthesize holdings, and predict outcomes based on common law development. Classes during the rest of the semester will focus on the principal Constitutional doctrines that underpin the American legal and political system, including federalism and separation of powers, with a focus on how American law interacts with global concerns. Throughout the course, students will practice skills that will help them succeed in law school, on the bar examination, and in practice. This course will meet remotely as follows: Tuesday, August 10th 1PM-4PM REMOTE Wednesday, August 11th 9AM-12PM REMOTE Thursday, August 12th 9AM-12PM REMOTE Friday, August 13th 9AM-12PM REMOTE Then Mondays and Wednesdays, August 16th-October 20th 11:20AM-12:35PM IN-PERSON Mandatory Review session: Wednesday, October 27th 11:20AM-12:35PM

Fall 2022 Description:
Fundamentals of U.S. Law introduces foreign law students to the American legal system, common-law method of case analysis, and U.S. forms of governance. Orientation week classes focus primarily on (1) the structure of the American court system and sources of law and (2) case analysis through the study of the development of one area of legal doctrine. Students will learn how to read cases, find and synthesize holdings, and predict outcomes based on common law development. Classes during the rest of the semester will focus on the principal Constitutional doctrines that underpin the American legal and political system, including federalism and separation of powers, with a focus on how American law interacts with global concerns. Throughout the course, students will practice skills that will help them succeed in law school, on the bar examination, and in practice. This course will meet as follows: Tuesday, August 16th 1PM-4PM Wednesday, August 17th 9AM-12PM Thursday, August 18th 9AM-12PM Friday, August 19th 9AM-12PM Then Mondays and Wednesdays, August 24th-October 31st 11:20AM-12:35PM


Law 208.9S Fundamentals of U.S. Law 3 Units
Summer 2021: Hybrid
Summer 2022: In-Person
Description:
Summer 2021 Description:
Fundamentals of U.S. Law introduces foreign law students to the fundamental principles of the U.S. legal system and the common-law method of case analysis. Students will focus on crucial doctrines that underpin U.S. governance, including federalism and separation of powers, as well as individual rights. Students will also study the structure of the U.S. court system, the lawyer's role in the system, and the culture of the law in this country. The course will introduce students to techniques associated with the common law, particularly the close reading of legal opinions in the context of prior precedent as well as organization of legal analysis. The course begins with an introductory module comprised of torts cases, and then students read primarily constitutional law cases for the remainder of the course. This course will meet in-person on campus on June 21st, 22nd, 23rd, 24th, and 25th in Warren (room 295).

Summer 2022 Description:
Fundamentals of U.S. Law introduces foreign law students to the fundamental principles of the American legal system and the common-law method of case analysis. In this course, students will focus on crucial doctrines that underpin American governance, particularly as expressed in landmark cases of American constitutional law. Students will also study the structure of the U.S. court system, the sources of U.S. law, the lawyer's role in the system, and the culture of the law in this country. The course will introduce students to techniques associated with the common law, particularly the close reading of legal opinions in the context of prior precedent. Throughout the course, students will practice skills that will help them succeed in law school, on the bar examination, and in practice.


Law 208I International and Foreign Legal Research 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
Do you want to be prepared to work in an international venue or practice in an area of international or comparative law? If so, you need this course. We will cover research methods and sources for international, foreign and comparative legal research, utilizing both print and electronic materials. Students will learn basic concepts of legal research, research strategies, evaluation of materials in various formats, search techniques for effective use of databases, and research organization. Topics include public international law, foreign law, private international law, the European Union, the United Nations and more. Class sessions will involve the use of research guides and materials to orient students to the topic, the sources, and appropriate research methodology. Students will conduct research in class using both print and electronic resources. Grading will be based on in-class or homework assignments that allow the student to use and evaluate the various sources; a brief oral presentation based on the topic for the final research guide; and a final research guide on an international or foreign law topic (a 30-page paper). At the end of the semester, students will have practical knowledge and experience in doing legal research, including selecting and using a variety of international and foreign legal sources. You will also gain confidence in your research abilities and become a more effective and efficient researcher overall. While there are no prerequisites for this course, it is assumed that students will have some basic familiarity with legal research techniques. Requires a significant paper of 30 pages or longer. Note to 1L students: You are not able to use this course to satisfy your writing requirement.

Spring 2021 Description:
Do you want to be prepared to work in an international venue or practice in an area of international or comparative law? If so, you need this course. We will cover research methods and sources for international, foreign and comparative legal research, utilizing both print and electronic materials. Students will learn basic concepts of legal research, research strategies, evaluation of materials in various formats, search techniques for effective use of databases, and research organization. Topics include public international law, foreign law, private international law, the European Union, the United Nations and more. Class sessions will involve the use of research guides and materials to orient students to the topic, the sources, and appropriate research methodology. Students will conduct research in class using both print and electronic resources. Grading will be based on in-class or homework assignments that allow the student to use and evaluate the various sources; a brief oral presentation based on the topic for the final research guide; and a final research guide on an international or foreign law topic (a 30-page paper). At the end of the semester, students will have practical knowledge and experience in doing legal research, including selecting and using a variety of international and foreign legal sources. You will also gain confidence in your research abilities and become a more effective and efficient researcher overall. While there are no prerequisites for this course, it is assumed that students will have some basic familiarity with legal research techniques. Requires a significant paper of 30 pages or longer. Note to 1L students: You are not able to use this course to satisfy your writing requirement.

Spring 2022 Description:
Do you want to be prepared to work in an international venue or practice in an area of international or comparative law? If so, you need this course. We will cover research methods and sources for international, foreign and comparative legal research, utilizing both print and electronic materials. Students will learn basic concepts of legal research, research strategies, evaluation of materials in various formats, search techniques for effective use of databases, and research organization. Topics include public international law, foreign law, private international law, the European Union, the United Nations and more. Class sessions will involve the use of research guides and materials to orient students to the topic, the sources, and appropriate research methodology. Students will conduct research in class using both print and electronic resources. Grading will be based on in-class or homework assignments that allow the student to use and evaluate the various sources; a brief oral presentation based on the topic for the final research guide; and a final research guide on an international or foreign law topic (a 30-page paper). At the end of the semester, students will have practical knowledge and experience in doing legal research, including selecting and using a variety of international and foreign legal sources. You will also gain confidence in your research abilities and become a more effective and efficient researcher overall. While there are no prerequisites for this course, it is assumed that students will have some basic familiarity with legal research techniques. Requires a significant paper of 30 pages or longer.


Law 209 JSP Orientation Seminar 3 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
This course provides a broad orientation to the inter- and multidisciplinary study of law in general, and the Jurisprudence and Social Policy program at Berkeley in particular. Each year the orientation seminar takes on a distinct but broad theme and uses it to explore the many methodologies and intellectual traditions represented in the program, including canonical works in the fields represented by JSP. The class is limited to first-year JSP students.

Fall 2021 Description:
This course provides a broad orientation to the inter- and multidisciplinary study of law in general, and the Jurisprudence and Social Policy program at Berkeley in particular. Each year the orientation seminar takes on a distinct but broad theme and uses it to explore the many methodologies and intellectual traditions represented in the program, including canonical works in the fields represented by JSP. The class is limited to first-year JSP students.

Fall 2022 Description:
This course provides a broad orientation to the inter- and multidisciplinary study of law in general, and in the Jurisprudence and Social Policy program at Berkeley in particular. Each year, the Orientation Seminar takes on a distinct but broad theme and uses it to explore the many methodologies and intellectual traditions represented in the program, including canonical works in the fields represented by JSP. The class is limited to first year JSP students.


Law 209.3 Introductory Statistics 4 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This course is the required first-year quantitative methods course for JSP students. The goal of this course is to provide students with enough background in probability and statistics so that they can successfully: --evaluate basic quantitative empirical research in law and social science --begin to conduct their own empirical research --take more advanced quantitative methods courses to further develop their skills. The course focuses on quantitative research design and the general concepts that underly statistical inference. The hope is that students who successfully complete the course will be able to think clearly about a wide range of substantive problems. This course is a starting point. It is simply not possible to cover what the typical empirical researcher should know about probability and statistics in one course. Students who plan to do empirical research should take several additional methodology courses. The course textbook will be Quantitative Social Science by Kosuke Imai.

Fall 2020 Description:
This course is the required first-year quantitative methods course for JSP students. The goal of this course is to provide students with enough background in probability and statistics so that they can successfully: --evaluate basic quantitative empirical research in law and social science --begin to conduct their own empirical research --take more advanced quantitative methods courses to further develop their skills. The course focuses on quantitative research design and the general concepts that underly statistical inference. The hope is that students who successfully complete the course will be able to think clearly about a wide range of substantive problems. This course is a starting point. It is simply not possible to cover what the typical empirical researcher should know about probability and statistics in one course. Students who plan to do empirical research should take several additional methodology courses. The course textbook will be Quantitative Social Science by Kosuke Imai.

Fall 2022 Description:
This course is the required first-year quantitative methods course for JSP students. The goal of this course is to provide students with enough background in applied empirical research so that they can successfully: --evaluate basic quantitative empirical research in law and social science --take more advanced quantitative methods courses to further develop their skills. --begin to conduct their own empirical research The course focuses on quantitative research design and the general concepts that underly statistical inference. The hope is that students who successfully complete the course will be able to think clearly about a wide range of substantive problems. Note: this course is a starting point. It is not possible to cover what the typical empirical researcher should know about statistics in one course. Students who plan to do empirical research should take several additional methodology courses.


Law 209.45 Psychology of Diversity and Discrimination in American Law 3 Units
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Spring 2021 Description:
How does the psychology of culture, race, and ethnicity shape the legal pursuit of diversity and equal treatment? How are people thinking about, reacting to, and doing diversity in their everyday lives? What are the predominant perspectives on diversity and how are they being deployed or challenged in legal battles over race-conscious policies? What are the implications for efforts to remedy historic discrimination? These will be the central questions of this course. We will examine concepts of race and culture, various understandings of and approaches to diversity found in the law, and the role of sociocultural structures in shaping the operation of anti-discrimination law and social policy. Special attention will be given to the use of diversity-related psychological research in law. Some topics include: inclusive institutional design; psychology of desegregation, colorblindness and equal protection; "critical mass," "diversity benefits," and affirmative action; stereotyping, intent, and anti-discrimination law; psychology of sexism in the workplace; psychology of social class and poverty. Students will broaden their toolkit for analyzing legal debates and issues surrounding “diversity” and learn how to create opportunities for building inclusive and equitable diverse environments. Due to the nature of this class, some or all of the sessions may not be recorded and posted except as required for accommodation of students with disabilities. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency.


Law 209.48 Berkeley Empirical Legal Studies Seminar 1 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Spring 2022: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
The BELS (Berkeley Empirical Legal Studies) seminar provides a context for students in law and social sciences graduate students conducting quantitative or qualitative empirical work on law in which to develop articles for publication, dissertation chapters, grant proposals, dissertation proposals, and/or drafts of methodological instruments (e.g., surveys, interview protocols, and observational strategies), etc. Depending on the type of project and the stage the project is at, the seminar will address issues such as: framing research in terms of the relevant literatures in law, law and society, and social sciences; motivating and framing research questions; contributions of the research question to theory and policy; logical problems with the argument; research design and feasibility; types of data and data collection strategies; data analysis; relevant audiences; publication options and strategies; presentation styles; and funding options (for research proposals). At each session, one participant will have their written work discussed and one student will be asked to write and circulate in advance a written critique of the work being discussed that week. Critiques will be posted to bspace along with other relevant materials generated in the discussions (e.g., lists of additional readings on theoretical and/or methodological approaches). Each seminar participant must attend all sessions, present their work once or twice, and be a discussant. THE SEMINAR IS ONLY OPEN TO THOSE GRADUATE STUDENTS WHO HAVE APPLIED FOR AND HAVE BEEN SELECTED AS BELS FELLOWS. https://www.law.berkeley.edu/research/center-for-the-study-of-law-society/bels-fellows/

Fall 2020 Description:
The BELS (Berkeley Empirical Legal Studies) seminar provides a context for students in law and social sciences graduate students conducting quantitative or qualitative empirical work on law in which to develop articles for publication, dissertation chapters, grant proposals, dissertation proposals, and/or drafts of methodological instruments (e.g., surveys, interview protocols, and observational strategies), etc. Depending on the type of project and the stage the project is at, the seminar will address issues such as: framing research in terms of the relevant literatures in law, law and society, and social sciences; motivating and framing research questions; contributions of the research question to theory and policy; logical problems with the argument; research design and feasibility; types of data and data collection strategies; data analysis; relevant audiences; publication options and strategies; presentation styles; and funding options (for research proposals). At each session, one participant will have their written work discussed and one student will be asked to write and circulate in advance a written critique of the work being discussed that week. Critiques will be posted to bspace along with other relevant materials generated in the discussions (e.g., lists of additional readings on theoretical and/or methodological approaches). Each seminar participant must attend all sessions, present their work once or twice, and be a discussant. THE SEMINAR IS ONLY OPEN TO THOSE GRADUATE STUDENTS WHO HAVE APPLIED FOR AND HAVE BEEN SELECTED AS BELS FELLOWS. https://www.law.berkeley.edu/research/center-for-the-study-of-law-society/bels-fellows/.

Spring 2021 Description:
The BELS (Berkeley Empirical Legal Studies) seminar provides a context for students in law and social sciences graduate students conducting quantitative or qualitative empirical work on law in which to develop articles for publication, dissertation chapters, grant proposals, dissertation proposals, and/or drafts of methodological instruments (e.g., surveys, interview protocols, and observational strategies), etc. Depending on the type of project and the stage the project is at, the seminar will address issues such as: framing research in terms of the relevant literatures in law, law and society, and social sciences; motivating and framing research questions; contributions of the research question to theory and policy; logical problems with the argument; research design and feasibility; types of data and data collection strategies; data analysis; relevant audiences; publication options and strategies; presentation styles; and funding options (for research proposals). At each session, one participant will have their written work discussed and one student will be asked to write and circulate in advance a written critique of the work being discussed that week. Critiques will be posted to bspace along with other relevant materials generated in the discussions (e.g., lists of additional readings on theoretical and/or methodological approaches). Each seminar participant must attend all sessions, present their work once or twice, and be a discussant. THE SEMINAR IS ONLY OPEN TO THOSE GRADUATE STUDENTS WHO HAVE APPLIED FOR AND HAVE BEEN SELECTED AS BELS FELLOWS. https://www.law.berkeley.edu/research/center-for-the-study-of-law-society/bels-fellows/

Fall 2021 Description:
This course is a professional workshop for advanced graduate students selected to be BELS fellows through a competitive process the prior spring at the Center for the Study of Law and Society. Only BELS fellows may attend or enroll. This course will meet September 2nd, October 14th, November 4th and December 2nd.
https://csls.berkeley.edu/opportunities/bels-fellowship

Spring 2022 Description:
empty

Fall 2022 Description:
THIS COURSE SHOULD NOT BE LISTED ON THE SCHEDULE OF CLASSES, IT IS A PRO SEMINAR FOR BERKELEY EMPIRICAL LEGAL STUDIES SCHOLARS SELECTED BY A COMPETITIVE PROCESS.


Law 209.5 Research Design 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This is an introductory course focusing on how to conceptualize and execute empirical research projects in the social sciences. We will briefly examine the philosophical issues that undergird such research, along with the nuts and bolts of actual research methods. At the end of this course, students should have a good sense of a range of research methods (both qualitative and quantitative) as well as a sense of how to think about the kinds of research problems that will provide the core of a Ph.D. thesis. The main intellectual agenda will be to develop a sophisticated and rigorous sense of how to ask and answer a scholarly interdisciplinary socio-legal research question using empirical observation (broadly defined). The objective for the semester is to write a research proposal in the style of a National Science Foundation (or other government agency) proposal. Students will also have smaller writing assignments over the course of the semester to learn how to write the components of an empirical research proposal. Admission to the course is by permission of the instructors only. Students should be prepared to describe the research project for which they will write a proposal in order to be admitted to the class. Students for whom this course is a degree requirement will have priority for enrollment. This course is primarily aimed at PhD students. Non-PhD students should consult with the instructor before enrolling in the course.

Spring 2021 Description:
This is an introductory course focusing on how to conceptualize and design empirical research projects in the social sciences. "Empirical research" includes a broad range of qualitative (including historical) and quantitative inquiry. We will briefly examine the philosophical issues that undergird such research, along with the nuts and bolts of actual research methods. At the end of this course, students should have a good familiarity with a range of research methods (both qualitative and quantitative) as well as a sense of how to think about the kinds of research problems that will occupy the core of a PhD dissertation or a similarly situated research project. The main intellectual agenda will be to develop a sophisticated and rigorous sense of how to ask and answer a scholarly research question concerning the workings of law and society (broadly understood), using social science and related data. Students should note that this course includes a simulation in which they will be asked to write a research proposal. Students will also be asked to complete smaller writing assignments throughout the course leading up to the final proposal. This course is primarily aimed at PhD students, although JSD and LLM thesis-track students interested in pursuing empirical research are welcome to apply. Admission to the course is by application. Students should email their applications to Professor Morrill by November 13th. In the application, students should briefly describe the research project they plan to write a proposal about in the class. Students for whom this course is a degree requirement will have priority for enrollment. After November 13th applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency.


Law 210 Legal Profession 2 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Spring 2022: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This course will explore the ethical issues facing all lawyers in the practice of law. We will focus on the ABA’s Model Rules of Professional Conduct as well as ethics opinions, statutes, regulations and relevant case law, with some consideration of California ethics rules on select issues. The course’s aim is to provide students the tools to identify and analyze ethical questions from a practical perspective. We will utilize real and hypothetical case studies to contextualize the various rules and learn a process for facing ethical dilemmas. This course is interactive and requires participation in the form of class discussion. For this reasons, attendance is required. Ten percent of the final grade will be determined by class participation. The class will include some discussion of the MPRE, and practice multiple-choice questions, although it is not an MPRE prep course. Hans I. Moore is an Assistant District Attorney in the Independent Investigation Bureau, an independent unit within the San Francisco District Attorney's Office ensuring law enforcement accountability by conducting independent investigations, and where warranted, criminally prosecuting officers who violate the law. Prior to joining the SFDA's office Hans was a Senior Staff Attorney at Public Advocates, Inc., a non-profit civil rights law firm where he focused on education equity through policy advocacy and litigation. Hans has served as Deputy Trial Counsel at the Office of the Chief Trial Counsel for the State Bar of California where he prosecuted violations of California's Rules of Professional Conduct and the State Bar Act. Before moving to California, Hans practiced law in Maryland as a state prosecutor and civil litigator and served on Maryland's Attorney Grievance Commission which oversees the misconduct complaints lodged against Maryland attorneys.

Fall 2020 Description:
This course explores the law governing lawyers, with primary focus on the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct and secondary focus on selected California rules. This course satisfies the Professional Responsibility requirement. Attendance is strongly encouraged, significant class participation can result in a grade bump. The instructor will provide all course materials online including an outline of the relevant law and a packet or readings and hypotheticals. Students may choose between an issue spotter final exam or writing a 20-page, double-spaced paper on some topic relevant to the course. (The instructor, John Steele, is a solo practitioner and is a certified specialist in the law of legal malpractice (Cal. Bd. of Legal Spec.))

Spring 2021 Description:
This course explores the law governing lawyers, with primary focus on the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct and secondary focus on selected California rules. This course satisfies the Professional Responsibility requirement. Attendance is strongly encouraged, significant class participation can result in a grade bump. The instructor will provide all course materials online including an outline of the relevant law and a packet or readings and hypotheticals. Students may choose between an issue spotter final exam or writing a 20-page, double-spaced paper on some topic relevant to the course. (The instructor, John Steele, is a solo practitioner and is a certified specialist in the law of legal malpractice (Cal. Bd. of Legal Spec.))

Fall 2021 Description:
This course explores the law governing lawyers, with primary focus on the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct and secondary focus on selected California rules. This course satisfies the Professional Responsibility requirement. Attendance is strongly encouraged, significant class participation can result in a grade bump. The instructor will provide all course materials online including an outline of the relevant law and a packet or readings and hypotheticals. Students may choose between an issue spotter final exam or writing a 20-page, double-spaced paper on some topic relevant to the course. (The instructor, John Steele, is a solo practitioner and is a certified specialist in the law of legal malpractice (Cal. Bd. of Legal Spec.))

Spring 2022 Description:
This course will explore the ethical issues facing all lawyers in the practice of law. We will focus on the ABA’s Model Rules of Professional Conduct as well as ethics opinions, statutes, regulations and relevant case law, with some consideration of California ethics rules on select issues. The course’s aim is to provide students the tools to identify and analyze ethical questions from a practical perspective. We will utilize real and hypothetical case studies to contextualize the various rules and learn a process for facing ethical dilemmas. This course is interactive and requires participation in the form of class discussion and small-group exercises. For this reason, attendance is required. Ten percent of the final grade will be determined by class participation. The class will include some discussion of the MPRE, and practice multiple-choice questions, although it is not an MPRE prep course. Merri A. Baldwin is a shareholder at the San Francisco law firm of Rogers Joseph O'Donnell where she represents attorneys and law firms in legal malpractice, discipline and risk management issues. She is a member of the California Lawyers Association Legal Ethics Committee and the past chair of the California State Bar Association’s Committee on Professional Responsibility and Conduct (COPRAC).

Fall 2022 Description:
This course will explore the ethical issues facing all lawyers in the practice of law. We will focus on the ABA’s Model Rules of Professional Conduct as well as ethics opinions, statutes, regulations and relevant case law, with consideration of California ethics rules on select issues. The course’s aim is to provide students the tools to identify and analyze ethical questions from a practical perspective. We will utilize real and hypothetical case studies to contextualize the various rules and learn a process for facing ethical dilemmas. This course is interactive and requires participation in the form of class discussion and small-group exercises. For this reason, attendance is required. Fifteen percent (15%) of the final grade will be determined by class participation. Dena M. Roche is a Managing Partner and founder of the California law firm O’Rielly & Roche LLP, where she counsels lawyers, law firms, and in-house legal departments on matters of professional responsibility, risk management, and law firm practice management. She is the current advisor and past chair of the State Bar of California’s Committee on Professional Responsibility and Conduct (COPRAC).


Law 210.1S Legal Ethics in the Practice of Law 3 Units
Summer 2021: Hybrid
Summer 2022: In-Person
Description:
Summer 2021 Description:
This course is a practical exploration of the varied and often competing duties and influences that guide lawyers’ conduct. These duties derive largely from written ethical rules and case law. The ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct have been adopted in one form or another by almost every state except California. The MPRE exam is based on these rules. We will look closely at them. We will also consider the major differences between the ABA Model Rules and California’s rules. But we will drill much more deeply than a mere study of rules and cases. This course will challenge you to understand the limitations of the rules and to reflect on how you would (or do) conduct yourselves when facing a variety of ethical dilemmas. We will explore a range of ethical problems faced by practicing lawyers. We will consider litigation and transactional matters, civil and criminal cases, and the particular concerns of prosecutors and other government lawyers. We will assess the kinds of ethical and moral decisions lawyers must make and the many consequences of those decisions. Classes will contain lectures but will primarily feature an extended conversation among the whole class about a series of current ethical cases and hypothetical problems. The hypos are designed to mirror genuine practice situations that also could be on the bar exam. The problems largely defy the idea of a “correct” answer. We will focus on those difficult cases that fall in the interstices of the rules, a place where common sense and a moral compass offer necessary guidance. They are intended to draw out varying points of view. You are encouraged to offer your own experiences and values as well as your country’s different approaches into the discussions. NOTE: Real time attendance is required for this course. You must be able to attend in real time either in-person or on Zoom. This course will meet in-person on campus on July 21st, 22nd, 23rd, 26th, and 27th in room 105.

Summer 2022 Description:
The course is intended to familiarize students with the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct, which are tested on the MPRE exam and the California Bar Exam, and the California Rules of Professional Conduct, which are tested on the California Bar Exam. We begin with an explanation of the rules that most frequently affect practicing attorneys. Then we either complete reinforcement exercises that apply the rules to different fact scenarios or we break into groups to discuss more detailed ethical problems from the Lerman and Schrag casebook that require a working knowledge of the rules combined with critical judgment. Some of the group exercises are based on actual scenarios; some are fictional; all provoke strong opinions. On days when we break into groups, we will all debrief together at the end of class. Professor Lois Schwartz has been teaching law students for over 25 years. She graduated from Berkeley Law in 1989. She is a member of the full-time faculty at UC Hastings and has taught a popular Legal Ethics course there for many years. She has participated in groups encouraging the reform of California Rules of Ethics and makes a particular point of incorporating relevant ethical issues into the other doctrinal courses she teaches. Texts for Legal Ethics: Rule Book. ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct 2021 ed. ISBN 1641058595 and 978-1641058599. There is also an e-book available. Order from amazon.com or www.ShopABA.org. Past editions are OK. This is the least expensive publication that contains both the rules and the comments. Other MRPC rule books are also OK. The ABA Model Rules are also available online but your access to online sites may be restricted while you are writing the final exam. Case book. Authors Lerman and Schrag have two versions of their casebook. One is the full text. That is the fifth edition described below. The other is the concise edition, which is the fourth edition described below. Either is fine for this course. Prior editions are also fine. You may purchase or rent either. I believe e-books are also available. Lisa Lerman & Philip Schrag, Ethical Problems in the Practice of Law. Full 5th edition (Wolters Kluwer 2020). ISBN: 9781543804669. OR Lisa Lerman and Philip Schrag, Ethical Problems in the Practice of Law Concise Edition. 4th edition (Wolters Kluwer 2016). ISBN-13: 978-1454891284 or ISBN-10: 1454891289. This is a shorter version of the full text casebook but the savings are not significant. Prior editions are fine.


Law 210.2A Workshop in Law, Philosophy & Political Theory 3 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
This course is a workshop for discussing work-in-progress in moral, political, and legal theory. The central aim is to enable students to engage directly with legal scholars, philosophers, and political theorists working on important normative questions. Another aim is to bring together scholars from different disciplines and perspectives, such as economics, history, sociology, and political science, who have normative interests. This semester the workshop, co-taught by Joshua Cohen and Desmond Jagmohan, will focus on the theme of property and justice. The semester will look at the subject historically and thematically. There are several sub-themes worth noting. The first is on the philosophical and legal foundations of property rights, moving from intimate to global concerns: the idea of self-ownership (Carnegy-Arbuthnott), patent protection and distributive justice (Syed), ownership and social obligations (Katz), and public ownership (Wyman). The second theme is on the historical relationship between race, slavery and property (Rosenthal, Jones-Rogers, and Nichols): what it means to own human beings, to have propery right in another person. The third theme is on territory and indigenous politics: the cost of conquest in North America (Hendrix) and its literary reclaiming (intellectual property) in the Americas, more broadly (Zimmer). The fourth theme looks at property rights from two quite different perspectives: the use of coercion to coordinate property rights across borders (Wenar) and what it means to have few, if any property rights—homelessness (Essert). The moral vulnerabilities of the homeless should be of especial interest here. The format of the course is as follows. For the sessions with guest presenters, a designated student commentator will lead off with a 15-minute comment on the paper. The presenter will have 5-10 minutes to respond and then we will open up the discussion to the group. The first part of the course will be open to non-enrolled students, faculty, and visitors who wish to participate in the workshop discussion. We’ll stop for a break at 2:00 and those not enrolled in the course will leave. Enrolled students will continue the discussion with the guest until 3:00. This is a cross-listed/room-shared course with the Philosophy and Political Science Departments. Students may enroll through Law (Law 210.2), Philosophy (Philosophy 290-09), or Political Science (PS 211). The first class will meet on Friday, August 28. Schedule: 8/28 Intro meeting (for enrolled students only) 9/4 Burke Hendrix, University of Oregon 9/11 Hannah Carnegy-Arbuthnott, York University 9/18 Leif Wenar, Stanford University 9/25 Caitlin Rosenthal, UC, Berkeley 10/2 Talha Syed, UC, Berkeley 10/9 Stephanie Jones-Rogers, UC, Berkeley 10/16 Robert Nichols, University of Minnesota 10/23 Chris Essert, University of Toronto 11/30 Zac Zimmer, University of California, Santa Cruz 11/6 Katrina Wyman, NYU Law 11/13 Martin Hagglund, Yale University 11/20 Larissa Katz, University of Toronto

Fall 2021 Description:
This course is a workshop for discussing work-in-progress in moral, political, and legal theory. The central aim is to enable students to engage directly with legal scholars, philosophers, and political theorists working on important normative questions. Another aim is to bring together scholars from different disciplines and perspectives, such as economics, history, sociology, and political science, who have normative interests. The theme for the Fall 2021 workshop is Rawls’s A Theory of Justice fifty years on. The format of the course is as follows: for the sessions with guest presenters, a designated student commentator will lead off with a 15-minute comment on the paper. The presenter will have 5-10 minutes to respond and then we will open up the discussion to the group. The first part of the course will be open to non-enrolled students, faculty, and visitors who wish to participate in the workshop discussion. We’ll stop for a break at 2:00 and those not enrolled in the course will leave. Enrolled students will continue the discussion with the guest until 3:00. This is a cross-listed/room-shared course with the Philosophy and Political Science Departments. Students may enroll through Law (Law 210.2A), Philosophy (Philosophy 290-07), or Political Science (PS 211). The first class will be on Friday, August 20th - 12PM-3PM, and the final class meeting is November 19th . This semester the workshop is co-taught by Joshua Cohen and Veronique Munoz-Darde. 20th August - Introduction - no speaker 27th August - Lara Buchak, Princeton 3rd September- Thomas Piketty, EHESS & the Paris School of Economics 10th September- Samuel Scheffler, NYU 17th September- Samuel Freeman, University of Pennsylvania 24th September- Sarah Song, UC Berkeley 1st October- Tommie Shelby, Harvard 8th October- Seana Shiffrin, UCLA 15th October- T. M. Scanlon, Harvard 22nd October- Arthur Ripstein, University of Toronto 29th October- Teresa Bejan, Oxford 5th November- Erin Kelly, Tufts 12th November- Josh Cohen, UC Berkeley 19th November- Kenzie Bok, Harvard

Fall 2022 Description:
This course is a workshop for discussing work-in-progress in moral, political, and legal theory. The central aim is to enable students to engage directly with legal scholars, philosophers, and political theorists working on important normative questions. Another aim is to bring together scholars from different disciplines and perspectives, such as economics, history, sociology, and political science, who have normative interests. The theme for the Fall 2022 workshop is "Structural Injustice". The format of the course is as follows: for the sessions with guest presenters, a designated student commentator will lead off with a 15-minute comment on the paper. The presenter will have 5-10 minutes to respond and then we will open up the discussion to the group. The first part of the course will be open to non-enrolled students, faculty, and visitors who wish to participate in the workshop discussion. We’ll stop for a break at 2:00 and those not enrolled in the course will leave. Enrolled students will continue the discussion with the guest until 3:00. This is a cross-listed/room-shared course with the Philosophy and Political Science Departments. Students may enroll through Law (Law 210.2A), Philosophy (Philosophy 290-08), or Political Science (PS 211). The first class will be on Friday, August 26th - 12PM-3PM, and the final class meeting is December 2nd . This semester the workshop is co-taught by Johann Frick and Veronique Munoz-Darde. August 26: Introduction, no speaker Sep 2: Sally Haslanger Sep 9: Kate Manne Sep 16: Alex Voorhoeve Sep 23: Renée Jorgensen Sep 30: tbc Oct 7: Lucas Stanczyk Oct 14: tbc Oct: 21: Wendy Salkin, Stanford Oct: 28: David Estlund Nov 4: Khiara Bridges Nov 18: Debra Satz


Law 210.2B Workshop in Law, Philosophy & Political Theory 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This course is a workshop for discussing works in progress in moral, political, and legal theory. The workshop creates a space for students to engage directly with philosophers, political theorists, and legal scholars working on normative questions toward the goal of fostering critical thinking about concepts of value and developing analytical thinking and writing skills. Another aim is to bring together people from different disciplines and perspectives who have strong normative interests or who speak to issues philosophers and theorists should know something about. For Spring 2020, the workshop will focus on work at the intersection of political economy, democracy, and justice. The schedule of guest speakers is included below. The format of the course is as follows. For the sessions with guest presenters, lunch will be served starting at 12:00. We’ll begin at 12:15. A designated commentator will lead off with a 15-minute comment on the paper. The presenter will have 5-10 minutes to respond and then we will open up the discussion to the group. The first part of the course will be open to non-enrolled students, faculty, and visitors who wish to participate in the workshop discussion. We’ll stop for a break at 2 and those not enrolled in the course will leave. Enrolled students will continue the discussion with the guest from 2:10 to 3:00. This is a shared seating course between the Law School (Law 210.2B), the Philosophy Department (Philosophy 290-6), and the Political Science Department (PS 211). Guest speaker schedule: Jan. 17 Introductory session (for enrolled students only) Jan. 24 Gina Schouten (Harvard Philosophy) Jan. 31 Katharina Pistor (Columbia Law) Feb. 7 Aziz Rana (Cornell Law) Feb.14 Isabelle Ferreras (University of Louvain) Feb.21 Stefan Eich (Georgetown Political Science) Feb.28 Steven Vogel (Berkeley Political Science) March 6 David Grewal (Berkeley Law) March 13 Enrico Moretti (Berkeley Economics) March 20 Sophia Moreau (Toronto Law & Philosophy) April 3 Lucas Stanczyk (Harvard Philosophy) April 10 Amy Kapczynski (Yale Law) April 17 Reva Siegel (Yale Law) April 24 Closing session (for enrolled students only)

Spring 2021 Description:
This course is a workshop for discussing works in progress in moral, political, and legal theory. The workshop creates a space for students to engage directly with philosophers, political theorists, and legal scholars working on normative questions toward the goal of fostering critical thinking about concepts of value and developing analytical thinking and writing skills. Another aim is to bring together people from different disciplines and perspectives who have strong normative interests or who speak to issues philosophers and theorists should know something about. For Spring 2021, the workshop will focus on the theme of democracy. The schedule of guest speakers is included below. The format of the course is as follows. For the sessions with a guest presenter, we’ll begin at 12:00pm. A designated commentator will lead off with a 15-minute comment on the paper. The presenter will have 5-10 minutes to respond and then we will open up the discussion to the group. The first part of the course will be open to non-enrolled students, faculty, and visitors who wish to participate in the workshop discussion. We’ll stop for a break at 2 and those not enrolled in the course will leave. Enrolled students will continue the discussion with the guest from 2:10 to 3:00. This is a shared seating course between the Law School (Law 210.2B), the Philosophy Department (Philosophy 290-6), and the Political Science Department (PS 211). Speaker schedule: January 22 -- Michael Hanchard (UPenn Africana Studies) January 29 -- Nadia Urbinati (Columbia Political Science) February 5 -- Eric Schickler & Paul Pierson (Berkeley Political Science) February 12 -- Daniela Cammack (Berkeley Political Science) February 19 -- Hélène Landemore (Yale Political Science) February 26 -- Lawrie Balfour (Virginia Politics) March 5 -- Niko Kolodny (Berkeley Philosophy) March 12 -- Aziz Huq (UChicago Law) March 19 -- Jonathan Gould (Berkeley Law) April 2 -- Melissa Lane (Princeton Politics) April 9 -- Richard Pildes (NYU Law) April 16 -- Michael Dawson (UChicago Political Science) April 23 -- David Estlund (Brown Philosophy) April 30 -- Closing session (enrolled students only)

Spring 2022 Description:
This course is a workshop for discussing works in progress in moral, political, and legal theory. The workshop creates a space for students to engage directly with philosophers, political theorists, and legal scholars working on normative questions toward the goal of fostering critical thinking about concepts of value and developing analytical thinking and writing skills. Another aim is to bring together people from different disciplines and perspectives who have strong normative interests or who speak to issues philosophers and theorists should know something about. The format of the course is as follows. For the sessions with a guest presenter, we’ll begin at 12:00pm. A designated commentator will lead off with a 15-minute comment on the paper. The presenter will have 5-10 minutes to respond and then we will open up the discussion to the group. The first part of the course will be open to non-enrolled students, faculty, and visitors who wish to participate in the workshop discussion. We’ll stop for a break at 2 and those not enrolled in the course will leave. Enrolled students will continue the discussion with the guest from 2:10 to 3:00. This is a shared seating course between the Law School (Law 210.2B), the Philosophy Department (Philosophy 290-6), and the Political Science Department (PS 211).


Law 210.6 Mindfulness for Lawyers:Essential Tools for Greater Effectiveness and Wellbeing in the Law 2 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
This course will be an exploration of what it means to bring mindful awareness and mindful thought leadership to the study and practice of law. As you engage in this exploration you'll be testing two hypotheses: (i) That in any given moment you have the opportunity - and maybe, because of the influence you will have as a member of the legal profession, you have the obligation - to choose who you are, what values are crucial to you, and how you'll honor those values, as students, members of the bar, and members of society; and (ii) That cultivating mindful awareness and developing mindful thought leadership gives you critical tools to help you make those choices in ways that can result in less conflict and suffering, and more effectiveness, compassion, and wellbeing, for yourselves and your clients, in your profession, and in the wide sphere of influence that you, as lawyers, will have. Here's another way of saying this, from J. Krishnamurti: To transform the world, we must begin with ourselves; and what is important in beginning with ourselves is the intention. The intention must be to understand ourselves and not to leave it to others to transform themselves or to bring about a modified change through revolution, either of the left or of the right. It is important to understand that this is our responsibility, yours and mine; because, however small may be the world we live in, if we can transform ourselves, bring about a radically different point of view in our daily existence, then perhaps we shall affect the world at large, the extended relationship with others. Attendance and class participation are the essential elements of this course. You will be allowed no more than two unexcused absences OR two unexcused missed journal entries OR one unexcused absence and one unexcused missed journal entry, and are discouraged from missing any classes or journal entries. There will be an all-day, off-site retreat on Saturday , November 7th, which you will be required to attend. If you are enrolling in this class, please be sure you can attend this date. If you do not attend the retreat, you cannot pass the class. You will be encouraged to practice mindfulness meditation every day. You will also be required to submit a short journal entry to the instructor each week (mentioned above), and to submit a final paper of no more than three pages in length. Attendance at the first class is mandatory for all enrolled students; any enrolled student who is not present at the first day of class without prior permission of the instructor (rarely given) will be dropped from the class. Attendance at the first class is also mandatory if you are on the waitlist and would like to be admitted to the class, and such continuing attendance is required through the drop/add period if you wish to remain on the waitlist. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency. ... Professor Judi Cohen is an attorney, mindfulness teacher, and lecturer at Berkeley Law. She practiced law from 1984 to 2014, and for ten of those years also taught academic classes at USF School of Law. She began practicing yoga in the mid-1980's and mindfulness meditation in 1993, and has sat more than 130 days of silent retreat. In 2009, she founded Warrior One and developed the Essential Mindfulness for Lawyers® curriculum, an integration of classical mindfulness, modern neuroscience, and the psychology of the legal mind. In addition to teaching at Berkeley and running Warrior One, Professor Cohen is a founding board member and the Teachers Division chair for the Mindfulness in Law Society, and a member of the Bay Area Working Group for Law and Meditation.

Spring 2022 Description:
This course will be an exploration of what it means to bring mindful awareness and mindful thought leadership to the study and practice of law. As you engage in this exploration you'll be testing two hypotheses: (i) That in any given moment you have the opportunity - and maybe, because of the influence you will have as a member of the legal profession, you have the obligation - to choose who you are, what values are crucial to you, and how you'll honor those values, as students, members of the bar, and members of society; and (ii) That cultivating mindful awareness and developing mindful thought leadership gives you critical tools to help you make those choices in ways that can result in less conflict and suffering, and more effectiveness, compassion, and wellbeing, for yourselves and your clients, in your profession, and in the wide sphere of influence that you, as lawyers, will have. Here's another way of saying this, from J. Krishnamurti: To transform the world, we must begin with ourselves; and what is important in beginning with ourselves is the intention. The intention must be to understand ourselves and not to leave it to others to transform themselves or to bring about a modified change through revolution, either of the left or of the right. It is important to understand that this is our responsibility, yours and mine; because, however small may be the world we live in, if we can transform ourselves, bring about a radically different point of view in our daily existence, then perhaps we shall affect the world at large, the extended relationship with others. Attendance and class participation are the essential elements of this course. You will be allowed no more than two unexcused absences OR two unexcused missed journal entries OR one unexcused absence and one unexcused missed journal entry, and are discouraged from missing any classes or journal entries. There will be an all-day, off-site retreat on Saturday, February 26th 9AM-4PM, which you will be required to attend. If you are enrolling in this class, please be sure you can attend this date. If you do not attend the retreat, you cannot pass the class. As you might note from course evaluations, in previous years this retreat constituted the final class. This year, the retreat is scheduled towards the beginning of class. Class will continue after the retreat, to the end of the semester. You will be encouraged to practice both solitary and portable mindfulness every day. You will also be required to submit a short journal entry to the instructor each week (mentioned above), and to submit a final paper of no more than three pages in length. ... Professor Judi Cohen is an attorney, mindfulness teacher, and lecturer at Berkeley Law. She practiced law from 1984 to 2014, and for ten of those years also taught academic classes at USF School of Law. She began practicing yoga in the mid-1980's and mindfulness meditation in 1993, and has sat more than 150 days of silent retreat. In 2009, she founded Warrior One and developed the Mindfulness for the Legal Mind curriculum, an integration of classical mindfulness, modern neuroscience, and the psychology of the legal mind. In addition to teaching at Berkeley and running Warrior One, Professor Cohen is a founding board member and the Teachers Collective chair for the Mindfulness in Law Society, and a member of the Bay Area Working Group for Law and Meditation.


Law 210.62 How to Be Happy in Law School 1 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
Studies have found alarming rates of depression, anxiety, stress, dissatisfaction among law students and attorneys. But it doesn’t have to be that way! This course will explore what’s hard about law school and, more important, how to improve the experience. Guided by materials from sociology, psychology, and those who study legal pedagogy, we will talk about what law students can do to foster their own happiness, and how they can tackle law school on their own terms (avoiding - as much as possible - the “shoulds.)” Students will emerge from this class with the tools to get the most out of these critical, and potentially wonderful, three years in law school. This class is among the special Fall 2020 1L elective seminars designed to give entering 1Ls an extra opportunity to form connections despite our remote form of interaction. In light of that goal, these classes will expect real-time attendance and may not be recorded. These classes will all be graded on a Credit/No Credit basis and total written work requirement will be no more than 8 double-spaced pages.


Law 210.63 Mindfulness, Self-Care, and Belonging in the Legal Profession 1 Units
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2021 Description:
We do our work as lawyers in relationship to ourselves and other people. How do we want to show up in those relationships? What boundaries do we need to set in order to care for our own well-being? In this course we will use techniques from mindfulness practice to cultivate inner steadiness, resilience, and compassion for ourselves and others. Through mindfulness practice, we will explore the impact of barriers to belonging in the legal profession such as systemic racism and marginalization along other identity axes. We will also look at how we might use mindfulness and self-reflection to counter the effects of impostor phenomenon and the inner critic.

Spring 2022 Description:
We do our work as lawyers in relationship to ourselves and other people. How do we want to show up in those relationships? What boundaries do we need to set in order to care for our own well-being? In this course we will use techniques from mindfulness practice to cultivate inner steadiness, resilience, and compassion for ourselves and others. Through mindfulness practice and inquiry, we will explore the impact of barriers to belonging in the legal profession such as systemic racism and marginalization along other identity axes. We will also look at how we might use mindfulness and self-reflection to counter the effects of impostor phenomenon and the inner critic.

Fall 2022 Description:
We do our work as lawyers in relationship to ourselves and other people. How do we want to show up in those relationships? What boundaries do we need to set in order to care for our own well-being? In this course we will use techniques from mindfulness practice to cultivate inner steadiness, resilience, and compassion for ourselves and others. Through mindfulness practice and inquiry, we will explore the impact of barriers to belonging in the legal profession such as systemic racism and marginalization along other identity axes. We will also look at how we might use mindfulness and self-reflection to counter the effects of impostor phenomenon and the inner critic.


Law 211.11 Understanding the U.S. Legal Profession 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This course will study the ethical issues facing all lawyers in the practice of law, with a particular focus on lawyers in a public interest, government civil and criminal practice, and labor and employment settings. Lawyers' ethical decision making is guided not only by the rules of professional conduct, which we will study, but also by the opportunities, constraints, and norms of their practice setting. Therefore, in addition to studying the rules of professional conduct tested on the California Bar Exam and the Multistate Professional Responsibility Exam, the class will consider highly relevant empirical information about social, economic, and other aspects of the legal profession. That knowledge is essential to equip students to understand how lawyers in practice actually relate to their clients and colleagues and how they resolve ethical dilemmas. Finally, the class will equip students to understand some of the major issues confronting the legal profession, including access to justice for low- and moderate-income people and the challenges confronting lawyers and clients in the criminal justice system. This course is interactive and requires participation. For this reason, attendance and participation are required.

Spring 2021 Description:
This course will study the ethical issues facing all lawyers in the practice of law, with a particular focus on lawyers in a public interest, government civil and criminal practice, and labor and employment settings. Lawyers' ethical decision making is guided not only by the rules of professional conduct, which we will study, but also by the opportunities, constraints, and norms of their practice setting. Therefore, in addition to studying the rules of professional conduct tested on the California Bar Exam and the Multistate Professional Responsibility Exam, the class will consider highly relevant empirical information about social, economic, and other aspects of the legal profession. That knowledge is essential to equip students to understand how lawyers in practice actually relate to their clients and colleagues and how they resolve ethical dilemmas. Finally, the class will equip students to understand some of the major issues confronting the legal profession, including access to justice for low- and moderate-income people and the challenges confronting lawyers and clients in the criminal justice system. This course is interactive and requires participation. For this reason, attendance and participation are required.

Spring 2022 Description:
This course will study the ethical issues facing all lawyers in the practice of law, with a particular focus on lawyers in a public interest, government civil and criminal practice, small and mid-size law firm practice, and labor and employment settings. Lawyers' ethical decision making is guided not only by the rules of professional conduct, which we will study, but also by the opportunities, constraints, and norms of their practice setting. Therefore, in addition to studying the rules of professional conduct tested on the California Bar Exam and the Multistate Professional Responsibility Exam, the class will consider highly relevant empirical information about social, economic, and other aspects of the legal profession. That knowledge is essential to equip students to understand how lawyers in practice actually relate to their clients and colleagues and how they resolve ethical dilemmas. Finally, the class will equip students to understand some of the major issues confronting the legal profession, including access to justice for low- and moderate-income people and the challenges confronting lawyers and clients in the criminal justice system. This course is interactive and requires participation. For this reason, attendance and participation are required.


Law 211.12 The U.S. Legal Profession: Professional Responsibility in Global Perspective 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
Drawing from various disciplines, this course is designed to teach you about the variety of practice settings in which lawyers work, both in the United States and around the world. While most law school courses teach the substance of the law, with a focus on the issues that are most important to clients, this course revolves around the profession you are entering, and aims to give you a sense of what you will experience once you are there. Why study the legal profession? This course will cover many of the issues that confront the legal profession globally, such as unequal access to justice, the profession’s demographics and social structure, the challenges of maintaining independence in the face of political power, and the effects of globalization. In preparation for the role you will take up as a future leader of the profession, this course will ask you to develop a perspective on which criticisms of the profession are justified and what policy responses are appropriate. Looking at these issues in comparative perspective will also push you to develop a global view of the profession, to better understand the common challenges lawyers face around the world and to appreciate the ways in which the American legal profession is unusual. As we discuss the the legal and ethical issues that lawyers confront across jurisdictions and practice settings, we will cover many of the American Bar Association’s Model Rules of Professional Conduct. These rules are tested on the Multistate Professional Responsibility Exam, as well as on the bar exam of California and many other states, and an important objective of the course is to make sure you are familiar with them. We will go well beyond the straightforward rule to consider ambiguity in the law and how lawyers do and should respond to it. A major theme of our discussion will be about how workplaces shape lawyers’ sense of their role and obligations, as much or more than ethics rules, disciplinary committees, liability controls, and a lawyer’s individual conscience.

Spring 2021 Description:
Drawing from various disciplines, this course is designed to teach you about the variety of practice settings in which lawyers work, both in the United States and around the world. While most law school courses teach the substance of the law, with a focus on the issues that are most important to clients, this course revolves around the profession you are entering, and aims to give you a sense of what you will experience once you are there. Why study the legal profession? This course will cover many of the issues that confront the legal profession globally, such as unequal access to justice, the profession’s demographics and social structure, the challenges of maintaining independence in the face of political power, and the effects of globalization. In preparation for the role you will take up as a future leader of the profession, this course will ask you to develop a perspective on which criticisms of the profession are justified and what policy responses are appropriate. Looking at these issues in comparative perspective will also push you to develop a global view of the profession, to better understand the common challenges lawyers face around the world and to appreciate the ways in which the American legal profession is unusual. As we discuss the legal and ethical issues that lawyers confront across jurisdictions and practice settings, we will cover many of the American Bar Association’s Model Rules of Professional Conduct. These rules are tested on the Multistate Professional Responsibility Exam, as well as on the bar exam of California and many other states, and an important objective of the course is to make sure you are familiar with them. We will go well beyond the straightforward rule to consider ambiguity in the law and how lawyers do and should respond to it. A major theme of our discussion will be about how workplaces shape lawyers’ sense of their role and obligations, as much or more than ethics rules, disciplinary committees, liability controls, and a lawyer’s individual conscience.

Spring 2022 Description:
Drawing from various disciplines, this course is designed to teach you about the variety of practice settings in which lawyers work, both in the United States and around the world. While most law school courses teach the substance of the law, with a focus on the issues that are most important to clients, this course revolves around the profession you are entering, and aims to give you a sense of what you will experience once you are there. Why study the legal profession? This course will cover many of the issues that confront the legal profession globally, such as unequal access to justice, the profession’s demographics and social structure, the challenges of maintaining independence in the face of political power, and the effects of globalization. In preparation for the role you will take up as a future leader of the profession, this course will ask you to develop a perspective on which criticisms of the profession are justified and what policy responses are appropriate. Looking at these issues in comparative perspective will also push you to develop a global view of the profession, to better understand the common challenges lawyers face around the world and to appreciate the ways in which the American legal profession is unusual. As we discuss the legal and ethical issues that lawyers confront across jurisdictions and practice settings, we will cover many of the American Bar Association’s Model Rules of Professional Conduct. These rules are tested on the Multistate Professional Responsibility Exam, as well as on the bar exam of California and many other states, and an important objective of the course is to make sure you are familiar with them. We will go well beyond the straightforward rule to consider ambiguity in the law and how lawyers do and should respond to it. A major theme of our discussion will be about how workplaces shape lawyers’ sense of their role and obligations, as much or more than ethics rules, disciplinary committees, liability controls, and a lawyer’s individual conscience.


Law 211.2 Practical Ethics: A Simulation Approach 2 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
“Virtually all difficult ethical problems arise from conflict between a lawyer’s responsibilities to clients, to the legal system, and to the lawyer’s own interest in remaining an ethical person while earning a satisfactory living.” Preamble [9] to ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct Many of you take this course just to satisfy your PR requirement. You think that legal ethics is a boring subject. Au contraire. Legal ethics is exciting, challenging, and profound. It is required for a very good reason: It is the most important course taught in law schools. At its essence it is about what kind of lawyer, even what kind of person you want to be. This course considers legal ethics from a real world perspective. Our class discussions will revolve around hypothetical problems that are designed to sensitize you to the kinds of ethical and moral issues you will no doubt face in your careers. They demand consideration of the many competing factors that tug at lawyers as they face those decisions. These factors include the rules of professional conduct (of which you will get a healthy dose), lawyers’ personal values and interests, the demands of justice and truth-seeking, and the rights of others. Lawyers are not merely rule reciters and legal analysts. They are human beings trying to navigate their careers and lives. One important course goal is to assist you in developing a rough methodology for approaching these issues in ways that are consistent with ethical rules and your own sense of self. This course is designed for those who enjoy learning by doing and discussing. It is not primarily a lecture course. Instead, its hallmarks are student-performed skits and lively discussions, leavened by sufficient lecturing to cover the basics. For those who prefer to learn simply by listening to lectures or who are interested just in the black letter law, another P.R. course might be a better fit. The starting point for our discussions will typically be lawyers’ ethical duties that derive largely from written rules and case law. For these duties our particular focus will be the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct (Model Rules), which have been adopted in one form or another by every state except California. We will examine the majority of the Model Rules. (The MPRE is based on the Model Rules.) We will also consider the significant differences between the Model Rules and California’s rules, with particular emphasis on California’s differing treatment of the duty to preserve client confidences. We will drill much more deeply than a mere study of rules and cases. This course will challenge you to understand the limitations of the rules and to reflect on how you would conduct yourselves when facing a variety of ethical dilemmas. The Model Rules in many instances represent only a minimum standard of conduct to which lawyers must adhere. You may decide to set your personal bar much higher. We will devote our final class to discussing professional satisfaction. This has proved to be especially meaningful for many students. This course is not designed primarily as a prep for the MPRE. But students regularly report that the course provides a strong foundation for independent MPRE preparation. NOTE: In this class, the usual provisions of Add/Drop do not apply. All interested students, whether enrolled or on the waitlist, must attend the first class in order to be admitted. Any student who does not attend the first class without prior permission of the instructor will be dropped from the class and the waitlist. No additional students will be permitted to add the course.

Spring 2021 Description:
“Virtually all difficult ethical problems arise from conflict between a lawyer’s responsibilities to clients, to the legal system, and to the lawyer’s own interest in remaining an ethical person while earning a satisfactory living.” Preamble [9] to ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct Many of you take this course just to satisfy your PR requirement. You think that legal ethics is a boring subject. Au contraire. Legal ethics is exciting, challenging, and profound. It is required for a very good reason: It is the most important course taught in law schools. At its essence it is about what kind of lawyer, even what kind of person you want to be. This course considers legal ethics from a real world perspective. Our class discussions will revolve around hypothetical problems that are designed to sensitize you to the kinds of ethical and moral issues you will no doubt face in your careers. They demand consideration of the many competing factors that tug at lawyers as they face those decisions. These factors include the rules of professional conduct (of which you will get a healthy dose), lawyers’ personal values and interests, the demands of justice and truth-seeking, and the rights of others. Lawyers are not merely rule reciters and legal analysts. They are human beings trying to navigate their careers and lives. One important course goal is to assist you in developing a rough methodology for approaching these issues in ways that are consistent with ethical rules and your own sense of self. This course is designed for those who enjoy learning by doing and discussing. It is not primarily a lecture course. Instead, its hallmarks are student-performed skits and lively discussions, leavened by sufficient lecturing to cover the basics. For those who prefer to learn simply by listening to lectures or who are interested just in the black letter law, another P.R. course might be a better fit. The starting point for our discussions will typically be lawyers’ ethical duties that derive largely from written rules and case law. For these duties our particular focus will be the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct (Model Rules), which have been adopted in one form or another by every state except California. We will examine the majority of the Model Rules. (The MPRE is based on the Model Rules.) We will also consider the significant differences between the Model Rules and California’s rules, with particular emphasis on California’s differing treatment of the duty to preserve client confidences. We will drill much more deeply than a mere study of rules and cases. This course will challenge you to understand the limitations of the rules and to reflect on how you would conduct yourselves when facing a variety of ethical dilemmas. The Model Rules in many instances represent only a minimum standard of conduct to which lawyers must adhere. You may decide to set your personal bar much higher. We will devote our final class to discussing professional satisfaction. This has proved to be especially meaningful for many students. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency. NOTE: In this class, the usual provisions of Add/Drop do not apply. All interested students, whether enrolled or on the waitlist, must attend the first class in order to be admitted. Any student who does not attend the first class without prior permission of the instructor will be dropped from the class and the waitlist. No additional students will be permitted to add the course.

Spring 2022 Description:
“Virtually all difficult ethical problems arise from conflict between a lawyer’s responsibilities to clients, to the legal system, and to the lawyer’s own interest in remaining an ethical person while earning a satisfactory living.” Preamble [9] to ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct Many of you take this course just to satisfy your PR requirement. You think that legal ethics is a boring subject. Au contraire. Legal ethics is exciting, challenging, and profound. It is required for a very good reason: It is the most important course taught in law schools. At its essence it is about what kind of lawyer, even what kind of person you want to be. This course considers legal ethics from a real world perspective. Our class discussions will revolve around hypothetical problems that are designed to sensitize you to the kinds of ethical and moral issues you will no doubt face in your careers. They demand consideration of the many competing factors that tug at lawyers as they face those decisions. These factors include the rules of professional conduct (of which you will get a healthy dose), lawyers’ personal values and interests, the demands of justice and truth-seeking, and the rights of others. Lawyers are not merely rule reciters and legal analysts. They are human beings trying to navigate their careers and lives. One important course goal is to assist you in developing a rough methodology for approaching these issues in ways that are consistent with ethical rules and your own sense of self. This course is designed for those who enjoy learning by doing and discussing. It is not primarily a lecture course. Instead, its hallmarks are student-performed skits and lively discussions, leavened by sufficient lecturing to cover the basics. For those who prefer to learn simply by listening to lectures or who are interested just in the black letter law, another P.R. course might be a better fit. The starting point for our discussions will typically be lawyers’ ethical duties that derive largely from written rules and case law. For these duties our particular focus will be the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct (Model Rules), which have been adopted in one form or another by every state except California. We will examine the majority of the Model Rules. (The MPRE is based on the Model Rules.) We will also consider the significant differences between the Model Rules and California’s rules, with particular emphasis on California’s differing treatment of the duty to preserve client confidences. We will drill much more deeply than a mere study of rules and cases. This course will challenge you to understand the limitations of the rules and to reflect on how you would conduct yourselves when facing a variety of ethical dilemmas. The Model Rules in many instances represent only a minimum standard of conduct to which lawyers must adhere. You may decide to set your personal bar much higher. We will devote our final class to discussing professional satisfaction. This has proved to be especially meaningful for many students. NOTE: In this class, the usual provisions of Add/Drop do not apply. All interested students, whether enrolled or on the waitlist, must attend the first class in order to be admitted. Any student who does not attend the first class without prior permission of the instructor will be dropped from the class and the waitlist. No additional students will be permitted to add the course.


Law 211.6 Citizenship and Immigration 3 Units
Fall 2021: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2021 Description:
In this course we will explore questions about citizenship and immigration in the contemporary world. Readings will be drawn from scholarship in political theory, law, and the social sciences with the goal of integrating insights from these different fields in new, thought-provoking ways. The first half of the course will focus on citizenship. How should we conceive of citizenship? As a formal legal status, an entitlement to a set of rights, active participation in self-governance, an identity, or something else? What is the relationship between citizenship, on the one hand, and race, class, gender, sexuality, and national origin, on the other? Which rights have historically been attached to citizenship status and which rights have been extended to noncitizens? What would cosmopolitan citizenship look like? The second half of the course will focus on immigration. Why do people migrate across international borders? Should people be allowed to migrate across borders? States exert control over migration but what, if anything, justifies this control? What is the impact of migration on sending countries, receiving countries, and migrants themselves? What are the key dynamics in the politics of immigration and how do they constrain immigration policymaking? What are the current immigration categories and priorities in U.S. immigration law? What kinds of immigration policies should the U.S. and other liberal democratic countries pursue? Course requirements include careful reading of texts, thoughtful participation in seminar discussions, and 5 papers approximately 1000 words each.


Law 212 Critical Theory and Social Science Method 3 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
THIS COURSE WILL BE HELD IN BERKELEY WAY WEST, Room 1205 (1919 Shattuck Ave.) Social science research on identity and vulnerable populations is at a critical moment. For example, race is, on one hand, theorized as a social construction -- meaning that the social sciences have largely rejected claims that race reflects natural or biological differences and is instead thought to be a product of social, economic, and political forces. Yet, on the other hand, this theoretical approach is underutilized in social scientists’ empirical research on race, where race is often measured as if it is a ‘real’ or natural entity. This ‘mismatch’ between theory and methods produces substantial tension in social science research and limits scholars’ ability to offer clear insights into the role of race and other traits in understanding social and health outcomes. This course will examine this tension, its adverse impact on social science research, and explore ways to develop methodological approaches to race and other markers of human difference that blend traditional empirical methods with critical theoretical traditions, e.g. critical race theory, feminist theory, disability theory, queer theory, and others. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the implications for research in the health sciences. About the Instructor: Osagie K. Obasogie, J.D., Ph.D., is Haas Distinguished Chair and Professor of Bioethics at the University of California, Berkeley, in the Joint Medical Program and School of Public Health. Obasogie's scholarly interests include Constitutional law, bioethics, sociology of law, and reproductive and genetic technologies. His research also looks at the past and present roles of science in both constructing racial meanings and explaining racial disparities. He has a particular interest in developing legal mechanisms that can create the conditions for eliminating health disparities. An additional thread of Obasogie’s research uses novel theoretical and empirical interventions to explore the hidden ways in which racial thinking is central to law, medicine, and science. His first book, "Blinded By Sight: Seeing Race Through the Eyes of the Blind" (Stanford University Press) was awarded the Herbert Jacob Book Prize by the Law and Society Association. His second book, "Beyond Bioethics: Toward a New Biopolitics" (with Marcy Darnovsky), was published by the University of California Press. Obasogie's writings have appeared in scholarly journals such as the Law & Society Review, Cornell Law Review, University of Pennsylvania Journal of Constitutional Law, and Stanford Technology Law Review as well as journalistic outlets such as the New York Times, Slate, and Scientific American.

Fall 2021 Description:
THIS COURSE WILL BE HELD IN BERKELEY WAY WEST, Room 1205 (1919 Shattuck Ave.) The makeup class on Tuesday, November 23rd for Veteran's Day will be held at Berkeley Way West Room 1203. Social science research on identity and vulnerable populations is at a critical moment. For example, race is, on one hand, theorized as a social construction -- meaning that the social sciences have largely rejected claims that race reflects natural or biological differences and is instead thought to be a product of social, economic, and political forces. Yet, on the other hand, this theoretical approach is underutilized in social scientists’ empirical research on race, where race is often measured as if it is a ‘real’ or natural entity. This ‘mismatch’ between theory and methods produces substantial tension in social science research and limits scholars’ ability to offer clear insights into the role of race and other traits in understanding social and health outcomes. This course will examine this tension, its adverse impact on social science research, and explore ways to develop methodological approaches to race and other markers of human difference that blend traditional empirical methods with critical theoretical traditions, e.g. critical race theory, feminist theory, disability theory, queer theory, and others. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the implications for research in the health sciences. About the Instructor: Osagie K. Obasogie, J.D., Ph.D., is Haas Distinguished Chair and Professor of Bioethics at the University of California, Berkeley, in the Joint Medical Program and School of Public Health. Obasogie's scholarly interests include Constitutional law, bioethics, sociology of law, and reproductive and genetic technologies. His research also looks at the past and present roles of science in both constructing racial meanings and explaining racial disparities. He has a particular interest in developing legal mechanisms that can create the conditions for eliminating health disparities. An additional thread of Obasogie’s research uses novel theoretical and empirical interventions to explore the hidden ways in which racial thinking is central to law, medicine, and science. His first book, "Blinded By Sight: Seeing Race Through the Eyes of the Blind" (Stanford University Press) was awarded the Herbert Jacob Book Prize by the Law and Society Association. His second book, "Beyond Bioethics: Toward a New Biopolitics" (with Marcy Darnovsky), was published by the University of California Press. Obasogie's writings have appeared in scholarly journals such as the Law & Society Review, Cornell Law Review, University of Pennsylvania Journal of Constitutional Law, and Stanford Technology Law Review as well as journalistic outlets such as the New York Times, Slate, and Scientific American.

Fall 2022 Description:
THIS COURSE WILL BE HELD IN BERKELEY WAY WEST, Room 1205 (1919 Shattuck Ave.) Social science research on identity and vulnerable populations is at a critical moment. For example, race is, on one hand, theorized as a social construction -- meaning that the social sciences have largely rejected claims that race reflects natural or biological differences and is instead thought to be a product of social, economic, and political forces. Yet, on the other hand, this theoretical approach is underutilized in social scientists’ empirical research on race, where race is often measured as if it is a ‘real’ or natural entity. This ‘mismatch’ between theory and methods produces substantial tension in social science research and limits scholars’ ability to offer clear insights into the role of race and other traits in understanding social and health outcomes. This course will examine this tension, its adverse impact on social science research, and explore ways to develop methodological approaches to race and other markers of human difference that blend traditional empirical methods with critical theoretical traditions, e.g. critical race theory, feminist theory, disability theory, queer theory, and others. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the implications for research in the health sciences.


Law 212.3 Critical Race Theory 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This seminar explores established debates within Critical Race Theory and introduces students to new directions within that genre. CRT originates in critiques of antidiscrimination law and in reactions to Critical Legal Studies. Beyond tracing these intellectual influences, this seminar will delve into recent CRT scholarship arguably marking a renewed vigor in legal scholarship on race. The class will also engage the influence of CRT in political discourse, including recent conversations about structural racism, reparations, and intersectionality. The seminar will draw heavily on student participation, and it requires a thirty-page paper. Students will be invited to write in areas of their particular interest, with the expectation that they will draw on CRT scholarship in framing their analysis. By way of comparison, the CRT seminar presumes familiarity with the basic canon of U.S. race cases that are taught in introductory Constitutional Law courses. The CRT seminar will focus almost exclusively on legal literature, though it will range broadly, from structural racism to the performance of racial identities, from gender and sexuality, to class to color. Please note that Professors Robinson is unlikely to supervise student writing projects outside the scope of this class. Admission to the course is limited to 24 students.

Spring 2021 Description:
This seminar explores established debates within Critical Race Theory and introduces students to new directions within that genre. CRT originates in critiques of antidiscrimination law and in reactions to Critical Legal Studies. Beyond tracing these intellectual influences, this seminar will delve into recent CRT scholarship marking a renewed vigor in legal scholarship on race. The class will also engage the influence of CRT in political discourse, including recent conversations about structural racism, reparations, and intersectionality. The seminar will draw heavily on student participation, and it requires a thirty-page paper. Students will be invited to write in areas of their particular interest, with the expectation that they will draw on CRT scholarship in framing their analysis. By way of comparison, the CRT seminar presumes familiarity with the basic canon of U.S. race cases that are taught in introductory Constitutional Law courses. The CRT seminar will focus almost exclusively on legal literature, though it will range broadly, from structural racism to the performance of racial identities, from gender and sexuality, to class to color. Please note that Professors Robinson is unlikely to supervise student writing projects outside the scope of this class.

Spring 2022 Description:
This seminar explores established debates within Critical Race Theory ("CRT") and introduces students to new directions within that genre. One area of focus will be contrasting the fundamentals of CRT with the current media and legislative furor about the role of CRT and anti-racism in education.CRT originates in critiques of antidiscrimination law and in reactions to Critical Legal Studies. Beyond tracing these intellectual influences, this seminar will delve into recent CRT scholarship marking a renewed vigor in legal scholarship on race. The class will also engage the influence of CRT in political discourse, including recent conversations about structural racism, reparations, and intersectionality. The seminar will draw heavily on student participation, and it requires a thirty-page paper. Students will be invited to write in areas of their particular interest, with the expectation that they will draw on CRT scholarship in framing their analysis. By way of comparison, the CRT seminar presumes familiarity with the basic canon of U.S. race cases that are taught in introductory Constitutional Law courses. The CRT seminar will focus almost exclusively on legal literature, though it will range broadly, from structural racism to the performance of racial identities, from gender and sexuality, to class to color. Please note that Professors Robinson is unlikely to supervise student writing projects outside the scope of this class.


Law 212.31 Critical Theories of Law: Race, Gender, and Sexuality (for 1Ls) 2 Units
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2022 Description:
This seminar explores critical theories of race, gender, and sexuality with an emphasis on intersections of those theories and identities. One area of focus will be contrasting the fundamentals of Critical Race Theory ("CRT") with the current media and legislative furor about the role of CRT and anti-racism in education. We will also explore critical theories and law school pedagogy, with a focus on the 1L experience. Finally, this seminar will highlight workshops with invited scholars and highlight emerging issues.


Law 212.8 Anti-Blackness and the Law 3 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
This seminar explores how anti-Blackness has been key to the creation and evolution of both American law and American society. We will examine anti-Blackness as an organizing principle across various domains including the criminal legal system, education, public health, employment, and housing. In exploring this topic we will take an interdisciplinary approach, blending case law, empirical studies, critical theory (namely critical race theory, Black feminist theory and Afro-pessimism) as well as the ideas of activists and other intellectuals situated outside of academia. The course will take as a given that the study of anti-Blackness requires an intersectional lens: special attention will be paid to how gender, class, sexual orientation and trans-experience produce unique forms of anti-Blackness. Seminar discussions will proceed from the assumption that participants have some familiarity with the study of race and/or racism. Therefore, it is recommended that interested students have completed relevant coursework (either in law school or in prior studies), or have some other relevant background experience. Due to the nature of this class, some or all of the sessions may not be recorded and posted except as required for accommodation of students with disabilities. Only those students who are able to attend live sessions at the designated class time should enroll.

Spring 2022 Description:
This seminar explores how anti-Blackness has been key to the creation and evolution of both American law and American society. We will examine anti-Blackness as an organizing principle across various domains including the criminal legal system, education, public health, employment, and housing. In exploring this topic we will take an interdisciplinary approach, blending case law, empirical studies, critical theory (namely critical race theory, Black feminist theory and Afro-pessimism) as well as the ideas of activists and other intellectuals situated outside of academia. The course will take as a given that the study of anti-Blackness requires an intersectional lens: special attention will be paid to how gender, class, sexual orientation and trans-experience produce unique forms of anti-Blackness. Seminar discussions will proceed from the assumption that participants have some familiarity with the study of race and/or racism. Therefore, it is recommended that interested students have completed relevant coursework (either in law school or in prior studies), or have some other relevant background experience. Only those students who are able to attend at the designated class time should enroll. Interested students should email Professor Rahim--asadrahim@berkeley.edu--a short paragraph of no more than 200 words explaining your interest in joining the course. Please make the subject line of your email "Application for Anti-Blackness and the Law." The deadline to apply is November 5th, with decisions made the week after. After this date, applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis. If selected, you will be sent the course control number to enroll.


Law 212.9 Love, Lawyering, and Liberation 1 Units
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2022 Description:
What do law, love, and liberation have in common? From a traditional, doctrinal law perspective, love and liberation are frameworks that are not commonly applied to the study and exploration of lawyering and professional identity. And yet, innumerable visionary, affirmative, creative, abolitionist perspectives on law and lawyering have emerged in recent decades. This course will apply those texts and directives, explore how radical Black and other feminist lawyers of color have effectuated social change, and study their calls on emerging lawyers to do the same. The class will survey a series of liberatory and abolitionist law frameworks and draw on law review articles, books, prose, and selected works of art and poetry to interrogate how emerging lawyers might envision their role as social change agents. Drawing on bell hooks’s Teaching to Transgress, adrienne marie brown’s Emergent Strategy, Kimberle Crenshaw’s intersectionality framework, and the long-curated (living) bibliography of movement lawyering texts, students will develop and apply critical analysis to what it means to lawyer in the service of liberation struggles and to practice law in a way that is affirmative, creative, and hopeful, while being rooted in resistance, movement, and structural change. This course will include short readings, guest speakers, written reflections and discussion, and a 5-8 page final reflection paper. Please Note: Enrollment in this course is by application only. If you wish to apply, please send an email to Seema N. Patel (seema.patel@berkeley.edu) and an application form will be sent to you. Applications are due by June 30 and students will be notified of their admission into the course no later than July 18th.


Law 214.2 Law & Classical Social Theory 3 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
“Law and Classical Social Theory” surveys leading attempts to construct social theories of law and to use legal materials for social theorizing, during the period from the mid-eighteenth century to the early twentieth century. While many figures are read and treated, the theorists receiving most attention are: Maine, Marx, Durkheim and Weber. The seminar introduces leading approaches to the social understanding of law and legal change, and furnishes an opportunity for more advanced work on particular contributions to this field.

Spring 2022 Description:
“Law and Classical Social Theory” surveys leading attempts to construct social theories of law and to use legal materials for social theorizing, during the period from the mid-eighteenth century to the twentieth century. While many figures are read and treated, the theorists receiving most attention are: Marx, Durkheim, Weber and DuBois. The seminar introduces leading approaches to the social understanding of law and legal change, and furnishes an opportunity for more advanced work on particular contributions to this field.


Law 214.4 Advanced Interdisciplinary Workshop on Law 3 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
This workshop serves a two-fold purpose. First, and most important, it is an opportunity for students working on interdisciplinary projects related to law to receive constructive, intensive feedback on a piece of academic writing. All participants will draft a 30-page piece of academic writing over the course of the semester, such as an article, dissertation chapter, prospectus, or grant proposal. The final paper for the course will be a full-length complete draft that incorporates feedback received during the semester. As that piece of writing takes shape, each student will have two opportunities to receive feedback from the group on work-in-progress. Accordingly, the core expectation of the workshop is that all students attend regularly, present their work twice, and comment on peer work (including by serving as a lead discussant several times during the semester). There is also a professional development component to the workshop, where we will cover writing-related topics such as giving and receiving high-quality constructive feedback, self-editing, resources for writing, and good writing habits. Perhaps most important, we will talk about the nuts and bolts of academic publishing and how different types of publishing institutions - including peer reviewed journals, law reviews, academic presses, and funding agencies - make decisions. The goal is to set students up for success in academic publishing by demystifying the process. The workshop is open to all students who have a suitable writing project slated for the fall that would benefit from intensive feedback. It is especially suitable for students who are considering an academic career path. This course is graded and satisfies the Option 2 writing requirement. To submit an application please do as at this link https://forms.gle/P65MwCi6wwcaCbpp8 . The deadline to submit the application is April 17th. Applications submitted after that date will be reviewed on a first come, first serve basis. Due to the nature of this class, some or all of the sessions may not be recorded and posted except as required for accommodation of students with disabilities. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency.

Fall 2021 Description:
This workshop is an opportunity for students working on interdisciplinary projects related to law to receive constructive, intensive feedback on their writing. All participants will draft a piece of academic writing over the course of the semester, such as an article, dissertation chapter, prospectus, or grant proposal. The final paper for the course will be a draft that is a minimum of ten pages, and that incorporates feedback received during the semester. As that piece of writing takes shape, each student will have at least one opportunity to receive feedback from the group on work-in-progress. Accordingly, the core expectation of the workshop is that all students attend regularly, present their work at least once, and comment on peer work (including by serving as a lead discussant several times during the semester). The workshop is open to all students who have a suitable writing project slated for the fall (not being submitted for credit in another class) that would benefit from intensive feedback. It is especially suitable for students who are considering an academic career path. This course is graded CR/NC. This course will meet every other week August 24th, September 7th, September 21st, October 5th, October 19th, November 2nd and November 16th.


Law 215.4 Foundations of Moral Philosophy 3 Units
Fall 2021: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2021 Description:
This seminar offers an overview of the history of moral philosophy, paying special attention to arguments about the relationship of morality to law, as well as the connections between moral philosophy and political economy. We will begin by studying canonical texts before turning to more contemporary work. Authors will include Aristotle, Cicero, Pufendorf, Hume, Smith, Bentham, Kant, Mill, Edgeworth, Pareto, Sen, Williams, Anderson, Rorty, and others.


Law 215.41 Responsibility in Law and Morality 3 Units
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Spring 2021 Description:
This graduate seminar will examine questions of responsibility in ethics, politics, and law. Among the specific topics we will address are: (1) The general conditions of moral responsibility and the significance of excuses, including in criminal law. (2) The nature of causal explanation and causal responsibility in liability, specifically in relation to the legal notion of proximate causation. (3) The relationship between environmental causal explanations (social, economic) and excuses in liability. -the importance (or not) of a general fault requirement for civil liability. (4) Neuroscientific explanation, mental illness, and moral/legal responsibility. (5) Collective responsibility for structural injustice, including for historical injustices. (6) State responsibility in international law and global ethics, especially in relation to refugees and the climate emergency. (7) Shared social responsibility in relation to the demands of basic justice.


Law 215.42 Foundations of Legal Philosophy 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This course is an introduction to (primarily) analytical legal theory through a close reading of some of the most important texts and arguments about the nature of law and legal authority of the last 75 years. We will pay special attention to questions of the relation of law to politics, history, and morality, and to questions about the philosophical justification (if there is) for the special role of courts in maintaining political order. Among the authors we will read are: H.L.A. Hart, Hans Kelsen, Ronald Dworkin, Jurgen Habermas, Joseph Raz, Scott Shapiro, Seana Shiffrin, and Jeremy Waldron. The course presupposes no prior work in philosophy or legal theory.

Fall 2022 Description:
This course is an introduction to (primarily) analytical legal theory through a close reading of some of the most important texts and arguments about the nature of law and legal authority of the last 75 years. We will pay special attention to questions of the relation of law to politics, history, and morality, especially when law reflects existing hierarchies and divisions of power, and to questions about the philosophical justification (if there is one) for the special role of courts in maintaining political order. Among the authors we will read are: H.L.A. Hart, Hans Kelsen, Ronald Dworkin, Jurgen Habermas, Joseph Raz, Scott Shapiro, Seana Shiffrin, and Jeremy Waldron. While the course presupposes no prior work in philosophy or legal theory, the readings are mostly drawn from philosophy.


Law 215.5 Foundations of Political Philosophy 3 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
This course is a seminar on the history of political thought. Its focus is the social contract tradition and its critics, including criticisms or amendments of contract theory based on the alleged sociability of humankind. We will study canonical texts in this tradition, with a special interest in their implications for law. Readings will include works by Aristotle, Hobbes, Pufendorf, Locke, Hume, Smith, Rousseau, Bentham, Kant, Mill, Marx, Rawls and others. Students will be expected to engage in close readings of these texts, participate in seminar discussion, and write a final paper. This course is a Foundations seminar in the PhD Program in Jurisprudence & Social Policy (JSP) and is open to all JSP, JD, LLM, and JSD students as well as graduate students from other campus departments.


Law 216 Law, Accounting, and Business Workshop 2 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
This seminar will provide students with an opportunity to be exposed to and discuss ongoing research in law, accounting, and business. At most sessions, an invited speaker from Berkeley or elsewhere will present work in progress, and then take questions from students and faculty in the audience. Speakers will include prominent scholars in the fields of law, accounting, and business. Students will write three short papers, one in advance of each of three of the speakers. A schedule of the speakers will be available at the Program in Law and Economics website. Course website will be available on bCourses.

Fall 2021 Description:
This seminar will provide students with an opportunity to discuss ongoing research in the economic analysis of law. At most sessions, an invited speaker from Berkeley or elsewhere will present a work in progress, and then take questions from students and faculty in the audience. Speakers will include prominent scholars in the field of business, law and economics from around the nation and the world. A schedule of the speakers is available at the Program in Law and Economics website. Course website is available at bCourses.

Fall 2022 Description:
This seminar will provide students with an opportunity to discuss ongoing research in the economic analysis of law. At most sessions, an invited speaker from Berkeley or elsewhere will present a work in progress, and then take questions from students and faculty in the audience. Speakers will include prominent scholars in the field of business, law and economics from around the nation and the world.


Law 216.1 Introduction to Law and Economics 1 Units
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2022 Description:
Economic analysis provides one of the major theoretical perspectives on the study of law in American universities. This course introduces students to the economic analysis of the law as a set of tools for analyzing laws. Students will learn how to construct and critique economic models of the incentive effects of different legal rules and institutions. These models will illuminate familiar areas of law, including criminal law, torts, contracts, property, corporations, intellectual property, and discrimination. The models are useful for finding strategies to make the best use of law to solve real-world problems.


Law 217 Law, Economics, and Business Workshop 2 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This seminar will provide students with an opportunity to discuss ongoing research in the economic analysis of law. At most sessions, an invited speaker from Berkeley or elsewhere will present work in progress, and then take questions from students and faculty in the audience. Speakers will include prominent scholars in the field of business, law and economics from around the nation and the world. Course website is available at bCourses. The seminar is normally offered in the fall and spring as Law 216 and Law 217 respectively. Students can enroll in each class once.

Spring 2021 Description:
This seminar will provide students with an opportunity to discuss ongoing research at the crossroads of law, finance, economics and accounting. At most sessions, an invited speaker from Berkeley or elsewhere will present work in progress, and then take questions from students and faculty in the audience. Speakers will include prominent scholars in the field of law, finance, economics and accounting from around the nation and the world. A schedule of the speakers is available at the Program in Law and Economics website: http://www.law.berkeley.edu/146.htm. Course website is available at bspace. The seminar is normally offered in the fall and spring as Law 216 and Law 217 respectively. Students can enroll in each class once.

Spring 2022 Description:
This seminar will provide students with an opportunity to discuss ongoing research in the economic analysis of law. At most sessions, an invited speaker from Berkeley or elsewhere will present work in progress, and then take questions from students and faculty in the audience. Speakers will include prominent scholars in the field of business, law and economics from around the nation and the world. A schedule of the speakers is available at the Program in Law and Economics website: http://www.law.berkeley.edu/146.htm. Course website is available at bspace. The seminar is normally offered in the fall (Law 216) and spring (Law 217).


Law 217.11 Law and Political Economy 3 Units
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Spring 2021 Description:
This seminar will focus on recent scholarship at the intersection of law and political economy. It will begin with several sessions introducing the history and theory of mainstream law and economics. It will then broaden out to consider several current law and political economy topics, including antitrust law and policy in the era of tech platforms; law and money; neoliberalism and constitutionalism; and the law and political economy of complex or intersectional inequality (i.e., class, race, gender). This is a rigorous seminar that will engage seriously with both mainstream law and economics and new and critical approaches. Evaluation will be based on student participation, including substantial reading and class discussion, and a final paper.


Law 217.12 Law and Economics Foundation Seminar 3 Units
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Spring 2021 Description:
The goal of this course is to expose students to a broad set of questions, models, and methods used in law and economics research. The readings for the course draw on recent empirical research, with a distinct focus on topics at the intersection of law, economics, politics, and inequality. The course is particularly oriented toward students interested in understanding and/or pursuing applied empirical research at the intersection of law and social science. To this end, it emphasizes the use of statistical and econometric methods to answer questions of legal and policy significance, with a particular emphasis on research design. While some familiarity with economic reasoning and statistical concepts will be useful, the course is intended for a broad audience interested in these topics. Students with questions about their preparation should reach out to the instructor. Grades will be based on short writing assignments during the semester, as well as one longer paper/assignment due at the end of the semester. Students will be expected to be able to understand and critique the relevant empirical literature in their assignments, and will be permitted though not required to produce their own empirical research.


Law 217.41 Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Case 1 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
There is so much more to a case than its holding. So what is reading a case all about? This course will explore thirteen different ways of looking at a case. It will introduce students to major schools of legal theory as we apply them to canonical cases from the core law school curriculum. In each class session we will learn a particular approach by close reading a case from constitutional law, contracts, property, torts, and other core classes. Among other schools of thought, we will study natural law, legal positivism, formalism, legal realism, the legal process, law and economics, critical legal studies, critical race theory, and feminism. Thus, this course will supplement the first-year curriculum by offering students an introduction to legal thought and providing them with various ways of understanding and critiquing case law. This class is among the special Fall 2020 1L elective seminars designed to give entering 1Ls an extra opportunity to form connections despite our remote form of interaction. In light of that goal, these classes will expect real-time attendance and may not be recorded. These classes will all be graded on a Credit/No Credit basis and total written work requirement will be no more than 8 double-spaced pages.


Law 217.9 Critical Theories of Law & Legal Education 2 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
Law aspires to objectivity and rationality, but can we discern the unstated norms, biases, and assumptions that it rests upon? What is the relationship of law to power and inequality? How does law interact with, reproduce, or challenge hierarchies of class, race, gender, and ability? How do we as legal practitioners exist and find meaningful work within those structures? This course grapples with these questions and provides an introduction to critiques of law and legal education, from the perspectives of Legal Realism, Critical Legal Studies, Critical Race Theory, Feminist Theory, and Sociolegal Studies, among others.


Law 219.31 Thinking Like a Lawyer 1 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
The course explores the question of what lies at the heart of the law, legal education and legal practice. What does it mean to think like a lawyer? How should one think about the law? We will read a few classic scholars like Holmes, Cardozo and Gilmore (two of whom have quotations on the outside of the building) to sketch out some answers. We will map these classic works on to the law in 2020. Response papers and one short, final paper will be required.


Law 219.4 Poetic Justice: Dostoevsky, Nabokov and Literature in the Shadow of the Law 3 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
In this seminar, offered jointly under the auspices of the Law School and Comparative Literature, we will examine some of the conceptual and thematic places where literature and law cross over into each other’s domain. The focus will be on novel reading - Crime and Punishment, The Brothers Karamazov, Pnin and Lolita - and on texts where crime, judgment and punishment assume particular procedural, narrative, moral or metafictive importance. We will pay particular attention to the themes of transgression, healing and vengeance and how they play out in legal and metafictive contexts. We will discuss cases where ethics and aesthetics pull in opposite directions - where bad or even good writing can be a crime. Dostoevsky’s legal commentaries - the Kornilova and Kairova cases - will also be addressed. We will search for conceptual cross-over points - what happens to notions of privacy, surveillance, even jurisdiction in a literary text. We will examine permutations of the relationship between author and hero and author and reader; are these relationships adversarial, contractual, erotic? The crucial texts will be the novels, the essential procedure will be close reading (both prosecutorial /aggressive and protective/deferential), but we will also read several works of literary theory as well as scholarly attempts to link literature and law. The course will seek to foster an exchange of views between graduate students in the humanities and law students on the value, cost and significance of engaging with legal issues in literary texts. How might literary scholars benefit from reading like lawyers, and vice versa? 3 Hours/week (1 session); open to graduate students in the humanities and to law students. No particular background in law or comparative literature is required, but students should be prepared to read up to 250 pages of fiction a week. All participants will lead occasional oral discussions. Learning goals include cultivation of close reading skills and of interdisciplinary approaches to interpretation, the questioning of rigid disciplinary boundaries, an understanding of the importance of humanistic inquiry to legal studies, and an appreciation for the benefits (and difficulties) implicit in using aesthetic categories to resolve ethical questions and vice versa. The instructor received his Ph.D. in Slavic Languages from Berkeley and his J.D. from Yale. He is a Professor of Comparative Literature and Slavic Languages and Literatures at Berkeley, as well as a retired member of the Massachusetts Bar. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency.


Law 219.4T Courts, Lawyers and Justice in Film 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This course will examine comparatively the representation of judicial process and the image of the legal profession in films in various countries. Courtroom dramas constitute an enduring and distinctive staple of American film culture. We will explore how this dramatic fiction influences a popular conception of justice that corresponds to a distinct model of civil society and is not simply limited to the resolution of disputes. Discussions will be based on partial or full screening and analysis of films produced within the last fifty years. In addition to discussing forms of representation of the adjudication process we will examine the role of lawyers and judges, their social status, the political function of courts as public forum, and the depiction of the relationship between legal rules, judicial process, and moral values. Class requirement includes one 15-20 page paper. Participation in class discussion will count for 20% of the final grade. Choice of paper topics is not limited to films, countries and topics discussed in class.

Spring 2021 Description:
This course will examine comparatively the representation of the judicial process and the image of the legal profession in films in various countries. Courtroom dramas constitute an enduring and distinctive staple of American film culture. We will explore how this dramatic fiction influences a popular conception of justice that corresponds to a distinct model of civil society and is not simply limited to the resolution of disputes. Discussions will be based on partial or full screening and analysis of films produced within the last fifty years. In addition to discussing forms of representation of the adjudication process we will examine the role of lawyers and judges, their social status, the political function of courts as public fora, and the depiction of the relationship between legal rules, judicial process, and moral values. Class requirement includes one 15-20 page paper or in class presentation. Choice of paper topics is not limited to films, countries and topics discussed in class.

Spring 2022 Description:
This course will examine comparatively the representation of the judicial process and the image of the legal profession in films in various countries. Courtroom dramas constitute an enduring and distinctive staple of American film culture. We will explore how this dramatic fiction influences a popular conception of justice that corresponds to a distinct model of civil society and is not simply limited to the resolution of disputes. Discussions will be based on partial or full screening and analysis of films produced within the last fifty years. In addition to discussing forms of representation of the adjudication process we will examine the role of lawyers and judges, their social status, the political function of courts as public fora, and the depiction of the relationship between legal rules, judicial process, and moral values. Class requirement includes one 15-20 page paper. Choice of paper topics is not limited to films, countries and topics discussed in class.


Law 219.81 Collaborative Research Seminar: Law & Humanities 2 Units
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Spring 2021 Description:
This is a seminar team-taught by three faculty members from different departments: Marianne Constable in Rhetoric, Bryan Wagner in English, and Leti Volpp in Law. We anticipate that students will enroll from an array of departments across campus. The course builds upon a long-standing effort to bring together scholars of law and humanities on the UC Berkeley campus, as exemplified by the volume, Constable, Volpp and Wagner, eds., Looking for Law in All the Wrong Places: Justice Beyond and Between (Fordham University Press, 2019). This is a UC Berkeley Collaborative Research Seminar supported by the Division of Arts & Humanities. The impetus behind these seminars is to integrate the arts and the humanities with UC Berkeley's signature initiatives, which identify key themes that tackle societal grand challenges. In particular, this course will engage directly with the signature initiative, "The Future of Democracy." Class meetings will correspond with initiative areas "Citizenship and Migration," "Democratic Speech Cultures," and "Making Democracy Work." The seminar understands law as a force that often reveals itself in realms in which it is supposed to be absent. By considering poetry and theater, painting and photography, folklore and popular culture along with more conventional legal documents, we will explore questions that are central to both law and humanities - including who we are, what to do, and how we know. We will be thinking about a range of topics, which may include: crime and punishment; personhood and property; language and medium; representation and interpretation; status and contract; violence, trauma, and testimony; retrospection, clues, and conjecture; and migration, borders, and citizenship. Students will work collaboratively and will hone skills of team-teaching, presenting their own research, and responding to others' work. Participants selected for the seminar will receive a $1,300 Research Stipend. To submit an application for the course, apply online by November 6, 2020, at https://forms.gle/BZD9iXmJyJKJzAaMA.


Law 219.9 Law and the Greek Classics 1 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
Attendance at the first class is mandatory The seminar will explore links between the Greek Classics and contemporary legal issues. Among the areas we will discuss are: Was Socrates' conviction unjust? What are the limits, if any, to free speech? Should Socrates have escaped to resist an unjust conviction? How should a contemporary lawyer confront outcomes she deems deeply unjust? What are the essential elements of a just legal system? What role should conscience play in granting exemptions to the duties of citizenship? We will read Plato's Crito and the Apologia; MLK, Jr, Letter from the Birmingham Jail; Aeschylus, "The Eumenides" (the birth of law); and"Antigone" (the birth of conscientious objection). No prior study of the Greek classics is required. We will read the plays aloud for the aesthetic joy of it before discussing the issues. Warning - I always get to play Creon - maybe in a Trump mask. I have taught this material at Berkeley, NYU and Stanford Law Schools.

Spring 2021 Description:
Attendance at the first class is mandatory The seminar will explore links between the Greek Classics and contemporary legal issues. Among the areas we will discuss are: Was Socrates' conviction unjust? What are the limits, if any, to free speech? Should Socrates have escaped to resist an unjust conviction? How should a contemporary lawyer confront outcomes she deems deeply unjust? What are the essential elements of a just legal system? What role should conscience play in granting exemptions to the duties of citizenship? We will read Plato's Crito and the Apologia; MLK, Jr, Letter from the Birmingham Jail; Aeschylus, "The Eumenides" (the birth of law); and"Antigone" (the birth of conscientious objection). No prior study of the Greek classics is required. We will read the plays aloud for the aesthetic joy of it before discussing the issues. Warning - I always get to play Creon - maybe in a Trump mask. I won't ignore the warts. We'll consider whether the misogyny that pervades the material disqualifies it as a serious source for modern legal discussion. We'll also look at the role of slavery and economic injustice in supporting Athenian democracy. I'll ask how we should use legal and aesthetic materials generated in such a climate. Hint - I'm extremely reluctant to throw the material away, but unwilling to whitewash the warts. I have taught this material at Berkeley, NYU, and Stanford Law Schools.


Law 220.1 The Constitution in the Early Republic 2 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This course explores the Constitution through an examination of the history of its framing. We will discuss the ideological origins of the American Revolution, the Critical Period under the Articles of Confederation, the drafting and ratification of the Constitution, and important debates in Washington administration. Readings will include a mix of primary sources, such as the Federalist Papers and debate records, and secondary historical works. Students will submit a paper on an issue of constitutional history or interpretation using historical sources.

Spring 2022 Description:
This course examines the history of the Constitution's framing. We will discuss the ideological origins of the American Revolution, the Critical Period under the Articles of Confederation, the drafting and ratification of the Constitution, and important debates in the Washington administration. Readings will include a mix of primary sources, such as the Federalist Papers and debate records, and secondary historical works. Students will submit a paper on an issue of constitutional history or interpretation.


Law 220.12 The Constitution in War Time 2 Units
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Spring 2021 Description:
This is an advanced constitutional law course that will address a series of interrelated issues that have arisen over the course of American history as the United States Constitution has had to confront the realities of war. The course will investigate wartime periods in American history and the legal issues that they triggered, along with the resulting debates over those issues and broader theoretical discussions that exist today over how the Constitution operates in wartime, with the aim of critically analyzing the various positions in such debates. Students will read judicial decisions and academic commentary and scholarship. Major issues to be covered include: exploring how the system of checks and balances can and should work during periods of national crisis, the relevance of traditional constitutional constraints on executive power in wartime, congressional checks and oversight of war powers; the role of the judiciary in wartime; how the Civil War has or should shape constitutional meaning, World War II, the War on Terror, the use of military tribunals, the suspension of habeas corpus, and more generally the intersection of war powers and civil liberties. Students will write four short reflection papers over the course of the semester. Regular attendance and active class participation are also required and will serve as an additional component of student evaluation. Due to the nature of this class, some or all of the sessions may not be recorded and posted except as required for accommodation of students with disabilities. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency. NOTE: In this class, the usual provisions of Add/Drop do not apply. All interested students, whether enrolled or on the waitlist, must attend the first class in order to be admitted. Any student who does not attend the first class without prior permission of the instructor will be dropped from the class and the waitlist. No additional students will be permitted to add the course.


Law 220.13 Constitutional Law and Colonialism 2 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This seminar will explore the constitutional law of colonial rule in contemporary, comparative, and historical perspectives. Typically, colonialism is not a topic of study in constitutional law courses in the United States. The seminar will fill that gap by considering the ways in which constitutional law has shaped, and been shaped by, colonialism within the United States. It will cover canonical cases concerning the relationships between the United States and Indigenous Peoples as well as cases concerning U.S. territories. It will also address cutting edges issues concerning Indigenous Peoples and the territories today. The seminar will also have a significant comparative law component, as it will explore constitutionalism and colonialism in Australia, Canada, and New Zealand, which, like the United States, are common law countries with colonial histories. Students will have the opportunity to delve deeply into a topic of their choosing by writing a research paper.


Law 220.14 Originalism 1 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
How should judges interpret the Constitution? One controversial approach is "originalism," a method that focuses on the Constitution's original public meaning. This seminar will explore the debate over originalism and will seek to evaluate originalist approaches to constitutional interpretation. We will try to understand what makes an interpretive approach originalist; to identify the different scholarly approaches to originalism; to assess whether a distinctive originalism is possible; to understand what values originalism serves; to see how to make (and how to dissect) originalist arguments; and to appreciate the arguments both for and against originalism relative to other approaches to constitutional interpretation. This class is among the special Fall 2020 1L elective seminars designed to give entering 1Ls an extra opportunity to form connections despite our remote form of interaction. In light of that goal, these classes will expect real-time attendance and may not be recorded. These classes will all be graded on a Credit/No Credit basis and total written work requirement will be no more than 8 double-spaced pages.


Law 220.15 The Federalist and Anti-Federalist Papers 1 Units
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2022 Description:
The course will cover reading and discussion of Federalist Papers Nos. 47-83 and corresponding Anti-Federalist Papers, addressing separation of powers and the specific powers and authorities of the three branches of government. The class will be taught in a discussion style and will focus on the arguments for and against various provisions of the Constitution advanced by the Federalists and Anti-Federalists at the time of the state ratification debates. The course meets on these dates: Thursday, March 31st 6:25PM-8:45PM Friday, April 1st 10AM-12:10PM AND 3:10PM-5PM Thursday, April 7th 6:25PM-8:45PM Friday, April 8th 10AM-12:10PM AND 3:10PM-5PM


Law 220.41 Natural Law and Constitutional Interpretation 2 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
One of the most difficult questions for constitutional interpretation is whether and how to fill in gaps in the text. Should courts, for example, recognize rights not textually enumerated in the Bill of Rights? Should we give force to principles of federalism or the separation of powers when the Constitution mentions neither phrase? One of the theories proposed as a background set of principles for constitutional interpretation is natural law. This class will examine historic natural law theories as they evolved and existed at the time of the Framing of the Constitution and the Civil War, the modern debate over natural law, and whether such theories can prove useful in answering the difficult constitutional questions of today. The Honorable Janice Rogers Brown is currently a jurist-in-residence at Berkeley Law. She has served in prominent positions in the federal and state judiciaries and California government. She served as the judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit from 2005 to 2017. She served as a Justice of the California Supreme Court from 1996-2005, and before that was a Justice of the California Third District Court of Appeal. Before her judicial service, she was Legal Affairs Secretary to California Governor Pete Wilson and held positions in the state Attorney General’s office and the Business, Transportation, and Housing Agency. Steven Hayward is a senior research fellow at Berkeley Law, a senior resident scholar at the Institute of Governmental Studies at UC Berkeley, and a visiting professor at the Goldman School of Public Policy. He was previously the Ronald Reagan Distinguished Visiting Professor at Pepperdine University’s Graduate School of Public Policy, and was the inaugural visiting scholar in conservative thought and policy at the University of Colorado at Boulder in 2013-14. From 2002 to 2012 he was the F.K Weyerhaeuser Fellow in Law and Economics at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington DC and has been a senior fellow at the Pacific Research Institute in San Francisco since 1991.


Law 220.5 Constitutional Theory 3 Units
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Spring 2021 Description:
In this seminar, we will examine the history and theory surrounding the adoption and ratification of the U.S. Constitution, as well as its principles and applications as they have evolved over time. We will start by addressing the major theories underlying the interpretation of the Constitution, including originalism, constitutional textualism, living constitutionalism, and pragmatism. We will then scrutinize assumptions about human capacity and nature and theories of politics that underlay the major components of the Constitution - Separation of Powers, Federalism, and Individual Rights. Next, we will explore what assumptions of human capacity and nature and theories of politics have been embedded in major constitutional cases in each of these areas over time. We conclude with an account of the sources of constitutional change from the transformation of political institutions and their relationships to each other, social movements, and evolving understandings of the past. Throughout the course, we will assess the extent to which our interpretation of the Constitution depends on our vision of American democracy and good society.


Law 220.6 Constitutional Law 4 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Spring 2022: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This course will provide an introduction to Constitution Law. The course will be divided into four major sections. The initial section will introduce you to judicial review and constitutional interpretation. The next two sections will focus on what are often referred to as “structural” matters. The second section explores the concept of separation of powers - the division of authority between the three branches of the federal government. The third section will address addresses federalism - the relationship between the federal government and the states and the constitutional limits that define the powers of each over various subject matters. The final section will focus on constitutionally guaranteed rights. This will include an introduction to the structure of constitutional protections, equal protection, and an examination of fundamental rights under the Due Process Clause.

Fall 2020 Description:
This is an introductory course on Constitutional Law. We will cover judicial review, commerce clause, federalism, separation of powers, equal protection, and substantive due process. The course examines how these concepts have emerged in doctrine, and have been contested through politics and the mobilizations of social movements during transformative periods of American history, such as the Founding, the Civil War, the New Deal, and the Civil Rights Movement. We will also address contemporary constitutional controversies, such as limits on executive power, affirmative action, immigration, or lgbt equality. Except as approved accommodation, laptops may not be used in this class.

Spring 2021 Description:
Constitutional Law focuses on the constitutional provisions creating the American system of government and protecting individual liberties. The course will focus especially on the methods that are used by judges and lawyers for analyzing and interpreting the Constitution. The course material will be divided into five units. Unit one will examine the separation and balance of powers among the three branches of the federal government. Unit two will focus on the constitutional relationship between the federal and state governments. Unit three will consider the structure of the Constitution’s protection of individual liberties, examining several principles that apply to the constitutional provisions protecting civil rights and civil liberties. The fourth unit will focus on the due process clauses of the fifth and fourteenth amendments and the rights protected under them. Finally, unit five will consider the constitutional guarantee of equal protection of the law.

Fall 2021 Description:
This is an introductory course on Constitutional Law. We will cover judicial review, commerce clause, federalism, separation of powers, equal protection, and substantive due process. The course examines how these concepts have emerged in doctrine, and have been contested through politics and the mobilizations of social movements during transformative periods of American history, such as the Founding, the Civil War, the New Deal, and the Civil Rights Movement. We will also address contemporary constitutional controversies, such as limits on executive power, affirmative action, immigration, or lgbt equality. Except as approved accommodation, laptops may not be used in this class.

Spring 2022 Description:
This is an introductory course on Constitutional Law. Although it is primarily a substantive class, the course will also focus on skill building and will include three required writing assignments in addition to the final. It will enhance students' abilities to read and synthesize cases, to formulate effective legal arguments, to engage in critical analysis, and to write law school exams. Although the course will cover basic principles such as judicial review and federalism, the focus will be on the role of the courts in assessing questions of equal protection (based on race, gender, sexual orientation and disability) and establishing the boundaries of fundamental rights, including sexual conduct, procreation, and marriage. This class is by application and for 1L students only. Additional information, including the application instructions, will be sent to 1Ls in January.

Fall 2022 Description:
This is a 4-unit introductory course on Constitutional Law. Although it is primarily a substantive class, the course will also include some small group exercises and practice exams to help build skills. It will enhance students' abilities to read and synthesize cases, to formulate effective legal arguments, to engage in critical analysis, and to write law school exams. Although the course will cover basic principles such as judicial review and federalism, the focus will be on the role of the courts in assessing questions of equal protection (based on race, gender, sexual orientation and disability) and establishing the boundaries of "fundamental rights," including sexual conduct, procreation, and marriage. We will also address contemporary constitutional controversies, such as the Supreme Court's consideration of affirmative action.


Law 220.9 First Amendment 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
In this course we will study the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, focusing on issues of religion and speech.

Spring 2021 Description:
The First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution is at the core of current debates in American governance. This course covers the Amendment's speech, association, and religion clauses. Cases and doctrines will be examined both from a historical perspective and in light of current issues, with attention to developments in technology, culture, and society.

Spring 2022 Description:
In this course we will study the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, focusing on issues of religion and speech. While the main focus of the course will be on legal doctrine, we will also read and discuss normative theories and frameworks that aim to guide our thinking about freedom of speech and religion.


Law 220.92 Democracy and the First Amendment 2 Units
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2022 Description:
The seminar will explore the interaction between Democracy and the First Amendment. We will ask how (or whether) the First Amendment protects the right to vote, run for office, support or oppose candidates, enjoy fair representation, spend money, seek relief, and criticize government. We will consider, as well, whether equality-based protections provide an adequate alternative to First Amendment protection. We will consider statutory protections and regulation of the democratic process, including the Voting Rights Act and federal regulation of campaign spending. We'll look, as well, at corporate political speech and spending. Seminar participants will be expected to research and write a paper exploring a topic of choice.


Law 220A Marijuana Law and Policy 1 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
In this marijuana law and policy seminar, students will engage with the wide variety of legal issues presented by one of the fastest-evolving fields in drug policy, and grapple with the policy and practical legal issues that arise when an illicit market evolves into one that is quasi-legal and regulated by the state but still prohibited under federal law. The course will cover the history of marijuana prohibition, including its race-based origins and its continued racially disparate enforcement; the political movement and strategy to decriminalize marijuana and allow medical access; the international and federal constraints on state law reform; the legal and regulatory questions involving criminal sentencing, tax, consumer safety, labor law, environmental protection, and public health; social justice considerations prompted by the emergence of a new, quasi-legal industry for a product that was previously criminalized in a racially-disparate manner; and the continuing challenges of navigating a new industry that remains illegal under federal law. The instructor was the legal director for the world’s largest drug policy advocacy organization, and has specialized for the last ten years in marijuana law and policy. She has been instrumental in the drafting of medical and recreational marijuana laws and voter initiatives in more than 15 states across the country; was a lead drafter of recently-enacted recreational marijuana laws in Colorado, Oregon, and California; and has testified in numerous legislative and government bodies in the United States and abroad on the issue of drug policy and the intersection of state and federal law. The reading for the course will be an eclectic mix of case law, policy articles, government studies and reports, statutes, advocacy pieces, and political campaign materials.

Spring 2021 Description:
In this marijuana law and policy seminar, students will engage with the wide variety of legal issues presented by one of the fastest-evolving fields in drug policy, and grapple with the policy and practical legal issues that arise when an illicit market evolves into one that is quasi-legal and regulated by the state but still prohibited under federal law. The course will cover the history of marijuana prohibition, including its race-based origins and its continued racially disparate enforcement; the political movement and strategy to decriminalize marijuana and allow medical access; the international and federal constraints on state law reform; the legal and regulatory questions involving criminal sentencing, tax, consumer safety, labor law, environmental protection, and public health; social justice considerations prompted by the emergence of a new, quasi-legal industry for a product that was previously criminalized in a racially-disparate manner; and the continuing challenges of navigating a new industry that remains illegal under federal law. The instructor was the legal director for the world’s largest drug policy advocacy organization, and has specialized for the last ten years in marijuana law and policy. She has been instrumental in the drafting of medical and recreational marijuana laws and voter initiatives in more than 15 states across the country; was a lead drafter of recently-enacted recreational marijuana laws in Colorado, Oregon, and California; and has testified in numerous legislative and government bodies in the United States and abroad on the issue of drug policy and the intersection of state and federal law. The reading for the course will be an eclectic mix of case law, policy articles, government studies and reports, statutes, advocacy pieces, and political campaign materials.

Spring 2022 Description:
In this marijuana law and policy seminar, students will engage with the wide variety of legal issues presented by one of the fastest-evolving fields in drug policy, and grapple with the policy and practical legal issues that arise when an illicit market evolves into one that is quasi-legal and regulated by the state but still prohibited under federal law. The course will cover the history of marijuana prohibition, including its race-based origins and its continued racially disparate enforcement; the political movement and strategy to decriminalize marijuana and allow medical access; the international and federal constraints on state law reform; the legal and regulatory questions involving criminal sentencing, tax, consumer safety, labor law, environmental protection, and public health; social justice considerations prompted by the emergence of a new, quasi-legal industry for a product that was previously criminalized in a racially-disparate manner; and the continuing challenges of navigating a new industry that remains illegal under federal law. The instructor was the legal director for the world’s largest drug policy advocacy organization, and has specialized for the last ten years in marijuana law and policy. She has been instrumental in the drafting of medical and recreational marijuana laws and voter initiatives in more than 18 states across the country; was a lead drafter of recently-enacted recreational marijuana laws in Colorado, Oregon, and California; and has testified in numerous legislative and government bodies in the United States and abroad on the issue of drug policy and the intersection of state and federal law. The reading for the course will be an eclectic mix of case law, policy articles, government studies and reports, statutes, advocacy pieces, and political campaign materials.


Law 220A1 Education Law and Policy: Access, Discrimination, and Constitutional Litigation 2 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
This fall seminar will address several contemporary issues in elementary, secondary, and postsecondary education. Topics will include, among others: constitutional remedies for unequal school funding; the use of race and ethnicity in K-12 people assignment policies and college admissions; denial of access to education due to immigration status, English proficiency, or disability; sex discrimination; and the challenges of racial and hyper-segregation. There will be no casebook. Course materials will be available online through bCourses. Grades will be based, approximately equally, on (a) class participation, (b) a draft 10-15-page paper on an approved topic, and (c) the final paper, after instructor feedback. This is a law course, but with substantial public policy content.


Law 220E Advanced Constitutional Law: Federalism 3 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
This course will examine the balance of powers between the national and state governments. We will cover the main sources of federal power, such as the Commerce Clause, the Taxing and Spending Powers, the Foreign Affairs Power, and the Necessary and Proper Clause. We will also examine doctrines of state sovereignty and theoretical approaches to federalism.


Law 220F Food Law and Policy 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This Seminar will explore a wide range of issues related to food law and policy. Topics will likely include issues such as food safety, food labeling, government dietary standards, regulating the treatment of farm animals, farm and restaurant labor, organic farming standards, hunger and obesity in America, food stamps, government provision of food via school lunches in prisons and in the military, free speech controversies in the food law context, and the interactions between food production and the environment in light of climate change. Students will read a variety of materials in preparation for weekly discussions and will each write a 30+-page research paper. The course may fulfill the writing requirement with the agreement of the instructor.


Law 220G Public Law and Policy Workshop 2 Units
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Spring 2021 Description:
This seminar gives students the opportunity to engage with leading public law scholars from Berkeley and other schools. This year, the seminar will focus on separation of powers, especially the scope of presidential power. This is an area of ferment on the Supreme Court and among scholars. It was also a focus of intense public debate during the Trump Administration. The speakers include Professors Jonathan Gould, Bertrall Ross, Amanda Tyler, and John Yoo from our own faculty. The outside speakers include Gillian Metzger (Columbia), Josh Chafetz (Cornell), Eloise Pasachoff (Georgetown), Kristin Hickman (Minnesota), John Harrison (Virginia), J.D. Mortenson (Michigan), and Saikrishna Prakash (Virginia). Students are expected to read the papers in advance and to participate in a discussion with the author. Grades will be based on four brief response papers and on class participation.


Law 220H Public Law in a Pandemic for LL.M.s 1 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
Many lawsuits have been filed in courts arising from COVID-19 and actions taken to stop its spread, and many more lawsuits are likely in the weeks and months ahead. What are the legal principles concerning the government’s power in a pandemic? How are civil liberties to balanced with the need to stop the spread of a communicable disease? The focus will be both on the underlying legal principles and on the issues now being litigated.


Law 220SP Advanced Constitutional Law: Separation of Powers 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This course provides an in-depth examination of the separation of powers under the U.S. Constitution. Topics will include the historical origins of the separation of powers, judicial review and justiciability, presidential and congressional power over the administrative state, executive privilege and congressional investigation, the war and treaty powers, and the budget process.

Spring 2022 Description:
This course provides an in-depth examination of the separation of powers under the U.S. Constitution. Topics will include the historical origins of the separation of powers, judicial review and justiciability, presidential and congressional power over the administrative state, executive privilege and congressional investigation, and the war and treaty powers.


Law 221.6 Education Law and Policy Seminar 2 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This seminar concerns equity, excellence and reform in public education across select areas of doctrine, legislation, regulation, and enforcement. The emphasis will be on K-12 public education, but we will also touch on undergraduate higher education. The principal topics will be: federal-state-local division of authority; accountability for educational equity and excellence; K-12 resource equity; and, more generally, antidiscrimination law in education. No casebook; course materials will be available on bCourses. Grades will be based on class participation and a 10-15-page paper on an approved topic, with feedback on a required first draft. This is a law course, but with substantial public policy content. There are no prerequisites, although Administrative Law, Legislation and to a lesser extent Constitutional Law would be helpful.

Fall 2022 Description:
This seminar explores the pursuit of equity in public education across select areas of doctrine, legislation, and regulation. The emphasis will be on K-12 schooling and the principal focus will be legislation addressing inequity in educational opportunity along lines of race, class, and disability status, and judicial interpretation of such legislation. The class will explore topics such as the division of authority between the federal government and the states to shape students' educational experiences; accountability for educational equity and quality; education outcomes; efforts to establish a right to education; the imposition of discipline; and the meaning of freedom of speech in the context of public education. Grades will be based on class participation and a 30-40 page paper on an approved topic; students will be required to submit a first draft and make revisions based on feedback received. This is a law course, but with substantial public policy content. There are no prerequisites, although Legislation, Administrative Law, and Constitutional Law would be helpful.


Law 221.61 Structural Change in Public Education Seminar 5 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Spring 2022: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This seminar is one part of a three-part immersive semester in education law and policy taught at Columbia Law School, through its Center for Public Research and Leadership (CPRL). CPRL’s intensive, full-semester seminar and field placement immerses students in the theory and practice of managing, governing, and transforming the public systems and social-sector organizations that deliver public education in the U.S. and abroad. Hosted at Columbia, this experiential offering has three components: A comprehensive seminar in the design, governance, regulation, democratic accountability and transformation of P-12 school systems and allied public- and social-sector organizations Skills training in a range of twenty-first century problem-solving competencies, including working in diverse teams to address multi-dimensional problems; design thinking; taking full advantage of difference and diversity; collaborative inquiry; quantitative and qualitative analysis and measurement; organizational macro- and micro-design; project and product management; client-centered and policy-focused information gathering; and the presentation of professional advice to government and social-sector clients A high-priority, professionally guided consulting project on which an interdisciplinary team of graduate students provides design, strategic, planning, and/or implementation advice and support on matters that combine management, legal, governance, policy, regulatory, and/or technological issues crucial to the mission of the client organization - typically, a state department of education, school district, charter school organization, school-support or advocacy group, or other non-profit serving children. For more information, visit CPRL's website at: https://cprl.law.columbia.edu/content/program-overview

Fall 2020 Description:
This seminar is one part of a three-part immersive semester in education law and policy taught at Columbia Law School, through its Center for Public Research and Leadership (CPRL). CPRL’s intensive, full-semester seminar and field placement immerses students in the theory and practice of managing, governing, and transforming the public systems and social-sector organizations that deliver public education in the U.S. and abroad. Hosted at Columbia, this experiential offering has three components: A comprehensive seminar in the design, governance, regulation, democratic accountability and transformation of P-12 school systems and allied public- and social-sector organizations Skills training in a range of twenty-first century problem-solving competencies, including working in diverse teams to address multi-dimensional problems; design thinking; taking full advantage of difference and diversity; collaborative inquiry; quantitative and qualitative analysis and measurement; organizational macro- and micro-design; project and product management; client-centered and policy-focused information gathering; and the presentation of professional advice to government and social-sector clients A high-priority, professionally guided consulting project on which an interdisciplinary team of graduate students provides design, strategic, planning, and/or implementation advice and support on matters that combine management, legal, governance, policy, regulatory, and/or technological issues crucial to the mission of the client organization - typically, a state department of education, school district, charter school organization, school-support or advocacy group, or other non-profit serving children. For more information, visit CPRL's website at: https://cprl.law.columbia.edu/content/program-overview

Spring 2021 Description:
This seminar is one part of a three-part immersive semester in education law and policy taught at Columbia Law School, through its Center for Public Research and Leadership (CPRL). CPRL’s intensive, full-semester seminar and field placement immerses students in the theory and practice of managing, governing, and transforming the public systems and social-sector organizations that deliver public education in the U.S. and abroad. Hosted at Columbia, this experiential offering has three components: A comprehensive seminar in the design, governance, regulation, democratic accountability and transformation of P-12 school systems and allied public- and social-sector organizations Skills training in a range of twenty-first century problem-solving competencies, including working in diverse teams to address multi-dimensional problems; design thinking; taking full advantage of difference and diversity; collaborative inquiry; quantitative and qualitative analysis and measurement; organizational macro- and micro-design; project and product management; client-centered and policy-focused information gathering; and the presentation of professional advice to government and social-sector clients A high-priority, professionally guided consulting project on which an interdisciplinary team of graduate students provides design, strategic, planning, and/or implementation advice and support on matters that combine management, legal, governance, policy, regulatory, and/or technological issues crucial to the mission of the client organization - typically, a state department of education, school district, charter school organization, school-support or advocacy group, or other non-profit serving children. For more information, visit CPRL's website at: https://cprl.law.columbia.edu/content/program-overview. Applications are due November 2nd, and students may contact Kristen Holmquist with more information about the program and how to apply.

Fall 2021 Description:
This seminar is one part of a three-part immersive semester in education law and policy taught at Columbia Law School, through its Center for Public Research and Leadership (CPRL). CPRL’s intensive, full-semester seminar and field placement immerses students in the theory and practice of managing, governing, and transforming the public systems and social-sector organizations that deliver public education in the U.S. and abroad. Hosted at Columbia, this experiential offering has three components: A comprehensive seminar in the design, governance, regulation, democratic accountability and transformation of P-12 school systems and allied public- and social-sector organizations Skills training in a range of twenty-first century problem-solving competencies, including working in diverse teams to address multi-dimensional problems; design thinking; taking full advantage of difference and diversity; collaborative inquiry; quantitative and qualitative analysis and measurement; organizational macro- and micro-design; project and product management; client-centered and policy-focused information gathering; and the presentation of professional advice to government and social-sector clients A high-priority, professionally guided consulting project on which an interdisciplinary team of graduate students provides design, strategic, planning, and/or implementation advice and support on matters that combine management, legal, governance, policy, regulatory, and/or technological issues crucial to the mission of the client organization - typically, a state department of education, school district, charter school organization, school-support or advocacy group, or other non-profit serving children. For more information, visit CPRL's website at: https://cprl.law.columbia.edu/content/program-overview. Applications are due April 23rd, and students may contact Kristen Holmquist with more information about the program and how to apply.

Spring 2022 Description:
This seminar is one part of a three-part immersive semester in education law and policy taught at Columbia Law School, through its Center for Public Research and Leadership (CPRL). CPRL’s intensive, full-semester seminar and field placement immerses students in the theory and practice of managing, governing, and transforming the public systems and social-sector organizations that deliver public education in the U.S. and abroad. Hosted at Columbia, this experiential offering has three components: A comprehensive seminar in the design, governance, regulation, democratic accountability and transformation of P-12 school systems and allied public- and social-sector organizations Skills training in a range of twenty-first century problem-solving competencies, including working in diverse teams to address multi-dimensional problems; design thinking; taking full advantage of difference and diversity; collaborative inquiry; quantitative and qualitative analysis and measurement; organizational macro- and micro-design; project and product management; client-centered and policy-focused information gathering; and the presentation of professional advice to government and social-sector clients A high-priority, professionally guided consulting project on which an interdisciplinary team of graduate students provides design, strategic, planning, and/or implementation advice and support on matters that combine management, legal, governance, policy, regulatory, and/or technological issues crucial to the mission of the client organization - typically, a state department of education, school district, charter school organization, school-support or advocacy group, or other non-profit serving children. For more information, visit CPRL's website at: https://cprl.law.columbia.edu/content/program-overview. Contact Kristen Holmquist to apply.

Fall 2022 Description:
This seminar is one part of a three-part immersive semester in education law and policy taught at Columbia Law School, through its Center for Public Research and Leadership (CPRL). CPRL’s intensive, full-semester seminar and field placement immerses students in the theory and practice of managing, governing, and transforming the public systems and social-sector organizations that deliver public education in the U.S. and abroad. Hosted at Columbia, this experiential offering has three components: A comprehensive seminar in the design, governance, regulation, democratic accountability and transformation of P-12 school systems and allied public- and social-sector organizations Skills training in a range of twenty-first century problem-solving competencies, including working in diverse teams to address multi-dimensional problems; design thinking; taking full advantage of difference and diversity; collaborative inquiry; quantitative and qualitative analysis and measurement; organizational macro- and micro-design; project and product management; client-centered and policy-focused information gathering; and the presentation of professional advice to government and social-sector clients A high-priority, professionally guided consulting project on which an interdisciplinary team of graduate students provides design, strategic, planning, and/or implementation advice and support on matters that combine management, legal, governance, policy, regulatory, and/or technological issues crucial to the mission of the client organization - typically, a state department of education, school district, charter school organization, school-support or advocacy group, or other non-profit serving children. For more information, visit CPRL's website at: a href=https://cprl.law.columbia.edu/content/program-overview https://cprl.law.columbia.edu/content/program-overview/a. Contact Kristen Holmquist to apply.


Law 221.62 Structural Change in Public Education Simulation Course 2 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Spring 2022: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This simulation course is one part of a three-part immersive semester in education law and policy taught at Columbia Law School, through its Center for Public Research and Leadership (CPRL). CPRL’s intensive, full-semester seminar and field placement immerses students in the theory and practice of managing, governing, and transforming the public systems and social-sector organizations that deliver public education in the U.S. and abroad. Hosted at Columbia, this experiential offering has three components: A comprehensive seminar in the design, governance, regulation, democratic accountability and transformation of P-12 school systems and allied public- and social-sector organizations Skills training in a range of twenty-first century problem-solving competencies, including working in diverse teams to address multi-dimensional problems; design thinking; taking full advantage of difference and diversity; collaborative inquiry; quantitative and qualitative analysis and measurement; organizational macro- and micro-design; project and product management; client-centered and policy-focused information gathering; and the presentation of professional advice to government and social-sector clients A high-priority, professionally guided consulting project on which an interdisciplinary team of graduate students provides design, strategic, planning, and/or implementation advice and support on matters that combine management, legal, governance, policy, regulatory, and/or technological issues crucial to the mission of the client organization - typically, a state department of education, school district, charter school organization, school-support or advocacy group, or other non-profit serving children. For more information, visit CPRL's website at: https://cprl.law.columbia.edu/content/program-overview

Fall 2020 Description:
This simulation course is one part of a three-part immersive semester in education law and policy taught at Columbia Law School, through its Center for Public Research and Leadership (CPRL). CPRL’s intensive, full-semester seminar and field placement immerses students in the theory and practice of managing, governing, and transforming the public systems and social-sector organizations that deliver public education in the U.S. and abroad. Hosted at Columbia, this experiential offering has three components: A comprehensive seminar in the design, governance, regulation, democratic accountability and transformation of P-12 school systems and allied public- and social-sector organizations Skills training in a range of twenty-first century problem-solving competencies, including working in diverse teams to address multi-dimensional problems; design thinking; taking full advantage of difference and diversity; collaborative inquiry; quantitative and qualitative analysis and measurement; organizational macro- and micro-design; project and product management; client-centered and policy-focused information gathering; and the presentation of professional advice to government and social-sector clients A high-priority, professionally guided consulting project on which an interdisciplinary team of graduate students provides design, strategic, planning, and/or implementation advice and support on matters that combine management, legal, governance, policy, regulatory, and/or technological issues crucial to the mission of the client organization - typically, a state department of education, school district, charter school organization, school-support or advocacy group, or other non-profit serving children. For more information, visit CPRL's website at: https://cprl.law.columbia.edu/content/program-overview

Spring 2021 Description:
This simulation course is one part of a three-part immersive semester in education law and policy taught at Columbia Law School, through its Center for Public Research and Leadership (CPRL). CPRL’s intensive, full-semester seminar and field placement immerses students in the theory and practice of managing, governing, and transforming the public systems and social-sector organizations that deliver public education in the U.S. and abroad. Hosted at Columbia, this experiential offering has three components: A comprehensive seminar in the design, governance, regulation, democratic accountability and transformation of P-12 school systems and allied public- and social-sector organizations Skills training in a range of twenty-first century problem-solving competencies, including working in diverse teams to address multi-dimensional problems; design thinking; taking full advantage of difference and diversity; collaborative inquiry; quantitative and qualitative analysis and measurement; organizational macro- and micro-design; project and product management; client-centered and policy-focused information gathering; and the presentation of professional advice to government and social-sector clients A high-priority, professionally guided consulting project on which an interdisciplinary team of graduate students provides design, strategic, planning, and/or implementation advice and support on matters that combine management, legal, governance, policy, regulatory, and/or technological issues crucial to the mission of the client organization - typically, a state department of education, school district, charter school organization, school-support or advocacy group, or other non-profit serving children. For more information, visit CPRL's website at: https://cprl.law.columbia.edu/content/program-overview. Applications are due November 2nd, and students may contact Kristen Holmquist with more information about the program and how to apply.

Fall 2021 Description:
This simulation course is one part of a three-part immersive semester in education law and policy taught at Columbia Law School, through its Center for Public Research and Leadership (CPRL). CPRL’s intensive, full-semester seminar and field placement immerses students in the theory and practice of managing, governing, and transforming the public systems and social-sector organizations that deliver public education in the U.S. and abroad. Hosted at Columbia, this experiential offering has three components: A comprehensive seminar in the design, governance, regulation, democratic accountability and transformation of P-12 school systems and allied public- and social-sector organizations Skills training in a range of twenty-first century problem-solving competencies, including working in diverse teams to address multi-dimensional problems; design thinking; taking full advantage of difference and diversity; collaborative inquiry; quantitative and qualitative analysis and measurement; organizational macro- and micro-design; project and product management; client-centered and policy-focused information gathering; and the presentation of professional advice to government and social-sector clients A high-priority, professionally guided consulting project on which an interdisciplinary team of graduate students provides design, strategic, planning, and/or implementation advice and support on matters that combine management, legal, governance, policy, regulatory, and/or technological issues crucial to the mission of the client organization - typically, a state department of education, school district, charter school organization, school-support or advocacy group, or other non-profit serving children. For more information, visit CPRL's website at: https://cprl.law.columbia.edu/content/program-overview. Applications are due April 23rd, and students may contact Kristen Holmquist with more information about the program and how to apply.

Spring 2022 Description:
This simulation course is one part of a three-part immersive semester in education law and policy taught at Columbia Law School, through its Center for Public Research and Leadership (CPRL). CPRL’s intensive, full-semester seminar and field placement immerses students in the theory and practice of managing, governing, and transforming the public systems and social-sector organizations that deliver public education in the U.S. and abroad. Hosted at Columbia, this experiential offering has three components: A comprehensive seminar in the design, governance, regulation, democratic accountability and transformation of P-12 school systems and allied public- and social-sector organizations Skills training in a range of twenty-first century problem-solving competencies, including working in diverse teams to address multi-dimensional problems; design thinking; taking full advantage of difference and diversity; collaborative inquiry; quantitative and qualitative analysis and measurement; organizational macro- and micro-design; project and product management; client-centered and policy-focused information gathering; and the presentation of professional advice to government and social-sector clients A high-priority, professionally guided consulting project on which an interdisciplinary team of graduate students provides design, strategic, planning, and/or implementation advice and support on matters that combine management, legal, governance, policy, regulatory, and/or technological issues crucial to the mission of the client organization - typically, a state department of education, school district, charter school organization, school-support or advocacy group, or other non-profit serving children. For more information, visit CPRL's website at: https://cprl.law.columbia.edu/content/program-overview. To apply, contact Kristen Holmquist.

Fall 2022 Description:
This simulation course is one part of a three-part immersive semester in education law and policy taught at Columbia Law School, through its Center for Public Research and Leadership (CPRL). CPRL’s intensive, full-semester seminar and field placement immerses students in the theory and practice of managing, governing, and transforming the public systems and social-sector organizations that deliver public education in the U.S. and abroad. Hosted at Columbia, this experiential offering has three components: A comprehensive seminar in the design, governance, regulation, democratic accountability and transformation of P-12 school systems and allied public- and social-sector organizations Skills training in a range of twenty-first century problem-solving competencies, including working in diverse teams to address multi-dimensional problems; design thinking; taking full advantage of difference and diversity; collaborative inquiry; quantitative and qualitative analysis and measurement; organizational macro- and micro-design; project and product management; client-centered and policy-focused information gathering; and the presentation of professional advice to government and social-sector clients A high-priority, professionally guided consulting project on which an interdisciplinary team of graduate students provides design, strategic, planning, and/or implementation advice and support on matters that combine management, legal, governance, policy, regulatory, and/or technological issues crucial to the mission of the client organization - typically, a state department of education, school district, charter school organization, school-support or advocacy group, or other non-profit serving children. For more information, visit CPRL's website at: a href=https://cprl.law.columbia.edu/content/program-overview https://cprl.law.columbia.edu/content/program-overview/a. To apply, contact Kristen Holmquist.


Law 221.74 Movement Lawyering from the Inside Out 1 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
Berkeley Law students can meet this incredibly challenging moment in U.S. history with skill and heart. The police killings of Black and brown people; environmental racism, vigilante violence against transgender people, threats to reproductive justice, economic injustice, and many other issues call on lawyers to support the resistance movements already happening in communities around the country. This is “movement lawyering”-- a modern way of lawyering that purposefully places attorneys in service of the grassroots communities already doing the work. Movement lawyering rejects the “top-down” approach that has historically put attorneys in leadership positions and ignored the knowledge, desires, and work of the people most impacted by an issue. Successful movement lawyering is personal: it requires us to think critically about our identities so that we can connect with and be led by the communities we hope to serve. It requires that we examine how our privileges may bias us against these same communities, and how our identities can also be deep sources of empathy and kindness This process often means identifying and beginning to unravel some of the “isms” we’ve internalized (racism, ableism, etc.). In this class, we’ll talk about race, class, nationality, (dis)ability, and more. We’ll meet prominent movement lawyers and activists and learn how they’ve explored, unpacked, challenged, and liberated themselves in order to help the communities they serve self-liberate, too. This course includes short readings, guest speakers, written reflections and discussion, and a 5-8 page final reflection paper. This class is among the special Fall 2020 1L elective seminars designed to give entering 1Ls an extra opportunity to form connections despite our remote form of interaction. In light of that goal, these classes will expect real-time attendance and may not be recorded. These classes will all be graded on a Credit/No Credit basis and total written work requirement will be no more than 8 double-spaced pages.

Spring 2021 Description:
Berkeley Law students can meet this incredibly challenging moment in U.S. history with skill and heart. The police killings of Black and brown people; environmental racism, vigilante violence against transgender people, threats to reproductive justice, economic injustice, and many other issues call on lawyers to support the resistance movements already happening in communities around the country. This is “movement lawyering”-- a modern way of lawyering that purposefully places attorneys in service of the grassroots communities already doing the work. Movement lawyering rejects the “top-down” approach that has historically put attorneys in leadership positions and ignored the knowledge, desires, and work of the people most impacted by an issue. Successful movement lawyering is personal: it requires us to think critically about our identities so that we can connect with and be led by the communities we hope to serve. It requires that we examine how our privileges may bias us against these same communities, and how our identities can also be deep sources of empathy and kindness This process often means identifying and beginning to unravel some of the “isms” we’ve internalized (racism, ableism, etc.). In this class, we’ll talk about race, class, nationality, (dis)ability, and more. We’ll meet prominent movement lawyers and activists and learn how they’ve explored, unpacked, challenged, and liberated themselves in order to help the communities they serve self-liberate, too. This course includes short readings, guest speakers, written reflections and discussion, and a 5-8 page final reflection paper.

Spring 2022 Description:
Berkeley Law students can meet this challenging moment in U.S. history with skill and heart. The police killings of Black and brown people, environmental racism, vigilante violence against transgender people, threats to reproductive justice, economic injustice, and many other issues call on lawyers to support the resistance movements already happening in communities around the country. This is “movement lawyering”-- a modern way of lawyering that purposefully places attorneys in service of the grassroots communities already doing the work. Movement lawyering rejects the “top-down” approach that has historically put attorneys in leadership positions and ignored the knowledge, desires, and work of the people most impacted by an issue. Successful movement lawyering is personal: it requires us to think critically about our identities so that we can connect with and be led by the communities we hope to serve. It requires that we examine how our privileges may bias us against these same communities, and how our identities can also be deep sources of empathy and kindness. This process often means identifying and beginning to unravel some of the “isms” we’ve internalized (racism, ableism, etc.). In this class, we’ll talk about race, class, nationality, (dis)ability, and more. We’ll meet prominent movement lawyers and activists and learn how they’ve explored, unpacked, challenged, and liberated themselves in order to help the communities they serve self-liberate, too. This course includes short readings, guest speakers, written reflections and discussion, and a 5-8 page final reflection paper.


Law 221.75 From Social Movement to Legal Change 1 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
Emergent social movements often aim to produce some form of legal change. But translating the energy and claims-making of mass mobilizations into proposals that can be implemented through law or policy has proven to be challenging. How does a social movement with a decentralized structure formulate proposals for change? How does a large or heterogeneous movement decide whose injuries or narratives should be prioritized as it approaches legal institutions? How do groups produce meaningful change within institutions structured by the very assumptions that movements have sought to challenge? We will examine these and other questions by looking at examples from three recent social movements: the Movement for Black Lives, #MeToo, and the Immigrant Rights Movement. This course has been scheduled for these dates: August 19, September 9, September 30, October 7, October 14, October 28, November 4 and November 18. To allow for a makeup class because of unforeseen circumstances this course has an automatic make-up class scheduled. Students must be able to attend all 8 scheduled meetings to earn credit. This class is among the special Fall 2020 1L elective seminars designed to give entering 1Ls an extra opportunity to form connections despite our remote form of interaction. In light of that goal, these classes will expect real-time attendance and may not be recorded. These classes will all be graded on a Credit/No Credit basis and total written work requirement will be no more than 8 double-spaced pages.


Law 221.8 Statutory Implementation: Agency Policymaking through Regulation 1 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
Much of first-year law school aims to give students an appreciation for how common law evolves and the central role that courts play. However, administrative agencies play a far greater role in shaping today's society through statutory implementation. The goal of this course is to give students insight into the critical work of these agencies. Specifically, the course is designed to provide students with an understanding of how agencies can create wide-ranging policies through their rulemakings and how those regulations impact everyday life. Thus, the emphasis will be on an agency’s legislative role (i.e., we will not be covering an agency’s adjudicative or enforcement functions). This course will provide students with an opportunity to gain fundamental lawyering skills in drafting and negotiating regulatory language in any area of law. To give students practical rulewriting experience, however, the course is grounded in consumer financial services and those laws governing the student loan servicing industry. I will teach this course against the backdrop of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s rulemaking authority under Title X of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010. Students will learn how to write regulations that address existing student loan servicing problems. But because the rulemaking process does not happen in a vacuum, policy and politics will play a role. Students will gain insight into the practical constraints of drafting regulations under this administration’s deregulatory focus. Class will meet for the first 7 weeks of the semester only (Except for the Monday Holidays).

Fall 2021 Description:
Much of first-year law school aims to provide students with an understanding for how common law evolves and the central role that courts play in governing society. Unless students take advanced courses in Public Law & Policy such as Administrative Law, they may graduate with the impression that the judicial system is best equipped to resolve societal problems and address public policy concerns. That is not necessarily the case. To be sure, even Administrative Law fails to provide a complete picture. It is taught using judicial opinions, again casting courts in the lead role. There is little focus on the inner workings of the modern administrative state and the increasing role agencies play in shaping today’s society. Tasked with implementing Congress’ statutory programs, administrative agencies impact everyday life when setting forth the scope of the rights and responsibilities of affected individuals under any given statute. The goal of this seminar is to provide students with insight into what happens after a bill becomes legislation and how an agency implements the statute using its quasi- legislative, executive, and judicial powers. Students will gain an understanding that statutory implementation inevitably results in agencies conducting some level of policymaking. Even the mere choice of selecting which statutory tool (e.g., guidance document or notice and comment rulemaking) can create wide-ranging policies. While the course introduces students to the panoply of administrative powers, the focus will be on agency rulemaking. This course will provide students with an opportunity to gain fundamental lawyering skills in drafting and negotiating regulatory language in any area of law. To give students practical rule writing experience, the course will focus on student loans and will be taught against the backdrop of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s authority under Title X of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010. Specifically, students will learn how to draft regulations that address an existing student loan servicing problem. But because agencies do not operate in a vacuum, we will discuss politics and how the party that controls the political branches determines the level of agency policymaking. At the end of this course, students will have developed a more informed view on the appropriate role of the modern administrative state. Before the first class, students should read the following. · “D.C. Circuit Review - Reviewed: ‘I vote for Chenery I, not Chenery II,’” a blog post from Yale Journal on Regulation. · Sections of the complaint in CFPB v. Navient pertaining to alleged payment processing errors (¶¶ 97-112, 134-137, and 166-171). The exam is a final paper containing parts of a draft regulation addressing payments processing. Class will meet for the first 7 weeks of the semester only.

Fall 2022 Description:
Much of first-year law school aims to provide students with an understanding for how common law evolves and the central role that courts play in governing society. Unless students take advanced courses in Public Law & Policy such as Administrative Law, they may graduate with the impression that the judicial system is best equipped to resolve societal problems and address public policy concerns. That's not necessarily the case. To be sure, even Administrative Law fails to provide a complete picture. It is taught using court opinions, again casting judges in the lead role. There is little focus on the inner workings of the modern administrative state that is tasked with implementing Congress’ statutory programs. With emerging technologies presenting intractable problems (e.g., consumer privacy), understanding how agencies inform affected parties of the scope of their rights and responsibilities under a statute is critical to providing clients strategic advice that furthers their goals. This seminar's objective is to provide students with insight into what happens after a bill becomes law and how an agency's enabling statute establishes the scope of its quasi- legislative, executive, and judicial powers. Students will decide for themselves whether statutory implementation inevitably results in policymaking. Does the mere choice of selecting a regulatory tool⏤for example, bringing an enforcement action or conducting a notice and comment rulemaking⏤reflect a policy decision? My goal in designing this class is for students to have the opportunity to develop a more informed view about the modern administrative state by giving the lead role to the agency attorneys who advise on actions an agency may (or should) take. While the course introduces students to the panoply of administrative powers, it centers on rulemaking. This course provides students with an opportunity to gain fundamental lawyering skills in drafting and negotiating regulatory language in any area of law. To give students practical rule writing experience, the course will focus on student loans and will be taught against the backdrop of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s authority under Title X of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010. Specifically, students will learn how to draft regulations that address an existing student loan servicing problem. But because agencies do not operate in a vacuum, we will discuss politics and how the party in control of the political branches impacts which regulatory tools are more often used. Before the first class, students should read the following. · a href=https://www.yalejreg.com/nc/d-c-circuit-review-reviewed-i-vote-for-chenery-i-not-chenery-ii/“D.C. Circuit Review - Reviewed: ‘I vote for Chenery I, not Chenery II,’”/a a blog post from Yale Journal on Regulation. · Sections of the complaint in a href=https://files.consumerfinance.gov/f/documents/201701_cfpb_Navient-Pioneer-Credit-Recovery-complaint.pdfCFPB v. Navient/a pertaining to alleged payment processing errors (97-112, 134-137, and 166-171). The exam is a final paper containing parts of a draft regulation addressing payments processing. Class will meet for the first 7 weeks of the semester only. There will be a make-up class held on Friday, August 26th from 2:30PM-4:20PM


Law 221.81 Student Loan Law 2 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
If you're a Berkeley student, chances are overwhelming that you're taking out loans to pay for school. These days most people in the U.S. - roughly 7 in 10 students - leave post-high school education with debt.  But do you know your legal rights as a student loan borrower?    In this course, students will develop a solid foundation in student loan law that helps them understand their own loans. The course will also cover ongoing litigation and policy developments at the state and federal level that touch on student debt. Consumer protection, administrative procedure and federal preemption will all be discussed along the way. *** Suzanne Martindale is a proud Berkeley alum who is thrilled to be teaching this course for the second year in a row. Off campus, as Senior Policy Counsel & Western States Legislative Manager for the nonprofit organization Consumer Reports, Suzanne engages in policy advocacy on a range of consumer finance and economic justice issues. She lobbies frequently before the California Legislature and has served on several rulemaking committees at the U.S. Department of Education to urge stronger protections for student borrowers. She is also a Fellow at the Student Borrower Protection Center. Suzanne received her J.D. from Berkeley Law in 2010; M.A. in the Humanities from The University of Chicago in 2005; and B.A. in Philosophy from UC Berkeley in 2003.    (Oh and she has student loans, too - so feel free to ask her about her own experience repaying them.)

Spring 2021 Description:
If you're a Berkeley student, chances are overwhelming that you're taking out loans to pay for school. These days most people in the U.S. - roughly 7 in 10 students - leave post-high school education with debt.  The debt burdens fall disproportionately on women and people of color, exacerbating inequities in our society and creating barriers to building family wealth. How did the promise of higher education turn into a mountain of debt? And what can we do to fix it? In this course, students will develop a solid foundation in student loan law that helps them understand their own loans. The course will also cover ongoing litigation and policy developments at the state and federal level that touch on student debt. Economic justice, administrative procedure, consumer protection and federal preemption will all be discussed along the way. This course will have a series of written assingments. *** Suzanne Martindale is a proud Berkeley alum who is thrilled to be teaching this course for the third year in a row. Off campus, as Senior Policy Counsel & Western States Legislative Manager for the nonprofit organization Consumer Reports, Suzanne engages in policy advocacy on a range of consumer finance and economic justice issues. She lobbies frequently before the California Legislature and has served on several rulemaking committees at the U.S. Department of Education to urge stronger protections for student borrowers. She is also a Fellow at the Student Borrower Protection Center. Suzanne received her J.D. from Berkeley Law in 2010; M.A. in the Humanities from The University of Chicago in 2005; and B.A. in Philosophy from UC Berkeley in 2003.    (Oh and she has student loans, too - so feel free to ask her about her own experience repaying them.)

Spring 2022 Description:
If you're a Berkeley student, chances are overwhelming that you're taking out loans to pay for school. These days most people in the U.S. - roughly 7 in 10 students - leave post-high school education with debt.  The debt burdens fall disproportionately on women and people of color, exacerbating inequities in our society and creating barriers to building family wealth. How did the promise of higher education turn into a mountain of debt? And what can we do to fix it? In this course, students will develop a solid foundation in student loan law that helps them understand their own loans. The course will also cover ongoing litigation and policy developments at the state and federal level that touch on student debt. Economic justice, administrative procedure, consumer protection and federal preemption will all be discussed along the way. This course will have a series of written assignments. *** Suzanne Martindale is a proud Berkeley Law alum who is thrilled to be teaching this course. Off campus, Suzanne serves as Senior Deputy Commissioner at the California Department of Financial Protection & Innovation (DFPI), the state's financial regulator. DFPI licenses and regulates banks and credit unions as well as a wide range of non-bank products and services, including student loan servicers and private education finance providers. Suzanne runs the new Consumer Financial Protection Division, which is dedicated to expanding oversight of the financial industry to protect vulnerable communities. Suzanne received her J.D. from Berkeley Law in 2010; M.A. in the Humanities from The University of Chicago in 2005; and B.A. in Philosophy from UC Berkeley in 2003.    (Oh and she just got PSLF - so feel free to ask her about her own experience repaying her loans!)


Law 222 Federal Courts 5 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Spring 2022: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This course studies the role of the federal courts in the federal system. This is an advanced course in public law, judicial administration, and constitutional law. The course will cover the following topics (among others): the power of Congress to regulate the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court, lower federal courts and state courts; non-Article III courts; the case or controversy requirement; doctrines of sovereign and individual immunity; choice of law in the federal courts and federal common law; Supreme Court review of state court judgments; collateral federal habeas corpus review of state criminal convictions; and the Suspension Clause and related issues from the War on Terrorism. NOTE: In this class, the usual provisions of Add/Drop do not apply. All interested students, whether enrolled or on the waitlist, must attend the first class in order to be admitted. Any student who does not attend the first class without prior permission of the instructor will be dropped from the class and the waitlist. No additional students will be permitted to add the course.

Fall 2020 Description:
The course will focus on the constitutional and statutory provisions defining the role of the federal courts in the American system of government. In considering the functions and duties of the federal courts, the course will examine the relationship of the federal courts both to the states and to the other branches of the federal government. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the implications of federal courts doctrines for the underlying principles of separation of powers and federalism. Specifically, the course material will be divided into three sections. Section one will examine the constitutional and statutory limits on the federal judicial power. Section two will focus on federal court relief against government and government officers. Section three will consider the circumstances and conditions under which federal courts may review state court judgments and proceedings.

Spring 2021 Description:
This course examines the role of the federal and state courts in the federal system. This is an advanced course in constitutional law, civil procedure, and choice of law. The course will cover the following topics: the case or controversy requirement (standing, mootness, ripeness, political question, advisory opinions); the power of Congress to regulate the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court, lower federal courts, and (indirectly) state courts; non-Article III courts; Supreme Court review of state court judgments; section 1983 civil rights suits; equitable abstention; a one class lecture and question-and-answer session with District Judge (ret.) Thelton Henderson; and, time permitting, a one class lecture on federal habeas corpus for state prisoners.

Fall 2021 Description:
The course will focus on the constitutional and statutory provisions defining the role of the federal courts in the American system of government. In considering the functions and duties of the federal courts, the course will examine the relationship of the federal courts both to the states and to the other branches of the federal government. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the implications of federal courts doctrines for the underlying principles of separation of powers and federalism. Specifically, the course material will be divided into three sections. Section one will examine the constitutional and statutory limits on the federal judicial power. Section two will focus on federal court relief against government and government officers. Section three will consider the circumstances and conditions under which federal courts may review state court judgments and proceedings.

Spring 2022 Description:
This course examines the role of the federal and state courts in the federal system. This is an advanced course in constitutional law, civil procedure, and choice of law. The course will cover the following topics: the case or controversy requirement (standing, mootness, ripeness, political question, advisory opinions); the power of Congress to regulate the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court, lower federal courts, and (indirectly) state courts; non-Article III courts; Supreme Court review of state court judgments; section 1983 civil rights suits; equitable abstention; a one class lecture and question-and-answer session with District Judge (ret.) Thelton Henderson; and, time permitting, a one class lecture on federal habeas corpus for state prisoners.

Fall 2022 Description:
This course studies the role of the federal courts in the federal system. This is an advanced course in public law, judicial administration, and constitutional law. The course will cover the following topics (among others): the power of Congress to regulate the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court and lower federal courts; non-Article III courts; the case or controversy requirement; doctrines of sovereign and individual immunity; choice of law in the federal courts and federal common law; Supreme Court review of state court judgments; federal habeas corpus; the relationship between the federal and state courts; the Suspension Clause, and how courts function during wartime.


Law 222.12 Whistleblower Law: Deterring Fraud Against the Government 2 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2022: In-Person Instruction
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This course will examine federal laws that incentivize whistleblowers to provide information and assist in the enforcement of laws prohibiting fraud on the government, securities and commodity frauds, and tax fraud. This will include study of the federal False Claims Act - the Government’s primary law enforcement mechanism for prosecuting frauds against the Government and its unique “qui tam” provisions which authorize private citizens to participate in that effort and offer a reward for successfully pursuing a case on the Government’s behalf. The False Claims Act was substantially revised in 1986 to address modern problems of fraud against the Government. Since 1986, the Government has recovered over $50 billion as a result of cases initiated by private citizens. The course will also study the SEC and CFTC whistleblower programs, established through the Dodd-Frank Act of 2010. Current trends and developing case law in these programs will be examined, and we will undertake a detailed comparison of these models to the False Claims Act’s qui tam provisions. Finally, we will look at the Internal Revenue Code’s reward system for reporting tax fraud. The course will be taught predominantly through simulated problems, based on composites of actual cases, with occasional guest speakers from private practice and the government offering their perspectives on how they would approach the problems. By using these simulated problems, students will gain professional practice skills, including drafting, negotiating, and client representation. Students will work on a final project involving analyzing and proposing solutions to a current policy issue. The instructors are Claire Sylvia and Erika Kelton (Boalt '87), partners in the law firm of Phillips & Cohen LLP, which represents whistleblowers in False Claims Act, SEC, CFTC and IRS matters.

Fall 2021 Description:
This course will examine federal laws that incentivize whistleblowers to provide information and assist in the enforcement of laws prohibiting fraud on the government, securities and commodity frauds, and tax fraud. This will include study of the federal False Claims Act - the Government’s primary law enforcement mechanism for prosecuting frauds against the Government and its unique “qui tam” provisions which authorize private citizens to participate in that effort and offer a reward for successfully pursuing a case on the Government’s behalf. The False Claims Act was substantially revised in 1986 to address modern problems of fraud against the Government. Since 1986, the Government has recovered over $50 billion as a result of cases initiated by private citizens. The course will also study the SEC and CFTC whistleblower programs, established through the Dodd-Frank Act of 2010. Current trends and developing case law in these programs will be examined, and we will undertake a detailed comparison of these models to the False Claims Act’s qui tam provisions. In addition, we will look at the Internal Revenue Code’s reward system for reporting tax fraud. The course will be taught predominantly through simulated problems, based on composites of actual cases, with occasional guest speakers from private practice and the government offering their perspectives on how they would approach the problems. By using these simulated problems, students will gain professional practice skills, including drafting, negotiating, and client representation. Students will work on a final project involving analyzing and proposing solutions to a current policy issue. The instructors are Claire Sylvia and Erika Kelton (Berkeley Law '87), partners in the law firm of Phillips & Cohen LLP, which represents whistleblowers in False Claims Act, SEC, CFTC and IRS matters.

Fall 2022 Description:
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Law 222.13 Colloquium on the Court and Judicial Process 2 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
Many scholars write about the courts, about judicial process, and about the practice of judging. But what do judges think of this scholarship? Is it right? Is it helpful? This colloquium on courts and judicial process brings together judges, scholars, and students to discuss current research about courts, judging, and procedure. Over the course of the semester, we’ll discuss about six projects, taking one week to discuss the paper amongst ourselves, and then, in the following week, holding a workshop for the paper. At a typical workshop, an invited scholar will present work-in-progress; and a judge of a federal, state, or foreign court will offer commentary on the research. Students (and faculty) will be invited to participate in the open discussion that follows. Students will be expected to prepare written critiques and questions for the scholars and judges, whose topics and research methods may range widely. In order to enroll in this class, please submit your written application to Professor Narechania (tnarecha@law.berkeley.edu) by email no later than November 8th. Your written application should include: (1) your name and email address; (2) a concise statement (no more than one page) of your interest in the course; and (3) a description of any experience you think may be relevant to the course. Confirmed guests for this semester include Chief Judge Diane P. Wood (7th Cir.), Chief Judge R. Guy Cole Jr. (6th Cir.), Judge Bernice B. Donald (6th Cir.), Judge Stephen A. Higginson (5th Cir.). Judge Amul R. Thapar (6th Cir.), and Judge Jon S. Tigar (N.D. Cal.).

Spring 2022 Description:
Many scholars write about the courts, about judicial process, and about the practice of judging. But what do judges think of this scholarship? Is it right? Is it helpful? This colloquium on courts and judicial process brings together judges, scholars, and students to discuss current research about courts, judging, and procedure. Over the course of the semester, we’ll discuss about six projects, taking one week to discuss the paper amongst ourselves, and then, in a following week, holding a workshop for the paper. At a typical workshop, an invited scholar will present work-in-progress; and a judge of a federal, state, or foreign court will offer commentary on the research. Students (and faculty) will be invited to participate in the open discussion that follows. These interactions can lead (and have led!) to exciting clerkship and judicial field placement connections and opportunities for students. There is no final paper for the course. Instead, students will be expected to prepare two to three short critiques and questions for the scholars and judges. Our scholars and judges for Spring 2022 are still being finalized but last semester's guests included Judge Diane Wood (7th Cir.), Judge Bernice Donald (6th Cir.), Judge Amul Thapar (6th Cir.), Judge Charles Breyer (N.D. Cal.) and Judge Jon Tigar (N.D. Cal.), alongside Melissa Wasserman (U. Texas), Tonja Jacobi (Northwestern), and Andrew Bradt (UC Berkeley), among others.


Law 223 Administrative Law 4 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
The Administrative Law course has never been more central to understanding what is happening in US governance. Indeed, in the first month alone, we'll discuss (among other things): Whether President Trump can fire agency heads; the constitutionality of Acting AGs and agency heads; the Supreme Court's recent decision throwing out SEC Administrative Law judges; Justices Kavanaugh's and Gorsuch's evolving roles in the constriction of the Administrative State; the constitutionality of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau; the viability of President Trump's order purporting to limit birthright citizenship; and the Supreme Court's Gundy decision addressing the constitutionality of the sex-offender registration statute. The course covers the study of the laws, doctrines, and structures that govern the executive branch, including relations with Congress and the Courts, and the processes that structure decisionmaking. It is a keystone for the study of regulation and governance across substantive areas, including environmental law, immigration, financial regulation, national security, privacy, health care, food and drugs, and telecommunications.

Spring 2021 Description:
The Administrative Law course has never been more central to understanding what is happening in US governance. Indeed, in the first month alone, we'll discuss (among other things): Whether Presidents can fire agency heads; the constitutionality of Acting AGs and agency heads; the Supreme Court's recent decision throwing out SEC Administrative Law judges; Justices Kavanaugh's and Gorsuch's evolving roles in the constriction of the Administrative State; the constitutionality of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau; the viability of executive orders by the President; and the Supreme Court's Gundy decision addressing the constitutionality of the sex-offender registration statute. The course covers the study of the laws, doctrines, and structures that govern the executive branch, including relations with Congress and the Courts, and the processes that structure decision making. It is a keystone for the study of regulation and governance across substantive areas, including environmental law, immigration, financial regulation, national security, privacy, health care, food and drugs, and telecommunications.

Spring 2022 Description:
The Administrative Law course has never been more central to understanding what is happening in US governance. Indeed, in the first month alone, we'll discuss (among other things): Whether Presidents can fire agency heads; the constitutionality of Acting AGs and agency heads; the Supreme Court's recent decision throwing out SEC Administrative Law judges; Justices Kavanaugh's and Gorsuch's evolving roles in the constriction of the Administrative State; the constitutionality of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau; the viability of executive orders by the President; and the Supreme Court's Gundy decision addressing the constitutionality of the sex-offender registration statute. The course covers the study of the laws, doctrines, and structures that govern the executive branch, including relations with Congress and the Courts, and the processes that structure decision making. It is a keystone for the study of regulation and governance across substantive areas, including environmental law, immigration, financial regulation, national security, privacy, health care, food and drugs, and telecommunications.


Law 223.1 Election Law 3 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
The purpose of this course is to give students a basic understanding of the major themes in the legal regulation of elections and politics. We will cover major Supreme Court cases on topics of voting rights, reapportionment/redistricting, ballot access, regulation of political parties, campaign finance, and gerrymandering. In addition to examining doctrine, we will focus attention on competing political philosophies and empirical assumptions underlying the Law of Democracy. Abhay Aneja is trained as a lawyer and social scientist. Both his teaching and research seek to integrate quantitative social science into the analysis of legal institutions. His current research focuses on how democratic institutions and criminal justice systems shape economic inequality, and in particular, the socioeconomic outcomes of historically marginalized groups. His work has appeared in journals including the Journal of Empirical Studies and the American Law and Economics Review. Prior to law school, Abhay worked at a non-profit organization focused on fostering economic development in historically-disadvantaged neighborhoods.

Spring 2022 Description:
The purpose of this course is to give students a basic understanding of the major themes in the legal regulation of elections and politics. We will cover major Supreme Court cases on topics of voting rights, reapportionment/redistricting, ballot access, regulation of political parties, campaign finance, and gerrymandering. In addition to examining doctrine, we will focus attention on competing political philosophies and empirical assumptions underlying the Law of Democracy. Abhay Aneja is trained as a lawyer and social scientist. Both his teaching and research seek to integrate quantitative social science into the analysis of legal institutions. His current research focuses on how democratic institutions and criminal justice systems shape economic inequality, and in particular, the socioeconomic outcomes of historically marginalized groups. His work has appeared in journals including the Journal of Empirical Studies and the American Law and Economics Review. Prior to law school, Abhay worked at a non-profit organization focused on fostering economic development in historically-disadvantaged neighborhoods.

Fall 2022 Description:
The purpose of this course is to give students a basic understanding of the major themes in the legal regulation of elections and politics. We will cover major Supreme Court cases on topics of voting rights, reapportionment/redistricting, ballot access, regulation of political parties, campaign finance, and gerrymandering. In addition to examining doctrine, we will focus attention on competing political philosophies and empirical assumptions underlying the Law of Democracy.


Law 223.11 Federal District Court Practice 1 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This course examines the practice of law in federal district court, primarily from the perspective of the judge. We will conduct an overview of the life of the civil and criminal case, and then dive deeper into specific areas, including class actions, injunctive relief, criminal sentencing, and multi-district litigation. This course is not an adequate substitute for the standard federal courts class, but could serve as a good practical precursor or complement to that class.


Law 223.21 Advanced Administrative Law: Trump and Obama Policies in Court 2 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
Politically controversial, headline-grabbing changes in domestic and economic policy very often have interesting administrative law dimensions. When challenges to such policies reach court, one can ask whether administrative law is "useful." The recent hyper-partisanship in federal policy-making creates frequent challenges for the administrative law project of disciplining administrative discretion--in favor of legality, empiricism, and transparency. This seminar will explore several recent, high-profile controversies from several fields, including: environment and energy; healthcare; health and safety; and civil rights. Students will complete a draft and final 15-page paper on an approved topic, pursuant to Writing Requirement Option 1. Students will also provide detailed written comments on the draft paper of another student. Grades will be based on equally on (a) class participation, (b) the first draft of a 10-15 page paper, and (c) the final version of that same paper, after instructor feedback.


Law 223.22 Dangers of the Administrative State 1 Units
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2022 Description:
This course is built on inquiries drawn from important debates and real-world controversies relating to administrative and structural constitutional law. This seminar will examine -- from a constitutional and rule-of-law perspective -- central features of the modern administrative state, including as characterized by some of its strongest critics. Are these features genuinely worrisome, or reflective of the avoidable complexity of governance? What forces have driven the evolution of government agencies? And what have critics of relevant constitutional doctrine and administrative law gotten wrong? Our highest aim is to foster fruitful discussion about whether the administrative state is lawful, based on both theoretical material and popular discussion in the media.


Law 223.6 Principles of Administrative Law for LLMs 1 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This 1-credit section of Administrative and Regulatory Law is intended specifically for students who are less familiar with the U.S. legal and political systems. We will touch on the fundamental areas of doctrine, with examples from a range of regulatory programs. The central purpose of Administrative Law is to create and apply Rule of Law principles to decisionmaking in the executive branch using powers of regulation, adjudication, and enforcement assigned to agencies by statutes. Thus, Administrative Law is relevant to virtually every area of government action in domestic and economic matters. Courts apply Administrative Law to disputes about an agency’s substantive and procedural choices. Did the agency act within its statutory authority, using the procedures required by statute or the Constitution? Was the evidence sufficient? Was the agency arbitrary when exercising its discretion? Are the government’s actions procedurally fair, substantively sound, and democratically accountable? Grading will be credit/no-credit based on class participation together with a take-home exam.


Law 223.8 California Constitutional Law 3 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
This course combines the topics formerly covered by Law 223.8 California Constitutional Law, and Law 224.1 California Government: The State Constitution in Practice. This new course offers students two paper options. We will use the galley proof version of a casebook West will publish in January 2021. The casebook contains more material than we can cover in a three unit course. Students will vote in the first class meeting on which chapters to cover. Casebook chapters we can cover: • State constitutional design • California’s constitutional design • The legislature • The executive • The judiciary • Popular sovereignty and direct democracy • Individual rights to speech, privacy, equal protection, fundamental rights, religion, and unconstitutional conditions • Elections • State and local interaction • State agency powers and limitations • Budget and taxation • Water law Students will be provided with PDF versions of the chapters we cover, at no cost, along with free copies of the California constitution. The format will be part lecture and part discussion. A 30 page paper is required. As a 2-A course, the paper may satisfy the writing requirement. Students can choose to write on an original topic of their choice, or write a 30 page response to a final-exam style hypothetical that will be available at the first class meeting. This course formerly featured many guest speakers; those now will be rare.

Fall 2021 Description:
This is a substantive constitutional law course. It focuses on California constitutional law, with some discussion of 50-state constitutional features and federal constitutional law for background and comparison. We will use a new West casebook: California Constitutional Law. The casebook contains more material than we can cover in a three unit course, so students will complete a poll before the first class meeting on which chapters to cover. Possible subjects: • State constitutional design • Separation of powers • Popular sovereignty • The legislature • The executive • The judiciary • Individual rights to speech, privacy, equal protection, fundamental rights, religion, and unconstitutional conditions • Elections • State and local interaction • State agency powers and limitations • Budget and taxation • Water law Students will be provided with free copies of the California constitution. The format will be part lecture and part discussion. A 30 page paper is required. As a 2-A course, the paper may satisfy the writing requirement (this requires instructor approval). There may be some guest speakers.

Fall 2022 Description:
This is a substantive constitutional law course. It focuses on California constitutional law, with some discussion of 50-state constitutional features and federal constitutional law for background and comparison. The required California Constitutional Law casebook contains more material than we can cover in a three unit course, so students will complete a poll before the first class meeting on which chapters to cover. Possible subjects: • State constitutional design • Separation of powers • Popular sovereignty • The legislature • The executive • The judiciary • Individual rights to speech, privacy, equal protection, fundamental rights, religion, and unconstitutional conditions • Elections • State and local interaction • State agency powers and limitations • Budget and taxation • Water law Students will be provided with free copies of the California constitution. This is a discussion seminar: expect primarily student conversation with little instructor lecturing. A 30 page paper is required. As a 2-A course, the paper may satisfy the writing requirement (this requires instructor approval). There may be some guest speakers.


Law 224.22 Mental Health and the Law 2 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
This seminar will explore the intersection of mental health and the law and provide students with tools to improve advocacy when mental health is an issue in a case. In the last few decades, the legal system has seen an evolution in the understanding between life circumstances, mental health, and involvement with the law. Advances in brain science and social history investigation, as well as an increasingly nuanced view of mental disorders have prompted these strides in various aspects of the law. People with mental disorders interact with the civil legal system in employment cases, civil rights actions, family law disputes, elder law cases, and in the corporate arena. Recognition of the role of cognition in legal cases extends beyond the confines of criminal law. Lawyers in most practice areas will encounter a client, witness, family member, or even another lawyer with a mental health issue. We should be able to recognize the issue, and understand its implications. Law students graduating today are faced with a system that is dramatically changing where mental health meets the law. Knowledge that was once considered a specialty area for lawyers is now best practice. New lawyers should be prepared for this new world. Students will be required to write a 12-15 page paper under Option 1 of the Writing Requirement.

Spring 2022 Description:
This seminar will explore the intersection of mental health and the law and provide students with tools to improve advocacy when mental health is an issue in a case. In the last few decades, the legal system has seen an evolution in the understanding between life circumstances, mental health, and involvement with the law. Advances in brain science and social history investigation, as well as an increasingly nuanced view of mental disorders have prompted these strides in various aspects of the law. People with mental disorders interact with the civil legal system in employment cases, civil rights actions, family law disputes, elder law cases, and in the corporate arena. Recognition of the role of cognition in legal cases extends beyond the confines of criminal law. Lawyers in most practice areas will encounter a client, witness, family member, or even another lawyer with a mental health issue. We should be able to recognize the issue, and understand its implications. Law students graduating today are faced with a system that is dramatically changing where mental health meets the law. Knowledge that was once considered a specialty area for lawyers is now best practice. New lawyers should be prepared for this new world. Students will be required to write a 12-15 page paper under Option 1 of the Writing Requirement. Please note that 1Ls cannot use this class to fulfill their writing requirement, they must wait until their 2L or 3L year.


Law 224.23 Public Health Law 3 Units
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2021 Description:
COVID-19 and the failure of government agencies to coordinate a national response has shocked the nation and the world. We now see so clearly how health is inextricably linked to the legal authority of federal, state and local governments - including legal and civic structures embedded in structural racism and historic discrimination. We are learning in real-time how global economics and transportation systems, workplace policies and employee benefits, food systems and retail environments, schools, playgrounds and every aspect of civic life influence health outcomes. Constitutional law is central to fighting disease from pandemics to chronic diseases like cancer, diabetes and heart disease. Over the past few months, the authority of state and federal governments to protect the public’s health at the expense of individual liberties has never been on greater display: religious services are cancelled, access to family planning is deemed non-essential, extensive restrictions are placed on the right to freely travel and assemble, the ability to earn a living is aggressively curtailed. The strengths and limits of cooperative federalism are daily headlines from the Army and National Guard both providing staffing services to homes for the elderly and disbanding peaceful protests for presidential photo ops, to states competing against each other for basic PPE supplies, and worse. The President of the United States has claimed “total power” and urges protesters to force states and localities to “liberate” their economies. Most critically, we are seeing how systemic inequities create diseases of poverty and vast disparities in health outcomes based on race/ethnicity, income inequality, and political marginalization. This extraordinary list of issues touches on everyday constitutional rights while simultaneously entering largely uncharted legal territory that will be the subject of litigation and legislation for years to come. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of how constitutional and administrative law is integrated with science, systems thinking, community organizing and organizational leadership to ensure everyone has the ability to live a healthy and prosperous life. Students interested in social justice lawyering will be exposed to a broad array of legal and scientific concepts and resources that will be central to their legal career regardless of future venue: legal aid offices and other community-based organizations, policy think tanks and government agencies that touch all aspects of civic life, and law firms dedicated to public interest lawyering. Students will learn how to integrate core legal theory with fundamental public health principles and will understand how to shape laws and policies to further the public’s health. They will be immersed in legal and policy strategies to redress inequalities and promote health equity. Students will study legal and public health theory, simulate responses to real world problems, and practice proactive legal and policy leadership to prevent and manage both emergent pathogens and ubiquitous chronic diseases resulting from systemic racism and historic discrimination that result in preventable death and disability. Class meetings will be offered online via Zoom. We will record each meeting and post it on bCourses. You are strongly encouraged to attend classes live on Zoom, which will provide the most engaging and enriching experience. If you are unable to attend in real-time, you should provide the instructors with timely advance notice (or subsequent notice of an unanticipated emergency). As a substitute for real-time attendance and participation, you will be required to answer a series of questions that are responsive to the readings and the recorded class content. This class combines lecture, exercises, polls, small-group discussions on Zoom, and discussion forums on bCourses.

Spring 2022 Description:
COVID-19 has shocked our nation and the world. And when we peel-back the data, we see so clearly how the public’s health is not primarily due to advances in medical care, but inextricably linked to the legal authorities and decision-making of federal, state and local governments. We have real-time exposure to how our legal and civic structures embedded in structural racism and historic discrimination impact health. Further, the pandemic has uncovered how global economics and transportation systems, workplace policies and employee benefits, food systems and retail environments, schools, playgrounds and every aspect of civic life influence health outcomes. This course will explore how constitutional and administrative law is central to fighting disease from pandemics to chronic diseases like cancer, diabetes and heart disease. Students will learn how to integrate core legal theory with fundamental public health principles, and to shape laws and policies that further the public’s health by redressing inequalities and to promoting health equity. The course uses a systems approach that links the nation’s health to legal issues related to fair wages, housing segregation, school financing, food security and more. We will simulate responses to real world problems, and practice proactive legal and policy leadership to prevent and manage both emergent infectious diseases and ubiquitous yet preventable chronic diseases. We will learn how lawyers and public health leaders can partner with each other and work with community-based organizers to ensure everyone has the ability to live a healthy and prosperous life. The course is open to both law and public health students and is designed to expose students to core skills regardless of their future career venue. It is especially designed for students interested in career dedicated to social justice. The instructor is Marice Ashe, JD, MPH. She is the founder of the national nonprofit, ChangeLab Solutions, where she served as CEO for nearly 25 years and pioneered the use of law and policy to solve complex problems related to institutionalized inequities and poor community health outcomes. Leading a staff of 60 lawyers and other public health experts, Ashe drove major health equity successes across a broad range of public health challenges. Under her direction, ChangeLab Solutions consulted with leadership from every level of government, health system and community health practice, and created a vast library of “how to” guides and model laws and policies that promote multi-disciplinary partnerships to empower leaders, mobilize resources and improve outcomes. Ashe is currently a public health law and policy consultant who works with public health leaders throughout the world. She serves on the national advisory boards for the Center for the Redress of Inequity Through Community-Engaged Scholarship at the University of Virginia and the Institute for Health Policy and Leadership at Loma Linda University. She is a graduate of the University of Notre Dame and has graduate degrees in both public health and law from the University of California at Berkeley.


Law 224.24 Law, Public Health, and Police Use of Force 2 Units
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2022 Description:
Public health is often juxtaposed to medicine. Rather than tying health outcomes to individual behaviors, choices, or predispositions, public health examines the social conditions that determine the positive or negative health outcomes for populations. There are similar opportunities to juxtapose a public health approach to traditional doctrinal analyses that, akin to medicine, focus heavily on individualist dynamics. In this seminar, we will apply this social determinist approach to a pressing legal problem with significant implications for human well-being: police use of force. Excessive force by law enforcement is often described as a function of individual officers making bad decisions driven by malice -- the proverbial bad apple. A public health approach invites us to ask whether the inequities that we see regarding police use of force are determined by social and legal structures rather than simplistic ideations concerning expired fruit. This course places public health law -- i.e. how law often shapes health outcomes and can create incentives to reduce health harms and disparities -- in conversation with relevant aspects of criminal procedure and constitutional torts to have a deeper understanding of the causes and consequences of excessive force by law enforcement and develop possible strategies for change. Specific topics will include the history of police use of force, doctrinal evolutions and limitations, community impacts of policing, and imagining a better future with law and other tools. No prior courses are required.


Law 224.3 Social Justice Issues in Entertainment and Media Law 3 Units
Fall 2021: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2021 Description:
This course will explore various social justice issues in the entertainment, media and technology industries. For example, we will consider the #MeToo and #OscarsSoWhite movements and broader issues of structural underrepresentation and discrimination against women, people of color, LGBTQ people, and other marginalized groups in Hollywood. We will also engage questions concerning inclusion in the tech industry, as well as how new technologies may perpetuate or disrupt discrimination. The class will include guest speakers from impacted industries and viewing and critiquing excerpts of relevant film and TV programs.


Law 225 Legislation and Statutory Interpretation 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This course will introduce students to the legislative process and statutory interpretation. Statutes govern nearly every aspect of our society and our economy, and this course will give students the tools to understand how statutes come to be and how they are interpreted and applied in practice. The first portion of the course will focus on the legislative process, including Congress’s internal procedures and organization, limits on Congress’s authority, and the role of parties, committees, and interest groups in the lawmaking process. The second portion of the course will turn to statutory interpretation, including theories of statutory interpretation, the use of legislative history, and major canons of construction. The third portion of the class will examine how administrative agencies interpret statutes and the doctrine surrounding judicial deference to agency statutory interpretations. In exploring these topics, the course will reference cases and materials from many substantive areas of law, including criminal law, civil rights law, environmental law, labor and employment law, health care law, and national security law. The course will thus provide students with a small taste of many different areas of law. There are not, however, any prerequisites for the course, and students from all backgrounds are welcome.

Fall 2020 Description:
This course will introduce students to the legislative process and statutory interpretation. Statutes govern nearly every aspect of our society and our economy, and this course will give students the tools to understand how statutes come to be and how they are interpreted and applied in practice. The first portion of the course will focus on the legislative process, including Congress’s internal procedures and organization, limits on Congress’s authority, and the role of parties, committees, and interest groups in the lawmaking process. The second portion of the course will turn to statutory interpretation, including theories of statutory interpretation, the use of legislative history, and major canons of construction. The third portion of the class will examine how administrative agencies interpret statutes and the doctrine surrounding judicial deference to agency statutory interpretations. In exploring these topics, the course will reference cases and materials from many substantive areas of law, including criminal law, civil rights law, environmental law, labor and employment law, health care law, and national security law. The course will thus provide students with a small taste of many different areas of law. There are not, however, any prerequisites for the course.

Spring 2021 Description:
This course will introduce students to the legislative process and statutory interpretation. Statutes govern nearly every aspect of our society and our economy, and this course will give students the tools to understand how statutes come to be and how they are interpreted and applied in practice. Our discussion of the legislative process will touch on Congress’s internal procedures and organization, limits on Congress’s authority, and the role of parties, committees, and interest groups in the lawmaking process. Our discussion of statutory interpretation will cover theories of statutory interpretation, the use of legislative history, and major canons of construction. A third portion of the course will examine the role of statutory interpretations by administrative agencies and the doctrines surrounding judicial deference to these interpretations. In exploring these topics, we will consider cases and materials from many substantive areas of law, including all or most of criminal law, civil rights law, environmental law, labor and employment law, health care law, and national security law. The course will thus provide students with a small taste of many different areas of law. There are not, however, any prerequisites for the course, and students from all backgrounds are welcome.

Spring 2022 Description:
This course will introduce students to the legislative process and statutory interpretation, focusing on the latter subject. Statutes govern nearly every aspect of our society and our economy, and this course will give students the tools to understand how statutes come to be and how they are interpreted and applied in practice. We will spend our initial class meetings considering the perspective from which courts should interpret statutes. Courts often claim to interpret statutes from the perspective of an ordinary person, but statutes have technical language and often apply to heavily regulated areas of the economy. If the ordinary person perspective is unrealistic, we will consider whether the standard be that of an ordinary lawyer or member of Congress. Our focus will be on statutory interpretation done by the courts in the first instance. We will cover theories of statutory interpretation, the use of legislative history, and major canons of construction. We will also examine doctrines of judicial deference to administrative agencies' statutory interpretations. In exploring these topics, we will consider cases and materials from many substantive areas of law, including all or most of criminal law, civil rights law, environmental law, labor and employment law, health care law, and national security law. The course will thus provide students with a small taste of many different areas of law. There are not, however, any prerequisites for the course.


Law 225.1 Law and Politics Foundation Seminar 3 Units
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2022 Description:
This graduate seminar provides an introduction to the study of law and political science. The readings will begin with constitutionalism and the core institutions of American government (Congress, Presidency, judiciary, administrative state) before turning to consider democratic legitimacy as a descriptive and normative problem for scholars working on the intersection of law and politics. Readings will be drawn from twentieth century "classics" of political science and legal scholarship as well as more contemporary arguments and analyses that treat longstanding questions. No particular background is required beyond familiarity with the basic framework of American government.


Law 225.3 Interpretation in Constitutional and Statutory Law 1 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
How should we understand the language of the Constitution, and of statutes? Should we be originalists or living constitutionalists? (Or something else?) How much leeway do and should judges have in interpreting statutes? These are some of the biggest questions in law, and we will introduce and debate major approaches and controversies in answering them. Although we can only scratch the surface in a 1-unit course, we will discuss both big issues and concrete applications to specific cases. Besides covering really interesting issues, this course will also provide students a look behind the curtain of how to think about the critical topic of legal interpretation. This course meets every other Tuesday for 7 sessions beginning August 25th. This class is among the special Fall 2020 1L elective seminars designed to give entering 1Ls an extra opportunity to form connections despite our remote form of interaction. In light of that goal, these classes will expect real-time attendance and may not be recorded. These classes will all be graded on a Credit/No Credit basis and total written work requirement will be no more than 8 double-spaced pages.


Law 225.31 Introduction to Statutory Interpretation in the Regulatory State for 1Ls 1 Units
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2022 Description:
The functioning of the law is based on how language is interpreted. This course focuses on the role of interpretation within the Regulatory State. Increasingly, governmental agencies have a primary role in interpreting our most important laws. We will consider how courts balance the judicial obligation ‘to say what the law is’ with the greater substantive expertise and democratic accountability of agencies. We will first consider fundamental issues of interpretation. These issues are constantly before the courts, even in relatively homogeneous, monolingual cultures. We will consider how the heterogeneous, multilingual nature of our society should impact legal interpretation. Thus, for instance, what does it mean for an “ordinary person” to have “fair notice” of the law? Is that a value courts should promote? Should a court interpret a legal text according to its “ordinary meaning”? Is there such a thing as “ordinary meaning,” and if so, how can an attorney or court identify it? How should the language of a law, such as a civil rights statute, be interpreted over time? Is it inevitable that such a law will be interpreted dynamically? We will consider how the interpretive power of agencies changes the answers we would otherwise give to the above questions. Professor Brian Slocum has a JD and a PhD in Linguistics and writes extensively on issues of legal interpretation. Recent articles include, The Meaning of Sex: Dynamic Words, Novel Applications, and Original Public Meaning, 119 Mich. L. Rev. 1503 (2021) (with William N. Eskridge Jr. & Stefan Th. Gries), and Statutory Interpretation from the Outside, Colum. L. Rev. (forthcoming, 2022) (with Kevin Tobia & Victoria Nourse). Prior to joining legal academia, Professor Slocum was a Trial Attorney in both the Civil and Criminal Divisions of the Department of Justice.


Law 225.32 Statutory Interpretation Seminar 2 Units
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2022 Description:
This seminar will focus on theories of statutory interpretation and their implications for doctrine. We will consider the principal methodological rationales for approaches to statutory interpretation, as well as several additional topics: • Legislative intent, purpose and the Legal Process school • Textualism • Legislative process-based “decision theory” • Additional topics, e.g., including application of ideas to the recent Bostock v. Clayton County case Our principal focus will be on underlying methodological frameworks, and most of our reading will be scholarship in the field. Grades will be based primarily on writing requirements, and secondarily on class participation. Each student will be responsible for several short writing assignments during the semester. Half of these papers will involve posing a discussion questions about the coming week's reading and composing your own answers those questions. The other half will involve responding to questions posed by classmates. You will receive feedback to help you improve subsequent submissions. The first week when any students will do writing assignments will be for our third class meeting. Both the discussion questions you provide and your answers will play an important--hopefully, guiding!--role in our in-class discussions. It's fair to expect that students who are askers or responders in a given week will play lead roles in that week's discussion, but I expect all students to come to class prepared to participate in discussions each week, including on days when they have not written response papers.


Law 225.7 Topics in Health Insurance Law and Regulation 1 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
Private health insurance is the primary vehicle through which access to healthcare is assured in the United States. For this reason, the law and regulation of health insurance is of vital importance to a wide variety of different types of lawyers and public policy advocates. This topic is nonetheless often only covered tangentially in traditional law school classes like Insurance Law, Health Law, and Employee Benefits. This condensed class will survey major issues in the law and regulation of U.S. health insurance. Topics that may be covered (depending on time constraints) include (i) the Affordable Care Act (i.e. Obamacare) and its regulation of private health insurers, (ii) State regulation of private health insurers, (iii) ERISA's regulation of employer-sponsored health plans, and (iv) State and federal laws governing the resolution of health insurance coverage disputes (both through courts and via internal and external review of coverage decisions). The class will not cover issues related to public health insurance programs like Medicare and Medicaid and it will not assume that students have any particular background in health or insurance law. It will be geared in equal parts to developing a basic understanding of the technical legal and regulatory issues in covered topics and to discussing the insurance-specific policy issues surrounding health care reform. This course meets: Thursday, March 12th 6:25PM-9:25PM Friday, March 13th 10AM-12PM and 3:10PM-5:10PM Saturday, March 14th 9:30AM-12:30PM and 2:10PM-5:10PM


Law 226.11 Current Topics in National Security Law 1 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
National security law is often inaccessible, and can be particularly hard to follow when divorced from the context of historical tradition, governmental structures, and the operational reality in which it functions. This course will aim to present national security law in context, exposing students as much as possible to the real-world effects of applicable legal standards and rules. Topics will include the history of the U.S. Intelligence Community, privacy and surveillance, and the role of a national security lawyer in protecting the national security. Matt Perry has over 15 years of experience working on a wide range of national security legal issues in the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Office of the General Counsel. His duties have covered operational and policy matters involving counterterrorism, counterintelligence, cyber, and criminal investigations involving the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA), the FISA Amendments Act (FAA), the Classified Information Procedures Act (CIPA), the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA), the USA Freedom Act, and the State Secrets Privilege, among others.

Spring 2021 Description:
This course examines the most pressing national security law issues of the day, introduces key domestic and international legal frameworks necessary to engage in law and policy debates, and provides practical perspectives on these topics. The course will analyze the roles of each of the branches of the U.S. federal government in matters of national security, examine the intersection of international and domestic law in this sphere, and provide an overview of the practice of national security law in the Executive Branch. Specific topics may be adjusted based on current events, but are likely to include the following: the War Powers Resolution of 1973, its implementation in practice, and proposals for reform; the scope of the 2001 Authorization for Use of Military Force and the “forever wars”; the powers and limits of Congress and the Judiciary to conduct national security oversight of the President; nuclear non-proliferation challenges, with a focus on North Korea and Iran; the ongoing conflicts in Syria and Yemen, including the legal status of the doctrine of humanitarian intervention and state responsibility for violations of the law of armed conflict; the legality of ongoing detention operations and military trials at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba; and key topics in cybersecurity, including election interference. Students will be expected to write a series of short papers for this course. Dr. Tess Bridgeman is a Senior Fellow at NYU Law School’s Center on Law and Security and Co-Editor in Chief of Just Security. Bridgeman served in the White House as Special Assistant to President Obama, Associate Counsel to the President, and Deputy Legal Adviser to the National Security Council (NSC), where she provided counsel on the full range of issues relating to the national security and foreign policy of the United States. Bridgeman previously served in the U.S. Department of State’s Office of the Legal Adviser, where she was Special Assistant to the Legal Adviser and, prior to that role, an Attorney Adviser in the Office of Political-Military Affairs, focusing on the law of armed conflict. Bridgeman clerked for Judge Thomas L. Ambro of the Third Circuit Court of Appeals. A Rhodes Scholar, Truman Scholar, and Gardner Fellow, Bridgeman has a D.Phil. in International Relations from Oxford University, a J.D. from NYU Law School, magna cum laude and Order of the Coif, which she attended as a Root-Tilden-Kern and Institute for International Law and Justice Scholar, and a B.A. from Stanford University.

Spring 2022 Description:
This course examines the most pressing national security law issues of the day, introduces key domestic and international legal frameworks necessary to engage in law and policy debates, and provides practical perspectives on these topics. The course will analyze the roles of each of the branches of the U.S. federal government in matters of national security, examine the intersection of international and domestic law in this sphere, and provide an overview of the practice of national security law in the Executive Branch. One or more class sessions will be reserved to cover new developments, and specific topics may be adjusted based on current events, but are likely to include the following: the War Powers Resolution of 1973, its implementation in practice, and proposals for reform; the scope of the 2001 Authorization for Use of Military Force and the “forever wars”; the powers and limits of Congress and the Judiciary to conduct national security oversight of the President; post-9/11 surveillance and intelligence collection; the use of domestic and multilateral sanctions; nuclear non-proliferation challenges, with a focus on North Korea and Iran; the legality of ongoing detention operations and military trials at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba; and key topics in cybersecurity, including election interference. Dr. Tess Bridgeman is a Senior Fellow & Visiting Scholar at NYU Law School’s Reiss Center on Law and Security and Co-Editor in Chief of Just Security. Bridgeman served in the White House as Special Assistant to President Obama, Associate Counsel to the President, and Deputy Legal Adviser to the National Security Council (NSC), where she provided counsel on the full range of issues relating to the national security and foreign policy of the United States. Bridgeman previously served in the U.S. Department of State’s Office of the Legal Adviser, where she was Special Assistant to the Legal Adviser and, prior to that role, an Attorney Adviser in the Office of Political-Military Affairs, focusing on the law of armed conflict. Bridgeman clerked for Judge Thomas L. Ambro of the Third Circuit Court of Appeals. A Rhodes Scholar, Truman Scholar, and Gardner Fellow, Bridgeman has a D.Phil. in International Relations from Oxford University, a J.D. from NYU Law School, magna cum laude and Order of the Coif, which she attended as a Root-Tilden-Kern and Institute for International Law and Justice Scholar, and a B.A. from Stanford University.


Law 226.12 Current Topics in Media Law 1 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This course will explore both traditional and more modern challenges to press freedom, free expression, and media law in the Digital Age. Students will learn traditional governing doctrine regulating newsgathering and publication, including but not limited to defamation, copyright and privacy law; statutory and constitutional work product protections such as the Privacy Protection Act and the California as well as other journalist shield laws; prior restraint; and the protections from criminal liability for the receipt or publication of truthful information. The course will also focus on developments brought about by technology, including data collection tools as well as surveillance and encryption. It will discuss topics such as the impact of different forms of national security surveillance tools (including FRCP 41, FISA, and National Security Letters) on journalist-source relationships; and the role of foreign governments and non-nation state actors in the historically local endeavor of publishing the news. Last, the course will cover transparency laws such as federal and state public records laws. Students will analyze how these frameworks both shape, and are shaped by, politics, theory, markets, and technological change. They will engage with theoretical and historical texts, current case law, and contemporary best practices. Victoria Baranetsky is general counsel at The Center for Investigative Reporting. Previously, Baranetsky worked at the Wikimedia Foundation, and as a fellow at the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press and at The New York Times. After graduating from Harvard Law School she received a master’s degree in philosophy from Oxford University and clerked for the Honorable Rosemary Pooler of the Second Circuit. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Columbia University, a graduate degree from Columbia Journalism School, and currently, is an academic fellow at the Tow Center for Digital Journalism at Columbia University. She is barred in California, New York and New Jersey.

Spring 2021 Description:
This course will explore both traditional and more modern challenges to press freedom, free expression, and media law. Students will learn traditional governing doctrine regulating newsgathering and publication, including but not limited to defamation, copyright and privacy law; statutory and constitutional work product protections as well as other journalist shield laws; prior restraint; and the protections from criminal liability for the receipt or publication of truthful information. The course will also focus on developments brought about by technology, including data collection tools as well as surveillance and encryption. It will discuss topics such as the impact of different forms of national security surveillance tools (including FRCP 41, FISA, and National Security Letters) on journalist-source relationships; and the role of foreign governments and non-nation state actors in the historically local endeavor of publishing the news. Last, the course will cover transparency laws such as federal and state public records laws. Perhaps the most important aim of this course is to uncover how these frameworks both shape, and are shaped by, politics, theory, markets, and technological change. The class will substantively engage with theoretical and historical texts, established as well as current case law, and evolving best practices. Victoria Baranetsky is general counsel at The Center for Investigative Reporting. Previously, Baranetsky worked at the Wikimedia Foundation, the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press and The New York Times. After graduating from Harvard Law School she received a master’s degree in philosophy from Oxford University and clerked for the Honorable Rosemary Pooler of the Second Circuit. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Columbia University, a graduate degree from Columbia Journalism School, and currently, is an academic fellow at the Tow Center for Digital Journalism at Columbia University. She is barred in California, New York and New Jersey.

Spring 2022 Description:
This course will explore both traditional and more modern challenges to press freedom, free expression, and media law. Students will learn traditional governing doctrine regulating newsgathering and publication, including but not limited to defamation, copyright and privacy law as well as journalist shield laws and prior restraint. While accounting for these legal doctrines, the course will also focus on developments brought about by technology, including data collection tools as well as surveillance and encryption. It will discuss topics such as the impact of different forms of national security surveillance tools; and the role of foreign governments and non-nation state actors. Last, the course will cover transparency laws such as federal and state public records laws. Perhaps the most important aim of this course is to uncover how these frameworks both shape, and are shaped by, politics, theory, and technological change. The class will substantively engage with theoretical and historical texts, established as well as current case law, and evolving best practices. Victoria Baranetsky is general counsel at The Center for Investigative Reporting. Previously, Baranetsky worked at the Wikimedia Foundation, the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press and The New York Times. After graduating from Harvard Law School she received a master’s degree in philosophy from Oxford University and clerked on the Second Circuit. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Columbia University, a graduate degree from Columbia Journalism School, and currently, is an academic fellow at the Tow Center for Digital Journalism at Columbia University. She is barred in California, New York and New Jersey. Geoffrey King is the chief executive officer of Informed California Foundation and the executive editor of its first project, the independent nonprofit newsroom Open Vallejo. Prior to founding Informed California Foundation, King led the global technology program at the Committee to Protect Journalists, a nonprofit organization that advocates for press freedom worldwide. King previously worked as a First Amendment litigator representing journalists, activists and artists in free expression and open government matters, and he has taught an undergraduate privacy law course at UC Berkeley since 2011. King earned his bachelor’s degree from UC Berkeley and his JD from Stanford Law School. He is a member of the California Bar.


Law 226.13 National Security Law: A Practitioner's Perspective 1 Units
Fall 2021: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2021 Description:
National security law is often inaccessible, and can be particularly hard to follow when divorced from the context of historical tradition, governmental structures, and the operational reality in which it functions. This course will aim to present national security law in context, exposing students as much as possible to the real-world effects of applicable legal standards and rules. Topics will include the history of the U.S. Intelligence Community, privacy and surveillance, and the role of a national security lawyer in protecting national security within the rule of law. Matt Perry has over 16 years of experience working on a wide range of national security legal issues in the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Office of the General Counsel. His duties have covered operational and policy matters relevant to counterterrorism, counterintelligence, cyber, and criminal investigations involving the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA), the FISA Amendments Act (FAA), the Classified Information Procedures Act (CIPA), the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA), the USA Freedom Act, and the State Secrets Privilege, among others.


Law 226.2 Foreign Relations Law 2 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
The course examines the law governing the conduct of American foreign relations. First, we will consider the distribution of the foreign affairs power between the executive, legislative, and judicial branches. Special attention will be given to the original understanding of the foreign affairs power and how the constitutional design has (or has not) changed over time. Second, we will examine the statutory distribution of authority in foreign affairs. The course will conclude with a review of legal constraints on the foreign affairs power imposed by the states, the judiciary, and by international law.


Law 226.4 Regulated Digital Industries: Telecommunications Law & Policy for a Modern Era 4 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
The telecommunications industry (including internet-related services) is one of the largest and most influential sectors of the economy. It is also the site of one our most complex legal regimes, blending features of administrative law, antitrust law, and constitutional law, among others. How should we regulate the interconnections between the networks that make telephone and internet communication possible? How should we allocate scarce spectrum resources? Should we require internet service providers to comply with net neutrality rules? What, if anything, should government do to ensure media representation of diverse voices? How do copyright concerns interact with broadcast regulation? The answers to these questions directly impact the structure of the telecommunications industry. More fundamentally, these questions implicate matters of distribution, efficiency, fairness, monopoly power, and the structure of government. This course examines these issues through a study of some of the foundational questions and modern conflicts in domestic (U.S.) telecommunications law and internet policy.

Spring 2022 Description:
The telecommunications industry (including internet-related services) is one of the largest and most influential sectors of the economy. It is also the site of one of our most complex legal regimes, blending features of administrative law, antitrust law, and constitutional law, among others. Should we require internet service providers to comply with net neutrality rules? What, if anything, should government do to ensure media representation of diverse voices? How should we regulate the content moderation practices of large platforms? How do copyright and accessibility concerns interact with video content platforms? And how do prior regulatory scheme inform modern legal practices? The answers to these questions directly impact the structure of the telecommunications industry. More fundamentally, these questions implicate matters of distribution, efficiency, fairness, monopoly power, and the structure of government. This course examines these issues through a study of some of the foundational questions and modern conflicts in domestic (U.S.) telecommunications law and internet policy.


Law 226.4S Regulated Digital Industries 3 Units
Summer 2021: Hybrid
Summer 2022: In-Person
Description:
Summer 2021 Description:
The telecommunications industry (including internet-related services) is one of the largest and most influential sectors of the U.S. economy. It is also the site of one its most complex legal regimes, blending features of administrative law, antitrust law, and constitutional law, among others. How should we regulate the interconnections between the networks that make telephone and internet communication possible? How should we allocate scarce spectrum resources? Should we require internet service providers to comply with net neutrality rules? What, if anything, should government do to ensure media representation of diverse voices? How do copyright concerns interact with broadcast regulation? The answers to these questions directly impact the structure of the telecommunications industry. More fundamentally, these questions implicate matters of distribution, efficiency, fairness, monopoly power, and the structure of government. This course examines these issues through a study of some of the foundational questions and modern conflicts in domestic (U.S.) telecommunications law and internet policy. This course will meet in-person on campus on July 28th, July 29th, July 30th, August 2nd, and August 3rd in room 110.

Summer 2022 Description:
The telecommunications industry (including internet-related services) is one of the largest and most influential sectors of the U.S. economy. It is also the site of one its most complex legal regimes, blending features of administrative law, antitrust law, and constitutional law, among others. How should we regulate the interconnections between the networks that make telephone and internet communication possible? How should we allocate scarce spectrum resources? Should we require internet service providers to comply with net neutrality rules? What, if anything, should government do to ensure media representation of diverse voices? How do copyright concerns interact with broadcast regulation? The answers to these questions directly impact the structure of the telecommunications industry. More fundamentally, these questions implicate matters of distribution, efficiency, fairness, monopoly power, and the structure of government. This course examines these issues through a study of some of the foundational questions and modern conflicts in domestic (U.S.) telecommunications law and internet policy.


Law 226.8 Strategic Constitutional Litigation in Property Rights and Economic Liberty 1 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
SEMINAR This class is designed to give students hands-on training and experience in strategic constitutional litigation focused on property rights and economic liberty. Conducted in cooperation with the Pacific Legal Foundation, this seminar provides insight to substantive legal theories and litigation strategy for developing precedent setting cases. We will cover substantive legal doctrines related to property rights, such as the Takings Clause of the Fifth Amendment, and new areas involving the Due Process Clause and economic liberty. Students may take this seminar on it's own or with the practicum (Law 226.8A). Students interested in taking the practicum must enroll in this seminar and should attend the first day of the seminar. At the first session of the seminar, the cases and issues available for the practicum will be presented to the students for their consideration. The instructor will provide the class number to those students interested in enrolling the practicum. At the conclusion of the seminar class, interested students will then begin the practicum. This course will have 7 class meetings. To allow for a makeup classes because of unforeseen circumstances this course has 2 automatic make-up classes scheduled. Students must be able to attend all 9 scheduled meetings to earn credit. The instructor, John Groen, first taught this course in Fall 2018 and has refined the reading assignments to better fit a one unit class. He has extensive experience in public interest litigation before all levels of federal and state courts including the Supreme Court of the United States. As a public interest lawyer, he brings a passion for his work and seeks to convey to students the strategies, obstacles and excitement in developing constitutional precedent.

Fall 2021 Description:
SEMINAR This class is designed to give students experience in strategic constitutional litigation focused on property rights and economic liberty. Conducted in cooperation with the Pacific Legal Foundation, this seminar will use pending and recent Supreme Court petitions and merits briefs to provide insight to substantive legal theories and litigation strategy for developing precedent setting cases. We will cover substantive legal doctrines related to property rights with particular focus on the Takings Clause of the Fifth Amendment. Students may take this seminar on it's own or with the practicum (Law 226.8A). Students interested in taking the practicum must enroll in this seminar and should attend the first day of the seminar. At the first session of the seminar, the cases and issues available for the practicum will be presented to the students for their consideration. The instructor will provide the class number to those students interested in enrolling the practicum. At the conclusion of the seminar class, interested students will then begin the practicum. The instructor, John Groen, first taught this course in Fall 2018 and has refined the reading assignments to better fit a one unit class. He has extensive experience in public interest litigation before all levels of federal and state courts including the Supreme Court of the United States. As a public interest lawyer, he brings a passion for his work and seeks to convey to students the strategies, obstacles and excitement in developing constitutional precedent.

Fall 2022 Description:
SEMINAR This class is designed to give students experience in strategic constitutional litigation focused on property rights and economic liberty. Conducted in cooperation with the Pacific Legal Foundation, this seminar will use pending and recent Supreme Court petitions and merits briefs to provide insight to substantive legal theories and litigation strategy for developing precedent setting cases. We will cover substantive legal doctrines related to property rights with particular focus on the Takings Clause of the Fifth Amendment. Students may take this seminar on it's own or with the practicum (Law 226.8A). Students interested in taking the practicum must enroll in this seminar and should attend the first day of the seminar. At the first session of the seminar, the cases and issues available for the practicum will be presented to the students for their consideration. The instructor will provide the class number to those students interested in enrolling the practicum. At the conclusion of the seminar class, interested students will then begin the practicum. The instructor, John Groen, first taught this course in Fall 2018 and has refined the reading assignments to better fit a one unit class. He has extensive experience in public interest litigation before all levels of federal and state courts including the Supreme Court of the United States. As a public interest lawyer, he brings a passion for his work and seeks to convey to students the strategies, obstacles and excitement in developing constitutional precedent.


Law 226.8A Strategic Constitutional Litigation in Property Rights and Economic Liberty Practicum 1 - 2 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
This course is offered in conjunction with the seminar Strategic Constitutional Litigation in Property Rights and Economic Liberty (Law 226.8). Students interested in the practicum must enroll in the companion seminar, Law 226.8 sec. 1(Seminar) during their enrollment and should attend the first day of the seminar. At the first session of the seminar, the cases and issues available for the practicum will be presented to the students for their consideration. The instructor will provide the class number to those students interested in enrolling the practicum. At the conclusion of the seminar class, interested students will then begin the practicum. Students enrolled in this practicum will work with attorneys at the Pacific Legal Foundation on current cases involving strategic constitutional litigation. Using modern communications technology, students will join a case litigation team to gain experience with actual cases pending before the Supreme Court of the United States, or other appellate courts, on matters related to property rights and economic liberty, and particularly the Takings Clause of the Fifth Amendment. Free speech or equal protection cases may also be available for practicum depending on student interest and litigation schedules. Along with substantive legal doctrines, students will gain experience on best practices for client and issue selection, the basics of civil rights litigation, effective brief writing for public interest litigation, the role of amicus curiae briefs, and integrating media and public outreach with litigation strategy. The instructor, John Groen, will coordinate the practicum and teach the associated seminar. This practicum was first offered in Fall, 2018, and students had a variety of experiences with most working directly on cases and briefs pending before the Supreme Court. Similar opportunities are expected for Fall, 2020.

Fall 2021 Description:
This course is offered in conjunction with the seminar Strategic Constitutional Litigation in Property Rights and Economic Liberty (Law 226.8). Students interested in the practicum must enroll in the companion seminar, Law 226.8 sec. 1(Seminar) during their enrollment and should attend the first day of the seminar. At the first session of the seminar, the cases and issues available for the practicum will be presented to the students for their consideration. The instructor will provide the class number to those students interested in enrolling the practicum. Students enrolled in this practicum will work with attorneys at the Pacific Legal Foundation on current cases involving strategic constitutional litigation. Using internet communications technology, students will join a case litigation team to gain experience with actual cases pending before the Supreme Court of the United States, or other appellate courts, on matters related to property rights and economic liberty, and particularly the Takings Clause of the Fifth Amendment. Free speech or equal protection cases may also be available for practicum depending on student interest and litigation schedules. Along with substantive legal doctrines, students will gain experience on best practices for client and issue selection, the basics of civil rights litigation, effective brief writing for public interest litigation, the role of amicus curiae briefs, and integrating media and public outreach with litigation strategy. The instructor, John Groen, will coordinate the practicum and teach the associated seminar. This practicum was first offered in Fall, 2018, and since then students have had a variety of experiences with most working directly on cases and briefs pending before the Supreme Court. Similar opportunities are expected for Fall, 2021.

Fall 2022 Description:
This course is offered in conjunction with the seminar Strategic Constitutional Litigation in Property Rights and Economic Liberty (Law 226.8). Students interested in the practicum must enroll in the companion seminar, Law 226.8 sec. 1(Seminar) during their enrollment and should attend the first day of the seminar. At the first session of the seminar, the cases and issues available for the practicum will be presented to the students for their consideration. The instructor will provide the class number to those students interested in enrolling the practicum. Students enrolled in this practicum will work with attorneys at the Pacific Legal Foundation on current cases involving strategic constitutional litigation. Using internet communications technology, students will join a case litigation team to gain experience with actual cases pending before the Supreme Court of the United States, or other appellate courts, on matters related to property rights and economic liberty, and particularly the Takings Clause of the Fifth Amendment. Free speech or equal protection cases may also be available for practicum depending on student interest and litigation schedules. Along with substantive legal doctrines, students will gain experience on best practices for client and issue selection, the basics of civil rights litigation, effective brief writing for public interest litigation, the role of amicus curiae briefs, and integrating media and public outreach with litigation strategy. The instructor, John Groen, will coordinate the practicum and teach the associated seminar. This practicum was first offered in Fall, 2018, and since then students have had a variety of experiences with most working directly on cases and briefs pending before the Supreme Court. Similar opportunities are expected for Fall 2022.


Law 226.9 State and Local Impact Litigation Practicum Seminar 2 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
Over the past decade, state and local governments have begun to proactively enforce their residents’ rights in areas as diverse as environmental justice, civil rights, immigration, reproductive freedom, and economic empowerment. This seminar will provide students with both a foundation in state and local government law and in complex/impact litigation. Students will learn about when, how, and why the government litigates as a Plaintiff on behalf of itself and its residents, and how affirmative litigation by state and local government differs from litigation brought by private individuals and non-profit groups. Specific case studies will frame discussions about the role of cities and states in our federal system, the opportunities and risks posed by affirmative litigation, the relationship between affirmative litigation and policy-making, and the strategic considerations unique to government litigation. Classroom materials will combine academic, statutory, and case law materials with trial-court and appellate pleadings in selected cases brought by state and local governments. The practicum component of the course will provide an opportunity for students to apply the materials to real case examples from local governments across the country. Erin Bernstein is a Supervising Deputy City Attorney at the Oakland City Attorney’s Office, heading the Community Lawyering and Civil Rights Unit (CLCR). Ms. Bernstein previously served as a Deputy City Attorney in the San Francisco City Attorney's Office, working as a litigator on that office’s Complex and Affirmative Litigation Team. She also served as the Executive Director of the office's Affirmative Litigation Task Force. Erin specializes in reproductive rights, First Amendment, public health and privacy-related cases, and has litigated issues including marriage equality, gender discrimination, public nuisance and abortion rights in both state and federal courts. Erin has been a regular guest lecturer for Yale Law School's popular San Francisco Affirmative Litigation Project (SFALP) course, a lecturer at Berkeley Law School, and in the spring of 2016, joined the Yale Law School faculty as a Visiting Lecturer in Law. Jill Habig is the Founder and President of the Public Rights Project, an organization dedicated to empowering state and local governments to enforce the legal rights of their most vulnerable communities through affirmative litigation. Before founding PRP, Jill served as Special Counsel to then-Attorney General Kamala Harris, and was the Deputy Campaign Manager and Policy Director for Harris’s Senate campaign. Her work has emphasized consumer fraud, health, education, human trafficking, and civil rights, including issues related to gender and LGBT rights. Jill was previously a Lecturer in Law at Yale Law School and served on the Affirmative Litigation Task Force at the San Francisco City Attorney’s Office. Interested students must apply to the course via this Google Form: https://forms.gle/GjJgqiBtv2ePjGp99 . The deadline to submit an application for consideration is November 11th at 12PM Pacific Time.

Fall 2020 Description:
Over the past decade, state and local governments have begun to proactively enforce their residents’ rights in areas as diverse as environmental justice, civil rights, immigration, reproductive freedom, and economic empowerment. This seminar will provide students with both a foundation in state and local government law and in complex/impact litigation. Students will learn about when, how, and why the government litigates as a Plaintiff on behalf of itself and its residents, and how affirmative litigation by state and local government differs from litigation brought by private individuals and non-profit groups. Specific case studies will frame discussions about the role of cities and states in our federal system, the opportunities and risks posed by affirmative litigation, the relationship between affirmative litigation and policy-making, and the strategic considerations unique to government litigation. Classroom materials will combine academic, statutory, and case law materials with trial-court and appellate pleadings in selected cases brought by state and local governments. The practicum component of the course will provide an opportunity for students to apply the materials to real case examples from local governments across the country. Erin Bernstein is a Supervising Deputy City Attorney at the Oakland City Attorney’s Office, heading the Community Lawyering and Civil Rights Unit (CLCR). Ms. Bernstein previously served as a Deputy City Attorney in the San Francisco City Attorney's Office, working as a litigator on that office’s Complex and Affirmative Litigation Team. She also served as the Executive Director of the office's Affirmative Litigation Task Force. Erin specializes in reproductive rights, First Amendment, public health and privacy-related cases, and has litigated issues including marriage equality, gender discrimination, public nuisance and abortion rights in both state and federal courts. Erin has been a regular guest lecturer for Yale Law School's popular San Francisco Affirmative Litigation Project (SFALP) course, a lecturer at Berkeley Law School, and in the spring of 2016, joined the Yale Law School faculty as a Visiting Lecturer in Law. Jill Habig is the Founder and President of the Public Rights Project, an organization dedicated to empowering state and local governments to enforce the legal rights of their most vulnerable communities through affirmative litigation. Before founding PRP, Jill served as Special Counsel to then-Attorney General Kamala Harris, and was the Deputy Campaign Manager and Policy Director for Harris’s Senate campaign. Her work has emphasized consumer fraud, health, education, human trafficking, and civil rights, including issues related to gender and LGBT rights. Jill was previously a Lecturer in Law at Yale Law School and served on the Affirmative Litigation Task Force at the San Francisco City Attorney’s Office. Interested students must apply to the course via this Google Form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSehQ0AWWa5mlywkuqkeievd--hgTbp0qajywlXhw0sXsxxg9w/viewform. Applications are due Friday, May 1 at 5pm PT.

Fall 2021 Description:
Over the past decade, state and local governments have begun to proactively enforce their residents’ rights in areas as diverse as environmental justice, civil rights, immigration, reproductive freedom, and economic empowerment. This seminar will provide students with both a foundation in state and local government law and in complex/impact litigation. Students will learn about when, how, and why the government litigates as a Plaintiff on behalf of itself and its residents, and how affirmative litigation by state and local government differs from litigation brought by private individuals and non-profit groups. Specific case studies will frame discussions about the role of cities and states in our federal system, the opportunities and risks posed by affirmative litigation, the relationship between affirmative litigation and policy-making, and the strategic considerations unique to government litigation. Classroom materials will combine academic, statutory, and case law materials with trial-court and appellate pleadings in selected cases brought by state and local governments. The practicum component of the course will provide an opportunity for students to apply the materials to real case examples from local governments across the country. Constitutional Law is a recommended, but not required, prerequisite. Erin Bernstein is a founder of Bradley Bernstein Sands LLP, where she represents municipalities across California in affirmative litigation and complex defense. Prior to founding BBS, Erin was a Supervising Deputy City Attorney at the Oakland City Attorney’s Office, heading the Community Lawyering and Civil Rights Unit (CLCR). Ms. Bernstein previously served as a Deputy City Attorney in the San Francisco City Attorney's Office, working as a litigator on that office’s Complex and Affirmative Litigation Team. She also served as the Executive Director of the office's Affirmative Litigation Task Force. Erin specializes in reproductive rights, First Amendment, public health and privacy-related cases, and has litigated issues including marriage equality, gender discrimination, public nuisance and abortion rights in both state and federal courts. Erin has been a regular guest lecturer for Yale Law School's popular San Francisco Affirmative Litigation Project (SFALP) course, a lecturer at Berkeley Law School, and in the spring of 2016, joined the Yale Law School faculty as a Visiting Lecturer in Law. Jill Habig is the Founder and President of the Public Rights Project, an organization dedicated to empowering state and local governments to enforce the legal rights of their most vulnerable communities through affirmative litigation. Before founding PRP, Jill served as Special Counsel to then-Attorney General Kamala Harris, and was the Deputy Campaign Manager and Policy Director for Harris’s Senate campaign. Her work has emphasized consumer fraud, health, education, human trafficking, and civil rights, including issues related to gender and LGBT rights. Jill was previously a Lecturer in Law at Yale Law School and served on the Affirmative Litigation Task Force at the San Francisco City Attorney’s Office. Interested students must apply to the course via this Google Form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeYf7wyDl7Bo6Jykmmkg5orh4ycNgoh34TKqBRQWI1-IqCp6w/viewform?usp=sf_link. Applications are due Friday, April 23 at 5pm PT. We encourage submission earlier to allow time for us to follow up with any questions as needed.

Fall 2022 Description:
Over the past decade, state and local governments have begun to proactively enforce their residents’ rights in areas as diverse as environmental justice, civil rights, immigration, reproductive freedom, and economic empowerment. This seminar will provide students with both a foundation in state and local government law and in complex/impact litigation. Students will learn about when, how, and why the government litigates as a Plaintiff on behalf of itself and its residents, and how affirmative litigation by state and local government differs from litigation brought by private individuals and non-profit groups. Specific case studies will frame discussions about the role of cities and states in our federal system, the opportunities and risks posed by affirmative litigation, the relationship between affirmative litigation and policy-making, and the strategic considerations unique to government litigation. Classroom materials will combine academic, statutory, and case law materials with trial-court and appellate pleadings in selected cases brought by state and local governments. The practicum component of the course will provide an opportunity for students to apply the materials to real case examples from local governments across the country. Constitutional Law is a recommended, but not required, prerequisite. Erin Bernstein is a founder of Bradley Bernstein Sands LLP, where she represents municipalities across California in affirmative litigation and complex defense. Prior to founding BBS, Erin was a Supervising Deputy City Attorney at the Oakland City Attorney’s Office, heading the Community Lawyering and Civil Rights Unit (CLCR). She previously served as a Deputy City Attorney in the San Francisco City Attorney's Office, working as a litigator on that office’s Complex and Affirmative Litigation Team. She also served as the Executive Director of the office's Affirmative Litigation Task Force. Erin specializes in reproductive rights, First Amendment, public health and privacy-related cases, and has litigated issues including marriage equality, gender discrimination, public nuisance and abortion rights in both state and federal courts. Erin has been a regular guest lecturer for Yale Law School's popular San Francisco Affirmative Litigation Project (SFALP) course, a lecturer at Berkeley Law School, and in the spring of 2016, joined the Yale Law School faculty as a Visiting Lecturer in Law. Jill Habig is the Founder and President of the Public Rights Project, an organization dedicated to empowering state and local governments to enforce the legal rights of their most vulnerable communities through affirmative litigation. Before founding PRP, Jill served as Special Counsel to then-Attorney General Kamala Harris, and was the Deputy Campaign Manager and Policy Director for Harris’s Senate campaign. Her work has emphasized consumer fraud, health, education, human trafficking, and civil rights, including issues related to gender and LGBT rights. Jill was previously a Lecturer in Law at Yale Law School and served on the Affirmative Litigation Task Force at the San Francisco City Attorney’s Office. Interested students must apply to the course via this Google Form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeYf7wyDl7Bo6Jykmmkg5orh4ycNgoh34TKqBRQWI1-IqCp6w/viewform?usp=sf_link Applications are due Friday, April 23 at 5pm PT. We encourage submission earlier to allow time for us to follow up with any questions as needed.


Law 226.9A State and Local Impact Litigation Practicum 2 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
Over the past decade, state and local governments have begun to proactively enforce their residents’ rights in areas as diverse as environmental justice, civil rights, immigration, reproductive freedom, and economic empowerment. This course will provide students with both a foundation in state and local government law and in complex/impact litigation. As part of the practicum component to the state and local impact litigation seminar, students will complete small group research and writing assignments related to both potential and ongoing impact litigation in the City of Oakland and other city and state jurisdictions across the country. Students will work collaboratively with each other and with the course instructors in researching and drafting work product for use in policy-driven litigation. Written work product may include internal factual and legal analysis, pitch memos, and draft pleadings and briefing. These assignments will be used to inform strategic litigation decisions by the City of Oakland, Public Rights Project, and other state and municipal law offices. Erin Bernstein is a Supervising Deputy City Attorney at the Oakland City Attorney’s Office, heading the Community Lawyering and Civil Rights Unit (CLCR). Ms. Bernstein previously served as a Deputy City Attorney in the San Francisco City Attorney's Office, working as a litigator on that office’s Complex and Affirmative Litigation Team. She also served as the Executive Director of the office's Affirmative Litigation Task Force. Erin specializes in reproductive rights, First Amendment, public health and privacy-related cases, and has litigated issues including marriage equality, gender discrimination, public nuisance and abortion rights in both state and federal courts. Erin has been a regular guest lecturer for Yale Law School's popular San Francisco Affirmative Litigation Project (SFALP) course, a lecturer at Berkeley Law School, and in the spring of 2016, joined the Yale Law School faculty as a Visiting Lecturer in Law. Jill Habig is the Founder and President of the Public Rights Project, an organization dedicated to empowering state and local governments to enforce the legal rights of their most vulnerable communities through affirmative litigation. Before founding PRP, Jill served as Special Counsel to then-Attorney General Kamala Harris, and was the Deputy Campaign Manager and Policy Director for Harris’s Senate campaign. Her work has emphasized consumer fraud, health, education, human trafficking, and civil rights, including issues related to gender and LGBT rights. Jill was previously a Lecturer in Law at Yale Law School and served on the Affirmative Litigation Task Force at the San Francisco City Attorney’s Office. Interested students must apply to the course via this Google Form: https://forms.gle/GjJgqiBtv2ePjGp99 . The deadline to submit an application for consideration is November 11th at 12PM Pacific Time.

Fall 2020 Description:
Over the past decade, state and local governments have begun to proactively enforce their residents’ rights in areas as diverse as environmental justice, civil rights, immigration, reproductive freedom, and economic empowerment. This course will provide students with both a foundation in state and local government law and in complex/impact litigation. As part of the practicum component to the state and local impact litigation seminar, students will complete small group research and writing assignments related to both potential and ongoing impact litigation in the City of Oakland and other city and state jurisdictions across the country. Students will work collaboratively with each other and with the course instructors in researching and drafting work product for use in policy-driven litigation. Written work product may include internal factual and legal analysis, pitch memos, and draft pleadings and briefing. These assignments will be used to inform strategic litigation decisions by the City of Oakland, Public Rights Project, and other state and municipal law offices. Erin Bernstein is a Supervising Deputy City Attorney at the Oakland City Attorney’s Office, heading the Community Lawyering and Civil Rights Unit (CLCR). Ms. Bernstein previously served as a Deputy City Attorney in the San Francisco City Attorney's Office, working as a litigator on that office’s Complex and Affirmative Litigation Team. She also served as the Executive Director of the office's Affirmative Litigation Task Force. Erin specializes in reproductive rights, First Amendment, public health and privacy-related cases, and has litigated issues including marriage equality, gender discrimination, public nuisance and abortion rights in both state and federal courts. Erin has been a regular guest lecturer for Yale Law School's popular San Francisco Affirmative Litigation Project (SFALP) course, a lecturer at Berkeley Law School, and in the spring of 2016, joined the Yale Law School faculty as a Visiting Lecturer in Law. Jill Habig is the Founder and President of the Public Rights Project, an organization dedicated to empowering state and local governments to enforce the legal rights of their most vulnerable communities through affirmative litigation. Before founding PRP, Jill served as Special Counsel to then-Attorney General Kamala Harris, and was the Deputy Campaign Manager and Policy Director for Harris’s Senate campaign. Her work has emphasized consumer fraud, health, education, human trafficking, and civil rights, including issues related to gender and LGBT rights. Jill was previously a Lecturer in Law at Yale Law School and served on the Affirmative Litigation Task Force at the San Francisco City Attorney’s Office. Interested students must apply to the course via this Google Form: https://forms.gle/Cx12Q2dZttDC3HgQ6. Applications are due Friday, May 1 at 5pm PT.

Fall 2021 Description:
Over the past decade, state and local governments have begun to proactively enforce their residents’ rights in areas as diverse as environmental justice, civil rights, immigration, reproductive freedom, and economic empowerment. This course will provide students with both a foundation in state and local government law and in complex/impact litigation. As part of the practicum component to the state and local impact litigation seminar, students will complete small group research and writing assignments related to both potential and ongoing impact litigation in the City of Oakland and other city and state jurisdictions across the country. Students will work collaboratively with each other and with the course instructors in researching and drafting work product for use in policy-driven litigation. Written work product may include internal factual and legal analysis, pitch memos, and draft pleadings and briefing. These assignments will be used to inform strategic litigation decisions by the City of Oakland, Public Rights Project, and other state and municipal law offices. Erin Bernstein is a founder of Bradley Bernstein Sands LLP, where she represents municipalities across California in affirmative litigation and complex defense. Prior to founding BBS, Erin was a Supervising Deputy City Attorney at the Oakland City Attorney’s Office, heading the Community Lawyering and Civil Rights Unit (CLCR). Ms. Bernstein previously served as a Deputy City Attorney in the San Francisco City Attorney's Office, working as a litigator on that office’s Complex and Affirmative Litigation Team. She also served as the Executive Director of the office's Affirmative Litigation Task Force. Erin specializes in reproductive rights, First Amendment, public health and privacy-related cases, and has litigated issues including marriage equality, gender discrimination, public nuisance and abortion rights in both state and federal courts. Erin has been a regular guest lecturer for Yale Law School's popular San Francisco Affirmative Litigation Project (SFALP) course, a lecturer at Berkeley Law School, and in the spring of 2016, joined the Yale Law School faculty as a Visiting Lecturer in Law. Jill Habig is the Founder and President of the Public Rights Project, an organization dedicated to empowering state and local governments to enforce the legal rights of their most vulnerable communities through affirmative litigation. Before founding PRP, Jill served as Special Counsel to then-Attorney General Kamala Harris, and was the Deputy Campaign Manager and Policy Director for Harris’s Senate campaign. Her work has emphasized consumer fraud, health, education, human trafficking, and civil rights, including issues related to gender and LGBT rights. Jill was previously a Lecturer in Law at Yale Law School and served on the Affirmative Litigation Task Force at the San Francisco City Attorney’s Office. Interested students must apply to the course via this Google Form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeYf7wyDl7Bo6Jykmmkg5orh4ycNgoh34TKqBRQWI1-IqCp6w/viewform?usp=sf_link. Applications are due Friday, April 23 at 5pm PT. We encourage submission earlier to allow time for us to follow up with any questions as needed.

Fall 2022 Description:
Over the past decade, state and local governments have begun to proactively enforce their residents’ rights in areas as diverse as environmental justice, civil rights, immigration, reproductive freedom, and economic empowerment. This course will provide students with both a foundation in state and local government law and in complex/impact litigation. As part of the practicum component to the state and local impact litigation seminar, students will complete small group research and writing assignments related to both potential and ongoing impact litigation in the City of Oakland and other city and state jurisdictions across the country. Students will work collaboratively with each other and with the course instructors in researching and drafting work product for use in policy-driven litigation. Written work product may include internal factual and legal analysis, pitch memos, and draft pleadings and briefing. These assignments will be used to inform strategic litigation decisions by the City of Oakland, Public Rights Project, and other state and municipal law offices. Erin Bernstein is a founder of Bradley Bernstein Sands LLP, where she represents municipalities across California in affirmative litigation and complex defense. Prior to founding BBS, Erin was a Supervising Deputy City Attorney at the Oakland City Attorney’s Office, heading the Community Lawyering and Civil Rights Unit (CLCR). She previously served as a Deputy City Attorney in the San Francisco City Attorney's Office, working as a litigator on that office’s Complex and Affirmative Litigation Team. She also served as the Executive Director of the office's Affirmative Litigation Task Force. Erin specializes in reproductive rights, First Amendment, public health and privacy-related cases, and has litigated issues including marriage equality, gender discrimination, public nuisance and abortion rights in both state and federal courts. Erin has been a regular guest lecturer for Yale Law School's popular San Francisco Affirmative Litigation Project (SFALP) course, a lecturer at Berkeley Law School, and in the spring of 2016, joined the Yale Law School faculty as a Visiting Lecturer in Law. Jill Habig is the Founder and President of the Public Rights Project, an organization dedicated to empowering state and local governments to enforce the legal rights of their most vulnerable communities through affirmative litigation. Before founding PRP, Jill served as Special Counsel to then-Attorney General Kamala Harris, and was the Deputy Campaign Manager and Policy Director for Harris’s Senate campaign. Her work has emphasized consumer fraud, health, education, human trafficking, and civil rights, including issues related to gender and LGBT rights. Jill was previously a Lecturer in Law at Yale Law School and served on the Affirmative Litigation Task Force at the San Francisco City Attorney’s Office. Interested students must apply to the course via this Google Form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeYf7wyDl7Bo6Jykmmkg5orh4ycNgoh34TKqBRQWI1-IqCp6w/viewform?usp=sf_link Applications are due Friday, April 22 at 5pm PT. We encourage submission earlier to allow time for us to follow up with any questions as needed.


Law 227 Labor Law 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This course will focus on the law governing relations between employers and workers acting collectively through unions. Topics include employee and employer rights of freedom of speech and association in connection with union organizing, the processes of negotiation and dispute resolution used to establish wages and working conditions, and the various forms of litigation, lobbying, and alternative dispute resolution, including arbitration, that are used to enforce collective bargaining agreements and other statutory labor rights. We discuss governance and finance of labor organizations and the current controversy over public sector unions. This course does not overlap in coverage with Employment Law (individual employee rights) or Employment Discrimination (status-based discrimination).

Spring 2021 Description:
This course will focus on the law governing relations between employers and workers acting collectively through unions. Topics include employee and employer rights of freedom of speech and association in connection with union organizing, the processes of negotiation and dispute resolution used to establish wages and working conditions, and the various forms of litigation, lobbying, and alternative dispute resolution, including arbitration, that are used to enforce collective bargaining agreements and other statutory labor rights. We discuss governance and finance of labor organizations and the current controversy over public sector unions. This course does not overlap in coverage with Employment Law (individual employee rights) or Employment Discrimination (status-based discrimination).

Spring 2022 Description:
This course will focus on the law governing relations between employers and workers acting collectively through unions. Topics include employee and employer rights of freedom of speech and association in connection with union organizing, the processes of negotiation and dispute resolution used to establish wages and working conditions, and the various forms of litigation, lobbying, and alternative dispute resolution, including arbitration, that are used to enforce collective bargaining agreements and other statutory labor rights. We discuss governance and finance of labor organizations and the current controversy over public sector unions. This course does not overlap in coverage with Employment Law (individual employee rights) or Employment Discrimination (status-based discrimination).


Law 227.1 Labor and Employment Arbitration 1 Units
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2021 Description:
This class focuses on the practice of the historically important role of arbitration in labor and employment law. At the outset of the course, students will review several key cases dealing with basic arbitration principles in the fields of union and non-union employment. For the balance of the course, students will engage in case-presentation and writing exercises to develop skills for different aspects of arbitration proceedings; for example, opening and closing statements, procedural and evidence questions, decision-writing, and so on. In the final session of the course, students will work in teams to prepare and present a mock arbitration case before a professional arbitrator. The exercises used in this course have been developed, in part, for use in professional skill-building courses taught by the instructor for advocates and arbitrators. There is no prerequisite. Some students might find past or current study of courses such as Labor Law, Employment Law, and Evidence to be helpful, but they are not required. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency. The instructor is Barry Winograd, an arbitrator and mediator since 1988 specializing in labor and employment cases, and a past president of the National Academy of Arbitrators. Previously, Mr. Winograd was an administrative law judge in the labor law field in the 1980's and a staff attorney with the United Farm Workers Union in the 1970's. He has served on the adjunct faculty at Berkeley Law since 1985, and at the University of Michigan Law School from 2004 to 2009. The course in 2021 is expected to be his final semester of teaching at Berkeley Law.

Spring 2022 Description:
This class, offered on a credit-no credit basis, is based on practical experience and simulation exercises, including, for the final class session, a mock arbitration hearing presented to professional arbitrators. The exercises are similar to those used in professional legal education programs developed by the instructors for advocates and arbitrators. Brief writing assignments also will be used to sharpen student skills. As background for the class, attention will be paid to the historically important role of arbitration in labor and employment law. This area of law has been the source of many principles governing all types of arbitration as it has evolved in the past 50 years. At the outset of the class, students will become acquainted with basic arbitration law and practice in the fields of union and non-union employment, including decisions reflecting the continuing debate over compelling arbitration of statutory discrimination claims for individuals. A few readings will cover key legal principles arising under the National Labor Relations Act, as amended, and the Federal Arbitration Act. There is no prerequisite for the course. Some students might find past or current study of courses such as Labor Law, Employment Law, and Evidence to be helpful, but they are not required. Two co-instructors will teach the course. One is Barry Winograd. He has maintained a dispute resolution practice since 1988 as an arbitrator and mediator of labor and employment cases, as well as business and other civil disputes. He is a past president of the National Academy of Arbitrators. Previously, Winograd served as an administrative law judge for the California Public Employment Relations Board and as an attorney for the United Farm Workers of America. He has been a lecturer at Berkeley Law since 1985, teaching courses on labor law, arbitration, and mediation. He also has taught on the adjunct law school faculty at the University of Michigan, and has written a number of articles in professional journals in the labor and employment field. The other instructor is Andrea Dooley. She began her arbitration practice in 2014 and works throughout California, Nevada, and Alaska. Prior to becoming an arbitrator, Arbitrator Dooley was in private practice, representing unions and trust funds in arbitrations and litigation, collective bargaining, and elections. She also practiced as management counsel to labor organizations and nonprofits. After leaving her practice, she led labor-management programs, participated in national contract bargaining and interest-based bargaining, designed and implemented occupational safety and health programs, and advised managers and leaders on operational and regulatory issues. Arbitrator Dooley is a Faculty Member with the Labor Arbitration Institute and is the author of The Beginner’s Guide to Labor Arbitration Practice.


Law 227.2 Satisfaction in Law and Life 1 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
Recent studies have found alarming high rates of depression, anxiety, stress, and substance abuse among attorneys. Are lawyers doomed to be unhappy? Is there something about the profession -- or the people who choose to practice it -- that breeds unhappiness? Does the law school experience contribute to changing lawyers' mental health and behavioral habits for the worse? What can law students and lawyers do to foster their own satisfaction and the satisfaction of their colleagues? This class will explore these questions using a variety of materials -- from scientific studies about mental health, to self-health guides drawing on the field of positive psychology, to works of popular culture exploring these themes. Among other sources, we will draw on the resources of Berkeley's Greater Good Science Center, see https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/

Spring 2021 Description:
Recent studies have found alarming high rates of depression, anxiety, stress, and substance abuse among attorneys. Are lawyers doomed to be unhappy? Is there something about the profession -- or the people who choose to practice it -- that breeds unhappiness? Does the law school experience contribute to changing lawyers' mental health and behavioral habits for the worse? What can law students and lawyers do to foster their own satisfaction and the satisfaction of their colleagues? This class will explore these questions using a variety of materials -- from scientific studies about mental health, to self-health guides drawing on the field of positive psychology, to works of popular culture exploring these themes. Among other sources, we will draw on the resources of Berkeley's Greater Good Science Center, see https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/

Spring 2022 Description:
Recent studies have found alarming high rates of depression, anxiety, stress, and substance abuse among attorneys. Are lawyers doomed to be unhappy? Is there something about the profession -- or the people who choose to practice it -- that breeds unhappiness? Does the law school experience contribute to changing lawyers' mental health and behavioral habits for the worse? What can law students and lawyers do to foster their own satisfaction and the satisfaction of their colleagues? This class will explore these questions using a variety of materials -- from scientific studies about mental health, to self-health guides drawing on the field of positive psychology, to works of popular culture exploring these themes.


Law 227.21 Employment Law 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This course surveys the key federal and California laws that govern the workplace. The instructor will use a combination of lectures, guest speakers, and interactive hypotheticals to explore cutting-edge issues in employment law. Topics include who is an employee, emerging employment models in the gig economy, employment discrimination, disability law, employment status, privacy in the workplace, the future of class actions, the intersection between immigration status and employment, and wage and hour law. Students who take this class will have the ability to apply the law to issues that arise in the real world workplace. NOTE for 1Ls: This course will discuss contract and tort principles as those are part of the Employment Law history and case law, so this will require that 1Ls familiarize themselves with some of the basic principles of both areas of law.

Fall 2020 Description:
This is a survey of the law of work, focusing on the rights of individual employees. We cover common law and statutory regulation of employment termination and employee mobility, statutory regulation of wages, and working conditions, harassment, safety, privacy, leaves of absence, and compensation for illness and injury. The course will focus especially on the challenges of regulating work in the global economy in which compliance with legal requirements is unequally distributed across sectors. This course focuses on the rights of individual employees; it does not overlap with Labor Law (which covers the law of unions and collective representation) or Employment Discrimination (which covers status-based discrimination).

Spring 2022 Description:
This is a survey of the law of work, focusing on the rights of individual employees. We cover common law and statutory regulation of employment termination and employee mobility, statutory regulation of wages and working conditions, harassment, safety, privacy, leaves of absence, and compensation for illness and injury. The course will focus especially on the challenges of regulating work in the global economy in which compliance with legal requirements is unequally distributed across sectors. This course focuses on the rights of individual employees; it does not overlap with Labor Law (which covers the law of unions and collective representation) or Employment Discrimination (which covers status-based discrimination).


Law 227.31 Employment, Social Policy, and the Pandemic 1 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
This course will explore how American social welfare policies are tied to employment and what that has meant for economic security and inequality in the United States. We will examine new employment legislation related to Covid-19. We will study the structural challenges of the employment-linked social welfare system and what this has meant for economic security, and racial, gender, and class inequality in the economic downturn and pandemic. The goal will be to understand the failures of the system, especially for low-wage workers, single parents, undocumented workers, and those in nonstandard employment relationships. We will also discuss other countries' approach to similar issues and consider possible policy reforms. This class is among the special Fall 2020 1L elective seminars designed to give entering 1Ls an extra opportunity to form connections despite our remote form of interaction. In light of that goal, these classes will expect real-time attendance and may not be recorded. These classes will all be graded on a Credit/No Credit basis and total written work requirement will be no more than 8 double-spaced pages.


Law 227.8 Supreme Court Seminar 3 Units
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2021 Description:
This seminar examines the Supreme Court as an institution with emphasis on the ways in which the institutional forms and structures of the Court influence the decisions that the Court hands down. Topics studied include: appointments to the Court; the Court’s jurisdiction; the Court's procedures for determining which cases it will review; the internal deliberative processes of the Court; the role of the Government and other advocates before the Court; the role of the law clerks at the Court; the role of precedent; and proposals for increasing public access to the Court. Students will read the briefs and lower court opinions in constitutional law cases currently pending before the Supreme Court and debate the cases while role-playing the part of a Justice of the Supreme Court. Over the course of the semester, students will write a short certiorari pool memorandum; a short bench memorandum in a pending case; and majority and dissenting opinions in one of the pending cases covered in the class. This is an option one writing requirement course. Due to the nature of this class, some or all of the sessions may not be recorded and posted except as required for accommodation of students with disabilities. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency. NOTE: In this class, the usual provisions of Add/Drop do not apply. All interested students, whether enrolled or on the waitlist, must attend the first class in order to be admitted. Any student who does not attend the first class without prior permission of the instructor will be dropped from the class and the waitlist. No additional students will be permitted to add the course.

Fall 2022 Description:
This seminar examines the Supreme Court as an institution with emphasis on the ways in which the institutional forms and structures of the Court influence the decisions that the Court hands down. Topics studied include: appointments to the Court; the Court’s jurisdiction; the Court's procedures for determining which cases it will review; the internal deliberative processes of the Court; the role of the Government and other advocates before the Court; the role of the law clerks at the Court; the role of precedent; and proposals for increasing public access to the Court. Students will read the briefs and lower court opinions in constitutional law cases currently pending before the Supreme Court and debate the cases while role-playing the part of a Justice of the Supreme Court. Over the course of the semester, students will write a short certiorari pool memorandum; a short bench memorandum in a pending case; and majority and dissenting opinions in one of the pending cases covered in the class. This is an option one writing requirement course. Due to the nature of this class, some or all of the sessions may not be recorded and posted except as required for accommodation of students with disabilities. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency. NOTE: In this class, the usual provisions of Add/Drop do not apply. All interested students, whether enrolled or on the waitlist, must attend the first class in order to be admitted. Any student who does not attend the first class without prior permission of the instructor will be dropped from the class and the waitlist. No additional students will be permitted to add the course.


Law 227.9 California Wage and Hour Law 1 Units
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2021 Description:
Wage and hour law continues to dominate the employment law landscape in California. In this class, we will read the latest cases, discuss the most recent strategies (for both plaintiffs and defendants), and hear from the leading practitioners. This class will be as practical and hands-on as possible. We will use fact patterns to learn how to identify wage and hour violations in the real world. Syllabus Outline 1. Introduction to the course and the role of the class action device in wage and hour case 2. Overtime (OT) a. Exemptions b. Exceptions to Exemptions c. How OT works in CA 3. Compensable Time and Minimum Wage 4. Wage and hour trials 5. Substantive Areas a. Meal and Rest Periods b. Vacation Pay 6. Substantive Areas a. Business Expenses b. Wage Statements and Forms of Payment 7. PAGA, Arbitration and the Future of W/H Law Materials The materials will be mainly cases, supplemented with secondary sources. We will provide all of the materials to the students. Course-Specific Learning Outcomes Our goal is that students who take this course will be able to: 1. Comprehend both the fundamental tenets of and the cutting-edge trends in California wage and hour law; 2. Apply California wage and hour law to issues that arise in the modern workplace; 3. Formulate meaningful questions in response to specific factual scenarios in order to evaluate which wage and hour laws are implicated by a particular situation; and 4. Analyze the societal impacts of wage and hour law.

Spring 2022 Description:
Wage and hour law continues to dominate the employment law landscape in California. In this class, we will read the latest cases, discuss the most recent strategies (for both plaintiffs and defendants), and hear from the leading practitioners. This class will be as practical and hands-on as possible. We will use fact patterns to learn how to identify wage and hour violations in the real world. Syllabus Outline 1. Introduction to the course and the role of the class action device in wage and hour case 2. Overtime (OT) a. Exemptions b. Exceptions to Exemptions c. How OT works in CA 3. Compensable Time and Minimum Wage 4. Wage and hour trials 5. Substantive Areas a. Meal and Rest Periods b. Vacation Pay 6. Substantive Areas a. Business Expenses b. Wage Statements and Forms of Payment 7. PAGA, Arbitration and the Future of W/H Law Materials The materials will be mainly cases, supplemented with secondary sources. We will provide all of the materials to the students. Course-Specific Learning Outcomes Our goal is that students who take this course will be able to: 1. Comprehend both the fundamental tenets of and the cutting-edge trends in California wage and hour law; 2. Apply California wage and hour law to issues that arise in the modern workplace; 3. Formulate meaningful questions in response to specific factual scenarios in order to evaluate which wage and hour laws are implicated by a particular situation; and 4. Analyze the societal impacts of wage and hour law.


Law 230 Criminal Law 4 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Spring 2022: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This course is an introduction to criminal law with primary emphasis on the general principles of criminal liability.

Fall 2020 Description:
This course is an introduction to criminal law with primary emphasis on the general principles of criminal liability.

Spring 2021 Description:
This course is an introduction to criminal law with primary emphasis on the general principles of criminal liability.

Fall 2021 Description:
This course is an introduction to criminal law with primary emphasis on the general principles of criminal liability.

Spring 2022 Description:
This course is an introduction to criminal law with primary emphasis on the general principles of criminal liability.

Fall 2022 Description:
This course is an introduction to criminal law with primary emphasis on the general principles of criminal liability.


Law 230.2 Police Interrogations and Investigations: A Comparative Perspective 2 Units
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2022: In-Person Instruction
Description:
Spring 2021 Description:
The early stages of criminal investigations are often outcome-determinative, and this is true across nations, societies, and types of criminal justice systems. This course takes a comparative approach to the early stages of criminal investigations with a particular emphasis on investigations and interrogations by police and prosecutors. The seminar will cover some aspects of U.S. law and practice. But we will spend more time examining developments in other nations and systems. We will begin with the context for criminal justice reforms, discussing the structure and function of governmental institutions, such as police, courts, prosecution and defense; regulation of police investigations; interrogation theory and practice; rates of crime; and various nations’ criminal justice priorities. This is a very interesting time to take a comparative approach. A number of countries in Latin America are moving from record-based forms of adjudication to oral trials. Japan adopted a lay judge system for certain serious cases, and is recording most interrogations. These reforms in the adjudicative process influence how investigations are conducted and evidence is collected. Decisions from the European Court of Human Rights, and directives from the European Parliament and the Council of the European Union, are prompting changes in nations’ laws and investigative procedures in much of Europe. Criminal justice systems provide a lens through which to examine various nations’ values, cultures, and institutions. A 12-18 page paper is required. First drafts of the paper are due March 18, and the final papers will be due May 10. Prior enrollment in Criminal Procedure-Investigations is suggested, but not required. Students with knowledge, experience or interest in other systems (including LL.M. students) are encouraged to enroll.

Fall 2022 Description:
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Law 230.9 Where Civil and Criminal Laws Collide 1 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
The historically tight distinction between criminal and civil actions is dead. Most criminal actions, for example, include mandatory restitution, a civil remedy. Many civil actions, for example, include the possibility of punitive damages, a quasi-criminal sanction. And numerous federal statutes, such as the securities and racketeering laws, provide civil, regulatory,and criminal sanctions for the identical conduct. Indeed, most defendants charged with "white collar" crimes also face parallel regulatory actions and private civil actions, sometimes both state and federal. This course explores, from both practical and jurisprudential standpoints, the dilemmas and acute conflicts created by this interplay of civil, administrative, and criminal lawsuits, and suggests that judges, and lawyers, need to open their eyes to the new world where "civil" and "criminal" no longer describe what is going on in the courts. The teacher, Judge Jed S. Rakoff, is a former federal prosecutor and criminal defense lawyer, who has served 23 years as a federal district judge in the Southern District of New York. He also serves as an adjunct professor at Columbia Law School and is a regular writer for the New York Review of Books. This class will meet: Thursday, March 12th at 6:25-9:25 pm, Friday, March 13th 10 am -12:00 pm and 3:10 pm- 5:10 pm Saturday, March 14th 9:30 am-12:30 pm and 2:10 pm-5:10 pm

Spring 2021 Description:
The historically tight distinction between criminal and civil actions is dead. Most criminal actions, for example, include mandatory restitution, a civil remedy. Many civil actions, for example, include the possibility of punitive damages, a quasi-criminal sanction. And numerous federal statutes, such as the securities and racketeering laws, provide civil, regulatory,and criminal sanctions for the identical conduct. Indeed, most defendants charged with "white collar" crimes also face parallel regulatory actions and private civil actions, sometimes both state and federal. This course explores, from both practical and jurisprudential standpoints, the dilemmas and acute conflicts created by this interplay of civil, administrative, and criminal lawsuits, and suggests that judges, and lawyers, need to open their eyes to the new world where "civil" and "criminal" no longer describe what is going on in the courts. The teacher, Judge Jed S. Rakoff, is a former federal prosecutor and criminal defense lawyer, who has served 25 years as a federal district judge in the Southern District of New York. He also serves as an adjunct professor at both Columbia Law School and NYU Law School, and is a regular writer for the New York Review of Books. This class will meet: Thursday, March 4th 6:25PM-9:15PM Friday, March 5th 10AM-12PM and 3:10PM-5:10PM Saturday, March 6h 9:30AM-12:30PM and 2:10PM-5:10PM

Spring 2022 Description:
The historically tight distinction between criminal and civil actions is dead. Most criminal actions, for example, include mandatory restitution, a civil remedy. Many civil actions, for example, include the possibility of punitive damages, a quasi-criminal sanction. And numerous federal statutes, such as the securities and racketeering laws, provide civil, regulatory, and criminal sanctions for the identical conduct. Indeed, as the recent reversal of Bill Cosby's criminal conviction illustrates, most defendants charged with "white collar" crimes also face parallel regulatory actions and private civil actions, sometimes both state and federal, with significant consequences. This course explores, from both practical and jurisprudential standpoints, the dilemmas and acute conflicts created by this interplay of civil, administrative, and criminal lawsuits, and suggests that judges, and lawyers, need to open their eyes to the new world where "civil" and "criminal" no longer describe what is going on in the courts. The teacher, Judge Jed S. Rakoff, is a former federal prosecutor and criminal defense lawyer, who has served 25 years as a federal district judge in the Southern District of New York. He also serves as an adjunct professor at both Columbia Law School and NYU Law School, and is a regular writer for the New York Review of Books. This class will meet: Thursday, February 24th 6:25PM-9:15PM Friday, February 25th 10AM-12PM and 3:10PM-5:10PM Saturday, February 26th 9:30AM-12:30PM and 2:10PM-5:10PM


Law 231 Criminal Procedure - Investigations 4 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Spring 2022: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
The course will examine criminal investigations and the constitutional law relating to police officers and lawyers. Topics include the role of prosecution and defense counsel, search and seizure, police interrogation, the exclusionary rule, grand juries, eyewitness identifications, and the assistance of counsel. In addition to doctrine, we will regularly discuss public policy and lawyering strategies. Students will be expected to attend class and participate in discussions throughout the semester. Students will be "on call" approximately every third week, and will be excused from "on call" obligations only if they notify the instructor in advance about a conflict, unavailability, or a circumstance that makes it unreasonable to expect them to participate. Students will be expected to make up any of these excused on-call obligations. Just like the big, big, big quiz held every July, there will be an in-class, closed book final exam. There will also be 2 open-book on-line quizzes during the semester.

Fall 2020 Description:
This course covers the law of criminal investigations, based primarily on the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution. Topics include the constitutional rules for searching homes, cars, and people; the law of arrests; stop and frisk; surveillance law and computer searches; the scope of the exclusionary rule; the law of police interrogations, including the framework provided by Miranda v. Arizona; the role of the Sixth Amendment right to counsel; entrapment law; and the law of eyewitness identification. Students will be expected to attend class and to participate in discussions throughout the semester.

Spring 2021 Description:
This course covers the law of criminal investigations, based primarily on the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution. Topics include the constitutional rules for searching homes, cars, and people; the law of arrests; stop and frisk; surveillance law and computer searches; the scope of the exclusionary rule; the law of police interrogations, including the framework provided by Miranda v. Arizona; the role of the Sixth Amendment right to counsel; entrapment law; and the law of eyewitness identification. Students will be expected to attend class and to participate in discussions throughout the semester.

Fall 2021 Description:
The course will examine criminal investigations and the constitutional law relating to police officers and lawyers. Topics include: the current structure and function of police, prosecutors and defense lawyers; the right to counsel; search and seizure; use of force; stop and frisk; police interrogation; the privilege against compelled self-incrimination; the exclusionary rule; and grand juries. We will explore public policy and lawyering strategies. We will discuss whether constitutional criminal procedure doctrines help or hinder efforts to regulate police and to check racism and police violence. We will also briefly consider civil rights doctrines, and the efficacy of civil lawsuits in regulating police. Students are expected to participate in class. Students will be "on call" periodically (with flexibility for those who cannot join on a particular day). The final will be a closed-book in-class exam. There will also be 2 required open-book on-line quizzes during the semester.

Spring 2022 Description:
This course covers the law of criminal investigations, based primarily on the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution. Topics include the constitutional rules for searching homes, cars, and people; the law of arrests; stop and frisk; surveillance law and computer searches; the scope of the exclusionary rule; the law of police interrogations, including the framework provided by Miranda v. Arizona; the role of the Sixth Amendment right to counsel; entrapment law; and the law of eyewitness identification. Students will be expected to attend class and to participate in discussions throughout the semester.

Fall 2022 Description:
The course will examine constitutional law concerning criminal investigations. Topics include the role of prosecution and defense counsel, search and seizure, police interrogation, the exclusionary rule, eyewitness identifications, and the assistance of counsel. In addition to doctrine, we will regularly discuss public policy and lawyering strategies. A major theme of the course looks at how the Supreme Court's decisions have contributed to issues of race and policing in the United States. Students will be expected to attend class and participate in discussions throughout the semester. The grade will be based on a final examination. It will be an open-book, open-notes eight hour take-home exam that can be taken any time during the exam period.


Law 231.1 Criminal Procedure - Adjudication 4 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This course is about how a criminal case advances through the court system. It covers charging decisions and grand jury; bail; right to counsel; right to jury; plea bargaining; discovery; pre-trial, trial, and post-trial proceedings; double jeopardy; sentencing; habeas corpus; and appellate standards of review. We will concentrate primarily on federal law, with some coverage of state procedure. This class will be taught from a practitioner's vantage. To that end, we will spend substantial class time discussing practical application, including a mandatory but ungraded motion assignment. Note, Criminal Procedure-Investigations is not a prerequisite.

Spring 2021 Description:
This course is about how a criminal case advances through the court system. It covers charging decisions and grand jury; bail; right to counsel; right to jury; plea bargaining; discovery; pre-trial, trial, and post-trial proceedings; double jeopardy; sentencing; habeas corpus; and appellate standards of review. We will concentrate primarily on federal law, with some coverage of state procedure. This class will be taught from a practitioner's vantage. To that end, we will spend substantial class time discussing practical application, including a mandatory but ungraded motion assignment. Note: Criminal Procedure-Investigations and Evidence are not prerequisites, and cover substantially different material. Also note: If you are taking Criminal Procedure primarily for bar exam purposes, and have to choose between taking Investigations or Adjudication, I would strongly suggest taking Investigations instead.

Spring 2022 Description:
The course aims to provide you with general knowledge and insights into the principles of American criminal procedure, focusing on the adjudicative process "from bail to jail." Our theoretical focus will be on the tension between the Crime Control model, which advocates swift determinations and final outcomes largely via a plea bargaining system, and the Due Process model, which advocates trial advocacy, cross examination, and opportunities for quality control. Through these models, we will examine various issues concerning adjudication and sentencing: bail, prosecutorial discretion in charging, preliminary hearings, grand juries, pretrial motions and discovery, joinder and severance, the right to a speedy trial, effective assistance of counsel, adversarial rights, the right to a jury, jury selection and deliberation, sentencing, crimmigration, double jeopardy, appeals, and habeas corpus. We will pay attention to Constitutional rights and limitations, as well as to Federal and California law, when applicable. The course is taught through a flipped classroom method. You will receive readings and prerecorded lecturettes. During class, we will focus on problem solving and simulations, including plea bargain negotiation, jury selection, closing and sentencing arguments, and motion practice. Learning Outcomes At the end of the semester you should be able to: 1. Describe bail mechanisms and assess whether a given decision to detain someone or release him/her on bail is constitutional 2. Explain the factors in, and constraints on, prosecutorial discretion in charging 3. Explain pretrial proceedings in California and Federal law, and assess whether a given defendant was treated constitutionally in a pretrial hearing or in a grand jury hearing 4. Explain the constitutional requirements of discovery and California practices regarding discovery, and assess whether the prosecution has complied with Brady requirements in a given scenario 5. Assess whether plea negotiations in a given case violated the constitution, and explain whether a given conviction obtained through a plea bargain can be attacked, directly or collaterally 6. Analyze possible violations of the right to a jury trial in a given case 7. Analyze possible violations of the right to confront witnesses in a given case 8. Describe the general sentencing scheme in a typical case under Federal law and under California law 9. Predict the immigration consequences of criminal convictions 10. Describe the appellate process and the Federal Habeas process 11. Assess which paths are open to a given defendant in terms of post-conviction remedies


Law 231.5 California Prisons and Discretionary Parole 1 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This is a one-unit course through which students learn a variety of practical legal skills while also learning how to advocate for indigent California prisoners. Students interact with prisoners' rights attorneys, prison experts, prison workers and people who are currently and formerly incarcerated. They also complete reading and writing assignments exposing them to the constantly-changing legal landscape of life inside California’s prison system. Students will develop skills in working with clients from diverse backgrounds; document review and synthesis; and counseling clients preparing for administrative proceedings. Students are graded on a credit/no-credit basis, as determined by class participation and completion of several writing assignments, which may include: legal counseling memoranda and reflection memoranda following prison tours and observations of parole consideration hearings. While not required, this course complements Berkeley Law’s Post-Conviction Advocacy Project (P-CAP), a student-initiated legal services project. P-CAP participants conduct in-depth, one-on-one meetings with clients housed at San Quentin and other prisons. They also interact with individuals and organizations in the community (e.g., family members of incarcerated persons, community service providers, etc.) to help clients develop residential, employment and after-care plans to address long-standing issues that contributed to past criminality. Students' P-CAP participation culminates in their appearance as certified law students representing clients appearing before the California parole board. Course Instructor Keith Wattley is the Founder and Executive Director of UnCommon Law, a nonprofit law firm that provides counseling and legal services to California prisoners serving life sentences. He is currently involved in a two-year Fellowship with the Obama Foundation, which is helping bring UnCommon Law's work to scale. Prior to launching UnCommon Law in 2006, Keith was a staff attorney at the Prison Law Office, a nonprofit law firm in Berkeley. He has represented thousands of prisoners in impact litigation and individual matters. He has also trained hundreds of lawyers, law students and others in prisoner and parole advocacy. Keith supervises the Post-Conviction Advocacy Project at UC Berkeley School of Law and received the Law School's 2016 Kathi Pugh Award for Exceptional Mentorship.

Spring 2021 Description:
This is a one-unit course through which students learn a variety of practical legal skills while also learning how to advocate for people serving time in California prisons. Students interact with attorneys, experts, prison workers and people who are currently and formerly incarcerated. They also complete reading and writing assignments exposing them to the constantly-changing legal landscape of life inside California’s prison system. Students will develop skills in working with clients from diverse backgrounds; document review and synthesis; and counseling clients preparing for administrative proceedings. Students are graded on a credit/no-credit basis, as determined by class participation and completion of several writing assignments, which may include: legal counseling memoranda and reflection memoranda following prison tours and observations of parole consideration hearings. While not required, this course complements Berkeley Law’s Post-Conviction Advocacy Project (P-CAP), a student-initiated legal services project. P-CAP participants conduct in-depth, one-on-one meetings with clients housed at San Quentin and other prisons. They also interact with individuals and organizations in the community (e.g., family members of incarcerated persons, community service providers, etc.) to help clients develop residential, employment and after-care plans to address long-standing issues that contributed to past criminality. Students' P-CAP participation culminates in their appearance as certified law students representing clients appearing before the California parole board. This course will meet every other week on these dates: January 25th, February 8th, February 22nd, March 8th, April 5th, April 19th, and May 3rd. Course Instructor Keith Wattley is the Founder and Executive Director of UnCommon Law, a nonprofit law firm that provides counseling and legal services to people serving life sentences. He was an inaugural Obama Foundation Fellow and a current James Irvine Foundation Leadership Award recipient. Prior to launching UnCommon Law in 2006, Keith was a staff attorney at the Prison Law Office, a nonprofit law firm in Berkeley. He has represented thousands in impact litigation and individual matters. He has also trained hundreds of lawyers, law students and others. Keith supervises the Post-Conviction Advocacy Project at UC Berkeley School of Law and received the Law School's 2016 Kathi Pugh Award for Exceptional Mentorship.

Spring 2022 Description:
This is a one-unit course through which students learn a variety of practical legal skills while also learning how to advocate for people serving time in California prisons. Students interact with attorneys, experts, prison workers and people who are currently and formerly incarcerated. They also complete reading and writing assignments exposing them to the constantly-changing legal landscape of life inside California’s prison system. Students will develop skills in working with clients from diverse backgrounds; document review and synthesis; and counseling clients preparing for administrative proceedings. Students are graded on a credit/no-credit basis, as determined by completion of several writing assignments, which may include: legal counseling memoranda and reflection memoranda following prison tours and observations of parole consideration hearings. While not required, this course complements Berkeley Law’s Post-Conviction Advocacy Project (P-CAP), a student-initiated legal services project. P-CAP participants conduct in-depth, one-on-one meetings with clients housed at San Quentin and other prisons. They also interact with individuals and organizations in the community (e.g., family members of incarcerated persons, community service providers, etc.) to help clients develop residential, employment and after-care plans to address long-standing issues that contributed to past criminality. Students' P-CAP participation culminates in their appearance as certified law students representing clients appearing before the California parole board. This course will meet roughly every other week from January through April. Course Instructor Keith Wattley is the Founder and Executive Director of UnCommon Law, a nonprofit law firm that provides counseling and legal services to people serving life sentences. He was an inaugural Obama Foundation Fellow and a current James Irvine Foundation Leadership Award recipient. He has represented thousands in impact litigation and individual matters. He has also trained hundreds of lawyers, law students and others. For many years, Keith supervised the Post-Conviction Advocacy Project at Berkeley Law and received the Law School's 2016 Kathi Pugh Award for Exceptional Mentorship.


Law 231.51 People, Prisons and the Pandemic 2 Units
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Spring 2021 Description:
This seminar will focus upon the plight and treatment of individuals detained in prisons, jails and detention centers during the COVID-19 pandemic. Potential topics may include COVID-19 and public health, and efforts by detainees, advocates, judges and officials to address the crisis, including through litigation, legislation, early release (such as parole, compassionate release, and home confinement), non-prosecution or diversion, bail, and implementing safety measures and medical care within institutions. We will adjust the course topics in light of conditions in Spring 2021. This is an Option 1 course with a paper of 12-18 pages. First drafts of the papers are due March 18. Final papers will be due May 10. Students will be encouraged to use their papers to explore any related topic that most interests them.


Law 232.11 When Technology Meets a Criminal Case 1 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
In today's world, technology is increasingly prevalent in the investigation and litigation of criminal cases. From location tracking information to facial recognition, from risk assessment tools used to set bail conditions to probabilistic genotyping software used to analyze DNA, among many others, technology permeates criminal cases from the start of an investigation to the conclusion of someone's sentence. This course will survey various technologies that are deployed during criminal cases and will confront the sorts of legal issues and challenges they present. Classes will be discussion-based and will focus on a different technology (or several) each week. Each student will give a short presentation (5-7 minutes) on a particular technology once during the course to help set the stage for our discussion. Grading will be based on a short final paper (6-8 pages) on a topic of the student's choosing, selected in consultation with the instructor. This class is among the special Fall 2020 1L elective seminars designed to give entering 1Ls an extra opportunity to form connections despite our remote form of interaction. In light of that goal, these classes will expect real-time attendance and may not be recorded. These classes will all be graded on a Credit/No Credit basis and total written work requirement will be no more than 8 double-spaced pages.


Law 232.31 Beyond Law and Order: Criminal Justice in Film and Television 1 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
This course explores how criminal justice has been portrayed in, and affected by, film and television. The class will watch several iconic films and TV shows depicting some aspect of the criminal justice system. It will explore the legal, social, and professional ethical issues raised by the films, critique the films' constructions of crime and criminality, lawyering and judging, and legal process (with an emphasis on race, class, and gender), and - to develop students' cultural literacy -- explain the films' substantive contributions to legal discourse, law reform, and public perceptions of criminal justice. The class will meet every other week for 100 minutes, and a film or TV show will be the assigned viewing between classes. We may experiment with simultaneous dinner-time viewing sessions. Instructors have years of experience representing indigent clients in the criminal justice system, watching movies and TV, and eating dinner. This course meets every other Thursday for 7 sessions beginning August 27th. This class is among the special Fall 2020 1L elective seminars designed to give entering 1Ls an extra opportunity to form connections despite our remote form of interaction. In light of that goal, these classes will expect real-time attendance and may not be recorded. These classes will all be graded on a Credit/No Credit basis and total written work requirement will be no more than 8 double-spaced pages.


Law 232.71 Police Use of Force in the 21st Century 2 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
High profile incidents like the deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner have put police conduct in the spotlight and created a wave of legal and policy reforms. In this course, we will examine the various legal responses and remedies to these incidents, including criminal prosecution, civil litigation, and administrative processes (internal affairs investigations/civilian oversight investigations/administrative discipline). This course will present a wide range of perspectives from civil rights lawyers, advocates for police accountability, and officers who have been involved in a shooting. Students will have the opportunity to go offsite to experience the use of force simulator used to train recruits and officers at the San Francisco Police Department Training Academy. The final evaluation will be an analysis of a model case from one or more of the perspectives presented.


Law 232.9 Crimmigration 2 Units
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Spring 2021 Description:
Over the last several years the fields of immigration law and criminal law have converged into what has become known as "crimmigration," a fusion that has been called a "new system of social control." "Crimmigration" is a phenomenon that relates both to the combining of techniques and targets of enforcement and to the conflation of the "immigrant" and the "criminal." We will examine how the system of "crimmigration" developed historically and how scholars assess its rise. We will study the role of rhetoric, including the use of the term "criminal alien," the way the term "illegal" - when used to modify "immigrants" - has become aligned with "criminal," and the linking of "immigrant" with "criminal." We will discuss the grounded consequences of this convergence, namely the immigration consequences of criminal convictions, the immigration offenses that are federally prosecuted, and the enforcement of crimmigration. And we will consider what might be strategic and ethical responses to this convergence. Students will be exposed to relevant doctrine and legal scholarship, as well as key writings from other fields. Immigration Law is not a prerequisite for this course. Course requirements will include a twelve-page research paper, in-class presentations, reflection papers, and active participation.


Law 233 White Collar Crime 2 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
This course is an introduction to white collar criminal law and practice. It is designed to teach substantive legal issues and real‐world lawyering skills from the perspectives of both the prosecution and the defense. We will explore a range of crimes, including conspiracy, mail and wire fraud, securities fraud, antitrust violations, obstruction of justice, and perjury. Students will reinforce their understanding of the black‐letter law through practical exercises based on realistic fact patterns. The exercises will include lawyering skills such as oral advocacy, presenting to Department of Justice supervisors, creating an investigative plan, and calculating sentences. Amy Craig is a partner at Ramsey & Ehrlich LLP, a small, trial-focused firm founded by two former federal prosecutors in Berkeley, California. Ms. Craig’s practice focuses on defending individuals in enforcement actions brought by the U.S. Department of Justice and the Securities and Exchange Commission. She has also represented special board committees during company internal investigations into potential misconduct or malfeasance by corporate officers, directors, or other employees. She and her colleagues also represent indigent clients as Criminal Justice Act counsel in the Northern District of California. Ismail Ramsey is a veteran trial lawyer specializing in white collar and general criminal defense, as well as commercial litigation. He has more than twenty years of experience litigating and trying highly sensitive, complex criminal and civil cases. He has also represented numerous individuals, as well as boards of directors and special board committees, during company internal investigations into potential misconduct or malfeasance by corporate officers, directors, or other employees. Before co-founding Ramsey & Ehrlich in 2006, he was a federal prosecutor in the United States Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of California, serving as a member of the White Collar Crime Section, as well as a founding member of the Computer Hacking and Intellectual Property Unit. He also volunteers in his community, serving by mayoral appointment as a Commissioner on the City of Berkeley Police Review Commission.

Fall 2021 Description:
This course is an introduction to white collar criminal law and practice. It is designed to teach substantive legal issues and real‐world lawyering skills from the perspectives of both the prosecution and the defense. We will explore a range of crimes, including conspiracy, mail and wire fraud, securities fraud, antitrust violations, trade secret theft, obstruction of justice, and perjury. Students will reinforce their understanding of the black‐letter law through practical exercises based on realistic fact patterns. The exercises will include lawyering skills such as oral advocacy, presenting to Department of Justice supervisors, creating an investigative plan, and calculating sentences. Amy Craig is a partner at Ramsey & Ehrlich LLP, a small, trial-focused firm founded by two former federal prosecutors in Berkeley, California. Ms. Craig’s practice focuses on defending individuals in enforcement actions brought by the U.S. Department of Justice and the Securities and Exchange Commission. She has also represented special board committees during company internal investigations into potential misconduct or malfeasance by corporate officers, directors, or other employees. She and her colleagues also represent indigent clients as Criminal Justice Act counsel in the Northern District of California. Ismail Ramsey is a veteran trial lawyer specializing in white collar and general criminal defense, as well as commercial litigation. He has more than twenty years of experience litigating and trying highly sensitive, complex criminal and civil cases. He has also represented numerous individuals, as well as boards of directors and special board committees, during company internal investigations into potential misconduct or malfeasance by corporate officers, directors, or other employees. Before co-founding Ramsey & Ehrlich in 2006, he was a federal prosecutor in the United States Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of California, serving as a member of the White Collar Crime Section, as well as a founding member of the Computer Hacking and Intellectual Property Unit. He also volunteers in his community, serving by mayoral appointment as a Commissioner on the City of Berkeley Police Review Commission.

Fall 2022 Description:
This course is an introduction to white collar criminal law and practice. It is designed to teach substantive legal issues and real‐world lawyering skills from the perspectives of both the prosecution and the defense. We will explore a range of crimes, including conspiracy, mail and wire fraud, securities fraud, antitrust violations, trade secret theft, obstruction of justice, and perjury. Students will reinforce their understanding of the black‐letter law through practical exercises based on realistic fact patterns. The exercises will include lawyering skills such as oral advocacy, presenting to Department of Justice supervisors, creating an investigative plan, and calculating sentences. Amy Craig is a partner at Ramsey & Ehrlich LLP, a small, trial-focused firm founded by two former federal prosecutors in Berkeley, California. Ms. Craig’s practice focuses on defending individuals in enforcement actions brought by the U.S. Department of Justice and the Securities and Exchange Commission. She has also represented special board committees during company internal investigations into potential misconduct or malfeasance by corporate officers, directors, or other employees. She and her colleagues also represent indigent clients as Criminal Justice Act counsel in the Northern District of California. Ismail Ramsey is a veteran trial lawyer specializing in white collar and general criminal defense, as well as commercial litigation. He has more than twenty years of experience litigating and trying highly sensitive, complex criminal and civil cases. He has also represented numerous individuals, as well as boards of directors and special board committees, during company internal investigations into potential misconduct or malfeasance by corporate officers, directors, or other employees. Before co-founding Ramsey & Ehrlich in 2006, he was a federal prosecutor in the United States Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of California, serving as a member of the White Collar Crime Section, as well as a founding member of the Computer Hacking and Intellectual Property Unit. He also volunteers in his community, serving by mayoral appointment as a Commissioner on the City of Berkeley Police Accountability Board.


Law 234.1 The School-to-Prison Pipeline 1 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This seminar will provide a broad survey of the origins, history, and disparate impact of the school-to-prison pipeline. Students will also have the opportunity to develop, debate, and practice advocacy skills to combat the pipeline. Students will be expected to think critically about the intersection of school discipline; racial, gender, and disability justice; juvenile justice; and policing through the lens of current events at schools in Alameda County, particularly in Oakland and Berkeley. Course materials will include documentaries, podcasts, policy reports, book chapters, government and non-profit websites, the California Education Code, and news articles about efforts to end the school-to-prison pipeline by removing police from schools, increasing the use of restorative justice, reframing "safety," and transforming the very structure of public schools, among other efforts. Students will have the opportunity to apply their knowledge through small group projects by drafting legislation and participating in mock expulsion and IEP hearings. Students will also hear from guest speakers, potentially including community organizers and restorative justice facilitators. This course is taught by Oscar Lopez, Staff Attorney and Clinical Instructor with the Education Advocacy Clinic at EBCLC. Professor Lopez represents young people caught at the intersection of the juvenile justice and school discipline systems in Alameda County. Professor Lopez also partners with local, state, and national organizers as part of larger systemic advocacy efforts. In lieu of a final assignment, students will be expected to submit brief weekly reflections on the week's course materials.

Spring 2021 Description:
This seminar will provide a broad survey of the origins, history, and disparate impact of the school-to-prison pipeline. Students will also have the opportunity to develop, debate, and practice advocacy skills to combat the pipeline. Students will be expected to think critically about the intersection of school discipline; racial, gender, and disability justice; juvenile justice; and policing through the lens of current events at schools in Alameda County, particularly in Oakland and Berkeley. Course materials will include documentaries, podcasts, policy reports, book chapters, government and non-profit websites, the California Education Code, caselaw, and news articles. Topics include general efforts to end the school-to-prison pipeline, the removal of police from schools, increasing the use of restorative justice, reimagining "safety," and transforming the very structure of public schools. Students will have the opportunity to apply their knowledge through small group projects and mock expulsion and IEP hearings. Students will also hear from guest speakers, potentially including community organizers and restorative justice facilitators. This course is taught by Oscar Lopez, Interim Director and Clinical Supervisor with the Education Advocacy Clinic at EBCLC. Professor Lopez represents young people caught at the intersection of the juvenile justice and school discipline systems in Alameda County. Professor Lopez also partners with local, state, and national organizers as part of larger systemic advocacy efforts. Students will be expected to submit a 3-page mid-semester reflection paper and an 8-page final paper.


Law 234.2 Criminal Justice Reform 2 Units
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2021 Description:
“In thinking specifically about the abolition of prisons, ...using the approach of abolition democracy, we would propose the creation of an array of social institutions that would begin to solve the problems that set people on the track to prison, thereby helping to render the prison obsolete.” -Angela Davis, Are Prisons Obsolete? (2003) This class investigates how criminal justice reform is changing as a result of the unprecedented Black Lives Matter movement. Just since June, some of the largest demonstrations in American history have issued calls for “defunding,” “shrinking” or even “abolishing” police and other institutions of criminal justice have joined the usual fray incremental policy improvements. This seminar aims to explore the shifting terrain of technocratic reform and abolition democracy across the various institutions that make up the criminal justice system. Some of the questions we will take up include: What makes some institutions reform worthy, and other one’s candidates for abolition? Given that the criminal justice system cannot change all at once, or disappear in an instant, when do reforms approach abolition? And when should reforms be resisted? Is it possible to be an abolitionist Public Defender? Prosecutor? Warden? Police Chief? Judge? To facilitate collaboration and discussion in the challenging terrain of Zoom, the instructor will make frequent use of short pre-recorded videos offering an overview of the weekly topic that will be available well before the class so that we can devote our time together to discussion. Watching these videos will be part of your assigned preparation and readings will be shortened accordingly. A short final paper (12-15 pages) that meets the Option 1 Writing Requirement will be due at the end of the final exam period.

Fall 2022 Description:
Today it is common to describe the form of legal punishment in the United States since the late 20th century as “mass incarceration”; but how did we get there and are the very visible social harms of that regime exceptions or expressions of fundamental flaws in the role punishment plays in modern society? This course provides tools to answer those questions by exploring the relationship between punishment, law and society, as well as efforts to abolish punishment, over the long arc of western legal history. The course will cover the major transformations of punishment and abolition since the birth of the prison at the end of the 18th century, right up to the birth of mass incarceration. It will also introduce students to theoretical work that can help untangle the historically and geographically diverse interrelationship between social change, legal reform, and penal practices including: the sociology of law, critical race theory, gender and sexuality theory, and political economy. The course is also designed to help students complete a major piece of research and writing (30 plus pages) for academic (journal article) or professional (strategic memo) purposes. Participants will choose a topic in discussion with Professor Simon related to change in penal laws, practices or abolitions thereof, going on today (or an historical example with contemporary resonance) and explain its significance (and policy implications) drawing on the histories or theories covered in the course or related materials. All students will receive comments on a graded rough draft (date and portion of grade to be determined) and be expected to participate in leading the discussion of specific assigned materials.


Law 234.21 Dismantling Mass Incarceration 1 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This one-unit seminar provides students with both a broad survey of both the underlying causes and invidious effects of the exploding prison and jail population in the United States, as well as the potential costs and benefits of reforms targeted at this crisis. Students will study how generally well-intentioned but ultimately misguided efforts undertaken in the name of public safety have resulted in a 500% increase in the number of people incarcerated in the United States over the last forty years, as well as the creation of a growing, pervasive and racially disparate underclass ensnared by the direct and collateral consequences of these policies. Assigned reading materials will prepare students to analyze and discuss the myriad factors that contribute to the racial disparities in policing, charging and sentencing inherent in the criminal justice system. Students will think critically about the confluence of societal, economic and political trends underlying recent efforts at reform, as well as the viability of other potential strategies, especially vis-à-vis today’s polarized political climate. In addition, students will question and debate the role that advocates can play in increasing public awareness of, and working towards solutions to, the dire social, economic and political consequences of mass incarceration. ------------------------ Tony Cheng is the Director of the Youth Defender Clinic (YDC) at the East Bay Community Law Center (EBCLC), a community-based legal services clinic affiliated with Berkeley Law. Clinical law students in the YDC represent system-involved and at-risk youth in Alameda County in both juvenile delinquency proceedings and school discipline matters. Prior to joining EBCLC in 2018, Tony practiced as a public defender for twenty years, litigating cases in the Ninth Circuit US Court of Appeals, the federal district court for the Southern District of California, San Diego County Superior Court and, most recently, Alameda County Superior Court. In addition to trying nearly forty criminal jury trials to verdict during his public defender career, Tony is also certified by the National Juvenile Defender Center to train juvenile defenders and has contributed to training and educational materials published by the Pacific Juvenile Defense Center.

Spring 2021 Description:
This seminar provides students with a broad survey of both the underlying causes and invidious effects of the exploding prison and jail population in the United States, as well as the potential costs and benefits of reforms targeted specifically at this crisis. Students will study how generally well-intentioned but ultimately misguided efforts undertaken in the name of public safety have resulted in a 500% increase in the number of people incarcerated in the United States over the last forty years, as well as the creation of a growing, pervasive and racially segregated underclass ensnared by the direct and collateral consequences of these policies. Assigned reading materials will prepare students to analyze and discuss the myriad factors that contribute to the racial disparities in policing, charging and sentencing that result in the structural racism endemic in our criminal justice system. Students will think critically about the confluence of societal, economic and political trends underlying recent efforts at reform, and debate the viability of other potential strategies, especially vis-à-vis today’s polarized political climate. In addition, students will examine and question the role that advocates can play in increasing public awareness of, and working towards solutions to, the dire social, economic and political consequences of mass incarceration. ------------------------ Tony Cheng is the Director of the Youth Defender Clinic (YDC) at the East Bay Community Law Center (EBCLC), the community-based legal services clinic affiliated with Berkeley Law. Clinical law students in YDC represent system-involved and system-adjacent youth in Alameda County in both juvenile delinquency proceedings and school discipline matters. Prior to joining EBCLC in 2018, Tony practiced as a public defender for twenty years, litigating cases in the Ninth Circuit US Court of Appeals, the federal district court for the Southern District of California, San Diego County Superior Court and, most recently, Alameda County Superior Court. In addition to trying nearly forty criminal jury trials to verdict during his public defender career, Tony is also certified by the National Juvenile Defender Center (NJDC) to train juvenile defenders and serves as CFO on the board of directors for the Pacific Juvenile Defense Center (PJDC).

Spring 2022 Description:
This seminar provides students with a broad survey of both the underlying causes and invidious effects of the exploding prison and jail population in the United States, as well as the potential costs and benefits of reforms targeted specifically at this crisis. Students will study how sometimes well-intentioned, but ultimately misguided, efforts undertaken in the name of public safety have resulted in a 500% increase in the number of people incarcerated in the United States over the last forty years, as well as the creation of a growing, pervasive and racially segregated underclass ensnared by the direct and collateral consequences of these policies. Assigned reading materials will prepare students to analyze and discuss the myriad factors that contribute to racial disparities in policing, charging and sentencing that result in the structural racism endemic in our criminal justice system. Students will think critically about the confluence of societal, economic and political trends underlying recent efforts at reform, and debate the viability of other potential strategies, especially vis-à-vis today’s polarized political climate. In addition, students will examine and question the role that advocates can play in increasing public awareness of, and working towards solutions to, the dire social, economic and political consequences of mass incarceration. ------------------------ Tony Cheng is the former Director of the Youth Defender Clinic (YDC) at the East Bay Community Law Center (EBCLC), a community-based legal services clinic affiliated with Berkeley Law. Prior to joining EBCLC in 2018, Tony practiced as a public defender for twenty years, in both federal and state trial and appellate courts in San Diego and in the Bay Area. In addition to having tried nearly forty criminal jury trials to verdict as a public defender, Tony is also certified as a trainer for juvenile defenders by the National Juvenile Defender Center (NJDC) and serves as CFO on the board of directors for the Pacific Juvenile Defender Center (PJDC).


Law 234.22 Dismantling the Carceral State 1 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
This seminar will explore the role of law in constructing and maintaining the carceral state, and the transformative potential and inherent limits of law as a means of abolishing the prison industrial complex. We will analyze these issues using an abolitionist framework, and though there are a number of movements that refer to themselves as abolitionist and that are working to dismantle a wide range of interrelated oppressive systems (including, but not limited to, sexual violence, patriarchy, capitalism, heteronormativity, ableism, imperialism, and militarism), this course will focus specifically on the movement to abolish the prison industrial complex. While abolitionists often resist closed definitions, we will ground our examination in three core tenets that are common to formulations of abolitionist philosophy: 1) The modern prison industrial complex can be traced back to chattel slavery and the racist regimes it relied on and sustained, 2) the criminal punishment system functions to oppress Black people and other politically marginalized groups in order to maintain racial hierarchy, and 3) we can imagine and build a more humane and just society that no longer defaults to violence and cages to solve social problems. Specific questions we will consider include: How does the law enable the anti-Black violence that is central to racial hierarchy? What is the role of economic exploitation in maintaining the carceral state? What might community safety look like in a world without police, prosecutors, and prisons? Finally, we will explore how law students and lawyers might operationalize abolitionist principles in their education and practice. This class is among the special Fall 2020 1L elective seminars designed to give entering 1Ls an extra opportunity to form connections despite our remote form of interaction. In light of that goal, these classes will expect real-time attendance and may not be recorded. These classes will all be graded on a Credit/No Credit basis and total written work requirement will be no more than 8 double-spaced pages.


Law 234.9 Election Law Practicum Seminar 2 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
In the Election Law seminar and practicum, students will be working on cutting-edge voting rights projects in California through a collaboration with the ACLU of Northern California voting rights attorneys. In the seminar component, students will learn about election law and policy, with an emphasis on 1) California state and local elections and 2) how voting laws affect power and representation of historically marginalized communities. The seminar will expand upon topics covered in Election Law, Legislation and Statutory Interpretation, and Administrative Law. These classes are not prerequisites for the seminar. In the practicum, students will have the opportunity to put theory into practice by advocating for election law reform in the state legislature, evaluating recent voting rights reforms, developing toolkits for better implementation, monitoring elections, or engaging in litigation to enforce voting rights. Students will join working groups focused on specific topics. Each working group will have 2-3 students and 1-2 supervising attorneys that will include staff from the ACLU and the co-seminar instructor, Bertrall Ross. Working groups will meet in person or by phone every other week. Students should e-mail assignment updates or written work product to supervising attorneys at least 24 hours in advance of each meeting. During working group meetings, students will present their work and supervising attorneys will give feedback, project updates, and new assignments. Potential topics for working group assignments will include districting and redistricting, voter registration, and election monitoring The seminar will be 2 units and will meet one day a week for 110 minutes. The practicum will 2 experiential units and will require 8 hours of work per week that will be scheduled and arranged with the student's working group. Students must enroll in both. This class will be enrollment by application. Please send to Bertrall Ross (bertrallr@berkeley.edu) your resume and a 1-2 paragraph explanation of the reason why you would like to take the course that can include your interest in election law, any future career plans in the area broadly defined, desire for public interest litigation and advocacy experience, or interest in working with public interest lawyers. Applications are due on November 1, 2019.


Law 234.9A Election Law Practicum 2 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
In the Election Law seminar and practicum, students will be working on cutting-edge voting rights projects in California through a collaboration with the ACLU of Northern California voting rights attorneys. In the seminar component, students will learn about election law and policy, with an emphasis on 1) California state and local elections and 2) how voting laws affect power and representation of historically marginalized communities. The seminar will expand upon topics covered in Election Law, Legislation and Statutory Interpretation, and Administrative Law. These classes are not prerequisites for the seminar. In the practicum, students will have the opportunity to put theory into practice by advocating for election law reform in the state legislature, evaluating recent voting rights reforms, developing toolkits for better implementation, monitoring elections, or engaging in litigation to enforce voting rights. Students will join working groups focused on specific topics. Each working group will have 2-3 students and 1-2 supervising attorneys that will include staff from the ACLU and the co-seminar instructor, Bertrall Ross. Working groups will meet in person or by phone every other week. Students should e-mail assignment updates or written work product to supervising attorneys at least 24 hours in advance of each meeting. During working group meetings, students will present their work and supervising attorneys will give feedback, project updates, and new assignments. Potential topics for working group assignments will include districting and redistricting, voter registration, and election monitoring The seminar will be 2 units and will meet one day a week for 110 minutes. The practicum will 2 experiential units and will require 8 hours of work per week that will be scheduled and arranged with the student's working group. Students must enroll in both. This class will be enrollment by application. Please send to Bertrall Ross (bertrallr@berkeley.edu) your resume and a 1-2 paragraph explanation of the reason why you would like to take the course that can include your interest in election law, any future career plans in the area broadly defined, desire for public interest litigation and advocacy experience, or interest in working with public interest lawyers. Applications are due on November 1, 2019.


Law 235.32 Youth Justice Law, Practice and Policy 2 Units
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2022 Description:
This course will provide an overview of the philosophy, objectives and evolution of the youth justice system, with an emphasis on examining current issues from a practice and policy perspective. These issues will include the integration of adolescent development principles into youth justice policy, the goals and best practices in juvenile “disposition” (sentencing), the presence of pervasive racial and ethnic disparities, the school to prison pipeline, whether to “raise the age” of juvenile court jurisdiction, and the transfer of youth to the adult criminal system. While the course will examine national trends, there will be focused examination of reform policies California has adopted and rejected in recent years, as well as reforms the State is considering adopting in the near future. Both doctrinal study and practice exercises will be employed to allow students to gain an understanding of the system as it exists today as well as how to work toward system reform as a defense attorney, prosecutor, policy advocate, or as a pro bono practitioner. Jonathan Laba, a 1996 graduate of Berkeley Law, currently supervises the juvenile unit in the Contra Costa County Public Defender’s Office. For most of his career, Jonathan has augmented his “day job” as an adult public defense trial and managing attorney with extensive youth justice policy advocacy efforts, including legislative and amicus work, training of juvenile defenders across the state, and engagement with community-based youth justice organizations. Having taught the Criminal Law Ethics Seminar for the past decade at Berkeley Law, Jonathan is excited to develop and teach this course geared to introducing students to both the theoretical underpinnings of the juvenile legal system as well as how to engage with, and improve, the system as a lawyer and advocate.


Law 236 Capital Punishment and the Constitution Seminar 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
The course offers an overview of federal constitutional law governing the death penalty, focusing primarily on the jurisprudence of the United States Supreme Court and the interpretation of the Eighth Amendment. Throughout the course we will identify the rules that govern how the death penalty is imposed, and examine how those rules developed in relation to larger societal and jurisprudential changes. We will ask how and if these rules promote a fair, rational, equitable and just use of the death penalty, and what changes, if any, should be made. We will consider the following topics: historical development of death penalty jurisprudence and the challenges of arbitrariness; different statutory attempts to enact constitutional death penalty schemes; execution of those who commit non-homicide crimes, juveniles, the mentally retarded, and the insane; the effect of race on the administration of capital punishment; jury selection in capital cases; methods of execution; and clemency proceedings. There will be an emphasis on class discussion. Attendance is mandatory. Students are expected to be prepared for class and participate in a critical discussion of the assigned readings and judicial opinions. The course is designed for students, regardless of their views about the death penalty, who generally wish to learn more about the application of capital punishment in the United States, and methods of constitutional interpretation. The course will be particularly useful for students who are interested in a career in criminal law. The casebook is Rivkind & Shatz, Cases and Materials on the Death Penalty, Fourth Edition (Thomson/Reuters 2016).

Spring 2022 Description:
This course examines the death penalty as imposed and regulated in the United States, primarily through a close reading of opinions from the United States Supreme Court. Following a brief historical overview, the course focuses on Eighth Amendment jurisprudence in the "modern era," and other legal doctrines, pertaining to aggravating and mitigating circumstances, victim impact evidence, proportionality principles, jury selection in capital cases, and other relevant topics. The course will also touch on the post-conviction process in capital cases, including the United States Supreme Court's interpretation of the Anti-Terrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act of 1996. There will be an emphasis on class discussion. Attendance is mandatory. Students are expected to complete the reading, come prepared for class, and contribute their own thoughts in a seminar environment. The course is designed for students who, regardless of their views about the death penalty, want to learn more about the application of capital punishment in the United States and relevant legal principles. The course will be particularly useful for students who are interested in a career in criminal law, including in a post-conviction context. The casebook is Rivkind & Shatz, Cases and Materials on the Death Penalty, Fourth Edition (Thomson/Reuters 2016).


Law 236.11 The Case of Curtis Flowers: Another Indictment of American Criminal Justice? 1 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
Curtis Flowers faced six capital murder trials for the same crime: a 1996 quadruple murder at a furniture store in a small town in Mississippi. He spent over 20 years on death row for the crimes. The Supreme Court reversed his most recent conviction and death sentence based on discriminatory jury selection, and Mr. Flowers is currently out on bail while awaiting a potential seventh trial. Recently, journalists investigated Mr. Flowers’s case, reporting on the flimsy evidence upon which he was convicted, the prosecutor's pattern of race-based jury selection, other prosecutorial misconduct, and the case’s journey across state and federal courts. Join us as we listen to the podcast produced by the journalists about the investigation, “In the Dark Season 2,” and explore issues-racism, police and prosecutorial misconduct, prosecutorial discretion in charging crimes, inadequate defense lawyering, and more-that infect our system of capital punishment and our criminal legal system more broadly. This course meets every other Tuesday for 7 sessions beginning August 18th. This class is among the special Fall 2020 1L elective seminars designed to give entering 1Ls an extra opportunity to form connections despite our remote form of interaction. In light of that goal, these classes will expect real-time attendance and may not be recorded. These classes will all be graded on a Credit/No Credit basis and total written work requirement will be no more than 8 double-spaced pages.


Law 241 Evidence 4 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Spring 2022: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This course will examine the law governing proof of facts, with special attention to the Federal Rules of Evidence (FRE). Topics will include the allocation and size of burdens of proof, relevance, hearsay, character evidence, circumstantial inference, impeachment and rehabilitation, expert and lay opinion witnesses, and scientific evidence. The goal of the course is to provide students with the ability to critique and assess the admissibility of evidence in judicial and other fact-finding contexts. This will necessarily involve an understanding of the FRE, and related constitutional and common-law doctrines. Although this is not a trial advocacy or clinical course, one goal will be to impart a sense of how the Rules actually work in court. There will also be a strong concentration on the underlying common law theories that provide the basis of various codifications, The instructor has taught Evidence for 40 years at NYU Law School, and has litigated hundreds of federal and state cases during his career as a civil liberties lawyer. The required textbook will be:the most recent edition of Weinstein et al, Evidence: Cases and Materials, plus any supplement. The complete Federal Rules of Evidence with Advisory Committee Notes can be found at: http://www.law.cornell.edu/rules/fre The California Evidence Code can de found at: http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/cgi-bin/calawquery?codesection=evid

Fall 2020 Description:
This course explores the law of proof in civil and criminal trials. Our principal focus is the Federal Rules of Evidence and the federal appellate court opinions interpreting and filling gaps in the Federal Rules, as well as the intersection of the Federal Rules and the Sixth Amendment’s “Confrontation Clause.” Topics include the relevance requirement, when hearsay is admissible, the uses and abuses of character evidence, the appropriate means of impeaching and rehabilitating witnesses, and the attorney-client privilege. Instructor Biography: Robert D. Infelise received his A.B. from Cal in 1977 and his J.D. from Berkeley Law in 1980. Upon graduating, Mr. Infelise joined the Los Angeles office of Cox, Castle & Nicholson LLP, one of the nation's premier law firms specializing in the real estate and financial services industries. Since the mid-1980’s, he has specialized in litigation involving soil and groundwater contamination. In 1998, Mr. Infelise helped found Cox, Castle & Nicholson's San Francisco office and later served as its managing partner. He is the former chair of the Advisory Committee, as well as former acting Executive Director, of Berkeley Law’s Center for Law, Energy and the Environment. In 2002-2003, Mr. Infelise was the acting head of Berkeley Law’s environmental law program. In 2014, he was named a “Christopher Edley, Jr. Lecturer.” Mr. Infelise writes and speaks on issues involving soil and groundwater pollution, as well as climate change. His scholarly work begins and ends with an article co-authored by Professor Robert A. Kagan entitled "American State Supreme Court Justices, 1900-70," American Bar Foundation Research Journal, 1984 (Vol. 2, Spring). In addition to this course, Mr. Infelise teaches Environmental Law & Policy; the Environmental Law Writing Seminar; Climate Change and the Law; Contracts for LLMs; and Remedies.

Spring 2021 Description:
This 3-unit course will explore the law of evidence as applied in American (primarily federal) courts, but with a different approach than the standard 4-unit course. We will use an experiential learning-by-doing approach, with part of our class time spent with students arguing for the admission or exclusion of evidence, sometimes in the full Zoom room and sometimes in break out rooms, based on problems drawn from two simulated case-files. Both of the cases involve important but disturbing gender equality issues. One involves an allegation of Spousal Violence/Murder; the other is a civil sexual harassment in employment case. You will need to become familiar with every aspect of the two cases, and apply the law of evidence, as found in the Federal Rules of Evidence and a few case decisions, to argue why the law permits or prohibits the admission or exclusion of the evidence offered. There is no traditional casebook in this class, and we will read only a handful of cases. We will use a "hornbook" (which is available free through the Berkeley Law Library subscription to Foundation Press study aids), the Federal Rules of Evidence (which are available for free online), and two casefiles published by the National Institute of Trial Advocacy (NITA). Students should expect to be on call in all class meetings. Students will be assigned a number from 1 - 4, which will determine which side they will represent in the two cases, and what role they will take in various exercises. Students will at times enter strategy sessions in break-out rooms with other students on their number, and more commonly work in groups of 4, in adversary role plays. Class will meet two days a week for 75 minutes/class. Course coverage will include relevance, character evidence, witness examination, offers of evidence (and thus objections to offers of evidence), authentication of documents and other physical evidence, motions in limine, impeachment and rehabilitation, privileges, opinion testimony, scientific evidence, and hearsay. Grading Grades will be based on two mid-term exams, a final exam, and class participation. Here is the grading formula: • The two mid-term exams, which will be take-homes, will each consist of 15 multiple choice questions worth 1 point for each question (a total of 30 points). At least some of the questions and answers will be subsequently reviewed in class for formative assessment purposes; • The final exam, which will be a take-home, will include ten short problems requiring you to support the admission or exclusion of evidence with a limit of 150 words each, worth 40 total points (4 points each), and 18 multiple-choice questions worth 1 point for each question (a total of 58 points); • Up to 12 class participation points will be awarded as follows. Four points will be awarded when a student is called on, is prepared, and satisfactorily participates. Thus, if you are called on and pass, or you are not present, or you are clearly not prepared, you’ll have lost an opportunity to earn four participation points. My goal is to give every student at least 3-4 opportunities to earn participation points (and to award 12 participation points to every student). If you enroll in this class, you should expect to be called on regularly. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency.

Fall 2021 Description:
This course will examine the Federal Rules of Evidence (FRE), as well as related common-law and constitutional doctrine. Topics include: relevance; character evidence; impeachment and rehabilitation; hearsay; expert and lay opinion witnesses; and privileges. The instructor, Mai Linh Spencer [ https://www.uchastings.edu/people/mai-linh-spencer/], is an experienced practitioner and a Clinical Professor at UC Hastings, where she teaches Evidence and the Individual Representation Clinic. Professor Spencer uses live polling and other formative assessment methods to maximize both classroom learning and the skill of self-development. She encourages a growth mindset in the study of Evidence (and law school generally) and strives to achieve classroom equity. Time permitting, the class will incorporate some experiential learning techniques. There will be a short, multiple-choice midterm and a closed-book final exam to ensure that students are prepared for the California bar exam.

Spring 2022 Description:
This 3-unit course will explore the law of evidence as applied in American (primarily federal) courts, but with a different approach than a standard course. We will use an experiential learning-by-doing approach, with part of our class time spent with students arguing for the admission or exclusion of evidence based on problems drawn from two simulated case-files. Both of the cases involve important but disturbing gender equality issues. One involves an allegation of Spousal Violence/Murder; the other is a civil sexual harassment in employment case. You will need to become familiar with every aspect of the two cases, and apply the law of evidence, as found in the Federal Rules of Evidence and a few case decisions, to argue why the law permits or prohibits the admission or exclusion of the evidence offered. There is no traditional casebook in this class, and we will read only a handful of cases. We will use a "hornbook" (which is available free through the Berkeley Law Library subscription to Foundation Press study aids), the Federal Rules of Evidence (which are available for free online), two casefiles published by the National Institute of Trial Advocacy (NITA), and a problem set which I co-authored, which I will distribute for free. Students should expect to participate in break-our sessions multiple times in each class meeting, and will be on call for 3 of the 14 weeks of the semester. Class will meet two days a week for 75 minutes/class. Course coverage will include relevance, character evidence, witness examination, offers of evidence (and thus objections to offers of evidence), authentication of documents and other physical evidence, motions in limine, impeachment and rehabilitation, privileges, opinion testimony, scientific evidence, and hearsay. Grading Grades will be based on two mid-term exams, a final exam, and class participation. Here is the grading formula: • The two mid-term exams, which will be take-homes, will each consist of 15 multiple choice questions worth 1 point for each question (a total of 30 points). At least some of the questions and answers will be subsequently reviewed in class for formative assessment purposes; • The final exam, which will be a take-home, will include ten short problems requiring you to support the admission or exclusion of evidence with a limit of 150 words each, worth 40 total points (4 points each), and 18 multiple-choice questions worth 1 point for each question (a total of 58 points); • Up to 12 class participation points will be awarded as follows. Four points will be awarded when a student is called on, is prepared, and satisfactorily participates. Thus, if you are called on and pass, or you are not present, or you are clearly not prepared, you’ll have lost an opportunity to earn four participation points. My goal is to give every student at least 3-4 opportunities to earn participation points (and to award 12 participation points to every student).

Fall 2022 Description:
This course examines the Anglo-American law of proof, with special attention to the Federal Rules of Evidence in the United States. Topics include relevance, hearsay, confrontation, character evidence, witness competence, impeachment and rehabilitation, expert witnesses, scientific evidence, and privileges. The final examination is largely multiple choice, with a policy essay component.


Law 241.3 Consumer Litigation: The Course of a Case 2 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
Have you ever wondered how plaintiffs’ attorneys decide which case to bring? Do you want to see how a lawsuit plays out, from start to finish? This course examines the progression of a private consumer class action brought under Business and Professions Code 17200 and the California Consumers Legal Remedies Act. Each week, the course takes students through one step of the case’s development, including: investigation and client vetting; crafting the complaint; utilizing written discovery and depositions; finding and leveraging expert witnesses; preparing for class certification and summary judgment; navigating the settlement process, etc. The reading materials will include actual (redacted) documents from the case, with illustrative opinions from similar cases for depth and context. Guest lecturers will illuminate the difference between private consumer litigation and public actions brought by government agencies. Requirements: Three writing assignments (one count of the complaint; one set of discovery requests; one partial summary judgment opposition). Instructor: Kristen Law Sagafi '02 was a partner at Lieff Cabraser Heimann & Bernstein LLP before launching the California office for Tycko & Zavareei LLP in 2016. Ms. Sagafi represented plaintiffs in consumer fraud and defective products class actions for more than 15 years.

Fall 2021 Description:
Have you ever wondered how plaintiffs’ attorneys decide which case to bring? Do you want to see how a lawsuit plays out, from start to finish? This course examines the progression of a private consumer class action brought under Business and Professions Code 17200 and the California Consumers Legal Remedies Act. Each week, the course takes students through one step of the case’s development, including: investigation and client vetting; crafting the complaint; utilizing written discovery and depositions; finding and leveraging expert witnesses; preparing for class certification and summary judgment; navigating the settlement process, etc. The reading materials will include actual (redacted) documents from the case, with illustrative opinions from similar cases for depth and context. Guest lecturers will illuminate the difference between private consumer litigation and public actions brought by government agencies. Requirements: Three writing assignments (one count of the complaint; one set of discovery requests; one partial summary judgment opposition). Instructor: Kristen Law Sagafi '02 was a partner at Lieff Cabraser Heimann & Bernstein LLP before launching the California office for Tycko & Zavareei LLP in 2016. Ms. Sagafi represented plaintiffs in consumer fraud and defective products class actions for more than 15 years.

Fall 2022 Description:
Have you ever wondered how plaintiffs’ attorneys decide which case to bring? Do you want to see how a lawsuit plays out, from start to finish? This course examines the progression of a private consumer class action brought under Business and Professions Code 17200 and the California Consumers Legal Remedies Act. Each week, the course takes students through one step of the case’s development, including: investigation and client vetting; crafting the complaint; utilizing written discovery and depositions; finding and leveraging expert witnesses; preparing for class certification and summary judgment; navigating the settlement process, etc. The reading materials will include actual (redacted) documents from the case, with illustrative opinions from similar cases for depth and context. Guest lecturers will illuminate the difference between private consumer litigation and public actions brought by government agencies. Requirements: Three writing assignments (one count of the complaint; one set of discovery requests; one partial summary judgment opposition). Instructor: Kristen Law Sagafi '02 represented plaintiffs in consumer fraud and defective products class actions for more than 15 years before shifting her practice from client service to strategic management. She began her career at Lieff, Cabraser, Heimann & Bernstein LLP and later launched the California office for Tycko & Zavareei LLP. She is currently the Litigation Director at Sher Edling LLP in San Francisco.


Law 241.8 Brief Stories by Lawyers 1 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
This small class will bring students together with practicing attorneys from a wide variety of practice settings. We will dive into the practice of lawyering by talking with practitioners, and by examining documents they typically produce, such as pleadings, policy memos, proposed legislation, congressional testimony, regulatory comments, trial and appellate briefs, and other types of persuasive writing, such as op-eds and press releases. Before each class, students will be assigned one short document prepared by a practitioner who will appear as a guest speaker in that week’s class. We will hear the real stories behind the documents and find out how they help advance the lawyer’s objectives. Practitioners will also talk about their career path, and their area of practice, which will include public interest, private practice, criminal law, and government. This class is among the special Fall 2020 1L elective seminars designed to give entering 1Ls an extra opportunity to form connections despite our remote form of interaction. In light of that goal, these classes will expect real-time attendance and may not be recorded. These classes will all be graded on a Credit/No Credit basis and total written work requirement will be no more than 8 double-spaced pages.


Law 241S Evidence 3 Units
Summer 2021: Hybrid
Summer 2022: In-Person
Description:
Summer 2021 Description:
This course examines the Anglo-American law of proof, with special attention to the Federal Rules of Evidence in the United States. Topics include relevance, hearsay, confrontation, character evidence, impeachment, opinion testimony, expert witnesses, scientific evidence, and privileges (including attorney-client). This course will meet in-person on campus on June 14th, 15th, 16th, 17th, and 18th in room 110.

Summer 2022 Description:
This course examines the Anglo-American law of proof, with special attention to the Federal Rules of Evidence in the United States. Topics include relevance, hearsay, confrontation, character evidence, impeachment, opinion testimony, expert witnesses, scientific evidence, and privileges (including attorney-client).


Law 242.3 Lawyering as Problem Solving 2 Units
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person Instruction
Description:
Spring 2021 Description:
In this course students will confront client problems--framed from the clients and attorneys points of view--more like practicing lawyers do. The course poses questions like: What sort of problems do lawyers solve? How do they solve them? What intellectual constructs do they bring to bear? What practical judgments? Answers to these questions help students combine their knowledge of the law with practical judgment to work with clients toward attaining their goals within the bounds of the law. During this course students will: Discuss the ways in which conceptions of professional role identity and styles of lawyering affect role performance and legal practice; Employ reasoned strategies for analyzing, prioritizing, and solving legal and legally related problems in context (including treating the California Bar Exam's Performance Tests as a problem to be solved); Identify biases, influences, and feelings that affect one's thinking and that of others when planning, counseling, negotiating or advocating; Draft memos and other legal documents of the kind prepared by practicing lawyers and demanded on the performance test portion of the bar exam. These writing exercises will help prepare students for the bar exam. The course will be taught through case studies (a number of which will be California Bar Performance Test problems), simulations, and readings drawn from psychology, decision making theory, and lawyering theory. Admission to the course is by application. To receive an application, please email Catharine Schultz at cschultz@law.berkeley.edu. Applications are due to Catharine by noon on Wednesday, November 11. This class is only open to 3L students.

Spring 2022 Description:
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Law 242.31 The Court of Public Opinion: Advocacy Outside of the Courtroom 2 Units
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2022 Description:
There is an entire world of public discussion and discourse happening outside of the courtroom that often goes untouched by the law school curriculum. For every Thurgood Marshal, there is a Martin Luther King, Jr. For every Ruth Bader Ginsburg, there is a Tarana Burke. And for every landmark decision like Brown v. Board of Education, there is landmark legislation like the Voting Rights Act. Being an advocate sometimes means persuading people outside of the courtroom. This course harnesses three different components of public discourse: legislative advocacy, media advocacy, and movement advocacy. In each area, you’ll be tasked with using your legal training to advocate for the policy change of your choosing. In the legislative advocacy section, you will research issue areas, develop talking points, and present as a witness in a mock legislative hearing. In the media advocacy section, you will write an opinion piece on an issue and then have a primetime-news style debate. And at the end of the course, you will take your skills and experiences to develop a nonprofit focused on tackling an issue of your choice before you pitch that new organization to fundraisers looking to invest in social change. Moving the ball forward on social issues is something that is happening all around us and lawyers are uniquely equipped to be advocates in the public arena. This course teaches you how to shape public discourse with the skills you’ve developed in law school.


Law 242.32 Legislative Drafting and Lobbying 3 Units
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2022 Description:
Statutory law and agency regulations play a central role in the modern legal system. This seminar explores the problem-solving art of legislative drafting - its effect on the systemic implementation of societal change, the institutional processes of legislating, as well as essential technical drafting skills for clarity of effect. The course will review theories of statutory interpretation, administrative law, and separation of powers from the perspective of how to apply this knowledge when drafting legislation or regulation. Students will learn about the federal and state legislative process, focusing on experiential observation of active bills pending in the California State Legislature, and develop oral advocacy skills through participation in simulated legislative committee hearings. The instructor will work with students to identify a legislative or regulatory issue of interest, research and draft legislation and an accompanying memorandum, in either a simulation or clinical context working with a stakeholder group or legislative office. The course will involve guest speakers working in the legislative process, and is ideal for those planning to practice law to some degree in a legislative or regulatory environment. Concurrent or prior enrollment in Legislation and Statutory Interpretation or equivalent background reading is recommended. Andy Katz has lobbied on behalf of a lung health association before the California State Legislature, and administrative agencies regulating air quality, energy, and health care matters, and currently serves as a local government elected official. He also litigates on behalf of Plaintiffs in employment discrimination, whistleblower, wage theft, health and disability insurance, toxic injury, and consumer protection matters, and engages in legislative drafting and advocacy through attorney associations and environmental organizations.


Law 242.9 Listening and Communicating:Stagecraft for Lawyers 1 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
The objective of this course is to train and empower students to be active listeners (who don’t simply wait for their turn to speak), effective communicators (who embody their physical and vocal presence), and inclusive team players (who can collaborate across backgrounds and hierarchies) as they embark on a career in law. The course will bridge the gap between academic preparation and its successful application in practice. It will combine workshops from the theatre - tailored specifically to address challenges that young lawyers face - with seminar-style discussions to help align the intellectual rigor of legal education with the communication skills necessary to succeed as a practicing attorney. The curriculum will span five aspects of communication: “Listen”; "Process"; "Include"; “(Story)Tell”; and "Collaborate". Every few lessons, we will invite prominent Bay Area lawyers to participate in our class and share personal learnings from their careers. The assignments for this course will comprise journal entries, readings, and preparation for workshops, including developing a theme and telling the story of two assigned cases (one criminal and one IP). Mohit Gourisaria is a Berkeley-based litigator. He has taught legal writing and oral advocacy to law students at Berkeley and Columbia. He clerked on the Second Circuit and previously practiced at Wachtell Lipton in New York and Keker Van Nest in San Francisco. Mohit studied Theatre Arts in college and performed professionally in Boston before attending law school at Columbia and the London School of Economics.

Fall 2021 Description:
THIS COURSE WILL MEET IN THE Goldberg Room IN SIMON HALL. The objective of this course is to train and empower students to be active listeners (who don’t simply wait for their turn to speak), effective communicators (who embody their physical and vocal presence), and inclusive team players (who can collaborate across backgrounds and hierarchies) as they embark on a career in the law. The course will bridge the gap between academic preparation and its successful application in practice. It will combine workshops from the theatre - tailored specifically to address challenges that young lawyers face - with seminar-style discussions to help align the intellectual rigor of legal education with the communication skills necessary to succeed as a practicing attorney. The curriculum will span five aspects of communication: “Listen”; "Process"; "Include"; “(Story)Tell”; and "Collaborate." Every few lessons, we will invite prominent Bay Area lawyers to participate in our class and share personal learnings from their careers. The assignments for this course will include journal entries, readings, and preparation for workshops, including developing a theme and telling the story of two assigned cases (one criminal and one IP). This course will have 7 class meetings. To allow for a makeup class because of unforeseen circumstances this course has an automatic make-up class scheduled for the 8th week. Students must be able to attend all 8 scheduled meetings to earn credit. Mohit Gourisaria is an Assistant United States Attorney. He has taught legal writing and oral advocacy to law students at Berkeley and Columbia. He clerked on the Second Circuit and began his legal career at Wachtell Lipton in New York City. Mohit studied Theatre Arts in college and performed professionally in Boston before attending law school at Columbia and the London School of Economics.

Fall 2022 Description:
The objective of this course is to train and empower students to be active listeners (who don’t simply wait for their turn to speak), effective communicators (who embody their physical and vocal presence), and inclusive team players (who can collaborate across backgrounds and hierarchies) as they embark on a career in the law. The course will bridge the gap between academic preparation and its successful application in practice. It will combine workshops from the theatre - tailored specifically to address challenges that young lawyers face - with seminar-style discussions to help align the intellectual rigor of legal education with the communication skills necessary to succeed as a practicing attorney. The curriculum will span five aspects of communication: “Listen”; "Process"; "Include"; “(Story)Tell”; and "Collaborate." Every few lessons, we will invite prominent Bay Area lawyers to participate in our class and share personal learnings from their careers. The assignments for this course will include journal entries, readings, and preparation for workshops, including developing a theme and telling the story of two assigned cases (one criminal and one IP). Mohit Gourisaria is an Assistant United States Attorney. He has taught legal writing and oral advocacy to law students at Berkeley and Columbia. He clerked on the Second Circuit and began his legal career at Wachtell Lipton in New York City. Mohit studied Theatre Arts in college and performed professionally in Boston before attending law school at Columbia and the London School of Economics.


Law 243 Appellate Advocacy 3 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
Appellate Advocacy is designed to further develop the skills learned in Written and Oral Advocacy - writing and presenting oral argument. The aim of Appellate Advocacy is to provide students an experience closely comparable to appellate practice. Students will write a full brief from a shortened record of a case pending in the California Supreme Court or United States Supreme Court. Students will also prepare, practice and deliver a full oral argument. Students will receive advice and guidance from the instructor and from Practitioner-Advisors who are among the best appellate practitioners in the Bay Area. The course is graded, with the brief counting as 75% of the grade and oral argument as 25% of the grade. The grade awarded will also reflect the quality and timeliness of interim assignments. Because this class requires efforts on the part of so many parties - including Practitioner-Advisors, judges, and opposing counsel - no student will be permitted to drop the class, without an extraordinary reason, after the first week of instruction. Appellate Advocacy will NOT be offered in the Spring Semester. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency. Alexandra Robert Gordon is an experienced trial and appellate litigator and a Superior Court Judge. From 2009 up until her judicial appointment in 2018, Judge Gordon served as a Deputy Attorney General in the Government Law Section of the California Department of Justice. She has represented the constitutional officers of the State of California in a wide array of litigation, in both the state and federal trial and appellate courts. Judge Gordon has handled many high-profile cases from the trial court to the United States Supreme Court, including challenges to California’s law prohibiting the possession of large-capacity magazines, banning possession of shark fin, and requiring the disclosure of major donor information by charitable organizations. In 2014, Judge Gordon was awarded the California Lawyer of the Year Award for her work defending the constitutionality of a state law prohibiting mental health professionals from engaging in treatments intended to change the sexual orientation of a minor.

Fall 2021 Description:
Appellate Advocacy is designed to further develop the skills learned in Written and Oral Advocacy - writing and presenting oral argument. The aim of Appellate Advocacy is to provide students an experience closely comparable to appellate practice. Students will write a full brief from a shortened record of a case pending in the California Supreme Court or United States Supreme Court. Students will also prepare, practice and deliver a full oral argument. Students will receive advice and guidance from the instructor and from Practitioner-Advisors who are among the best appellate practitioners in the Bay Area. The course is graded, with the brief counting as 75% of the grade and oral argument as 25% of the grade. The grade awarded will also reflect the quality and timeliness of interim assignments. Because this class requires efforts on the part of so many parties - including Practitioner-Advisors, judges, and opposing counsel - no student will be permitted to drop the class, without an extraordinary reason, after the first week of instruction. Appellate Advocacy will NOT be offered in the Spring Semester. Scotia Hicks is a partner at the law firm of Ehlert Hicks LLP, where she specializes in appeals and critical motions. Prior to that, she practiced as a litigation attorney with Winston & Strawn LLP for 11 years, where her primary areas of focus were complex commercial litigation and white collar investigations, and she was a member of the Appellate and Critical Motions group. Ms. Hicks has represented clients before state and federal courts of appeal, the California and Ohio Supreme Courts, and the United States Supreme Court. Ms. Hicks received a B.A., with high honors, in Psychology and East Asian Languages (Japanese) in 1996 from the University of California, Berkeley. She received a M.A. in 2002 and a Ph.D. in Psychology in 2004 from the University of Arizona, where her primary area of research was Criminal Profiling. Ms. Hicks is a 2007 graduate of Berkeley Law, where she was a Notes & Comments Editor for the California Law Review, and a member of the Asian American Law Journal. Scotia was also the Appellate Advocacy Director for the Moot Court Board (now BOA), a national finalist on the National Moot Court Competition team, and a semi-finalist and Best Brief award winner in the McBaine Moot Court Competition.

Fall 2022 Description:
Appellate Advocacy is designed to further develop the skills learned in Written and Oral Advocacy - writing and presenting oral argument. The aim of Appellate Advocacy is to provide students an experience closely comparable to appellate practice. Students will write a full brief from a shortened record of a case pending in the California Supreme Court or United States Supreme Court. Students will also prepare, practice and deliver a full oral argument. Students will receive advice and guidance from the instructor and from Practitioner-Advisors who are among the best appellate practitioners in the Bay Area. The course is graded, with the brief counting as 75% of the grade and oral argument as 25% of the grade. The grade awarded will also reflect the quality and timeliness of interim assignments. Because this class requires efforts on the part of so many parties - including Practitioner-Advisors, judges, and opposing counsel - no student will be permitted to drop the class, without an extraordinary reason, after the first week of instruction. Appellate Advocacy may not be offered in the Spring semester. Alexandra Robert Gordon is an experienced trial and appellate litigator and a Superior Court Judge. From 2009 up until her judicial appointment in 2018, Judge Gordon served as a Deputy Attorney General in the Government Law Section of the California Department of Justice. She has represented the constitutional officers of the State of California in a wide array of litigation, in both the state and federal trial and appellate courts. Judge Gordon has handled many high-profile cases from the trial court to the United States Supreme Court, including challenges to California’s law prohibiting the possession of large-capacity magazines, banning possession of shark fin, and requiring the disclosure of major donor information by charitable organizations. In 2014, Judge Gordon was awarded the California Lawyer of the Year Award for her work defending the constitutionality of a state law prohibiting mental health professionals from engaging in treatments intended to change the sexual orientation of a minor.


Law 243.3 Oral Advocacy for LL.M. Students 1 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
Course Description - Oral Advocacy for LL.M Students Judge David M. Krashna (Ret./Assigned), Alameda County CA Superior Court Oral advocacy is one of the critical professional skills mastered by U.S. lawyers. In this one unit skills workshop, we will study oral advocacy through readings, lectures, demonstrations, discussions, an oral quiz and (above all else) by practicing oral advocacy in small groups with critiques by experienced lawyers and judges. The course will meet on three Saturdays - February 29, March 7, & 14, 2020 - from 10:00-12:00 and 13:30-16:00. Each student will be expected to present an opening statement (Mar. 7) and a closing argument (Mar. 14) in a simulated case. Readings will be from materials posted on bCourses, classroom PowerPoint presentations and one text: Brian Johnson & Marsha Hunter, The Articulate Advocate (2016) Enrollment is limited to LL.M students. Attendance is MANDATORY for all three Saturday classes and one brief video review session (April 3, 2020), where students will sign up for a timeslot between 8:30AM-4:30PM to meet with Judge Krashna. A brief video introduction of the instructor will be provided in bCourses; each student is required to provide their own brief video introduction. The DEADLINE for submittal of the MANDATORY student video introduction is Valentine's Day, by midnight, February 14, 2020.

Spring 2021 Description:
Judge David M. Krashna (Ret./Assigned), Alameda County CA Superior Court Oral advocacy is one of the critical professional skills mastered by U.S. lawyers. In this one unit skills workshop, we will study oral advocacy through readings, lectures, demonstrations, discussions, an oral quiz and (above all else) by practicing oral advocacy in small groups with critiques by experienced lawyers and judges. The course will meet on three Saturdays - March 6, March 13, & 20, 2021 - from 10:00-12:00 and 13:30-16:00. Each student will be expected to present an opening statement (Mar. 13) and a closing argument (Mar. 20) on a simulated case. Readings will be from materials posted on bCourses, classroom PowerPoint presentations and one text: Brian Johnson & Marsha Hunter, The Articulate Advocate (2016) Enrollment is limited to LL.M students. Attendance is MANDATORY for all three Saturday classes AND one brief video review session (April 2, 2021), where students will sign up for a time slot between 8:30AM-4:30PM to meet individually with Judge Krashna. A brief video introduction of the instructor will be provided in bCourses; each student is required to provide their own brief video introduction. The DEADLINE for submitting of the MANDATORY student video introduction is Valentine's Day, by 11:59 PM, February 14, 2021. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency. As a retired judge I am still active as a judicial officer through the Judicial Council Temporary Assigned Judges Program and serve throughout Northern California. I am active in the California Judges Association, for example, I was recently appointed to the Task Force on the Elimination of Bias and Inequality in our judicial system. I am also active in local and national community affairs.

Spring 2022 Description:
Judge David M. Krashna (Ret./Assigned), Alameda County CA Superior Court Oral advocacy is one of the critical professional skills mastered by U.S. lawyers. In this one unit skills workshop, we will study oral advocacy through readings, lectures, demonstrations, discussions, an oral quiz and (above all else) by practicing oral advocacy in small groups with critiques by experienced lawyers and judges. The course will meet on three Saturdays - January 29, February 5, February 12, 2022 - from 10:00-12:00 and 1:30-4:00. Each student will be expected to present an opening statement (Feb. 5) and a closing argument (Feb. 12) on a simulated case. Readings will be from materials posted on bCourses, classroom PowerPoint presentations, and one text: Brian Johnson & Marsha Hunter, The Articulate Advocate, 2nd edition (2016) Enrollment is limited to LL.M students. Attendance is MANDATORY for all three Saturday classes AND one brief video review session (Friday, Feb. 25, 2022), where students will sign up for a time slot between 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM to meet individually with Judge Krashna. A brief video introduction of the instructor will be provided in bCourses; each student is required to provide their own brief video introduction. The DEADLINE for submitting the MANDATORY student video introduction is Sunday, January, 16, 2022, by 11:59 PM. As a retired judge I am still active as a judicial officer through the CA Judicial Council Temporary Assigned Judges Program and serve throughout Northern California. I am active in the California Judges Association, for example, I am a member of the Task Force on the Elimination of Bias and Inequality in our Judicial System. I am also active in local and national community affairs.


Law 243.5 Going Solo:Starting Your Own Law Firm 1 Units
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Spring 2021 Description:
Going Solo: Starting Your Own Law Firm is designed to prepare law students with basic training in how to open a law office and market themselves as a solo practitioner. Topics will include strategies for operating a lucrative and sustainable practice while serving underserved clients including people of limited means or in remote regions. Course includes: • Starting and operating a sustainable, affordable law office that can serve clients of a variety of income levels; • Integrating technology to maximize profitability and/or to bridge the geographic divide when serving remote and/or otherwise underserved areas • Establishing your business: licensing, zoning, banking, commercial leasing, tax benefits, and key resources • Managing risks • Budgeting, pricing, and financial requirements • Professional Branding • Mission/Vision Development • Marketing for attorneys • Converting or rejecting prospective clients • Professional Ethics and Social Responsibility • Record-keeping and intake process • Client communications • Billing and fee agreements • Customer relationship management • Strategic, transitional, and succession planning • Drafting a formal business plan that may be presented to investors, partners, or stakeholders Due to the nature of this class, some or all of the sessions may not be recorded and posted except as required for accommodation of students with disabilities. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency. Instructor bio: Des Lafleur is a business attorney with 10 years of experience consulting companies ranging from startups to blue chip businesses. Her practice has a heavy emphasis on commercial contracts, intellectual property, and marketing law. Lafleur helps clients protect, enforce, and exploit their intellectual property assets while mitigating risks. Following her 2012 Berkeley Law graduation she helped small means entrepreneurs build businesses through services provides at Berkeley Law. An entrepreneur herself, Lafleur founded her boutique bi-coastal consulting practice in 2013. Her practice focused on clients in creative industries and retail. Although she grew her own practice mostly off-line, Lafleur helps others design their digital presences and grow their own businesses. Lafleur is also a Clinical Teaching Fellow for Berkeley Law’s New Business Community Law Clinic.


Law 243.6 Skills of Exceptional Lawyers - Social Intelligence and The Human Dimension 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
Class meets once a week for one two-hour block each week of the semester + four two-hour blocks during the first four weeks of the semester + a mandatory one-day workshop that will be determined. It will meet Tuesdays, 3:35PM-5:25PM January 14-February 4th, and Thursdays 3:35PM-5:25PM January 16th-April 23rd. Final project. No final exam. Discussion based. Class and small group participation required. Readings required for most weekly sessions. Lawyer Skills. Reading people, building trust, having difficult conversations, being listened to, improving judgment, enhancing creativity, making good decisions, winning negotiations, managing people, time and your career, making connections, setting goals, investing in yourself, understanding your limits, finding happiness in the law, having fun and being successful. Exceptional lawyers are good at these things. Experience and recent developments in the science and practice of Social Intelligence show that everyone can learn and get better at them. Most students who have taken this course in the past report genuine progress in improving their skills in many of these areas and in learning how to make continuing progress after the class has been completed. This is a life-long endeavor, but well worth the effort and self-investment. Law school is primarily focused on teaching future lawyers to ‘think like lawyers’ and have a broad knowledge base of legal principles, laws and precedents, and therefore emphasizes issue spotting, rational thinking, research, clear writing and argumentation. However, studies have shown that proficiency, even excellence, in these skills is not sufficient and does not predict successful or satisfying legal careers. Rather these are necessary, but not sufficient, skills. This class is intended to start students on a life-long learning process of developing these Social Intelligence and Human Dimension Skills that are the other - and overwhelmingly more difficult to learn aspect (because they require buying into their importance, committing with strong motivation to improve, and constant application, re-enforcement and learning over a lifetime and a career) - of what it takes to be both happier and more successful in your career. It is NOT the expectation of this class that you will leave proficient at these skills. No 14-week small-unit class can do that. The expectation is that you will leave with your eyes more open, your antennae less wooden, your attentiveness to yourself and others a bit heightened, and most critically a vocabulary of the concepts at play here, a belief in the importance of these skills, a dedication to investing in them and an idea of how to do that - for the rest of your life. Along the way we hope to have some fun and generate enthusiasm for this endeavor. While some refer to Human Dimension skills as soft skills, they are actually hard to learn as they require learning and practicing new skills until they become ‘second nature’ much like it is not possible to learn to ride a bike or serve a tennis ball by only listening to a lecture and not practicing and getting coaching until it becomes a skill you employ without much having to consciously think about it. The science about these things has developed at remarkable pace in recent years, lead in part by the work of Princeton Professor Daniel Kahneman who won the Nobel Prize for his pioneering work on the mind and for helping to create the field of behavioral economics. Research, science and techniques developed at Harvard in conducting negotiations and handling difficult conversations and feedback have also advanced the field. Using these materials and the work of Paul Ekman on emotions and nonverbal communication and Daniel Gilbert on how memory, perception and our views of the future develop and of Daniel Goleman, author of both Emotional Intelligence and Social Intelligence, and others it is possible to develop new teachable and learnable skills that on can master with a commitment to self-investment and the help of fellow class members. Many people report the results as ‘life changing’. Exceptional lawyers have learned these skills. Besides all this, most students report not only making progress on these skills but also that they build bonds and form new friendships over the course of the class that they have not in other classes … and have fun doing it.


Law 243.7 9th Circuit Practicum Seminar 2 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: Hybrid
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
This Seminar is the classroom component for the Ninth Circuit Practicum. Please see the course description for the Practicum (Law 243.7A). The Seminar will introduce the substantive and procedural federal law involved in the Practicum’s appeals and techniques of appellate advocacy. The Seminar will also serve as a forum to workshop the cases and strategies. We will frontload the learning. Students must attend an all-day Seminar meeting on Saturday, August 15, 2020. The Seminar will meet less frequently after the opening briefs are filed in October. Course Applications Admission to the Practicum Clinic and the co-requisite Seminar is by application only. The Ninth Circuit requires that a student have completed two thirds of their law school training in order to practice before the Court. As a result, we will consider applications only from rising third-year students. Please apply for the course through our online application. The APPLICATION DEADLINE is April 17, 2020. (Only one application is required for both the seminar and clinic components.) We hope to make offers of admission on May 1st. The Ninth Circuit Practicum requires students to enroll in both the Practicum and Seminar for the entire academic year. The Fall Seminar is limited to students who are accepted for enrollment in the Practicum for academic year 2020-21. Accepted students will enroll in the Advanced Practicum and Advanced Seminar in Spring 2020 at the appropriate time. Attendance Requirement Full attendance at each seminar session and full participation in the clinical portion is mandatory to receive credit for this course. An information session was held on April 14th. Contact William Fernholz (wfernholz@law.berkeley.edu) for the link to a videorecording of that session. Due to the nature of this class, some or all of the sessions may not be recorded and posted except as required for accommodation of students with disabilities. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency.

Fall 2021 Description:
This Seminar is the classroom component for the Ninth Circuit Practicum. Please see the course description for the Practicum (Law 243.7A) for application procedures and other information. The Seminar will introduce the substantive and procedural federal law involved in the Practicum’s appeals and techniques of appellate advocacy. The Seminar will also serve as a forum to workshop the cases and strategies. We will frontload the learning. Students must attend an all-day (remote) Seminar meeting on the Saturday before the first week of class. The Seminar will meet less frequently after the opening briefs are filed in October.

Fall 2022 Description:
Please apply for the course through our online application. The APPLICATION DEADLINE is Noon on April 13, 2022. (Only one application is required for both the seminar and clinic components.) We plan to interview applicants and make decisions shortly thereafter. Admission to the Practicum Clinic and the co-requisite Seminar is by application only. The Ninth Circuit requires that a student have completed two thirds of their law school training to practice before the Court. As a result, we will consider applications only from rising third-year students. This Seminar is the classroom component for the Ninth Circuit Practicum. The Seminar introduces the substantive and procedural federal law involved in the Practicum’s appeals and techniques of appellate advocacy. The Seminar also serves as a forum to workshop the cases and strategies. We frontload the learning. Students must attend an all-day (remote) Seminar meeting on the Saturday before the first week of class. The Seminar will meet less frequently after the opening briefs are filed in October. The Ninth Circuit Practicum requires students to enroll in both the Practicum and Seminar for the entire academic year. The Fall Seminar is limited to students who are accepted for enrollment in the Practicum for academic year 2022-23. Accepted students will enroll in the Advanced Practicum and Advanced Seminar in Spring 2023 at the appropriate time.


Law 243.71 Advanced 9th Circuit Practicum Seminar 1 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This Seminar is the classroom component for the Advanced Ninth Circuit Practicum. Please see the course description for the Advanced Ninth Circuit Practicum. Students will continue to learn and apply the substantive and procedural federal law involved in the Practicum’s appeals and the techniques of appellate advocacy. The Seminar will also serve as a forum to workshop the cases and strategies. The course will meet during the seminar time set aside for clinics. Attendance at each seminar session and full participation in the practicum portion is mandatory to receive credit for this course.

Spring 2021 Description:
This Seminar is the classroom component for the Advanced Ninth Circuit Practicum. Please see the course description for the Advanced Ninth Circuit Practicum. Students will continue to learn and apply the substantive and procedural federal law involved in the Practicum’s appeals and the techniques of appellate advocacy. The Seminar will also serve as a forum to workshop the cases and strategies. The course will meet during the seminar time set aside for clinics. Attendance at each seminar session and full participation in the practicum portion is mandatory to receive credit for this course. Due to the nature of this class, some or all of the sessions may not be recorded and posted except as required for accommodation of students with disabilities. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency.

Spring 2022 Description:
This Seminar is the classroom component for the Advanced Ninth Circuit Practicum. Please see the course description for the Advanced Ninth Circuit Practicum. Students will continue to learn and apply the substantive and procedural federal law involved in the Practicum’s appeals and the techniques of appellate advocacy. The Seminar will also serve as a forum to workshop the cases and strategies. The course will meet during the seminar time set aside for clinics. Attendance at each seminar session and full participation in the practicum portion is mandatory to receive credit for this course.


Law 243.7A 9th Circuit Practicum 4 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
The Ninth Circuit Practicum will provide students an intense experience in appellate advocacy. Students will brief and potentially argue cases before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit on behalf of clients who would otherwise not have legal representation. Students will also learn aspects of federal law and appellate practice. Working in collaboration with the Ninth Circuit’s Pro Bono Program, the Practicum will brief and possibly argue three appeals during the academic year. These will most likely be immigration cases, though the Practicum will not know the cases and clients until this summer. Students will work in teams of two on a strict schedule. We expect to file opening briefs in October, and reply briefs in early 2021. The cases may be set for argument in April or May, and some students may argue under faculty supervision. Because of this schedule, the Practicum is a two-semester experience. This will be a demanding course. Students will work very hard early in the Fall semester to master the cases and prepare the opening briefs. The work will also be uneven in the Spring semester given the timing of the reply briefs and arguments. Students must devote the necessary amount of time to these cases on this schedule, so they should not be concurrently enrolled in another clinic, field placement or practicum, Appellate Advocacy, or other course with a competing commitment. Each team and case will have a primary faculty supervisor - either Professor Fernholz or an adjunct faculty member - though the teams will also collaborate with each other. Because of the needs of the clients, we cannot guarantee that the briefing will follow this schedule or that every case will be fully litigated or argued. We will do what is best for the clients, and that might mean settling or mediating a case. It is possible that the Practicum will need to alter the briefing or argument schedule. But we will select cases with the anticipation that they will be handled during the academic year. Course Applications: Admission to the Practicum Clinic and the co-requisite Seminar is by application only. The Ninth Circuit requires that a student have completed two thirds of their law school training in order to practice before the Court. As a result, we will consider applications only from rising third-year students. Please apply for the course through our online application. The APPLICATION DEADLINE is April 17, 2020. (Only one application is required for both the seminar and clinic components.) We hope to make offers of admission on May 1st. The Ninth Circuit Practicum requires students to enroll in both the Practicum and Seminar for the entire academic year. The Fall Seminar is limited to students who are accepted for enrollment in the Practicum for academic year 2020-21. Accepted students will enroll in the Advanced Practicum and Advanced Seminar in Spring 2020 at the appropriate time. Attendance Requirement Full attendance at each seminar session and full participation in the clinical portion is mandatory to receive credit for this course. An information session was held on April 14th. Contact William Fernholz (wfernholz@law.berkeley.edu) for the link to a videorecording of that session. Due to the nature of this class, some or all of the sessions may not be recorded and posted except as required for accommodation of students with disabilities. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency.

Fall 2021 Description:
The Ninth Circuit Practicum will provide students an intense experience in appellate advocacy. Students will brief and potentially argue cases before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit on behalf of clients who would otherwise not have legal representation. Students will also learn aspects of federal law and appellate practice. Working in collaboration with the Ninth Circuit’s Pro Bono Program, the Practicum will brief and possibly argue three appeals during the academic year. These will most likely be immigration cases, though the Practicum will not know the cases and clients until this summer. Students will work in teams of two on a strict schedule. We expect to file opening briefs in October, and reply briefs in February 2022. The cases may be set for argument in April or May, and some students may argue under faculty supervision. Because of this schedule, the Practicum is a two-semester experience. This will be a demanding course. Students will work very hard early in the Fall semester to master the cases and prepare the opening briefs. The work will also be uneven in the Spring semester given the timing of the reply briefs and arguments. Students must devote the necessary amount of time to these cases on this schedule, so they should not be concurrently enrolled in another clinic, field placement or practicum, Appellate Advocacy, or other course with a competing commitment. Each team and case will have a primary faculty supervisor, though the teams will also collaborate with each other. Because of the needs of the clients, we cannot guarantee that the briefing will follow this schedule or that every case will be fully litigated or argued. We will do what is best for the clients, and that might mean settling or mediating a case. It is possible that the Practicum will need to alter the briefing or argument schedule. But we will select cases with the anticipation that they will be handled during the academic year. Course Applications: Admission to the Practicum Clinic and the co-requisite Seminar is by application only. The Ninth Circuit requires that a student have completed two thirds of their law school training in order to practice before the Court. As a result, we will consider applications only from rising third-year students. An information session will be held in early April. Please apply for the course through our online application. The APPLICATION DEADLINE is Noon on April 12, 2021. (Only one application is required for both the seminar and clinic components.) We hope to interview applicants and plan to make decisions shortly thereafter. The Ninth Circuit Practicum requires students to enroll in both the Practicum and Seminar for the entire academic year. The Fall Seminar is limited to students who are accepted for enrollment in the Practicum for academic year 2021-22. Accepted students will enroll in the Advanced Practicum and Advanced Seminar in Spring 2022 at the appropriate time. Attendance Requirement Full attendance at each seminar session and full participation in the clinical portion is mandatory to receive credit for this course.

Fall 2022 Description:
Please apply for the course through our online application. The APPLICATION DEADLINE is Noon on April 13, 2022. (Only one application is required for both the seminar and clinic components.) We plan to interview applicants and make decisions shortly thereafter. Admission to the Practicum Clinic and the co-requisite Seminar is by application only. The Ninth Circuit requires that a student have completed two thirds of their law school training to practice before the Court. As a result, we will consider applications only from rising third-year students. The Ninth Circuit Practicum provides students an intense experience in appellate advocacy. Students brief and argue cases before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit on behalf of clients who would otherwise not have legal representation. Students also learn aspects of federal law and appellate practice. Because of Ninth Circuit rules for student practice, the Practicum is limited to rising third-year law students. Working in collaboration with the Ninth Circuit’s Pro Bono Program, members of the Practicum brief and argue four appeals during the academic year. These most likely will be immigration or civil rights cases, though we will not know the cases and clients until this summer. Students work in teams of two on a strict schedule. We expect to file opening briefs in October, and reply briefs in February 2023. The cases may be set for argument in April, and students will argue under faculty supervision. Because of this schedule, the Practicum is a two-semester experience. This is a demanding course. Students work very hard early in the Fall semester to master the cases and prepare the opening briefs. The work is uneven in the Spring semester given the timing of the reply briefs and arguments. Students must devote the necessary amount of time to these cases on this schedule, so they may not concurrently enroll in another clinic, field placement or practicum, Appellate Advocacy, or other courses with a competing commitment. Each team and case has a primary faculty supervisor, though the teams also collaborate with each other. Because of the needs of the clients, we cannot guarantee that the briefing will follow this schedule or that every case will be fully litigated or argued. We will do what is best for the clients, and that might mean settling or mediating a case. It is possible that the court or the Practicum will need to alter the briefing or argument schedule. But we select cases anticipating that they will be litigated during the academic year. The Ninth Circuit Practicum requires students to enroll in both the Practicum and Seminar for the entire academic year. The Fall Seminar is limited to students who are accepted for enrollment in the Practicum for academic year 2022-23. Accepted students will enroll in the Advanced Practicum and Advanced Seminar in Spring 2023 at the appropriate time. Attendance Requirement Full attendance at each seminar session and full participation in the clinical portion is mandatory to receive credit for this course.


Law 243.7B Advanced 9th Circuit Practicum 4 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This is the second semester of a two-semester sequence. Enrollment is limited to students who completed the Ninth Circuit Practicum in the fall semester. The Ninth Circuit Practicum provides students an intense experience in appellate advocacy. Students brief and potentially argue cases before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit on behalf of clients who would otherwise not have legal representation. Students also learn aspects of federal law and appellate practice. The Practicum works in collaboration with the Ninth Circuit’s Pro Bono Program. We were appointed to several cases in the fall, with opening briefs filed then. In the Advanced Ninth Circuit Practicum, we will file reply briefs in these cases and potentially present oral argument under faculty supervision. Students must devote considerable time to these cases on this schedule, so they should not be concurrently enrolled in another clinic, field placement or practicum, or course with a competing commitment. Nor should they have a competing commitment in an employment or volunteer setting. Attendance at each seminar session and full participation in the practicum portion is mandatory to receive credit for this course.

Spring 2021 Description:
This is the second semester of a two-semester sequence. Enrollment is limited to students who completed the Ninth Circuit Practicum in the fall semester. The Ninth Circuit Practicum provides students an intense experience in appellate advocacy. Students brief and potentially argue cases before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit on behalf of clients who would otherwise not have legal representation. Students also learn aspects of federal law and appellate practice. The Practicum works in collaboration with the Ninth Circuit’s Pro Bono Program. We were appointed to several cases in the fall, with opening briefs filed then. In the Advanced Ninth Circuit Practicum, we will file reply briefs in these cases and potentially present oral argument under faculty supervision. Students must devote considerable time to these cases on this schedule, so they should not be concurrently enrolled in another clinic, field placement or practicum, or course with a competing commitment. Nor should they have a competing commitment in an employment or volunteer setting. Attendance at each seminar session and full participation in the practicum portion is mandatory to receive credit for this course. Due to the nature of this class, some or all of the sessions may not be recorded and posted except as required for accommodation of students with disabilities. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency.

Spring 2022 Description:
This is the second semester of a two-semester sequence. Enrollment is limited to students who completed the Ninth Circuit Practicum in the fall semester. The Ninth Circuit Practicum provides students an intense experience in appellate advocacy. Students brief and potentially argue cases before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit on behalf of clients who would otherwise not have legal representation. Students also learn aspects of federal law and appellate practice. The Practicum works in collaboration with the Ninth Circuit’s Pro Bono Program. We were appointed to several cases in the fall, with opening briefs filed then. In the Advanced Ninth Circuit Practicum, we will file reply briefs in these cases and potentially present oral argument under faculty supervision. Students must devote considerable time to these cases on this schedule, so they should not be concurrently enrolled in a clinic, field placement or practicum, or course with a competing commitment. Nor should they have a competing commitment in an employment or volunteer setting. Attendance at each seminar session and full participation in the practicum portion is mandatory to receive credit for this course.


Law 243.9 Persuasion 2 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This course will expose you to classical and modern techniques aimed at increasing your personal abilities to persuade others. The primary learning experience will come as you are on your feet in class presenting. Through lecture and student exercises, there will be opportunities for you to develop and expand your persuasive skills for use in many legal situations, with an emphasis on persuasion in trial and appellate courts. We will cover a history of great advocates, voice training, the use of rhetorical devises (including the uses of emotion), presenting witnesses, argument, and other related subjects. Exercises will include examples from intellectual property and criminal law. There will be a heavy emphasis on student performance. This course is recommended for those who anticipate doing some courtroom work in their future law practice. Attendance at the first class is mandatory for all enrolled students; any enrolled students who are not present at the first day of class without prior permission of the instructor will be dropped from the class. Instructor requires attendance to the first class.

Spring 2021 Description:
This course will expose you to classical and modern techniques aimed at increasing your personal abilities to persuade others. The primary learning experience will come as you are on your feet in class presenting. Through lecture and student exercises, there will be opportunities for you to develop and expand your persuasive skills for use in many legal situations, with an emphasis on persuasion in trial and appellate courts. We will cover a history of great advocates, voice training, the use of rhetorical devices (including the uses of emotion), presenting witnesses, argument, and other related subjects. Exercises will include examples from intellectual property and criminal law. There will be a heavy emphasis on student performance. This course is recommended for those who anticipate doing some courtroom work in their future law practice. Attendance at the first class is mandatory for all enrolled students; any enrolled students who are not present at the first day of class without prior permission of the instructor will be dropped from the class. Instructor requires attendance at the first class. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency.


Law 244 Conflict of Laws 3 Units
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Spring 2021 Description:
The subject of Conflict of Laws engages the problem of multi-state litigation--that is litigation in which the parties may hail from, or events occur, in different states. Such litigation raises questions, such as: what law is applicable?; where to file suit?; and how to enforce a judgment? As the country and the world grow more interconnected, these problems recur ever more frequently. As a result, this course covers three topics in depth: Choice of Law, Adjudicative Jurisdiction, and Recognition of Judgments. Emphasis is placed on theoretical and practical problems and traditional and modern approaches. While most of the material focuses on conflicts between states of the US, we will also engage with problems of international civil litigation and extraterritorial application of United States law. Ultimately, Conflicts is a challenging course best suited to students who intend to pursue a nationwide civil-litigation practice (indeed, it is essential for such students) or who are intrigued by complicated questions of legal theory, jurisprudence, and federalism.


Law 244.1 Advanced Civil Procedure: Complex Litigation 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
The subject of this course is complex civil litigation. The complexity stems from, among other things, technical issues, high moral or monetary stakes, multiple parties, and multiple jurisdictions in a federal system. We will focus in particular on how the litigation process deals with situations where many persons have been affected by the defendant's conduct. To start, we will revisit some topics covered in the first-year procedure course, including jurisdiction, preclusion, and simple joinder, among others. We will then delve deeply into material you may not have covered in depth, or at all, in the first year, primarily class actions and multidistrict litigation (MDL)--and how they fit into the larger procedural system. The material is difficult and deals with issues that have been perennial subjects of judicial and political controversy, in Congress and state legislatures, in a divided Supreme Court, and in the federal rulemaking process. We will master the relevant doctrine and policy, nurture the ability to think like a lawyer about the many strategic and tactical issues involved in litigating these cases on both sides of the "v.", and investigate the policy choices involved in designing systems to deal with cases of this kind. This course is important, if not essential, for prospective litigators; pure pleasure for procedure enthusiasts.

Spring 2021 Description:
The subject of this course is complex civil litigation. The complexity stems from, among other things, technical issues, high moral or monetary stakes, multiple parties, and multiple jurisdictions in a federal system. We will focus in particular on how the litigation process deals with situations where many persons have been affected by the defendant's conduct. To start, we will revisit some topics covered in the first-year procedure course, including jurisdiction, preclusion, and simple joinder, among others. We will then delve deeply into material you may not have covered in depth, or at all, in the first year, primarily class actions and multidistrict litigation (MDL)--and how they fit into the larger procedural system. The material is difficult and deals with issues that have been perennial subjects of judicial and political controversy, in Congress and state legislatures, in a divided Supreme Court, and in the federal rulemaking process. We will master the relevant doctrine and policy, nurture the ability to think like a lawyer about the many strategic and tactical issues involved in litigating these cases on both sides of the "v.", and investigate the policy choices involved in designing systems to deal with cases of this kind. This course is important, if not essential, for prospective litigators; pure pleasure for procedure enthusiasts.

Spring 2022 Description:
The subject of this course is complex civil litigation. The complexity stems from, among other things, technical issues, high stakes, multiple parties, and multiple jurisdictions in a federal system. We will focus in particular on how the litigation process deals with situations where many persons have been affected by the defendant's conduct. To start, we will revisit some topics you likely covered in the first-year procedure course, including the basics of jurisdiction, preclusion, and simple joinder, among others. We will then delve deeply into material you may not have covered in depth, or at all, in the first year, primarily class actions and multidistrict litigation (MDL)--and how they fit into the larger procedural system. The material is difficult and deals with issues that have been perennial subjects of judicial and political controversy--in Congress and state legislatures, in a divided Supreme Court, and in the federal rulemaking process. We will master the relevant doctrine and policy, nurture the ability to think like a lawyer about the many strategic and tactical issues involved in litigating these cases on both sides of the "v.", and investigate the policy choices involved in designing systems to deal with cases of this kind. This course is important, if not essential, for prospective litigators; pure pleasure for procedure enthusiasts.


Law 244.12 Civil Procedure Stories 2 Units
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2022 Description:
This seminar will peel back the curtain behind seminal cases in the Civil Procedure curriculum. It will delve into the background and scope of these cases' impacts on the people involved in them, with an emphasis on the interwoven relationship between procedure and substance--the fact that every procedural case comes from somewhere, and the important ones alter the landscape afterward. Issues related to equality and inequality based on race, class, sex, and sexual orientation abound. We will draw substantially from a book called Civil Procedure Stories, edited by Kevin Clermont, which contains wonderful chapters on classic cases including Hansberry v. Lee; Erie R.R. Co. v. Tompkins; Goldberg v. Kelly; Owen Equipment and Erection Co. v. Kroger; and Celotex Corp. v. Catrett. Other cases we might study using law review sources include Ashcroft v. Iqbal, via Shirin Sinnar's article "The Lost Story of Iqbal"; the marriage equality cases in Alabama, via Howard Wasserman's article "Crazy in Alabama: Judicial Process and the Last Stand Against Marriage Equality in the Land of George Wallace"; Word-Wide Volkswagen v. Woodson, via Charles Adams's "World-Wide Volkswagen v. Woodson-The Rest of the Story"; and perhaps also some studies of MDL cases via sources including Beth Burch's recent book, "Mass Tort Deals: Backroom Bargaining in Multidistrict Litigation," together with other views about the functioning of the MDL system. Grades will be based primarily on writing requirements, and secondarily on class participation. Each student will be responsible for several short writing assignments during the semester. Half of these papers will involve posing a discussion questions about the coming week's reading and composing your own answers those questions. The other half will involve responding to questions posed by classmates. You will receive feedback to help you improve subsequent submissions. Both the discussion questions you provide and your answers will play an important--hopefully, guiding!--role in our in-class discussions. It's fair to expect that students who are askers or responders in a given week will play lead roles in that week's discussion, but I expect all students to come to class prepared to participate in discussions each week, including on days when they have not written response papers.


Law 244.2 Remedies 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
Remedies is a practice-oriented exploration of the substantive and strategic issues associated with the forms of redress available to parties in constitutional, contract and tort litigation. The class will explore the complexities lurking in the various measures of damages; restitution and unjust enrichment; provisional and permanent injunctive relief; and specific performance. Along with learning the law, students will be exposed to the powerful roles played by the judiciary and juries in determining outcomes. The overriding objective of the class is to prepare students for the practice of law. A grasp of the litigation process, including remedies, is an essential step in becoming a competent lawyer. Thus, the class is recommended for all law students, regardless of their anticipated area of specialization. Instructor Biography: Robert D. Infelise received his A.B. from Cal in 1977 and his J.D. from Berkeley Law in 1980. Upon graduating, Mr. Infelise joined the Los Angeles office of Cox, Castle & Nicholson LLP, one of the nation's premier law firms specializing in the real estate and financial services industries. Since the mid-1980’s, he has specialized in litigation involving soil and groundwater contamination. In 1998, Mr. Infelise helped found Cox, Castle & Nicholson's San Francisco office and later served as its managing partner. Mr. Infelise writes and speaks on issues involving soil and groundwater pollution, as well as climate change. His scholarly work begins and ends with an article co-authored by Professor Robert A. Kagan entitled "American State Supreme Court Justices, 1900-70," American Bar Foundation Research Journal, 1984 (Vol. 2, Spring). In addition to this course, Mr. Infelise teaches Environmental Law & Policy; the Environmental Law Writing Seminar; Climate Change and the Law; The Law of Hazardous Waste: CERCLA, RCRA and Common Law Claims; Contracts for LLMs; and Evidence. He is the former chair of the Advisory Committee, as well as former acting executive director, of Berkeley Law’s Center for Law, Energy and the Environment. In 2002-2003, Mr. Infelise was the acting head of Berkeley Law’s environmental law program. In 2014, he was named a “John and Elizabeth Boalt Lecturer.”

Spring 2021 Description:
The course in Remedies explores the stakes of civil litigation: that is, what tangible results lawyers for plaintiffs may achieve for their clients, and how lawyers for defendants resist those outcomes. The subject matter of the cases in the class is trans-substantive, and we will cover particular remedies available in contract, tort, IP, and constitutional cases, among others--but the course is more about Remedies law in general, rather than the law in any particular substantive area. To wit, we will cover money damages (including damages for property loss, physical injury, pain and suffering, emotional distress, and punitive damages), injunctive relief in both private and public-law litigation, restitution and disgorgement of unjust enrichment, and ancillary remedies (including attorneys' fees and contempt). In terms of approach, aside from covering the black-letter doctrine, the course will be both theoretical and practical. We will examine both the appropriate purposes of different civil remedies and engage with the many interesting strategic questions for lawyers on both sides of various kinds of litigation. As a result, this course is appropriate for anyone planning a career in civil litigation, or those more interested in theories of redress and the proper scope of judicial power.

Spring 2022 Description:
The course in Remedies explores the stakes of civil litigation: that is, what tangible results lawyers for plaintiffs may achieve for their clients, and how lawyers for defendants resist those outcomes. The subject matter of the cases in the class is trans-substantive, though we will cover particular remedies available in contract, tort, IP, and constitutional cases, among others. The course is, however, more about Remedies law in general, rather than the law in any particular substantive area. To wit, we will cover money damages (including damages for property loss, physical injury, pain and suffering, emotional distress, and punitive damages), injunctive relief and specific performance, and restitution and disgorgement of unjust enrichment. In terms of approach, aside from covering the black-letter doctrine, the course will be both theoretical and practical. We will examine both the appropriate purposes of different civil remedies and engage with the many interesting strategic questions for lawyers on both sides of various kinds of litigation. As a result, this course is appropriate for anyone planning a career in civil litigation, or those more interested in theories of redress and the proper scope of judicial power.

Fall 2022 Description:
Remedies is a practice-oriented exploration of the substantive and strategic issues associated with the forms of redress available to parties in constitutional, contract and tort litigation. The class will explore the complexities lurking in the various measures of damages; restitution and unjust enrichment; provisional and permanent injunctive relief; and specific performance. Along with learning the law, students will be exposed to the powerful roles played by the judiciary and juries in determining outcomes. The overriding objective of the class is to prepare students for the practice of law. A grasp of the litigation process, including remedies, is an essential step in becoming a competent lawyer. Thus, the class is recommended for all law students, regardless of their anticipated area of specialization. Instructor Biography: Robert D. Infelise received his A.B. from Cal in 1977 and his J.D. from Berkeley Law in 1980. Upon graduating, Mr. Infelise joined the Los Angeles office of Cox, Castle & Nicholson LLP, one of the nation's premier law firms specializing in the real estate and financial services industries. Since the mid-1980’s, he has specialized in litigation involving soil and groundwater contamination. In 1998, Mr. Infelise helped found Cox, Castle & Nicholson’s San Francisco office and later served as its managing partner. Mr. Infelise writes and speaks on issues involving soil and groundwater pollution, as well as climate change. His scholarly work begins and ends with an article co-authored by Professor Robert A. Kagan entitled “American State Supreme Court Justices, 1900-70,” American Bar Foundation Research Journal, 1984 (Vol. 2, Spring). In addition to this course, Mr. Infelise teaches Environmental Law & Policy; the Environmental Law Writing Seminar; Climate Change and the Law; Pathways to Carbon Neutrality; and Evidence. He is the former chair of the Advisory Committee, as well as former acting executive director, of Berkeley Law’s Center for Law, Energy and the Environment. In 2002-2003, Mr. Infelise was the acting head of Berkeley Law’s environmental law program. In 2014, he was given an honorific title, and is now a Christopher Edley, Jr. Lecturer. Mr. Infelise proudly serves as the faculty advisor to the Ecology Law Quarterly. Course Text: Laycock & Hasen, Modern American Remedies Cases and Materials (5th Ed.) There are two options, either of which will work: (i) Connected ebook plus print book: 9781454891277 $298 (New print textbook plus lifetime access to the ebook, outline tool, and other resources at casebookconnect.com. Access code for digital components included inside print book) and (ii) Connected ebook: 9781543844078 $209 (Lifetime access to the ebook, outline too, and other resources at casebookconnect.com).


Law 244.2S Remedies 3 Units
Summer 2021: Hybrid
Summer 2022: In-Person
Description:
Summer 2021 Description:
The course in Remedies explores the stakes of civil litigation: that is, what tangible results lawyers for plaintiffs may achieve for their clients, and how lawyers for defendants resist those outcomes. The subject matter of the cases in the class is trans-substantive, and we will cover particular remedies available in contract, tort, IP, and constitutional cases, among others--but the course is more about Remedies law in general, rather than the law in any particular substantive area. We will cover money damages (including damages for property loss, physical injury, pain and suffering, emotional distress, and punitive damages), injunctive relief in both private and public-law litigation, restitution and disgorgement of unjust enrichment, and ancillary remedies (including attorneys' fees and contempt). In terms of approach, aside from covering the black-letter doctrine, the course will be both theoretical and practical. This course will meet in-person on campus on July 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th, and 16th in room 110.

Summer 2022 Description:
This course in Remedies explores the stakes of civil litigation: that is, what tangible results lawyers for plaintiffs may achieve for their clients, and how lawyers for defendants resist those outcomes. The subject matter of the cases in the class is trans-substantive, and we will cover particular remedies available in contract, tort, IP, and constitutional cases, among others--but the course is more about Remedies law in general, rather than the law in any particular substantive area. We will cover money damages (including damages for property loss, physical injury, pain and suffering, emotional distress, and punitive damages), injunctive relief in both private and public-law litigation, restitution and disgorgement of unjust enrichment, and ancillary remedies (including attorneys' fees and contempt). In terms of approach, aside from covering the black-letter doctrine, the course will be both theoretical and practical.


Law 244.42 Litigation 101 2 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
What are the first years of litigation practice at a law firm like? How should young litigators best set themselves up for success? What are some basic dos and don'ts in early litigation practice? We divide the class into plaintiff and defendant, and litigate through each stage of a simulated case. Throughout the substantive journey of our hypothetical case, we’ll incorporate discussion of the extra-legal considerations: Do you feel like you’re doing meaningful work? Is your work-life balance totally out of whack? How to conduct yourself in a work crisis? How to get and give credit? Is this why I went to law school? The class will focus on law firm litigators, but will also involve presenting the perspectives of in-house clients and non-attorney clients, and of regulatory and governmental sectors. Instructors: Shaudy Danaye-Armstrong is senior counsel at Google, and has worked at both the District Attorneys' office and the law firms of Howard Rice and Arnold and Porter. She's litigated (and continues to litigate) some of the country's most high-profile cases, which we expect to discuss further in class. Bobbie Wilson is a Litigation partner at Perkins Coie. She has extensive experience in complex civil litigation primarily in the area of intellectual property. She focuses on patent, trade secrets, the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, and Section 230 litigation under the Communications Decency Act. Ms. Wilson also serves as the lead trial counsel in intellectual property, complex class action litigation, and political law cases. She has been recognized by The Recorder in its annual "Women Leaders in Tech Law" list for many years, and as a Top 10 "Power Player." She has was also named one of the "Top 100 Women Lawyers" in California by the Daily Journal.

Spring 2021 Description:
What are the first years of litigation practice at a law firm like? How should young litigators best set themselves up for success? What are some basic dos and don'ts in early litigation practice? We divide the class into plaintiff and defendant, and litigate through each stage of a simulated case. Throughout the substantive journey of our hypothetical case, we’ll incorporate discussion of the extra-legal considerations: Do you feel like you’re doing meaningful work? Is your work-life balance totally out of whack? How to conduct yourself in a work crisis? How to get and give credit? Is this why I went to law school? The class will focus on law firm litigators, but will also involve presenting the perspectives of in-house clients and non-attorney clients, and of regulatory and governmental sectors. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency. Instructors: Shaudy Danaye-Armstrong is senior counsel at Google, where she handles Regulatory Litigation and Investigations as well as civil litigation. She has worked at both the District Attorneys' office and the law firms of Howard Rice and Arnold and Porter. She's litigated (and continues to litigate) some of the country's most high-profile cases, running the gamut from biometrics to antitrust; copyright to privacy; and everything in between. She's very excited to work with students as they navigate through the ups and down of a simulated case, and get a feel for the arts of war and peace in litigation. Sonali Maitra has been a partner at Durie Tangri, one of the country's most successful IP litigation boutiques, and an associate at Keker & Van Nest. She's been named one of the country's top IP attorneys under 40 and one of the top attorneys under 40 in California, among other honors.

Spring 2022 Description:
What are the first years of litigation practice at a law firm like? How should young litigators best set themselves up for success? What are some basic dos and don'ts in early litigation practice? We divide the class into plaintiff and defendant, and litigate through each stage of a simulated case. Throughout the substantive journey of our hypothetical case, we’ll incorporate discussion of the extra-legal considerations: Do you feel like you’re doing meaningful work? Is your work-life balance totally out of whack? How to conduct yourself in a work crisis? How to get and give credit? Is this why I went to law school? The class will focus on law firm litigators, but will also involve presenting the perspectives of in-house clients and non-attorney clients, and of regulatory and governmental sectors. Instructors: Shaudy Danaye-Armstrong is senior counsel at Google, where she sits on the Regulatory Response, Investigations & Strategy team, handling regulatory and other high gravity litigation. She has worked at both the District Attorneys' office and the law firms of Howard Rice and Arnold and Porter. She's litigated (and continues to litigate) some of the country's most high-profile cases, running the gamut from biometrics to antitrust; copyright to privacy; and everything in between. She's very excited to work with students as they navigate through the ups and downs of a simulated case, and get a feel for the arts of war and peace in litigation. Sonali Maitra has been a partner at Durie Tangri, one of the country's most successful IP litigation boutiques, and an associate at Keker & Van Nest. She's been named one of the country's top IP attorneys under 40 and one of the top attorneys under 40 in California, among other honors.


Law 244.49 Trial Competition 2 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
This course is limited to and required for members of the Board of Advocate's trial team. The course will teach trial competition skills, including case analysis and strategies. It will combine lecture with student performance. Spencer Pahlke is a trial lawyer at Walkup, Melodia, Kelly & Schoenberger in San Francisco. His practice focuses on prosecuting catastrophic personal injury and wrongful death cases resulting from governmental negligence, vehicular negligence, products liability, premises liability, and medical malpractice. This course will have 9 class meetings. To allow for a makeup class because of unforeseen circumstances this course has an automatic make-up class scheduled for the 10th week. Students must be able to attend all 10 scheduled meetings to earn credit. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency.

Fall 2021 Description:
This course is limited to and required for members of the Board of Advocate's trial team. The course will teach trial competition skills, including case analysis and strategies. It will combine lecture with student performance. Spencer Pahlke is a trial lawyer at Walkup, Melodia, Kelly & Schoenberger in San Francisco. His practice focuses on prosecuting catastrophic personal injury and wrongful death cases resulting from governmental negligence, vehicular negligence, products liability, premises liability, and medical malpractice. This course will have 9 class meetings. To allow for a makeup class because of unforeseen circumstances this course has an automatic make-up class scheduled. Students must be able to attend all 10 scheduled meetings to earn credit.

Fall 2022 Description:
This course is limited to and required for members of the Board of Advocate's trial team. The course will teach trial competition skills, including case analysis and strategies. It will combine lectures with student performance. Spencer Pahlke is a trial lawyer at Walkup, Melodia, Kelly & Schoenberger in San Francisco. His practice focuses on prosecuting catastrophic personal injury and wrongful death cases resulting from governmental negligence, vehicular negligence, products liability, premises liability, and medical malpractice. This course will have 9 class meetings. To allow for a makeup class because of unforeseen circumstances this course has an automatic make-up class scheduled. Students must be able to attend all 10 scheduled meetings to earn credit.


Law 244.61 Multidistrict Litigation: The New Reality of Class Actions and Mass Torts 1 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
This one-unit elective will focus on one of the most important developments in modern civil practice: the emergence of Multidistrict Litigation, or MDL, as the primary mechanism for mass-tort and class-action litigation in the United States. The MDL statute, passed in 1968, provides for consolidation of cases sharing a common question of fact before a single federal district judge for pretrial proceedings, such as motion practice, discovery, class certification, and often settlement negotiations and bellwether trials. Currently, the biggest and most important cases in the country are consolidated into MDLs, including the litigations involving the opioids crisis, Volkswagen Clean Diesel scandal, concussions in the National Football League, and the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, not to mention enormous cases involving defective products and drugs, antitrust violations, and consumer data breaches. All told, MDL now comprises over a third of the federal civil docket: over 130,000 cases are currently part of an MDL. In this class, we will examine how MDL was created and became so dominant and how it works in the real world. For students interested in becoming litigators, the court will be a in-depth introduction to the world of complex litigation, as it is practiced at the highest levels. This course will meet every other Tuesdays on August 18, September 1, September 15, September 29, October 13, October 27, and November 10. This is an advanced course in US Civil Procedure intended for students who have already completed the basic first-year JD course in procedure. Due to the nature of this class, some or all of the sessions may not be recorded and posted except as required for accommodation of students with disabilities.

Fall 2022 Description:
This one-unit elective will focus on one of the most important developments in modern civil practice: the emergence of Multidistrict Litigation, or MDL, as the primary mechanism for mass-tort and class-action litigation in the United States. The MDL statute, passed in 1968, provides for consolidation of cases sharing a common question of fact before a single federal district judge for pretrial proceedings, such as motion practice, discovery, class certification, settlement negotiations, and often bellwether trials, if there is jurisdiction. Currently, the biggest and most important cases in the country are consolidated into MDLs, including the litigations involving the opioids crisis, concussions in the National Football League, not to mention enormous cases involving defective products and drugs, antitrust violations, securities fraud, and consumer data breaches. All told, MDL now comprises over a third of the federal civil docket: over 400,000 pending cases are currently part of an MDL. In this class, we will examine how MDL was created, how it became so prominent, and how it works in the real world. For students interested in becoming litigators in a national practice, this course will be an in-depth introduction to the world of complex litigation, as it is practiced at the highest levels. This is an advanced course in US Civil Procedure intended for students who have already completed the basic first-year JD course in procedure. Due to the nature of the course, classes will not be recorded except as required to accommodate students with disabilities.


Law 244.8 Mediation 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
Mediation is a non-binding conflict resolution process in which disputing parties retain the services of a third party neutral to assist them in their efforts to seek out, develop, evaluate, and voluntarily adopt potential solutions to their mutual problems. The study of mediation in this course focuses on learning to help disputing parties solve their own problems in a way that best meets their individual needs. This approach to helping people resolve disputes is vastly different from that of most law school courses, which focus on lawyers as advisors and zealous client representatives. In this class, students will learn to sit in the unique role of a neutral, and gain a new perspective on lawyering. Mediation has become an almost inescapable part of both the practice of law, whatever one's area of specialization may be, and of a large variety of business transactions. Students will benefit from enhanced problem-solving, communication and interpersonal skills - all key to effective lawyering and advocacy. Most students will find these skills transformative not only in broadening their legal repetoire, but also in a large variety of professional and personal situations. This course will offer students an opportunity to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to effectively participate in a mediation process, as a neutral and as an advocate. Mediation theory, applicable law, and related ethical considerations and public policy concerns will be among the many subjects covered. Students will have the the opportunity to develop dispute resolution skills through experiential learning in a safe and supportive setting. This course is for students interested in mediation as a career as well as for the far greater number of students who will provide legal representation for clients involved in mediation processes or who may themselves be parties in mediated conflicts. All students with an interest in the subject matter, with or without prior mediation or negotiation experience, are encouraged to enroll. All interested students, whether enrolled or on the wait list, must attend the first session at which time enrollment will be confirmed. If you have questions or concerns, contact Darshan Brach at darshb13@gmail.com. INSTRUCTOR BIOGRAPHY: Darshan Brach began her legal career in 1988 as an environmental attorney in Connecticut and later in Massachusetts. She left the practice of law and, in 1995, initiated her career as a mediator and mediation trainer. She began teaching Negotiation and Mediation at New England School of Law in 1998. Since moving to the Bay Area in 2005, she has taught Negotiation and Mediation at Stanford Law School, Hastings College of the Law, Santa Clara School of Law and Mills College of Business. Between 2008 and 2014, and again in 2019, Professor Brach has primarily taught as part of the Mediation Clinic at Hastings College of the Law, where she has trained and guided law students in hands on, experiential learning through fieldwork in the San Francisco Superior Court Small Claims Department and in several city, county and state agencies. In addition to her private mediation practice and teaching work, she has conducted numerous trainings in both the public and private sectors, including trainings for the California Public Utilities Commission, the San Francisco Superior Court, for the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Army Corps of Engineers. Most recently, Professor Brach has mediated as a panelist for the United States District Court, California Northern District. Professor Brach also holds a license as a Marriage and Family Therapist..

Spring 2021 Description:
Mediation is a non-binding conflict resolution process in which disputing parties retain the services of a third party neutral to assist them in their efforts to seek out, develop, evaluate, and voluntarily adopt potential solutions to their mutual problems. The study of mediation in this course focuses on learning to help disputing parties solve their own problems in a way that best meets their individual needs. This approach to helping people resolve disputes is vastly different from that of most law school courses, which focus on lawyers as advisors and zealous client representatives. In this class, students will learn to sit in the unique role of a neutral, and gain a new perspective on lawyering. Mediation has become an almost inescapable part of both the practice of law, whatever one's area of specialization may be, and of a large variety of business transactions. Students will benefit from enhanced problem-solving, communication and interpersonal skills - all key to effective lawyering and advocacy. Most students will find these skills transformative not only in broadening their legal repertoire, but also in a large variety of professional and personal situations. This course will offer students an opportunity to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to effectively participate in a mediation process, as a neutral and as an advocate. Mediation theory, applicable law, and related ethical considerations and public policy concerns will be among the many subjects covered. Students will have the opportunity to develop dispute resolution skills through experiential learning in a safe and supportive setting. This course is for students interested in mediation as a career as well as for the far greater number of students who will provide legal representation for clients involved in mediation processes or who may themselves be parties in mediated conflicts. All students with an interest in the subject matter, with or without prior mediation or negotiation experience, are encouraged to enroll. I will also be offering a 1 credit practicum in which students who are currently taking this course or have taken this course previously will have the opportunity to remotely mediate one or more commercial lease renegotiation for business owners and landlords impacted by COVID. Please see the description for the Mediation Practicum under Law 244.8B - Sec. 1. All interested students, whether enrolled or on the wait list, must attend the first session at which time enrollment will be confirmed. If you have questions or concerns, contact Darshan Brach at darshb13@gmail.com. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency. INSTRUCTOR BIOGRAPHY: Darshan Brach began her legal career in 1988 as an environmental attorney in Connecticut and later in Massachusetts. She left the practice of law and, in 1995, initiated her career as a mediator and mediation trainer. She began teaching Negotiation and Mediation at New England School of Law in 1998. Since moving to the Bay Area in 2005, she has taught Negotiation and Mediation at Stanford Law School, Hastings College of the Law, Santa Clara School of Law and Mills College of Business. Between 2008 and 2014, and again in 2019, Professor Brach has primarily taught as part of the Mediation Clinic at Hastings College of the Law, where she has trained and guided law students in hands on, experiential learning through fieldwork in the San Francisco Superior Court Small Claims Department and in several city, county and state agencies. In addition to her private mediation practice and teaching work, she has conducted numerous trainings in both the public and private sectors, including trainings for the California Public Utilities Commission, the San Francisco Superior Court, for the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Army Corps of Engineers. Most recently, Professor Brach has mediated as a panelist for the United States District Court, California Northern District. Professor Brach also holds a license as a Marriage and Family Therapist.

Fall 2021 Description:
Mediation is a non-binding conflict resolution process in which disputing parties retain the services of a third party neutral to assist them in their efforts to seek out, develop, evaluate, and voluntarily adopt potential solutions to their mutual problems. The study of mediation in this course focuses on learning to help disputing parties solve their own problems in a way that best meets their individual needs. This approach to helping people resolve disputes is vastly different from that of most law school courses, which focus on lawyers as advisors and zealous client representatives. In this class, students will learn to sit in the unique role of a neutral, and gain a new perspective on lawyering. Mediation has become an almost inescapable part of both the practice of law, whatever one's area of specialization may be, and of a large variety of business transactions. Students will benefit from enhanced problem-solving, communication and interpersonal skills - all key to effective lawyering and advocacy. Most students will find these skills transformative not only in broadening their legal repertoire, but also in a large variety of professional and personal situations. This course will offer students an opportunity to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to effectively participate in a mediation process, as a neutral and as an advocate. Mediation theory, applicable law, and related ethical considerations and public policy concerns will be among the many subjects covered. Students will have the opportunity to develop dispute resolution skills through experiential learning in a safe and supportive setting. This course is for students interested in mediation as a career as well as for the far greater number of students who will provide legal representation for clients involved in mediation processes or who may themselves be parties in mediated conflicts. **This course will have two required Saturday classes (September 25th and October 2nd). All students with an interest in the subject matter, with or without prior mediation or negotiation experience, are encouraged to enroll. INSTRUCTOR BIOGRAPHY: Darshan Brach began her legal career in 1988 as an environmental attorney in Connecticut and later in Massachusetts. She left the practice of law and, in 1995, initiated her career as a mediator and mediation trainer. She began teaching Negotiation and Mediation at New England School of Law in 1998. Since moving to the Bay Area in 2005, she has taught Negotiation and Mediation at Stanford Law School, Hastings College of the Law, Santa Clara School of Law and Mills College of Business. Between 2008 and 2014, and again in 2019, Professor Brach has primarily taught as part of the Mediation Clinic at Hastings College of the Law, where she has trained and guided law students in hands on, experiential learning through fieldwork in the San Francisco Superior Court Small Claims Department and in several city, county and state agencies. In addition to her private mediation practice and teaching work, she has conducted numerous trainings in both the public and private sectors, including trainings for the California Public Utilities Commission, the San Francisco Superior Court, for the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Army Corps of Engineers. Most recently, Professor Brach has mediated as a panelist for the United States District Court, California Northern District. Professor Brach also holds a license as a Marriage and Family Therapist.

Fall 2022 Description:
Mediation is a non-binding conflict resolution process in which disputing parties retain the services of a third party neutral to assist them in their efforts to seek out, develop, evaluate, and voluntarily adopt potential solutions to their mutual problems. The study of mediation in this course focuses on learning to help disputing parties solve their own problems in a way that best meets their individual needs. This approach to helping people resolve disputes is vastly different from that of most law school courses, which focus on lawyers as advisors and zealous client representatives. In this class, students will learn to sit in the unique role of a neutral and gain a new perspective on lawyering. Mediation has become an almost inescapable part of both the practice of law, whatever one's area of specialization may be, and of a large variety of business transactions. Students will benefit from enhanced problem-solving, communication and interpersonal skills - all key to effective lawyering and advocacy. Most students will find these skills transformative not only in broadening their legal repertoire, but also in a large variety of professional and personal situations. This course will offer students an opportunity to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to effectively participate in a mediation process, as a neutral and as an advocate. Mediation theory, applicable law, and related ethical considerations and public policy concerns will be among the many subjects covered. Students will have the opportunity to develop dispute resolution skills through experiential learning in a safe and supportive setting. This course is for students interested in mediation as a career as well as for the far greater number of students who will provide legal representation for clients involved in mediation processes or who may themselves be parties in mediated conflicts. For students interested in continuing their training as mediators after taking this course, the Mediation Practicum (generally offered in the Spring Semester) offers hands-on experience mediating real life conflicts. All students with an interest in the subject matter, with or without prior mediation or negotiation experience, are encouraged to enroll. Due to the experiential nature of this class, real-time attendance is required except in cases of illness or emergency. INSTRUCTOR BIOGRAPHY: Darshan Brach began her legal career in 1988 as an environmental attorney in Connecticut and later in Massachusetts. She left the practice of law and, in 1995, initiated her career as a mediator and mediation trainer. She began teaching Negotiation and Mediation at New England School of Law in 1998. Since moving to the Bay Area in 2005, she has taught Negotiation and Mediation at Stanford Law School, Hastings College of the Law, Santa Clara School of Law and Mills College of Business. Between 2008 and 2014, and again in 2019, Professor Brach has primarily taught as part of the Mediation Clinic at Hastings College of the Law, where she has trained and guided law students in hands on, experiential learning through fieldwork in the San Francisco Superior Court Small Claims Department and in several city, county and state agencies. In addition to her private mediation practice and teaching work, she has conducted numerous trainings in both the public and private sectors, including trainings for the California Public Utilities Commission, the San Francisco Superior Court, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Army Corps of Engineers. Professor Brach is a panelist for the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, and most recently has mediated discrimination cases for the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing. Professor Brach is also a trained psychotherapist.


Law 244.82 Mediation Advocacy 2 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
This intensive mediation advocacy course is offered in three Saturday classes (October 17th, October 24th and November 7th). The first day of class will include lectures, a series of skill building exercises, and an overview of the mediation process, basic mediation theory and practice, mediation confidentiality, and ethical issues specific to mediation. The second and third days of class will be devoted to practicing as advocates in simulated mediation exercises and debriefing. Students can expect personalized coaching and feedback from peers, the instructor, and guest mediators. Homework will include a short text on mediation, to be read in advance of the first class. Otherwise, homework will focus on studying simulation materials and preparing a strategic plan (for submission), drafting and exchanging mediation statements, and counseling clients in advance of the simulated mediation sessions. Attendance is mandatory at all three dates. Biography of Instructor Professor Lange worked for 20 years as a litigator and as a mediator in private practice before joining the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California as ADR Program Counsel & Mediator. She brings to the classroom extensive experience negotiating, arguing, and mediating complex, high-value, and emotionally charged disputes. Professor Lange previously worked at Heller Ehrman; Caldwell Leslie (now Boies Schiller Flexner); the ACLU’s LGBT & AIDS Project; the National Center for Youth Law; and Santa Clara County Counsel, where she served as a Lead Deputy. She received her J.D. from Berkeley Law in 1995, Order of the Coif, and clerked for the Hon. Richard A. Paez and the Hon. William A. Fletcher.

Spring 2022 Description:
This intensive mediation advocacy course is offered in three Saturday classes (January 22, February 12, March 5) from 9:30 am to 6 pm. The first day of class will include in-depth practice preparing a sophisticated client for mediation and an overview of the mediation process, basic mediation theory and practice, core principles of mediation confidentiality and party self-determination, and ethical issues specific to mediation. The second and third days of class will be devoted to practicing as advocates in simulated mediation exercises, and debriefing. Students can expect personalized coaching and feedback from peers, the instructor, and guest mediators. Homework will include a short text on mediation, to be read in advance of the first class. Most homework will involve studying simulation materials and preparing a strategic plan (for submission), drafting and exchanging mediation statements, and counseling clients in advance of the simulated mediation sessions. Attendance is mandatory at all three dates. Biography of Instructor Professor Lange worked for 20 years as a litigator and as a mediator in private practice before joining the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, where she is now the ADR Director. She brings to the classroom extensive experience negotiating, arguing, and mediating complex, high-value, and emotionally charged disputes. Professor Lange previously worked at Heller Ehrman; Caldwell Leslie; the ACLU’s LGBT & AIDS Project; the National Center for Youth Law; and Santa Clara County Counsel, where she served as the founding Lead Deputy for the Social Justice and Impact Litigation Section. She received her J.D. from Berkeley Law, Order of the Coif, and clerked for the Hon. Richard A. Paez and the Hon. William A. Fletcher.


Law 244.83 Mediation Practicum Seminar 1 Units
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2022 Description:
This seminar is offered in conjunction with Law 244.8B Mediation Practicum, which provides students with the opportunity to mediate California Department of Fair Employment and Housing (DFEH) discrimination cases and to observe mediations at the Alameda Small Claims Court (SCC). The seminar will include orientation to discrimination law under the California Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA), preparation for interfacing professionally with mediation parties, review and analysis of student mediation experiences, and learning about processes and procedures for observing SCC cases and mediating at the DFEH. Students will be required to write short analytical memos relating to their experiential learning. Students must have taken the Mediation class (Law 244.8 Mediation) prior to enrolling in the Mediation Seminar and Practicum. INSTRUCTOR BIOGRAPHY: Darshan Brach began her legal career in 1988 as an environmental attorney in Connecticut and later in Massachusetts. She left the practice of law and, in 1995, initiated her career as a mediator and mediation trainer. She began teaching Negotiation and Mediation at New England School of Law in 1998. Since moving to the Bay Area in 2005, she has taught Negotiation and Mediation at Stanford Law School, Hastings College of the Law, Santa Clara School of Law and Mills College of Business. Between 2008 and 2014, and again in 2019, Professor Brach has primarily taught as part of the Mediation Clinic at Hastings College of the Law, where she has trained and guided law students in hands on, experiential learning through fieldwork in the San Francisco Superior Court Small Claims Department and in several city, county and state agencies. In addition to her private mediation practice and teaching work, she has conducted numerous trainings in both the public and private sectors, including trainings for the California Public Utilities Commission, the San Francisco Superior Court, for the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Army Corps of Engineers. Most recently, Professor Brach has mediated as a panelist for the United States District Court, California Northern District. Professor Brach also holds a license as a Marriage and Family Therapist.


Law 244.8B Mediation Practicum 1 Units
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2021 Description:
This practicum offers students the opportunity to remotely mediate one or more commercial lease renegotiation for business owners and landlords impacted by COVID. Students must either be taking Mediation (244.8) concurrently or already have taken the class. Students will be required to take a 1-2 hour commercial lease training, a mediation preparation training and will submit a 5 - 7 page memo reflecting on the challenges and learning associated with the mediation experience. Students apply by emailing Darshan Brach at darshb13@gmail.com and in one or two sentences 1) explain why you want to do the practicum and 2) stating whether you have taken Mediation (Law 244.8) or are enrolled in Mediation in Spring 2021. After that email, I also ask that students have a follow-up conversation with me so that I can explain the practicum in more detail. I encourage early applications as the openings are limited to 3. The deadline to apply is Monday, November 16th and after that date applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis.

Spring 2022 Description:
The Mediation Practicum is offered in conjunction with Law 244.83 Section 1, Mediation Seminar. The Practicum will provide students with the training and opportunity to mediate California Department of Fair Employment and Housing (DFEH) discrimination cases and to observe mediations at the Alameda Small Claims Court. Students will be trained to interface professionally with mediation parties and to mediate their disputes under the California Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA). Students will also observe mediators in the small claims context to gain perspective on different approaches to mediation. The Seminar portion of the Practicum will allow for integration of these hands-on experiences by providing orientation to applicable law and through reflective discussion and writing. Students must have taken the Mediation class (Law 244.8 Mediation) prior to enrolling in the Mediation Seminar and Practicum. INSTRUCTOR BIOGRAPHY: Darshan Brach began her legal career in 1988 as an environmental attorney in Connecticut and later in Massachusetts. She left the practice of law and, in 1995, initiated her career as a mediator and mediation trainer. She began teaching Negotiation and Mediation at New England School of Law in 1998. Since moving to the Bay Area in 2005, she has taught Negotiation and Mediation at Stanford Law School, Hastings College of the Law, Santa Clara School of Law and Mills College of Business. Between 2008 and 2014, and again in 2019, Professor Brach primarily taught as part of the Mediation Clinic at Hastings College of the Law, where she has trained and guided law students in hands on, experiential learning through fieldwork in the San Francisco Superior Court Small Claims Department and in several city, county and state agencies. In addition to her private mediation practice and teaching work, she has conducted numerous trainings in both the public and private sectors, including trainings for the California Public Utilities Commission, the San Francisco Superior Court, for the Environmental Protection Agency, and t he Army Corps of Engineers. Most recently, Professor Brach has mediated as a panelist for the United States District Court, California Northern District. Professor Brach also holds a license as a Marriage and Family Therapist.


Law 244.91A Appellate Competition Intensive Part 1 1 Units
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2021 Description:
Appellate Competition Intensive is a one-credit crash course in the fundamentals of appellate writing and oral argument. This class is designed for members of moot court teams who are not enrolled in the full 3-unit Appellate Advocacy class. The aim of this class is to give students the essential tools of appellate practice, with an emphasis on effective writing. By the end of this class, students will be able to competently and confidently address the problems presented in moot court competitions and in real appellate practice. These skills include reviewing an appellate record, crafting sections of an appellate brief, and outlining and presenting a compelling oral argument. To apply for this course please email and detail which competition you have been admitted to Ted Pelletier at tedpelletierlaw@gmail.com. Ted W. Pelletier is a partner at the Oakland law firm of Kazan, McClain, Satterley and Greenwood, PLC. He has practiced California civil litigation, with an emphasis on appellate work, for over 20 years. He has handled the briefing and oral argument in dozens of appeals in the California appellate courts, including three cases in the California Supreme Court. With the Kazan firm, he also actively participates in trial and motion work, leading the firm’s briefing on legal issues including summary-judgment motions, evidentiary issues, jury instructions, and post-trial matters.

Fall 2022 Description:
Appellate Competition Intensive is a one-credit crash course in the fundamentals of appellate writing and oral argument. This class is designed for members of moot court teams who are not enrolled in the full 3-unit Appellate Advocacy class. The aim of this class is to give students an overview of law-school appellate-advocacy competitions, including how they work, how to understand and respond to the competition's "problem," and how to work effectively in a competition team. Through this process, the class addresses the essential tools of appellate practice, with an emphasis on effective writing. By the end of this class, students will be able to competently and confidently address the problems presented in moot court competitions and in real appellate practice. Ted W. Pelletier is the principal in the Law Office of Ted W. Pelletier. He has practiced California civil litigation, with an emphasis on appellate work, for over 25 years. He has handled the briefing and oral argument in dozens of appeals in the California appellate courts, including numerous cases in the California Supreme Court. He also works with trial counsel on trial and motion work, including summary-judgment motions and oppositions, evidentiary issues, jury instructions, and post-trial matters.


Law 245 Negotiations 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Spring 2022: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This highly interactive course will help students succeed in their professional and personal negotiations. It is designed to provide students with strategic considerations, an understanding of tactics to apply and to defend against, and intended to increase the student’s comfort and skill in real world negotiations. The course will explore theory, and through group discussions and negotiation role plays, students will gain skills in applying the theory to real-life negotiations, particularly those encountered when practicing law and arising from litigated disputes and business transactions. Class exercises will cover preparation, creating and claiming value, creative problem solving, client counseling, difficult tactics, ethical issues, difficult conversations, listening and communication skills. The intensive nature of this class provides students with an opportunity to learn and integrate valuable interpersonal skills, evaluate and improve their own skills, work closely with one another, and receive feedback. Course Objectives •Familiarize the student with various negotiation approaches and styles, including knowledge of competitive negotiation techniques and effective responses •Understand and develop effective strategies for each stage of a negotiation •Explore adversarial and collaborative bargaining •Understand ethical responsibilities of the lawyer representative •Learn techniques for concluding a negotiation successfully •Identify cultural and interpersonal challenges that can arise in negotiations •Enhance communication skills, emphasizing effective use of listening, persuasion and relationship-building •Develop personal techniques to increase efficacy in negotiations •Strengthen creative abilities to expand the range of options for resolving a dispute Attendance and participation at all scheduled classes is mandatory. Please note that there will be a mandatory Saturday class (April 4th) during which students will conduct a team negotiation across the table from students in other negotiation classes. All interested students, whether enrolled or on the wait list, should attend the first session at which time enrollment will be confirmed. Enrolled students who are not present during the first class may be dropped at the instructor's discretion. If you have questions, please contact Professor Link.

Fall 2020 Description:
This seminar is designed to teach students to become better negotiators and to represent clients effectively in both transactional and dispute resolution settings. The structure of the course emphasizes both theoretical and experiential learning. Since negotiation is something you learn by doing, we will engage in hands-on negotiation simulations throughout the course. These simulations are designed to enhance your skills, demonstrate concepts, and provide you with opportunities to experiment with various negotiation techniques. In addition, we will discuss theories of negotiation and use them to analyze the simulated negotiations. As a result, we will move back and forth between theory and practice, applying lessons from theory to our negotiation practice, and drawing lessons from our experience to critique theory. Each student will be paired with one or more other students to lead a class discussion of one reading assignment. This involves an explication of the text, an explanation of how the ideas expressed fit into the course’s framework, and an examination of the usefulness of the ideas. There will be a mandatory Saturday class on November 14th. The course involves extensive, intensive feedback. The assessment in this course will be a series of papers and oral presentations. Course Objectives: * Familiarize the student with various negotiation approaches and styles, including competitive and collaborative bargaining * Understand and develop effective strategies for each stage of a negotiation * Enhance communication skills, emphasizing effective use of listening and relationship-building * Explore psychological forces and cognitive biases that affect decision-making * Learn techniques for concluding a negotiation successfully, including crafting durable and enforceable agreements Exercises will include negotiation of business, family law, environmental, tort, employment, and multi-party international diplomacy disputes as well as business deals. At a general level, we will move from negotiations that involve fewer factors to ones that are more complex. By the end of the course, however, we hope that you will appreciate the layered complexity that was involved in what first appeared to be simple negotiations. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency. Biography of Instructor: Hon. Elaine Rushing (Ret.) served on the Sonoma County Superior Court for nearly 2 decades, including 5 years as Supervising Judge of the Civil Division. As a judge she heard real estate cases including fraud, broker compensation, adverse possession, partition, boundary disputes, and homeowners association disputes; business cases including bank matters and trade secrets; probate, trusts and estates litigation; and construction defect litigation. As a neutral at Judicial Arbitration and Mediation Services (JAMS) Judge Rushing has resolved numerous employment cases, including claims for wrongful, discrimination, retaliation, sexual harassment and wage and hour issues; probate matters including lack of capacity, breach of fiduciary duty, and undue influence; and real property cases including mortgage fraud, commercial tenancies and foreclosures.

Spring 2021 Description:
This course will be offered in an entirely online format focusing on “e-negotiations” (although the course concepts can be applied to both online and in-person negotiations), and meets three (3) times only: January 23, January 30, and February 6 (each day falling on a Saturday, 9:00am-6:00pm, with an approximately hour break for lunch). Attendance and participation in all three course sessions is mandatory. The afternoons will primarily be used for negotiation simulations (preparation, negotiation, and post-game analysis), which will be one of many key interactive course features. How do you strategically prepare for a successful negotiation, including online e-negotiations? How do you persuade people? Should you aim to “win” in negotiations? Are negotiators driven by emotion or rationality? How do you recognize and rectify implicit biases? What is a “fair” outcome? And what is the right balance between “competition” and “cooperation”? To create a roadmap to think about these issues, this highly interactive course provides a framework to “think like a negotiator” from both a domestic and international business perspective. The simulations utilized in the course, similar to other simulation-driven courses elsewhere, are a “for example” of one of many contextual ways in which the course concepts can be applied. The simulations rely on “first principles” with purposely simple and decluttered fact patterns to allow you to focus on specified persuasion principles each week. These persuasion principles can and should be subsequently scaled up in terms of context and complexity for your legal or non-legal career. Each course session will involve active engagement in a variety of negotiation - related scenarios - including negotiation simulations, actionable concepts, and experiential exercises - with a focus on “e-negotiations” (online negotiations; Zoom, email, social media, texts, and digital messaging platforms). You will also have the opportunity to learn different conceptual frameworks underlying negotiation theory and practice, including positional bargaining, integrative bargaining, communication skills, psychological influences, and negotiation power, which apply to both online e-negotiation and in-person negotiation contexts. Throughout this course, you will learn various strategies on how to get others to want what you want through persuasion, sway, and influence underlying your negotiations. As part of this, you will develop broad tools to constantly improve as negotiators by asking the right questions, framing issues, and negotiating with others with different skill sets, perceptions, experiences, and backgrounds. Ultimately, this course may help you to learn more about yourself. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency. Instructor Profile: Jasper Kim is a scholar-consultant based in California and Korea, with particular expertise in negotiations, and the structuring of capital markets instruments for social impact. He is Director of the Center for Conflict Management at the Graduate School of International Studies at Ewha University and is a Senior Fellow at the University of Melbourne. He served as invited faculty for the Supreme Court of Korea and is an Arbitrator for the Korea Commercial Arbitration Board. In addition, he is the founder of Asia-Pacific Global Research Group, a consultancy focused on policy trends. He was also a visiting scholar at Harvard Law School and Stanford University. Previously, he held key positions in fixed-income and structured products with Barclays Capital, Credit Suisse and Lehman Brothers. He is a contributor to various media, including the BBC, Bloomberg, CNN and The Wall Street Journal. He received a M.Sc. degree from the London School of Economics, a J.D. from Rutgers Law School, a M.B.A. from the University of London and M.Sc. in Taxation from Christ Church, University of Oxford (Faculty of Law and Said Business School).

Fall 2021 Description:
This course combines theory, skills and law. You will have the opportunity to negotiate, mediate, represent clients, be clients and observe role-plays. Please let yourself get into the roles, prepare where appropriate and take them seriously. Role-plays provide an opportunity to experience the process, experiment and receive feedback. The reading on negotiation theory and research will inform weekly negotiation exercises. The intensive nature of this class provides students with an opportunity to evaluate their own skills, to experiment with new skills and techniques, and to work closely with one another. Full engagement will require preparation each week as well as in-class participation. There will be a mandatory Saturday class on November 13th 9AM-1PM. Learning outcomes Students in the course will be expected to achieve the following Berkeley Law Learning Outcomes: (a) Knowledge and understanding of substantive and procedural law relating to negotiation; (b) Legal analysis and reasoning, problem-solving, and written and oral communication in the legal context; (c) Exercise of proper professional and ethical responsibilities to clients and the legal system; and (d) Using the law to solve real-world problems. In addition, students in the course will be expected to achieve the following course-specific outcomes: * Understand the ritual and stages of legal negotiation * Develop a systematic approach to preparing for a negotiation * Strengthen communication skills (listening, observing cues, expressing interests) * Develop a habit of questioning perceptions and relating with curiosity * Develop self-confidence, presence, and the ability to respond in the moment * Understand and recognize different negotiation styles and their strengths * Develop greater comfort with both adversarial and collaborative bargaining * Understand the role of relationship-building in negotiation * Develop understanding of diverse backgrounds in negotiation dynamics * Understand the ethical responsibilities of a lawyer in negotiations * Obtain a basic understanding of how to negotiate in mediation Biography of Instructors Esther Kim is a partner with Turner, Huguet, Adams & Farr, a small firm in Martinez, where she represents clients in estate planning, trust administration and probate matters. She is an active member of the Estate Planning and Probate Section of the Contra Costa County Bar Association as a Board Member and a past Board Member of the Diablo Valley Estate Planning Council. She formerly worked as a civil litigator at Cooley and as a staff attorney for the Santa Clara County Bar Association, where she helped to develop and implement an early court-administered ADR program. Prof. Kim is also a trained mediator having received her training from Pepperdine University as well as community based mediation with Community Boards, a nonprofit dispute resolution provider, in San Francisco. She earned her undergraduate degree from Pennsylvania State University and her law degree from Georgetown University Law Center and has an LL.M in Tax from Golden Gate University. Jonathan U. Lee is an Assistant United States Attorney prosecuting firearms, drugs, and other violent crimes, as well as cases involving internet-based crimes against children, labor trafficking, fraud, and embezzlement. He formerly practiced civil litigation for a private firm in San Francisco, for the San Francisco City Attorney's Office and as an Assistant U.S. Attorney. He serves as a court appointed mediator for federal and state courts. Prof. Lee also serves as adjunct faculty teaching advanced trial advocacy at UC-Hastings and has in the past taught trial advocacy for UC-Berkeley and John F. Kennedy University law schools, and for the Department of Justice's National Advocacy Center in Columbia, South Carolina. He earned his undergraduate degree from Washington University and his law degree from Georgetown University Law Center.

Spring 2022 Description:
This seminar is designed to teach students to become better negotiators and to represent clients effectively in both transactional and dispute resolution settings. The structure of the course emphasizes both theoretical and experiential learning. Since negotiation is something you learn by doing, we will engage in hands-on negotiation simulations throughout the course. These simulations are designed to enhance your skills, demonstrate concepts, and provide you with opportunities to experiment with various negotiation techniques. In addition, we will discuss theories of negotiation and use them to analyze the simulated negotiations. As a result, we will move back and forth between theory and practice, applying lessons from theory to our negotiation practice, and drawing lessons from our experience to critique theory.

Fall 2022 Description:
This seminar is designed to teach students to become better negotiators and to represent clients effectively in both transactional and dispute resolution settings. The structure of the course emphasizes experiential learning. Since negotiation is something you learn by doing, we will engage in hands-on negotiation simulations throughout the course. These simulations are designed to enhance your skills, demonstrate concepts, and provide you with opportunities to experiment with various negotiation techniques in varying legal disciplines and subject matters. Genske was born and raised in Southern California, where he attended Pepperdine University, receiving his B.S. in Business Administration. He subsequently received his J.D. from the renowned University of California at Berkeley School of Law, where he now teaches courses on sports law, representing professional athletes and negotiations. Prior to entering the sports industry, he practiced with leading national law firms as a trial attorney and also negotiated multi-million-dollar transactions on behalf of emerging growth and Fortune 500 companies. Genske is a lawyer and Major League Baseball Players Association certified player representative. In July 2020, Genske merged his GEM Agency with Gary Vaynerchuk’s VaynerSports to create VaynerBaseball. Genske serves as VaynerBaseball’s CEO and oversees all of VaynerSports’ baseball player representation activities. In October 2019, Genske launched the GEM Agency in partnership with Hicks Equity Partners, the private equity arm of Tom Hicks and his family. Prior to launching GEM, Genske was Executive Director and President of Baseball for The Legacy Agency. Since 2015, Genske has served as a law professor at the University of California-Berkeley, his alma mater, teaching classes on sports law, representing professional athletes and negotiations. In 2009, Genske was named to Sports Business Daily’s prestigious 40 under 40 list. This course will have 10 class meetings. To allow for a makeup classes because of the Labor Day Holiday and any unforeseen circumstances this course has automatic make-up classes scheduled. Students must be able to attend all 10 scheduled meetings to earn credit.


Law 245.1 Pre-Trial Civil Litigation 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This course is designed to acquaint students with pretrial litigation practice in typical civil cases. The skills taught are applicable in any civil case setting. This is a skills course, in that it focuses on the practical application of the federal civil rules, decision making and judgment. We will cover pleadings; written discovery; preparing for, taking and defending depositions (including mock deposition practice); making and opposing motions; and oral argument of motions. Strategies, settlement considerations, client relations and other topics relevant to typical litigation practice are also discussed. The evidence course, while useful, is not a prerequisite. The vast majority of federal civil cases never proceed to trial. Rather, most such cases are resolved through settlement or dispositive motion practice. This course will focus on those pretrial activities that litigation attorneys will undertake upon graduating from law school. We will study the law and strategies applicable to filing various types of court pleadings and other real-world litigation scenarios. You will be required to draft pleadings, present oral arguments and engage in other simulations against adversaries. The primary objectives of this three unit course are to provide pretrial skills background and training. Students will learn the lawyer’s role in discovery and fact development by drafting and responding to written discovery requests. Through course materials, lectures and discussions, you will garner the tools and insights necessary to perform these real world litigation tasks. Instructor Biography: Quynh Vu is a partner at the law firm Kaufhold Gaskin LLP. Her practice is focused on complex civil litigation and she has worked in both in a big law and small law firm setting. She is a 2012 graduate of UC Berkeley Law School, holds a B.A. in Economics and Political and Social Thought from the University of Virginia. She is on the Board of the American Lawyer - Young Lawyers Editorial.

Spring 2021 Description:
This course is designed to acquaint students with pretrial litigation practice in typical civil cases. The skills taught are applicable in any civil case setting. This is a skills course, in that it focuses on the practical application of the federal civil rules, decision making and judgment. We will cover pleadings; written discovery; preparing for, taking and defending depositions (including mock deposition practice); making and opposing motions; and oral argument of motions. Strategies, settlement considerations, client relations and other topics relevant to typical litigation practice are also discussed. The Evidence course, while useful, is not a prerequisite. The vast majority of federal civil cases never proceed to trial. Rather, most such cases are resolved through settlement or dispositive motion practice. This course will focus on those pretrial activities that litigation attorneys will undertake upon graduating from law school. We will study the law and strategies applicable to filing various types of court pleadings and other real-world litigation scenarios. You will be required to draft pleadings, present oral arguments and engage in other simulations against adversaries. The primary objectives of this three unit course are to provide pretrial skills background and training. Students will learn the lawyer’s role in discovery and fact development by drafting and responding to written discovery requests. Through course materials, lectures and discussions, you will garner the tools and insights necessary to perform these real world litigation tasks. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency. Quynh Vu is a partner at the law firm Kaufhold Gaskin Gallagher LLP. Her practice is focused on complex civil litigation and she has worked in both a big law and small law firm setting. She is a 2012 graduate of UC Berkeley Law School, holds a B.A. in Economics and Political and Social Thought from the University of Virginia. She is on the Board of the American Lawyer - Young Lawyers Editorial.


Law 245.11 Pretrial Civil Written Discovery Theory, Practice, and Procedure 3 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
This course is a deep dive into pre-trial civil written discovery. Mastery of this subject is crucial to the practice of law. Yet practitioners often gripe that they hate discovery - it is time-consuming, fact-(rather than law)-oriented, and contentious. Out-of-law-school hires often know little or nothing about it, though it is one of the few aspects of civil litigation that can be, with preparation, immediately accessible to them. The goal of this course, therefore, is to develop a skillset for you to participate in substantive lawyering early in your legal career. The course will revolve around a fictional dispute. You will represent the plaintiff or defendant, devise the appropriate litigation strategy, and execute the written discovery portion thereof. This means, among other things, drafting discovery requests, objections, responses, meet and confer letters, and motions to compel, and occasionally making an oral argument before a “judge.” Instructor Background: Alisa Givental is a Berkeley Law graduate (class of 2010) and a practicing attorney. She is a member at the Severson & Werson law firm in San Francisco. In her decade of practicing law, Ms. Givental has litigated hundreds of single-plaintiff cases in a broad range of practice areas, with a primary focus on financial services and defending claims under various state and federal statutes.

Fall 2021 Description:
This course is a deep dive into pre-trial civil written discovery. Mastery of this subject is crucial to the practice of law. Yet practitioners often gripe that they hate discovery - it is time-consuming, fact-(rather than law)-oriented, and contentious. Just out-of-law-school hires often know little or nothing about it, though it is one of the few aspects of civil litigation that can be, with preparation, immediately accessible to them. The goal of this course, therefore, is to develop a skill set for you to participate in substantive lawyering early in your legal career. The course will revolve around a fictional dispute. You will represent the plaintiff or defendant, devise the appropriate litigation strategy, and execute the written discovery portion thereof. This means, among other things, drafting discovery requests, objections, responses, meet and confer letters, and motions to compel, and making an oral argument before a “judge.” To the extent that there is some overlap with material taught in other courses (e.g. Pre-Trial Civil Litigation), students should feel free to take both. This course zeroes in on drafting discovery, not Civil Procedure as a whole. Instructor Background: Alisa Givental is a Berkeley Law graduate (class of 2010) and a practicing attorney. She is a Member at the Severson & Werson law firm in San Francisco. In her decade of practicing law, Ms. Givental has litigated hundreds of single-plaintiff cases in a broad range of practice areas, with a primary focus on financial services and defending claims under various state and federal statutes.

Fall 2022 Description:
This course is a deep dive into pre-trial civil written discovery. Mastery of this subject is crucial to the practice of law. Yet practitioners often gripe that they hate discovery - it is time-consuming, fact-(rather than law)-oriented, and contentious. Just out-of-law-school hires often know little or nothing about it, though it is one of the few aspects of civil litigation that can be, with preparation, immediately accessible to them. The goal of this course, therefore, is to develop a skill set for you to participate in substantive lawyering early in your legal career. The course will revolve around a fictional dispute. You will represent the plaintiff or defendant, devise the appropriate litigation strategy, and execute the written discovery portion thereof. This means, among other things, drafting discovery requests, objections, responses, meet and confer letters, and motions to compel, as well as making an oral argument before a “judge.” To the extent that there is some overlap with material taught in other courses (e.g. Pre-Trial Civil Litigation), students should feel free to take both. This course zeroes in on drafting discovery, not Civil Procedure as a whole. Instructor Background: Alisa Givental is a Berkeley Law graduate (class of 2010) and a practicing attorney. She is a Member at the Severson & Werson law firm in San Francisco. Ms. Givental has litigated hundreds of single-plaintiff cases in a broad range of practice areas, with a primary focus on financial services and defending claims under various state and federal statutes.


Law 245.13 Introduction to Negotiations 1 Units
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Spring 2021 Description:
Both professionally and personally, one of the skills you rely on most is your capacity to negotiate. You will negotiate not just over cases, but any time that you need something that you cannot achieve alone. You will negotiate with your boss, your clients, your paralegal, and all of their counterparts (plus the lawyers) on the other side as well as those who run our systems such as the government or our courts. You are also in an ongoing dialogue and negotiation with your family, your friends, and yourself. This course is designed to develop your understanding of negotiation, and your awareness of yourself as a negotiator and give you some beginning tools and concepts for analyzing and preparing for negotiations. You will develop your negotiating skills by 1) understanding key theories through readings and lectures, 2) practicing through role plays, and 3) learning from your experience through reflection and feedback. We will require preparation of readings, simulations, and written assignments for both days of this class. Because participation in the simulations is central to the course, attendance at both classes is required. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance and written assignments. Enrolling in this one unit Intro to Negotiations class does not prevent students from taking Negotiations (Law 245) in a future semester. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency.


Law 245.2 Civil Trial Practice 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This is an intense trial advocacy course taught by two judges, focusing on planning and preparation for trial, including direct examination, cross examination, introduction of exhibits, objections to evidence, opening statements, closing arguments, pre-trial motion practice, use of visual aids, and courtroom communication skills. This is a “learning by doing” course in which students will learn to prepare and perform as effective trial advocates. While there will be brief lectures, students will get real and repeated experience in standing, questioning, objecting and persuading in court, using the tools available in actual state and federal courtrooms. Class sessions consist of weekly student performances of trial exercises, and a brief lecture on a trial component. There will be assigned reading and video viewing outside of class. The course culminates in a mock jury trial before state and federal judges which will be held on a Wednesday, May 6th 5:30PM-9PM. Students must have taken Evidence or be taking it concurrently. NOTE: The first class will meet at the law school, but the remainder of the course will meet at the U.S. District Court in Oakland, which is approximately a 3-minute walk from BART (City Center). INSTRUCTORS: Judge Jeffrey S. White, United States District Court for the Northern District of California, and Justice Tracie L. Brown, California Court of Appeal. Judge White and Justice Brown have taught for many years at UC Berkeley School of Law. In addition, both judges were previously Assistant United States Attorneys who tried numerous civil and criminal cases to verdict. They have also presided over hundreds of cases in their roles as judges.

Spring 2021 Description:
This trial advocacy skills course will teach you how to try cases effectively. While it focuses on the core skills of witness examination and opening/closing statements, students will also be trained to hear and make evidentiary objections, introduce exhibits into evidence, prepare for trial, and identify ethical issues. This is a “learning by doing” class. Each week every student will perform an assigned trial skill exercise. Fellow students will act as witnesses and opposing counsel and there will be feedback by the instructors. Student performances are videotaped and there will be assigned reading and video viewing. Each week the instructor will do a lecture in preparation for the next week's class. The course culminates in a jury trial that will take place Saturday, May 1st and Sunday, May 2nd. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency. INSTRUCTORS: The course instructors are California judges who will also share their perspectives on how to be persuasive, professional and ethical in the courtroom. They have taught trial practices courses at Berkeley Law for several years. Justice Ioana Petrou, a Berkeley Law alumna, is a former Assistant United States Attorney serving in both the Eastern District of New York and the Northern District of California. In the private sector, she worked in the firms of O’Melveny and Myers, Foley & Lardner LLP, and Proskauer Rose LLP. Justice Petrou was a judge with the Alameda County Superior Court from 2010 to 2018 before being elevated to the First District Court of Appeals in San Francisco. Judge Charles A. Smiley is the Assistant Presiding Judge of the Alameda County Superior Court. He is a former public defender and court commissioner who has taught trial advocacy at U.C. Hastings College of the Law and judicial ethics to other judges. He has presided over contested hearings in family law, limited civil, and juvenile departments. He has also presided over criminal jury trials.

Spring 2022 Description:
Course Description: This trial advocacy skills course will teach you how to try cases effectively. While it focuses on the core skills of witness examination and opening/closing statements, students will also be trained to hear and make evidentiary objections, introduce exhibits into evidence, prepare for trial, and identify ethical issues. This is a “learning by doing” class. Each week every student will perform an assigned trial skill exercise. Fellow students will act as witnesses and opposing counsel and there will be feedback by the instructors. Student performances are videotaped and there will be assigned reading and video viewing. Each week the instructor will do a lecture in preparation for the next week's class. The course culminates in a jury trial that will take place Saturday, April 23rd, and Sunday, April 24th. Enrollment in Civil Trial Practice is limited to 16 students. The Hon. Evelio M. Grillo is a Judge in the Alameda County Superior Court where he presently is assigned to the Complex Litigation Department and sits as the supervising judge of the Alameda County Superior Court Appellate Panel. Prior to being assigned to complex litigation, Judge Grillo sat in the as a Civil Direct Calendar Department (2009-20011, 2028-2021) and the Civil Law and Motion Department (2012-2016) where he heard law and motion matters and civil writs, including administrative writs, and writs brought pursuant to the California Public Records Act and CEQA. Over thirty of Judge Grillo’s trial decisions have resulted in published appellate opinions in such diverse areas as the Public Records Act, CEQA, arbitration, and attorneys’ fees under Code of Civil Procedure section 1021.5. Judge Grillo, a 1985 graduate of the Harvard Law School, was appointed by Governor Gray Davis in 2003. The Honorable Winifred Younge Smith (ret.) was appointed to the Alameda Superior Court in November 2000. Since her appointment, Judge Smith has had a variety of assignments including Civil law and Motion (20006-20070 Civil Direct Calendar Judge (2007-20012) Assistant Presiding Judge (20013-2014) Presiding Judge (20015-2016) and Complex Civil Litigation (20017-2021). Judge Smith heard civil law and motion matters, conducted civil trials and has extensive experience managing coordinated cases; the largest of which had 31,000 plaintiffs. She also heard the “Roundup” trial which resulted in the largest civil jury award in California history. The judgment was affirmed by the Court of Appeal. Judge Smith is a graduate of Stanford University and Boston University School of Law.


Law 245.21 Introduction to Trial Practice for 1Ls 1 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This course is designed to introduce 1L students to trial practice. It is taught by Alameda County Superior Court Judge Charles Smiley (Presiding Judge, Juvenile Division) and First District Court of Appeal Justice Ioana Petrou. Justice Petrou is a former Alameda County Judge and former Assistant U.S. Attorney, Judge Smiley is a former Alameda County Public Defender, and they have tried numerous jury cases to verdict in state and federal court. On a weekly basis, students will practice their skills in front of each other and the instructors will lead a positive group discussion and critique. The course is being offered on a credit/no credit basis. Students are expected to be prepared for every class and to participate in the weekly exercises and group critique, and to work diligently on the final exam. The course will take place at the law school. Taking this course will not preclude you from enrolling in Civil Trial Practice or Criminal Trial Practice in a future semester. All interested 1L students -- whether or not enrolled or placed on the wait list -- must attend the first class; any students who are not present at the first day of class without prior permission of the instructor will be dropped from the class. Due to the use of role play exercises throughout the semester and the need to determine the members of the class as soon as possible, the usual provisions of "Drop/Add" do not apply. If you wish to enroll, you must commit to remain in the course no later than the last day of the first full week of spring semester classes. The required text is Steven Lubet book "Modern Trial Advocacy" (Law School Edition). Any version starting in 2013 or later will suffice. The class will be held over seven sessions, the first seven weeks of the semester, 110 minutes each session.

Spring 2022 Description:
This course is designed to introduce 1L students to trial practice. It is taught by Alameda County Presiding Judge Charles Smiley and First District Court of Appeal Justice Ioana Petrou. Justice Petrou is a former Alameda County Judge and Assistant U.S. Attorney, Judge Smiley is a former Alameda County Public Defender, and they have tried numerous jury cases to verdict in state and federal court. On a weekly basis, students will practice their skills in front of each other and the instructors will lead a positive group discussion and critique. The course is being offered on a credit/no credit basis. Students are expected to be prepared for every class and to participate in the weekly exercises and group critique, and to work diligently on the final exam. The course will take place at the law school. Taking this course will not preclude you from enrolling in Civil Trial Practice or Criminal Trial Practice in a future semester. All interested 1L students -- whether or not enrolled or placed on the waitlist -- must attend the first class; any students who are not present on the first day of class without prior permission of the instructor will be dropped from the class. Due to the use of role play exercises throughout the semester and the need to determine the members of the class as soon as possible, the usual provisions of "Drop/Add" do not apply. If you wish to enroll, you must commit to remain in the course no later than the last day of the first full week of spring semester classes. You will need (1) Modern Trial Advocacy, Steven Lubet (NITA) (any edition you purchase will work) and (2) a trial problem to be announced. The class will be held over seven sessions, the first seven weeks of the semester, 110 minutes each session.


Law 245.4 Drafting and Negotiating Sports Law Contracts 3 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
This seminar focuses on the drafting and negotiation of certain sports law transaction documents. Examples of documents to be discussed in the seminar are suite license agreements, sponsorship agreements, naming rights agreements, sports team acquisition agreements and media rights agreements. This seminar is intended to be "hands-on" with all students having the opportunity to experience being a "sports law attorney." The classroom environment is intended to simulate the experiences that a junior attorney would encounter in a law firm or corporate legal setting. The major emphasis of this seminar will be on how sports transaction documents are drafted, negotiated, revised and finalized. In addition to a discussion of some of the specific sports transaction documents and the drafting and negotiation techniques related to those documents, there will be general discussions of other sports law related issues. Depending on availability and timing, the seminar may also feature sports law practitioners (e.g., general counsel for professional sports teams or organizations) as guest speakers to discuss their sports law experiences and their perspective on some of the documentation covered by this seminar. There will be no exams but instead there will be a number of independent writing assignments which will require the students to draft transaction documents based on forms from actual sports transactions. The final assignment will be a group assignment consisting of drafting, negotiating and finalizing a sports transaction document. There will also be numerous negotiation sessions. Attendance at all class sessions is mandatory. Enrolled and waitlisted students must attend the first class meeting to be enrolled in the course and waitlisted students must continue to attend classes until they are either enrolled or until the final determination of their waitlist status is made. Late papers are subject to grading penalties. Class participation (quality not quantity), attendance, written drafting assignments, and the final negotiation/drafting assignment are the elements considered in determining the grade. Due to the nature of this class, some or all of the sessions may not be recorded and posted except as required for accommodation of students with disabilities. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency. Biographical Information Rich Brand is Managing Partner of Arent Fox’s San Francisco office and heads the firm’s Sports practice. He advises professional sports franchises, owners of sports and entertainment facilities, sponsors, and service content providers in virtually all areas of sports law, including in media rights, naming rights and sponsorship transactions, arena and stadium leases and licenses, suite and club seat licensing, financings for pro sports teams as well as advertising, promotional, and food and beverage/concession agreements. Rich also advises prospective purchasers and sellers of pro sports franchises and sports and entertainment facilities and negotiates player, coaches, and executive contracts, license agreements, as well as salary cap and collective bargaining interpretation, and related matters for professional sports teams. Rich has counseled numerous professional sports team clients in all the major leagues, including the Atlanta Hawks, Brooklyn Nets, Charlotte Hornets, Cleveland Cavaliers, DC United, Los Angeles Galaxy, Los Angeles Kings, Los Angeles Lakers, Los Angeles Rams, Memphis Grizzlies, Miami Dolphins, Miami Heat, New York Jets, Oklahoma Thunder, Phoenix Suns, San Francisco 49ers, San Antonio Spurs, Seattle Seahawks, Washington Capitals, and the Washington Wizards. Rich Brand is on the Board of Directors of the Los Angeles Sports Council, a prestigious group comprising individuals and corporate members of the sports business community. He is often a featured speaker at national industry events and a go-to source for the San Francisco Business Times, Daily Journal, LawInSport, and the YES Network’s Forbes SportsMoney talk show. He has routinely appeared on CNN, Fox Sports, and other national media programs. He was recently named a ‘Sports Lawyer of the Year’ by The Best Lawyers in America©. Rich Brand earned his law degree from University of Pennsylvania Law School and his undergraduate degree in finance from Georgetown University.

Fall 2021 Description:
This seminar focuses on the drafting and negotiation of certain sports law transaction documents. Examples of documents to be discussed in the seminar are suite license agreements, sponsorship agreements, naming rights agreements and sports team acquisition agreements. This seminar is intended to be "hands-on" with all students having the opportunity to experience being a "sports law attorney." The classroom environment is intended to simulate the experiences that a junior attorney would encounter in a law firm or corporate legal setting. The major emphasis of this seminar will be on how sports transaction documents are drafted, negotiated, revised and finalized. In addition to a discussion of some of the specific sports transaction documents and the drafting and negotiation techniques related to those documents, there will be general discussions of other sports law related issues. The seminar will also feature sports law practitioners (e.g., general counsels for professional sports teams or organizations) as guest speakers to discuss their sports law experiences and their perspective on some of the documentation covered by this seminar. There will be no exams but instead there will be a number of independent drafting assignments which will require the students to draft transaction documents based on forms from actual sports transactions. The final assignment will be a group assignment consisting of drafting, negotiating and finalizing a sports transaction document. There will also be numerous negotiation sessions. Attendance at all class sessions is mandatory. Enrolled and waitlisted students must attend the first class meeting to be enrolled in the course and waitlisted students must continue to attend classes until they are either enrolled or until the final determination of their waitlist status is made. Late papers are subject to grading penalties. Class participation (quality not quantity), attendance, written drafting assignments and the final negotiation/drafting assignment are the elements considered in determining the grade. Biographical Information Rich Brand is Managing Partner of Arent Fox’s San Francisco office and heads the firm’s Sports practice. He represents professional sports franchises, owners of sports and entertainment facilities, sponsors and service content providers in connection with naming rights transactions, media rights agreements, sponsorship agreements, advertising agreements, promotional agreements, food and beverage agreements, suite and club seat licensing, and financings for professional sports teams and owners of sports and entertainment facilities. He also represents prospective purchasers and sellers of professional sports franchises and sports and entertainment facilities, negotiates player, coach and executive contracts, license agreements, salary cap and collective bargaining interpretation and related matters for professional sports teams. Rich has counseled numerous professional sports team clients in all the major leagues, including the Atlanta Hawks, Brooklyn Nets, Charlotte Hornets, Cleveland Cavaliers, DC United, Inter Milan, Los Angeles Galaxy, Los Angeles Kings, Los Angeles Lakers, Los Angeles Rams, Madison Square Garden Company (the owner of the New York Knicks and New York Rangers), Memphis Grizzlies, Miami Dolphins, Miami Heat, New York Jets, Oklahoma Thunder, Phoenix Suns, Portland Trailblazers, San Antonio Spurs, San Francisco 49ers, Seattle Seahawks, Washington Capitals, and Washington Wizards. Rich is on the Board of Directors of the Los Angeles Sports Council, a prestigious group comprising individuals and corporate members of the sports business community. He is often a featured speaker at national industry events and a go-to source for the San Francisco Business Times, Daily Journal, LawInSport, and the YES Network’s Forbes SportsMoney talk show. He has routinely appeared on CNN, Fox Sports, and other national media programs. He was named a ‘Sports Lawyer of the Y ear’ in 2019 by The Best Lawyers in America©. Rich Brand earned his law degree from University of Pennsylvania Law School and his undergraduate degree in finance from Georgetown University.

Fall 2022 Description:
This seminar focuses on the drafting and negotiation of certain sports law transaction documents. Examples of documents to be discussed in the seminar are suite license agreements, sponsorship agreements, naming rights agreements and sports team acquisition agreements. This seminar is intended to be "hands-on" with all students having the opportunity to experience being a "sports law attorney." The classroom environment is intended to simulate the experiences that a junior attorney would encounter in a law firm or corporate legal setting. The major emphasis of this seminar will be on how sports transaction documents are drafted, negotiated, revised and finalized. In addition to a discussion of some of the specific sports transaction documents and the drafting and negotiation techniques related to those documents, there will be general discussions of other sports law related issues. The seminar will also feature sports law practitioners (e.g., general counsels for professional sports teams or organizations) as guest speakers to discuss their sports law experiences and their perspective on some of the documentation covered by this seminar. There will be no exams but instead there will be a number of independent drafting assignments which will require the students to draft transaction documents based on forms from actual sports transactions. The final assignment will be a group assignment consisting of drafting, negotiating and finalizing a sports transaction document. There will also be numerous negotiation sessions. Attendance at all class sessions is mandatory. Enrolled and waitlisted students must attend the first class meeting to be enrolled in the course and waitlisted students must continue to attend classes until they are either enrolled or until the final determination of their waitlist status is made. Late papers are subject to grading penalties. Class participation (quality not quantity), attendance, written drafting assignments and the final negotiation/drafting assignment are the elements considered in determining the grade. Biographical Information Rich Brand is Managing Partner of ArentFox Schiff’s San Francisco office and heads the firm’s Sports practice. He represents professional sports franchises, owners of sports and entertainment facilities, sponsors and service content providers in connection with naming rights transactions, media rights agreements, sponsorship agreements, advertising agreements, promotional agreements, food and beverage agreements, suite and club seat licensing, and financings for professional sports teams and owners of sports and entertainment facilities. He also represents prospective purchasers and sellers of professional sports franchises and sports and entertainment facilities, negotiates player, coach and executive contracts, license agreements, salary cap and collective bargaining interpretation and related matters for professional sports teams. He is one of the best-known sports law attorneys in the United States and has been the lead attorney in connection with some of the largest, most complex, and most prominent transactions in the United States for many years. In just the past several years, in addition to building and running ArentFox Schiff’s San Francisco office and steering it through the COVID-19 crisis, Rich has led teams of lawyers on some of this year’s highest profile sports transactions in the country, including: 1) the extension of the Los Angeles Lakers Staples Center lease through 2041; 2) the record-breaking eye-opening naming rights and sponsorship transaction with SoFi; 3) back-to-back MLS stadium naming rights transactions with Q2 Holdings and Total Quality Logistics; and 4) a multi-year naming rights transaction with YouTube that names the development’s 6,000-seat performance venue, YouTube Theater together with a multi-year partnership for Google Cloud to power SoFi Stadium and Hollywood Park’s digital innovation experiences. Rich has counseled numerous professional sports team clients in all the major leagues, including the Atlanta Hawks, Brooklyn Nets, Charlotte Hornets, Cleveland Cavaliers, DC United, Inter Milan, Los Angeles Galaxy, Los Angeles Kings, Los Angeles Lakers, Los Angeles Rams, Madison Square Garden Company (the owner of the New York Knicks and New York Rangers), Memphis Grizzlies, Miami Dolphins, Miami Heat, New York City Football Club, New York Jets, New York Red Bulls, Oklahoma Thunder, Phoenix Suns, Portland Trailblazers, San Antonio Spurs, San Francisco 49ers, Seattle Seahawks, Washington Capitals, and Washington Wizards. Rich is on the Board of Directors of the Los Angeles Sports Council, a prestigious group comprising individuals and corporate members of the sports business community. He is often a featured speaker at national industry events and a go-to source for the San Francisco Business Times, Daily Journal, LawInSport, and the YES Network’s Forbes SportsMoney talk show. He has routinely appeared on CNN, Fox Sports, and other national media programs. He was named a ‘Sports Lawyer of the Year’ in 2019 by The Best Lawyers in America©. Rich Brand earned his law degree from University of Pennsylvania Law School and his undergraduate degree in finance from Georgetown University.


Law 245.7 Negotiations Competition Intensive 1 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
This course teaches practical negotiation and mediation skills for 2L/3L/LLM students competing in ADR competitions. To apply for this course please email and detail which competition you have been admitted to Clinton Waasted at cdmw66@gmail.com. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency.

Fall 2021 Description:
This course teaches practical negotiation and mediation skills for 2L/3L/LLM students competing in ADR competitions. Enrollment is limited to students who have accepted offers from the Board of Advocates to participate on the ADR Team. To apply for this course please email and detail which competition you have been admitted to Clinton Waasted at cdmw66@gmail.com

Fall 2022 Description:
This course teaches practical negotiation and mediation skills for 2L/3L/LLM students competing in ADR competitions. Enrollment is limited to students who have accepted offers from the Board of Advocates to participate on the ADR Team.


Law 245.9 International Business Negotiations 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Spring 2022: Remote Instruction
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
APPLICATION DUE DATE: OCTOBER 31, 2019 THIS CLASS INVOLVES INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL AND REQUIRES YOU TO ARRIVE IN TEL AVIV, ISRAEL ON JANUARY 1, 2020. EACH STUDENT MUST FUND $500 TOWARDS THE COSTS OF TRAVEL. Other costs of flights and lodging will be provided for your travel. Any incidental expenses while traveling will be the responsibility of students. THE CLASS WILL BE COMPLETED (except final paper) IN TEL AVIV DURING THE DATES SPECIFIED. ENROLLMENT IN THIS CLASS IS BY APPLICATION. THERE WILL BE AN INFORMATIONAL MEETING ON WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23 AT LUNCH (12:50, ROOM 115) FOR INTERESTED STUDENTS TO LEARN ABOUT THE CLASS AND OBTAIN THE APPLICATION (which can also be requested by email to jay.finkelstein@dlapiper.com). THE CLASS IS LIMITED TO 12 STUDENTS. THERE WILL BE TWO 3-HOUR PREPARATORY SESSIONS HELD NOV. 14, 15 OR 16 AT TIMES TBD. ATTENDANCE AT THESE MEETINGS, WHILE OPTIONAL, WILL BE ONE OF THE FACTORS I CONSIDER WHEN MAKING ENROLLMENT DECISIONS. Questions should be directed to the instructor at jay.finkelstein@dlapiper.com. This course is structured around a simulated negotiation exercise in which the students in this class will represent an African agricultural company (Malundian Cassava Corporation) and the students in a counterpart class at Tel Aviv University will represent a multi-national pharmaceutical company (KJH Pharmaceutical Corporation). The two companies are interested in working together to exploit a new technology developed by KJH Pharmaceutical that uses the cassava produced by Malundian Cassava Corporation. The form of their collaboration could be a joint venture, licensing agreement or long term supply contract. The negotiations will take place through written exchanges and through live negotiations. The purpose of the course is to provide students with an opportunity (i) to experience the sequential development of a business transaction over an extended negotiation, (ii) to study the business and legal issues and strategies that impact the negotiation, (iii) to gain insight into the dynamics of negotiating and structuring international business transactions, (iv) to learn about the role that lawyers and law play in these negotiations, (v) to give students experience in drafting communications, and (vi) to provide negotiating experience in a context that replicates actual legal practice. This course will also give participants the opportunity to work across cultures with students from a different country. The course will begin with three introductory sessions focused on understanding and analyzing the facts, identifying substantive legal issues, and developing negotiation objectives and strategy in preparation for the negotiation exercise. Prior to arrival in Israel, students must complete introductory readings, listen to a pre-recorded initial presentation (1 hour), and attend TWO 3-hour preparatory sessions to be scheduled on two of the following days: evenings Nov 14 or 15 or on Saturday morning Nov 16. Following arrival in Israel, the class will meet for a third 3-hour preparatory class, scheduled for Jan 3 (morning). These classes will focus on understanding and analyzing the facts, identifying substantive legal issues, and developing negotiation objectives and strategy in preparation for the negotiation exercise. The class will engage in four days of live, face-to-face negotiations with the counterpart class from Tel Aviv University as well as participate in separate discussion and strategy sessions. These classes will be held January 5 through Jan 8. (NOTE: In Israel, Sunday is the first day of the week and neither Dec 31 nor Jan 1 is a holiday). On Jan 9 there will be a full day tour to Jerusalem for all students. There will be time to explore Tel Aviv during weekends and evenings. The thrust of this course is class participation and active involvement in the negotiations process. Students are expected to spend time outside of class, working in teams, to prepare for class discussions involving the written exchanges as well as to prepare for the live negotiations. Class discussions will focus on the strategy for, and progress of, the negotiations, as well as the substantive legal, business and policy matters that impact the negotiations, and policy matters that impact the negotiations.

Fall 2020 Description:
This course is structured around a simulated negotiation exercise in which the students in this class will represent an African agricultural company (Malundian Cassava Corporation) and the students in a counterpart class Stanford Law School will represent a multi-national pharmaceutical company (KJH Pharmaceutical Corporation). The two companies are interested in working together to exploit a new technology developed by KJH Pharmaceutical that uses the cassava produced by Malundian Cassava Corporation. The form of their collaboration could be a joint venture, licensing agreement or long term supply contract. The negotiations will take place through written exchanges and through live negotiations. The purpose of the course is to provide students with an opportunity (i) to experience the sequential development of a business transaction over an extended negotiation, (ii) to study the business and legal issues and strategies that impact the negotiation, (iii) to gain insight into the dynamics of negotiating and structuring international business transactions, (iv) to learn about the role that lawyers and law play in these negotiations, (v) to give students experience in drafting communications, and (vi) to provide negotiating experience in a context that replicates actual legal practice. The course will begin with three introductory sessions focused on understanding and analyzing the facts, identifying substantive legal issues, and developing negotiation objectives and strategy in preparation for the negotiation exercise. In addition to class sessions, beginning in October through the first weekend in November, the class will engage in five 3 to 4 hour sessions of live, Zoom negotiations with the counterpart class from Stanford. These classes will be held on Saturday, October 3, 10, 17 10:30AM-1:30PM, Thursday, October 22 7PM-10PM and Saturday November 7th 10:30AM-2:30PM. The thrust of this course is class participation and active involvement in the negotiations process. Students are expected to spend time outside of class, working in teams, to prepare for class discussions involving the written exchanges as well as to prepare for the live negotiations. Class discussions will focus on the strategy for, and progress of, the negotiations, as well as the substantive legal, business and policy matters that impact the negotiations, and policy matters that impact the negotiations. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency.

Spring 2021 Description:
This class which has previously involved international travel will be taught this year via Zoom. The class remains partnered with a counterpart class at Tel Aviv University and will offer a cross-cultural negotiation experience. The class will be completed (except final paper) by January 8, 2021. ENROLLMENT IN THIS CLASS IS BY APPLICATION. THERE WILL BE AN INFORMATIONAL MEETING ON October, 27 AT LUNCH (12:50, PACIFIC TIME) FOR INTERESTED STUDENTS TO LEARN ABOUT THE CLASS AND OBTAIN THE APPLICATION (which can also be requested by email to jay.finkelstein@dlapiper.com). THE CLASS IS LIMITED TO 14 STUDENTS. THERE WILL BE THREE 3-HOUR PREPARATORY SESSIONS HELD ON DECEMBER 21, 22, and 23rd. ATTENDANCE AT THESE MEETINGS, WHILE OPTIONAL, WILL BE ONE OF THE FACTORS I CONSIDER WHEN MAKING ENROLLMENT DECISIONS. Questions should be directed to the instructor at jay.finkelstein@dlapiper.com. October 27th Meeting Link: https://dlapiperus.zoom.us/j/98599145010?pwd=c1FLNE9XZVdYVWdLT29EbE1MWDE4QT09 Meeting ID: 985 9914 5010; Password: 653819 This course is structured around a simulated negotiation exercise in which the students in this class will represent a multinational pharmaceutical company (KJH Pharmaceutical Corporation) and the students in a counterpart class at Tel Aviv University will represent an African agricultural company (Malundian Cassava Corporation) and the students in a counterpart class. The two companies are interested in working together to exploit a new technology developed by KJH Pharmaceutical that uses the cassava produced by Malundian Cassava Corporation. The form of their collaboration could be a joint venture, licensing agreement or long-term supply contract. The negotiations will take place through written exchanges and through live negotiations. The purpose of the course is to provide students with an opportunity (i) to experience the sequential development of a business transaction over an extended negotiation, (ii) to study the business and legal issues and strategies that impact the negotiation, (iii) to gain insight into the dynamics of negotiating and structuring international business transactions, (iv) to learn about the role that lawyers and law play in these negotiations, (v) to give students experience in drafting communications, and (vi) to provide negotiating experience in a context that replicates actual legal practice. This course will also give participants the opportunity to work across cultures with students from a different country. NOTE: this class has been taught via Zoom multiple times since March 2020, including with Tel Aviv University, and the Zoom experience is substantially equivalent to the in-person class (albeit without the travel). In addition, the Zoom experience is an introduction to the future of law practice, as many negotiations will continue to be conducted via online platforms. The course will begin with three introductory sessions focused on understanding and analyzing the facts, identifying substantive legal issues, and developing negotiation objectives and strategy in preparation for the negotiation exercise. The class will engage in five days of face-to-face Zoom negotiations with the counterpart class from Tel Aviv University as well as participate in separate discussion and strategy sessions in breakout rooms. These classes will be held January 3 through Jan 8. (NOTE: In Israel, Sunday is the first day of the week). We will also schedule various social sessions with the TAU students and possible other activities TBD. A final debrief session will be held on January 8th. The thrust of this course is class participation and active involvement in the negotiations process. Students are expected to spend time outside of class, working in teams, to prepare for class discussions involving the written exchanges as well as to prepare for the live negotiations. Class discussions will focus on the strategy for, and progress of, the negotiations, as well as the substantive legal, business and policy matters that impact the negotiations, and policy matters that impact the negotiations. Applications are in the Supplemental File at the end of the course description, and are due November 2nd. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency.

Fall 2021 Description:
The course is structured around a simulated negotiation exercise that will cover the entire Fall semester in which the students in this class will represent an African agricultural production company (Malundian Cassava Corporation) and the students in a similar class at Stanford Law School will represent a US pharmaceutical company (KJH Pharmaceutical Corporation). The two companies are interested in working together to exploit a new technology developed by KJH Pharmaceutical (KJH) that uses the cassava produced by Malundian Cassava Corporation (MCC). The form of their collaboration could be a joint venture, a licensing agreement or a long term supply contract. The negotiations will take place through written exchanges and through live negotiations, which will be conducted both in person (four sessions) and via videoconference/Zoom or teleconference (one session). All negotiation sessions will be held at the offices of DLA Piper in San Francisco. These classes will be held on Saturday, October 9th, 16th, and 30th 10:30AM-1:30PM, Thursday, October 21 7:30PM-10:30PM and Saturday November 13th 10:30AM-2:30PM. The purpose of the course is to provide students with an opportunity to: > Experience the sequential development of a business transaction over an extended negotiation, and to study the businesses and legal issues and strategies that impact the negotiation > Gain insight into the dynamics of negotiating and structuring international business transactions > Learn about the role that lawyers and law play in these negotiations > Give students experience in drafting communications and an introduction to elements of drafting business contracts > Provide negotiating experience in a context that replicates actual legal practice with an unfamiliar opposing party (here, the students at Stanford). The thrust of this course is class participation and active involvement in the negotiations process. Students are expected to spend time outside of class, working in teams, to prepare for class discussions regarding the written exchanges between KJH and MCC and preparing for the live negotiations. Class discussions will focus on the strategy for, and progress of, the negotiations, as well as the substantive legal, business and policy matters that impact on the negotiation. As the Stanford class starts later than the Berkeley class, there is usually time for some in-class negotiation simulations between the Berkeley Law students.

Spring 2022 Description:
THIS CLASS WILL BE HELD ON SPECIFIED DATES BETWEEN DEC 20 - JAN 7 AND DUE TO CONTINUED TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS WILL BE CONDUCTED VIA ZOOM. THE CLASS WILL BE COMPLETED (except the final paper) DURING THE DATES SPECIFIED. In the absence of travel, various cultural events will be arranged. Last year we had a virtual cooking class with an Israeli chef, a virtual tour of Jerusalem with the tour guide that we use when we are able to travel, and a speaker who focused on the introduction of new technologies in Africa. ENROLLMENT IN THIS CLASS IS BY APPLICATION. THERE WILL BE AN IN PERSON INFORMATIONAL MEETING ON OCTOBER 27, 12:50 - 2:00, IN ROOM 132 FOR INTERESTED STUDENTS TO LEARN ABOUT THE CLASS AND OBTAIN THE APPLICATION (which can also be requested by email to jay.finkelstein@dlapiper.com). Students who are not able to attend in-person can attend via Zoom: https://berkeley.zoom.us/j/93314041662?pwd=d05NTXNmRFYra0FHbVV0cW5hdzFPQT09 THE CLASS IS LIMITED TO 16 STUDENTS. THERE WILL BE THREE THREE-HOUR PREPARATORY SESSIONS HELD ON DECEMBER 20, 21 AND 22 (VIA ZOOM). ATTENDANCE AT THESE CLASSES IS MANDATORY. Questions should be directed to the instructor at jay.finkelstein@dlapiper.com. This course is structured around a simulated negotiation exercise in which the students in this class will represent a multi-national pharmaceutical company (KJH Pharmaceutical Corporation) and the students in a counterpart class at Tel Aviv University will represent an African agricultural company (Malundian Cassava Corporation). The two companies are interested in working together to exploit a new technology developed by KJH Pharmaceutical that uses the cassava produced by Malundian Cassava Corporation. The form of their collaboration could be a joint venture, licensing agreement or long-term supply contract. The negotiations will take place through written exchanges and through live negotiations. The purpose of the course is to provide students with an opportunity (i) to experience the sequential development of a business transaction over an extended negotiation, (ii) to study the business and legal issues and strategies that impact the negotiation, (iii) to gain insight into the dynamics of negotiating and structuring international business transactions, (iv) to learn about the role that lawyers and law play in these negotiations, (v) to give students experience in drafting communications, and (vi) to provide negotiating experience in a context that replicates actual legal practice. This course will also give participants the opportunity to work across cultures with students from a different country. The course will begin with three introductory sessions focused on understanding and analyzing the facts, identifying substantive legal issues, and developing negotiation objectives and strategy in preparation for the negotiation exercise. The class will then engage in five days of live, face-to-face negotiations (via Zoom) with the counterpart class from Tel Aviv University as well as participate in separate discussion and strategy sessions during those days. The negotiation classes will be held January 2 through January 6. January 7th will be used to conclude the class after negotiations (NOTE: In Israel, Sunday is the first day of the week). The thrust of this course is class participation and active involvement in the negotiations process. Students are expected to spend time outside of class, working in teams, to prepare for class discussions involving the written exchanges as well as to prepare for the live negotiations. Class discussions will focus on the strategy for, and progress of, the negotiations, as well as the substantive legal, business and policy matters that impact the negotiations. Attendance at the first class in December is mandatory for all enrolled students; any enrolled students who are not present at the first day of class without prior permission of the instructor will be dropped from the class. COURSE MATERIALS: TEXTBOOK: D. Bradlow and J. Finkelstein, “Negotiating Business Transactions” (2d Edition, 2018, Wolters Kluwer) Materials for the first class are noted in the syllabus and must be read prior to the first class. COURSE REQUIREMENTS: In order to successfully complete this course, students must meet the following requirements: 1) Active participation in (i) class discussions regarding the preparation of the written exchanges in the negotiation (ii) the live negotiations (iii) class analysis of the process and progress of the negotiations. (iv) the preparation (working in teams) and discussion (with class) of written communications incorporating the class’s positions on issues. 2) Write two short “journal entries” (as assigned) following the live negotiation sessions reflecting the student’s assessment and evaluation of (and lessons learned from) the preparation for, conduct of, and progress of, the negotiation, principally from a personal perspective. Diaries will be due on January 12, 2022 More details will be provided in class. 4) Write a 10-12 page retrospective paper after the conclusion of the course. More detailed instructions will be provided in class. The paper will be due on February 11, 2022. Grading is based on class participation (50%), the journal entries (20%), and the paper (30%).

Fall 2022 Description:
The course is structured around a simulated negotiation exercise that will cover the entire Fall semester in which the students in this class will represent an African agricultural production company (Malundian Cassava Corporation) and the students in a similar class at Stanford Law School will represent a US pharmaceutical company (KJH Pharmaceutical Corporation). The two companies are interested in working together to exploit a new technology developed by KJH Pharmaceutical Corporation that uses the cassava produced by Malundian Cassava Corporation. The form of their collaboration could be a joint venture, a licensing agreement, or a long-term supply contract. The negotiations will take place through written exchanges and through live negotiations. Each of the negotiation sessions will be conducted by a team of approximately 6 students, but all students attend all negotiation sessions. In addition to the regular weekly class sessions, negotiation sessions (with Stanford) will meet on the following four Saturdays in San Francisco at the offices of DLA Piper: Oct. 8, 15, 29 (all 10:30 AM - 1:30 PM), and Nov. 5 (10:30 AM - 2:30 PM) . In addition, there will be one Thursday evening negotiation session on October 20 (7:00-10:00 PM). The purpose of the course is to provide students with an opportunity to: • experience the sequential development of a business transaction over an extended negotiation, and to study the businesses and legal issues and strategies that impact the negotiation, • gain insight into the dynamics of negotiating and structuring international business transactions, • learn about the role that lawyers and law play in these negotiations, • give students experience in drafting communications and an introduction to elements of drafting business contracts, and • provide negotiating experience in a context that replicates actual legal practice with an unfamiliar opposing party (here, the students at Stanford representing KJH). The thrust of this course is class participation and active involvement in the negotiation process. Students are expected to attend all classes and spend time outside of class, working in teams, to prepare for class discussions regarding the written exchanges and the preparation for the live negotiations. The negotiations are serial, building on the preceding negotiation sessions, enabling students to experience the evolving nature of a business transaction. Class discussions will focus on the strategy for, and progress of, the negotiations, as well as the substantive legal, business and policy matters that impact on the negotiations. Our class time will be divided between lecture and substantive discussions. Attendance at the first class is mandatory for all enrolled students; any enrolled students who are not present at the first day of class without prior permission of the instructor will be dropped from the class. COURSE MATERIALS: TEXTBOOK: D. Bradlow and J. Finkelstein, “Negotiating Business Transactions” (3rd Edition, 2022, Wolters Kluwer) Materials for the first class are noted in the syllabus and must be read prior to the first class. COURSE REQUIREMENTS: In order to successfully complete this course, students must meet the following requirements: 1) Active participation in (i) class discussions regarding the preparation of the written exchanges in the negotiation (ii) the live negotiations (iii) class analysis of the process and progress of the negotiations. (iv) the preparation (working in teams) and discussion (with class) of written communications incorporating the class’s positions on issues. 2) Write three short “journal entries” (as assigned) following the live negotiation sessions reflecting the student’s assessment and evaluation of (and lessons learned from) the preparation for, conduct of, and progress of, the negotiation, principally from a personal perspective. Diaries will be due at specified times during the semester; more details will be provided in class. 4) Write a 10-12 page retrospective paper after the conclusion of the course. More detailed instructions will be provided in class. The paper will be due approximately two weeks following the last class. Grading is based on class participation (50%), the journal entries (20%), and the paper (30%).


Law 245.9S International Business Negotiations 1 Units
Summer 2021: Remote due to COVID
Summer 2022: Remote Instruction
Description:
Summer 2021 Description:
This course is structured around a simulated negotiation exercise in which half of the students in this class will represent a multi-national pharmaceutical company (KJH Pharmaceutical Corporation) and the other half of the students will represent an African agricultural production company (Malundian Cassava Corporation). The two companies are interested in working together to exploit a new technology developed by KJH Pharmaceutical that uses the cassava produced by Malundian Cassava Corporation. The form of their collaboration could be a joint venture, a licensing agreement or a long term supply contract. The negotiations will take place through written exchanges and through live negotiations. The purpose of the course is to provide students with an opportunity (i) to experience the sequential development of a business transaction over an extended negotiation, (ii) to study the businesses and legal issues and strategies that impact the negotiation, (iii) to gain insight into the dynamics of negotiating and structuring international business transactions, (iv) to learn about the role that lawyers and law play in these negotiations, (v) to give students experience in drafting communications, and (vi) to provide negotiating experience in a context that replicates actual legal practice. The thrust of this course is class participation and active involvement in the negotiations process. Students are expected to spend time outside of class, working in teams, to prepare for class discussions involving the written exchanges as well as to prepare for the live negotiations. Class discussions will focus on the strategy for, and progress of, the negotiations, as well as the substantive legal, business and policy matters that impact on the negotiations. NOTE: This class has been taught multiple times by Zoom with great success (including last summer). With Zoom likely to become a continuing means for many negotiations, students will experience both the present and future of business negotiations. Real time attendance is required for this course. You must be able to attend the Zoom sessions live. COURSE REQUIREMENTS: In order to successfully complete this class, students must meet the following requirements: 1) Active participation in (i) class discussions concerning the negotiation, (ii) the preparation of the written exchanges in the negotiation, (ii) the live negotiations, and (iii) class analysis of the process and progress of the negotiations. Participation in the exercise will constitute 75% of the final grade. 2) Write a 2-3 page paper that will be due at the end of the class. The topic of the paper will be selected from various recommended topics or a topic of your own choosing (approved by the instructor). This paper will constitute 25% of the final grade. Detailed class schedule and preliminary assignments (readings and a 1-hour pre-recorded presentation) are in the syllabus. This course is for credit/no credit. Attendance is mandatory.

Summer 2022 Description:
This course is structured around a simulated negotiation exercise in which half of the students in this class will represent a multi-national pharmaceutical company (KJH Pharmaceutical Corporation) and the other half of the students will represent an African agricultural production company (Malundian Cassava Corporation). The two companies are interested in working together to exploit a new technology developed by KJH Pharmaceutical that uses the cassava produced by Malundian Cassava Corporation. The form of their collaboration could be a joint venture, a licensing agreement or a long term supply contract. The negotiations will take place through written exchanges and through live negotiations. The purpose of the course is to provide students with an opportunity (i) to experience the sequential development of a business transaction over an extended negotiation, (ii) to study the businesses and legal issues and strategies that impact the negotiation, (iii) to gain insight into the dynamics of negotiating and structuring international business transactions, (iv) to learn about the role that lawyers and law play in these negotiations, (v) to give students experience in drafting communications, and (vi) to provide negotiating experience in a context that replicates actual legal practice. The thrust of this course is class participation and active involvement in the negotiations process. Students are expected to spend time outside of class, working in teams, to prepare for class discussions involving the written exchanges as well as to prepare for the live negotiations. Class discussions will focus on the strategy for, and progress of, the negotiations, as well as the substantive legal, business and policy matters that impact on the negotiations. COURSE REQUIREMENTS: In order to successfully complete this class, students must meet the following requirements: 1) Active participation in (i) class discussions concerning the negotiation, (ii) the preparation of the written exchanges in the negotiation, (ii) the live negotiations, and (iii) class analysis of the process and progress of the negotiations. Participation in the exercise will constitute 75% of the final grade. 2) Write a 2-3 page paper that will be due at the end of the class. The topic of the paper will be selected from various recommended topics or a topic of your own choosing (approved by the instructor). This paper will constitute 25% of the final grade. Detailed class schedule and preliminary assignments (readings and a 1-hour pre-recorded presentation) are in the syllabus. NOTE: This course will be taught via Zoom and real time attendance at all four class meetings is required.


Law 245S Negotiations 1 Units
Summer 2021: Remote due to COVID
Summer 2022: In-Person
Description:
Summer 2021 Description:
This course will introduce you to fundamental negotiation theory, communication skills and a model for conducting negotiations more successfully. We will explore the strengths and weaknesses of different negotiation styles, methodical preparation for a negotiation, the difference between positions and interests, essential influencing strategies, the tension between creating and claiming value (including how to build your strengths in both areas), effective listening and gathering of information, the phases of a negotiation, the benefits and tensions representatives in negotiation, and dealing with difficult tactics or behaviors in a negotiation. The structure of the course will be a mix of interactive discussion and small exercises to develop theoretical understanding combined with experiential learning in longer roleplay simulations. These simulations are designed to enhance your skills, demonstrate concepts and provide you with opportunities to experiment with various styles and negotiation techniques. Note: Real time attendance is required for this course. You must be able to attend and participate through Zoom live.

Summer 2022 Description:
This course will introduce you to fundamental negotiation theory, communication skills and a model for conducting negotiations more successfully. We will explore the strengths and weaknesses of different negotiation styles, methodical preparation for a negotiation, the difference between positions and interests, essential influencing strategies, the tension between creating and claiming value (including how to build your strengths in both areas), effective listening and gathering of information, the phases of a negotiation, the benefits and tensions representatives in negotiation, and dealing with difficult tactics or behaviors in a negotiation. The structure of the course will be a mix of interactive discussion and small exercises to develop theoretical understanding combined with experiential learning in longer roleplay simulations. These simulations are designed to enhance your skills, demonstrate concepts and provide you with opportunities to experiment with various styles and negotiation techniques.


Law 246.1 Criminal Trial Practice 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Spring 2022: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
Course Description: This course focuses upon the courtroom application of criminal law principles and practices. Students will prepare and present opening statements, direct and cross examination, documentary and demonstrative evidence, and closing arguments. They will also gain a practical understanding of common issues in criminal law, including bail, sentencing, preliminary hearings, ethics and misconduct and motions to suppress. The format will be hands-on and participatory, and the emphasis will be on learning practical techniques for shaping the evidence, using the law, and exploiting the courtroom to create a coherent and convincing case theory. All performances will be videotaped and the course will culminate in a half-day jury trial. Enrollment is limited to 16 students. Class enrollment will be determined by the beginning of the second class meeting. Therefore, all students interested in enrollment should be present for both the first and second classes. Final trials will be Friday, April 24th-Sunday, April 26th. Instructor Biography: Charles Denton is in his 37th year as an attorney with the Alameda County Public Defender's Office. Nearly all of that time has been spent in the courtroom. Mr. Denton has litigated hundreds of motions and hearings and has tried nearly every kind of criminal case -- from drunk driving to the death penalty. He is one of the most prolific lecturers on trial practice and criminal litigation in the state and a well-recognized expert on criminal law and procedure. He is currently the author of Criminal Defense Jury Instructions: California Criminal Jury Charges. For nearly a decade, he has been one of the principal authors of California Continuing Education of the Bar's Recent Developments in Criminal Law Practice as well as a contributor to their California Criminal Law: Procedure and Practice and California Sentencing Enhancements handbooks. His written manuals and practice guides are highly acclaimed and widely published, and he is the past president of the California Public Defender's Association and its current training coordinator. This is Mr. Denton's 23nd year teaching at Berkeley Law.

Fall 2020 Description:
This course focuses upon the courtroom application of criminal law principles and practices. Students will prepare and present opening statements, direct and cross examination, documentary and demonstrative evidence, and closing arguments. They will also gain a practical understanding of common issues in criminal law, including bail, sentencing, preliminary hearings, ethics, misconduct, objections and motions to suppress. The format will be hands-on and participatory, and the emphasis will be on learning practical techniques for shaping the evidence, using the law, and exploiting the courtroom to create a coherent and convincing case theory. All performances will be videotaped and the course will culminate in a half-day jury trial. Enrollment is limited to 16 students. Class enrollment will be determined by the beginning of the second class meeting. Therefore, all students interested in enrollment should be present for both the first and second classes. Final trials will be Friday, November 20th-Sunday, November 22nd. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency. Instructor Biography: Charles Denton is in his 37th year as an attorney with the Alameda County Public Defender's Office. Nearly all of that time has been spent in the courtroom. Mr. Denton has litigated hundreds of motions and hearings and has tried nearly every kind of criminal case -- from drunk driving to the death penalty. He is one of the most prolific lecturers on trial practice and criminal litigation in the state and a well-recognized expert on criminal law and procedure. He is currently the author of Criminal Defense Jury Instructions: California Criminal Jury Charges. For nearly a decade, he was one of the principal authors of California Continuing Education of the Bar's Recent Developments in Criminal Law Practice as well as a contributor to their California Criminal Law: Procedure and Practice. He is currently one of the authors of California: Criminal Sentencing Enhancements. His written manuals and practice guides are highly acclaimed and widely published, and he is the past president of the California Public Defender's Association and its current training coordinator. This is Mr. Denton's 24th year teaching at Berkeley Law.

Spring 2021 Description:
This course focuses upon the courtroom application of criminal law principles and practices. Students will prepare and present opening statements, direct and cross examination, documentary and demonstrative evidence, and closing arguments. They will also gain a practical understanding of common issues in criminal law, including bail, sentencing, preliminary hearings, ethics, misconduct, objections and motions to suppress. The format will be hands-on and participatory, and the emphasis will be on learning practical techniques for shaping the evidence, using the law, and exploiting the courtroom to create a coherent and convincing case theory. All performances will be videotaped and the course will culminate in a half-day jury trial. All students interested in enrollment should be present for both the first and second classes. Final trials will be Friday, April 30th-Sunday, May 2nd. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency. Instructor Biography: Charles Denton is in his 37th year as an attorney with the Alameda County Public Defender's Office. Nearly all of that time has been spent in the courtroom. Mr. Denton has litigated hundreds of motions and hearings and has tried nearly every kind of criminal case -- from drunk driving to the death penalty. He is one of the most prolific lecturers on trial practice and criminal litigation in the state and a well-recognized expert on criminal law and procedure. He is currently the author of Criminal Defense Jury Instructions: California Criminal Jury Charges. For nearly a decade, he was one of the principal authors of California Continuing Education of the Bar's Recent Developments in Criminal Law Practice as well as a contributor to their California Criminal Law: Procedure and Practice. He is currently one of the authors of California: Criminal Sentencing Enhancements. His written manuals and practice guides are highly acclaimed and widely published, and he is the past president of the California Public Defender's Association, its current training coordinator and the recipient of its 2020 Defender of the Year award. This is Mr. Denton's 24th year teaching at Berkeley Law.

Fall 2021 Description:
This course focuses on the courtroom application of criminal law principles and practices. Students will prepare and present opening statements, direct and cross examination, documentary and demonstrative evidence, and closing arguments. They will also gain a practical understanding of common issues in criminal law, including bail, sentencing, preliminary hearings, ethics, misconduct, objections and motions to suppress. The format will be hands-on and participatory, and the emphasis will be on learning practical techniques for shaping the evidence, using the law, and exploiting the courtroom to create a coherent and convincing case theory. All performances will be videotaped and the course will culminate in a half-day jury trial. All students interested in enrollment should be present for both the first and second classes. Final trials will be Friday, November 19 - Sunday, November 21. Instructor Biography: Charles Denton is in his 38th year as an attorney with the Alameda County Public Defender's Office. Nearly all of that time has been spent in the courtroom. Mr. Denton has litigated hundreds of motions and hearings and has tried nearly every kind of criminal case -- from drunk driving to the death penalty. He is one of the most prolific lecturers on trial practice and criminal litigation in the state and a well-recognized expert on criminal law and procedure. He is currently the author of Criminal Defense Jury Instructions: California Criminal Jury Charges. For nearly a decade, he was one of the principal authors of California Continuing Education of the Bar's Recent Developments in Criminal Law Practice as well as a contributor to their California Criminal Law: Procedure and Practice. He is currently one of the authors of California: Criminal Sentencing Enhancements. His written manuals and practice guides are highly acclaimed and widely published, and he is the past president of the California Public Defender's Association, its current training coordinator and the recipient of its 2020 Defender of the Year award. This is Mr. Denton's 25th year teaching at Berkeley Law.

Spring 2022 Description:
This course focuses on the courtroom application of criminal law principles and practices. Students will prepare and present opening statements, direct and cross examination, documentary and demonstrative evidence, and closing arguments. They will also gain a practical understanding of common issues in criminal law, including bail, sentencing, preliminary hearings, ethics, misconduct, objections and motions to suppress. The format will be hands-on and participatory, and the emphasis will be on learning practical techniques for shaping the evidence, using the law, and exploiting the courtroom to create a coherent and convincing case theory. All performances will be videotaped and the course will culminate in a half-day jury trial. All students interested in enrollment should be present for both the first and second classes. Final trials will be Friday, April 22 - Sunday, April 24. Instructor Biography: Charles Denton is in his 38th year as an attorney with the Alameda County Public Defender's Office. Nearly all of that time has been spent in the courtroom. Mr. Denton has litigated hundreds of motions and hearings and has tried nearly every kind of criminal case -- from drunk driving to the death penalty. He is one of the most prolific lecturers on trial practice and criminal litigation in the state and a well-recognized expert on criminal law and procedure. He is currently the author of Criminal Defense Jury Instructions: California Criminal Jury Charges. For nearly a decade, he was one of the principal authors of California Continuing Education of the Bar's Recent Developments in Criminal Law Practice as well as a contributor to their California Criminal Law: Procedure and Practice. He is currently one of the authors of California: Criminal Sentencing Enhancements. His written manuals and practice guides are highly acclaimed and widely published, and he is the past president of the California Public Defender's Association, its current training coordinator and the recipient of its 2020 Defender of the Year award. This is Mr. Denton's 25th year teaching at Berkeley Law.

Fall 2022 Description:
This course focuses on the courtroom application of criminal law principles and practices. Students will prepare and present opening statements, direct and cross examination, documentary and demonstrative evidence, and closing arguments. They will also gain a practical understanding of common issues in criminal law, including bail, sentencing, preliminary hearings, ethics, misconduct, objections and motions to suppress. The format will be hands-on and participatory, and the emphasis will be on learning practical techniques for shaping the evidence, using the law, and exploiting the courtroom to create a coherent and convincing case theory. All performances will be videotaped and the course will culminate in a half-day jury trial. All students interested in enrollment should be present for both the first and second classes. Final trials will be Friday, November 18 - Sunday, November 20. Instructor Biography: Charles Denton is in his 38th year as an attorney with the Alameda County Public Defender's Office. Nearly all of that time has been spent in the courtroom. Mr. Denton has litigated hundreds of motions and hearings and has tried nearly every kind of criminal case -- from drunk driving to the death penalty. He is one of the most prolific lecturers on trial practice and criminal litigation in the state and a well-recognized expert on criminal law and procedure. He is currently the author of Criminal Defense Jury Instructions: California Criminal Jury Charges. For nearly a decade, he was one of the principal authors of California Continuing Education of the Bar's Recent Developments in Criminal Law Practice as well as a contributor to their California Criminal Law: Procedure and Practice. He is currently one of the authors of California: Criminal Sentencing Enhancements. His written manuals and practice guides are highly acclaimed and widely published, and he is the past president of the California Public Defender's Association, its current training coordinator and the recipient of its 2020 Defender of the Year award. This is Mr. Denton's 25th year teaching at Berkeley Law.


Law 246.11 Advanced Criminal Trial Practice 2 Units
Spring 2022: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2022 Description:
This course is devoted to the continued development and performance of trial advocacy skills in the courtroom. Combining lecture, student hands-on practice and participation, this advanced skills course trains students on the organization and presentation of a criminal trial. Pretrial preparation, in limine motions, jury selection, strategy, effective openings, witness examination (direct and cross), evidentiary issues, jury instruction, advocacy skills, closing, and effective handling of both prosecution and defense cases through verdict will be covered. Recommended either Law 231 Criminal Procedure: Investigations or Law 231.1 Criminal Procedure: Adjudication be taken in advance of this course. Ms. Balakrishnan has served as a Deputy Public Defender in San Francisco for the last 11 years. She has conducted over 30 jury trials, including misdemeanors, felonies, sexual assaults, attempted homicides, and life cases. She has taught Criminal Law and Ethics at Berkeley Law since 2017. She earned her undergraduate degree from Stanford University and graduated from Yale Law School in 2009.

Fall 2022 Description:
This course is devoted to the continued development and performance of trial advocacy skills in the courtroom. Combining lecture, student hands-on practice and participation, this advanced skills course trains students on the organization and presentation of a criminal trial. Pretrial preparation, in limine motions, jury selection, strategy, effective openings, witness examination (direct and cross), evidentiary issues, jury instruction, advocacy skills, closing, and effective handling of both prosecution and defense cases through verdict will be covered. Recommended that either Law 231 Criminal Procedure: Investigations or Law 231.1 Criminal Procedure: Adjudication be taken in advance of this course. Ms. Balakrishnan served as a Deputy Public Defender in San Francisco for the last 11 years. She is currently a Principal at The Wren Collective, an organization devoted to criminal law reform. She has conducted over 30 jury trials, including misdemeanors, felonies, sexual assaults, attempted homicides, and life cases. She has taught Criminal Law and Ethics at Berkeley Law since 2017. She earned her undergraduate degree from Stanford University and graduated from Yale Law School in 2009.


Law 246.3 Depositions 3 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Spring 2022: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
Over 98% of all civil cases filed in Federal court are resolved short of trial. When a litigator questions a witness today, it is far more likely to be in a law office at a deposition than in a courtroom at trial. This skills course primarily uses "learning by doing" (role plays) to teach the art and science of preparing for, taking, and defending depositions. The role plays will be conducted in small groups with experienced litigators and the instructor as observers who will provide individual feedback to each student. In addition, the deposition role plays will be video recorded, and each student will have two individual video review sessions with the instructor. Undergraduates will play the role of the witnesses. Court reporters will transcribe the testimony, and students will receive transcripts of the depositions they take and defend. Skills addressed include: preparing the fact (lay) witness; gathering information (discovery); gaining admissions; seeking evidence for impeachment; using documents; defending your witness; dealing with both obstreperous counsel and problem witnesses; and using depositions at trial. Enrollment is limited to 18 students. All interested students, whether enrolled or on the wait list, must attend the first class in order to be admitted. Any student who does not attend the first class without prior permission of the instructor will be dropped from the class. Due to both the use of simulation exercises throughout the semester and the need to determine the members of the class as soon as possible, the usual provisions of "Drop/Add" do not apply. If you wish to enroll, you must commit to remain in the course by no later than Friday afternoon, August 21, 2020, the last day of the first full week of fall semester classes. If you have any questions, please contact Professor Hecht by e-mail (hhecht@law.berkeley.edu). Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency.

Spring 2021 Description:
Over 98% of all civil cases filed in Federal court are resolved short of trial. When a litigator questions a witness today, it is far more likely to be in a law office at a deposition than in a courtroom at trial. This skills course primarily uses "learning by doing" (role plays) to teach the art and science of preparing for, taking, and defending depositions. The role plays will be conducted in small groups with experienced litigators and the instructor as observers who will provide individual feedback to each student. In addition, the deposition role plays will be video recorded, and each student will have two individual video review sessions with the instructor. Undergraduates will play the role of the witnesses. Student court reporters will transcribe the testimony, and law students will receive transcripts of the depositions they take and defend. Skills addressed include: preparing the fact (lay) witness; gathering information (discovery); gaining admissions; seeking evidence for impeachment; using documents; defending your witness; dealing with both obstreperous counsel and problem witnesses; and using depositions at trial. Enrollment is limited to 18 students. All interested students, whether enrolled or on the wait list, must attend the first class in order to be admitted. Any student who does not attend the first class without prior permission of the instructor will be dropped from the class. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency. Due to both the use of simulation exercises throughout the semester and the need to determine the members of the class as soon as possible, the usual provisions of "Drop/Add" do not apply. If you wish to enroll, you must commit to remain in the course by no later than Friday afternoon, January 22, 2021, the last day of the first full week of spring semester classes. If you have any questions, please contact Professor Hecht by e-mail (hhecht@law.berkeley.edu). The textbook for the course can be purchased as an ebook directly from the ABA at a 25% discount. Price will be $112.46 plus tax and shipping (lowered price to reflect 25% discount) No discount code is needed, but mention you are a student in Depositions with Professor Henry Hecht at Berkeley Law School Students can order by calling the service center (800-285-2221, M-F 9am-6pm ET) or ordering online (you will need to create a webstore account): https://www.americanbar.org/products/inv/book/214908/

Fall 2021 Description:
Over 98% of all civil cases filed in Federal court are resolved short of trial. When a litigator questions a witness today, it is far more likely to be in a law office at a deposition than in a courtroom at trial. This skills course primarily uses "learning by doing" (role plays) to teach the art and science of preparing for, taking, and defending depositions. The role plays will be conducted in small groups with experienced litigators and the instructor as observers who will provide individual feedback to each student. In addition, the deposition role plays will be video recorded, and each student will have two individual video review sessions with the instructor. Undergraduates will play the role of the witnesses. Student court reporters will transcribe the testimony, and law students will receive transcripts of the depositions they take and defend. Skills addressed include: preparing the fact (lay) witness; gathering information (discovery); gaining admissions; seeking evidence for impeachment; using documents; defending your witness; dealing with obstreperous counsel and problem witnesses; and using depositions at trial. Enrollment is limited to 18 students. All interested students, whether enrolled or on the waitlist, must attend the first class in order to be admitted. Any student who does not attend the first class without prior permission of the instructor will be dropped from the class. Due to both the use of simulation exercises throughout the semester and the need to determine the members of the class as soon as possible, the usual provisions of "Drop/Add" do not apply. If you wish to enroll, you must commit to remain in the course by no later than Friday afternoon, August 20, 2021, the last day of the first full week of fall semester classes. If you have any questions, please contact Professor Hecht by email (hhecht@law.berkeley.edu). A hardcopy of the textbook for the course can be purchased from either the Law School bookstore or directly from the ABA, from either location at a 25% discount from the list price. The textbook can be purchased as an ebook directly from the ABA at a 25% discount. The ebook is not available from the Law School bookstore at a discount. The discounted price of the hard copy from the ABA is $112.46 plus tax and shipping. Students can order from the ABA by calling the ABA service center (800-285-2221, M-F 9am-6pm ET) or ordering online (you will need to create a webstore account): https://www.americanbar.org/products/inv/book/214908/ No discount code is needed to purchase from the ABA, but mention you are a student in Depositions with Professor Henry Hecht at Berkeley Law School.

Spring 2022 Description:
Over 98% of all civil cases filed in Federal court are resolved short of trial. When a litigator questions a witness today, it is far more likely to be in a law office at a deposition than in a courtroom at trial. This skills course primarily uses "learning by doing" (role plays) to teach the art and science of preparing for, taking, and defending depositions. The role plays will be conducted in small groups with experienced litigators and the instructor as observers who will provide individual feedback to each student. In addition, the deposition role plays will be video recorded, and each student will have two individual video review sessions with the instructor. Undergraduates will play the role of the witnesses. Student court reporters will transcribe the testimony, and law students will receive transcripts of the depositions they take and defend. Skills addressed include: preparing the fact (lay) witness; gathering information (discovery); gaining admissions; seeking evidence for impeachment; using documents; defending your witness; dealing with obstreperous counsel and problem witnesses; and using depositions at trial. Enrollment is limited to 18 students. All interested students, whether enrolled or on the waitlist, must attend the first class in order to be admitted. Any student who does not attend the first class without prior permission of the instructor will be dropped from the class. Due to the nature of this class, real-time attendance is required (without an alternative way to earn equivalent credit) except in cases of illness or emergency. In addition, due to both the use of simulation exercises throughout the semester and the need to determine the members of the class as soon as possible, the usual provisions of "Drop/Add" do not apply. If you wish to enroll, you must commit to remain in the course by no later than Friday afternoon, January 14, 2022, the last day of the first full week of spring semester classes. If you have any questions, please contact Professor Hecht by email (hhecht@law.berkeley.edu). A hardcopy of the textbook for the course can be purchased from either the Law School bookstore or directly from the ABA at a 25% discount from the list price. If preferred, the textbook can be purchased as an ebook directly from the ABA at a 25% discount. The ebook is not available from the Law School bookstore at a discount. The discounted price of the hard copy from the ABA is $112.46 plus tax and shipping. Students can order from the ABA by calling the ABA service center (800-285-2221, M-F 9am-6pm ET) or ordering online (you will need to create a webstore account): https://www.americanbar.org/products/inv/book/214908/. No discount code is needed to purchase from the ABA, but mention you are a student in Depositions with Professor Henry Hecht at Berkeley Law School.

Fall 2022 Description:
Over 98% of all civil cases filed in Federal court are resolved short of trial. When a litigator questions a witness today, it is far more likely to be in a law office at a deposition than in a courtroom at trial. This skills course primarily uses "learning by doing" (role plays) to teach the art and science of preparing for, taking, and defending depositions. The role plays will be conducted in small groups with experienced litigators and the instructor as observers who will provide individual feedback to each student. In addition, the deposition role plays will be video recorded, and each student will have two individual video review sessions with the instructor. Undergraduates will play the role of the witnesses. Student court reporters will transcribe the testimony, and law students will receive transcripts of the depositions they take and defend. Skills addressed include: preparing the fact (lay) witness; gathering information (discovery); gaining admissions; seeking evidence for impeachment; using documents; defending your witness; dealing with obstreperous counsel and problem witnesses; and using depositions at trial. Enrollment is limited to 18 students. All interested students, whether enrolled or on the waitlist, must attend the first class in order to be admitted. Any student who does not attend the first class without prior permission of the instructor will be dropped from the class. In addition, due to both the use of simulation exercises throughout the semester and the need to determine the members of the class as soon as possible, the usual provisions of "Drop/Add" do not apply. If you wish to enroll, you must commit to remain in the course by no later than Friday afternoon, August 26, 2022, the last day of the first full week of fall semester classes. If you have any questions, please contact Professor Hecht by email (hhecht@law.berkeley.edu). A hardcopy of the textbook for the course can be purchased from either the Law School bookstore or directly from the ABA at a 25% discount from the list price. If preferred, the textbook can be purchased as an ebook directly from the ABA at a 25% discount. The ebook is not available from the Law School bookstore at a discount. The discounted price of the hard copy from the ABA is $112.46 plus tax and shipping. Students can order from the ABA by calling the ABA service center (800-285-2221, M-F 9am-6pm ET) or ordering online (you will need to create a webstore account): https://www.americanbar.org/products/inv/book/214908/. No discount code is needed to purchase from the ABA, but mention you are a student in Depositions with Professor Henry Hecht at Berkeley Law School.


Law 246.31 Economic Expert Witnesses: Depositions and Testimony 1 Units
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2022 Description:
This course provides students with exposure to the taking and defending of deposition and trial testimony from expert witnesses. Specifically, the class focuses on economic expert witnesses and includes common areas of examination and rebuttal, expert qualification, Daubert challenges, and appropriate scoping of expert engagements. Students will practice deposition strategies and develop lines of questioning via role-playing exercises with each other and with the instructor and experienced guest lecturers. These practice sessions will illustrate economic testimony in cases such as insider trading, shareholder class action lawsuits, and valuations. The final paper is a practice-oriented writing assignment. Note: students who take this class are not precluded from taking Depositions in later semesters. This class will meet over three days: Thursday, January 20th 6:25 PM - 9:05 PM Friday, January 21st 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM and 3:10 PM - 5:30 PM Saturday, January 22nd 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM and 2:10 PM - 5:10 PM The instructor, Dr. Matthew D. Cain is a Senior Fellow at the Berkeley Center for Law and Business, University of California. He has provided economic analysis, consulting, and expert witness testimony on behalf of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and other clients, including during investigations, settlement negotiations, and trials. He has experience in a variety of topic areas, including in cases alleging insider trading, foreign bribery, accounting fraud, investment advisor cherry-picking, mutual fund conflicts and violations, disclosure violations, improper valuations, and broker-dealer conflicts. Dr. Cain spent several years working at the SEC, where he served as an advisor to Commissioner Robert J. Jackson, Jr. He also worked as a Financial Economist in the Office of Litigation Economics, part of the Division of Economic and Risk Analysis. Prior to working with the SEC, Dr. Cain was an Assistant Professor of Finance in the Mendoza College of Business at the University of Notre Dame. He holds a Ph.D. in Finance from Purdue University, and prior to academia he worked as a capital markets analyst, assisting companies with capital raisings in relation to M&A and other corporate purposes.


Law 246.9 California Trial Practice 3 Units
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2022 Description:
This course provides students the opportunity to learn and refine various trial advocacy skills using California law and procedure in the context of both civil and criminal cases. The course combines short lectures with examples/demonstrations, in-class and small group discussions and opportunities for students to practice and be critiqued on their advocacy skills by their peers, as well as by practitioners. Specific topics covered may vary, but may include subjects such as pretrial motions, motions in limine, jury selection and voir dire, opening statements, closing arguments, evidentiary objections and advocacy, trial strategy and/or witness examinations, including examinations of experts, investigators and/or opposing parties. In-class instruction will be supplemented by presentations from practitioners familiar with real world application of legal theory, as well as opportunities to observe and analyze specific examples of skills used in actual live and recorded cases. Tony Cheng is an attorney in private practice specializing in juvenile delinquency and criminal appeals and the former Director of the Youth Defender Clinic (YDC) at the East Bay Community Law Center (EBCLC). Prior to joining EBCLC in 2018, Tony practiced as a public defender for twenty years, litigating cases in the Ninth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals, the federal district court for the Southern District of California, the San Diego County Superior Court and the Alameda County Superior Court. In addition to nearly a decade of experience as a juvenile defender, Tony has also tried almost forty criminal jury trials to verdict during his career. Tony serves on the board of directors of the Pacific Juvenile Defender Center (PJDC) and is certified by the National Juvenile Defender Center (NJDC) as a juvenile defense trainer. Tony has contributed to training and educational materials published by PJDC and has presented at the NJDC Leadership Summit and the Practising Law Institute. Tony is a graduate of the UC Davis School of Law (King Hall), where he served as chair of the Moot Court Board and graduated from the school’s Public Interest Law Program.


Law 247.1 Regulation of Capital Markets and Financial Institutions 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This course will address the institutional and regulatory framework of the US capital markets and the role that financial institutions, particularly investment banks and investment funds, perform in these markets. The course will start with an overview of the functions and regulation of banks, exchanges, over-the-counter markets, broker-dealers, institutional investors, and mutual and hedge funds. We will study in particular the financial crisis of 2008-2009, including the rise and fall of securitization, failures in investment banks and the government-sponsored enterprises, credit derivatives, money market funds and hedge funds. We will study the division of regulatory responsibilities after Gramm-Leach-Bliley repealed Glass-Steagall and how these responsibilities correspond, or do not correspond, with the various financial functions that GLB intended to regulate. We will examine a range of actual and proposed regulatory responses to the crisis, including the Dodd Frank Act, the actions of the banking, securities and futures regulators and other legislative proposals and actions of Congress and the Treasury. This course is intended to provide students with an overview of the US financial system. It does not cover the same material or the same details as specific courses in corporate, securities or banking law.

Spring 2021 Description:
This course will address the institutional and regulatory framework of the US capital markets and the role that financial institutions, particularly investment banks, investment funds and derivatives dealers, perform in these markets. We will study the legal, political and regulatory structures that reinforce the prominence of capital markets in the US financial system. The course will provide an overview of the functions and regulation of banks, exchanges, over-the-counter markets, broker-dealers, institutional investors, mutual and hedge funds, retail investment advice, securitization, and futures and derivatives markets. We also will cover a series of case studies that illustrate the features and weaknesses of the US regulatory system, including the rise and fall (and rise again) of securitization, failures in investment banks and financial holdings companies, energy and credit derivatives, the modern mortgage market, money market funds and hedge funds, and challenges presented by technology to equity and debt market structure. We will study the fragmented US regulatory system, including the division of regulatory responsibilities under the Gramm-Leach-Bliley and Dodd-Frank Acts, as well as the actions and varying (and often conflicting) policy purposes of the banking, securities and derivatives regulators and other legislative proposals and actions of Congress and the Treasury. This course is intended to provide students with an overview of the US financial system. It does not cover the same material or the same details as specific courses in corporate, securities, banking or Consumer Financial Regulation (749.1).

Spring 2022 Description:
This course will address the institutional and regulatory framework of the US capital markets and the role that financial institutions, particularly investment banks, investment funds and derivatives dealers, perform in these markets. We will study the legal, political and regulatory structures that reinforce the prominence of capital markets in the US financial system. The course will provide an overview of the functions and regulation of banks, exchanges, over-the-counter markets, broker-dealers, institutional investors, mutual and hedge funds, retail investment advice, securitization, and futures and derivatives markets. We also will cover a series of case studies that illustrate the features and weaknesses of the US regulatory system, including the rise and fall (and rise again) of securitization, failures in investment banks and financial holdings companies, energy and credit derivatives, money market funds and hedge funds, fintech and the challenges presented by technology to investment products and their providers, as well as to equity and debt market structure. We will study the fragmented US regulatory system, including the division of regulatory responsibilities under the Gramm-Leach-Bliley and Dodd-Frank Acts, as well as the actions and varying (and often conflicting) policy purposes of the securities, derivatives and banking regulators and other legislative proposals and actions of Congress and the Treasury. This course is intended to provide students with an overview of the US capital markets and financial system. It does not cover the same material or the same details as specific courses in corporate, securities, banking or Consumer Financial Regulation (749.1).


Law 247.11 Consumer Financial Regulation 3 Units
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2021 Description:
This course provides an interdisciplinary overview of consumer finance. In the past few decades, culminating in the COVID-19 pandemic, households have faced the mounting pressures on their finances due to mortgages, student loans, credit cards, healthcare, long term care, and inadequate retirement income. Demands to ease this pressure led to the establishment of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and the issuance of a variety of regulations aimed at improving consumer outcomes. Students in this course will learn the economic underpinnings of how consumers make financial decisions, like choosing loans, insurance, and retirement products. The course traces out existing consumer protection efforts targeting financial products, focusing on particular markets where recent regulations have been passed. The course will explore the legal theories related to ongoing discussions about consumer financial protection. Students will be expected to participate in class discussions and write up a policy paper and presentation for the final classes.

Fall 2022 Description:
This course provides an interdisciplinary overview of consumer finance. In the past few decades, culminating in the COVID-19 pandemic, households have faced the mounting pressures on their finances due to mortgages, student loans, credit cards, healthcare, long term care, and inadequate retirement income. Demands to ease this pressure led to the establishment of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and the issuance of a variety of regulations aimed at improving consumer outcomes. Students in this course will learn the economic underpinnings of how consumers make financial decisions, like choosing loans, insurance, and retirement products. The course traces out existing consumer protection efforts targeting financial products, focusing on particular markets where recent regulations have been passed. The course will explore the legal theories related to ongoing discussions about consumer financial protection. Students will be expected to participate in class discussions and write a policy paper and presentation for the final classes.


Law 247.3 FinTech: Tools for Analyzing New Financial Products 1 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
This course will provide students with an analytic framework that can be applied to determine the application of existing regulations to new financial products. Students will review the application of existing federal and state securities and banking laws to emerging "FinTech" products (e.g., mobile wallets, online lenders). The adequacy of existing regulation and the responses of the regulators to the FinTech products will be discussed. This class will meet for 4 classes: Thursday, October 15 from 6:25-8:25pm Friday, October 16 from 10:00-12:15pm and 3:10-5:15pm Thursday, October 22 from 6:25-8:25pm Friday, October 23 from 10:00-12:15pm and 3:10-5:15pm Paul Clark is the Managing Partner of the Washington, DC, office of Seward & Kissel LLP. He has over 30 years experience working with financial services companies on new products.

Fall 2021 Description:
This course will provide students with an analytic framework that can be applied to determine the application of existing regulations to new financial products. Students will review current trends in FinTech and, using case studies, determine the application of existing federal and state securities and banking laws to emerging "FinTech" products (e.g., p2p payment services, "challenger banks", mobile wallets, online lenders). The course will examine the adequacy of existing financial regulation and the responses of the regulators to the FinTech products, as well as the role of the lawyer in assisting clients in developing new financial products. This class will meet for 4 classes: Thursday, October 7 from 6:25-8:25pm Friday, October 8 from 10:00-12:15pm and 3:10-5:15pm Thursday, October 14 from 6:25-8:25pm Friday, October 15 from 10:00-12:15pm and 3:10-5:15pm Paul Clark is the Managing Partner of the Washington, DC, office of Seward & Kissel LLP. He has over 30 years experience working with financial services companies on new products.

Fall 2022 Description:
This course will introduce students to "FinTech" products, such as p2p payments, neo banks, platform lenders and crypto currencies, and provide them with a framework that can be applied to determine the application of existing regulations to new financial products. Students will review current trends in FinTech and, using case studies, determine the application of existing federal and state securities and banking laws to emerging FinTech products. The course will examine the adequacy of existing financial regulation to protect consumers using FinTech products and the responses of the regulators to FinTech. Particular focus will be placed on the role of the lawyer in assisting clients in developing new financial products. This class will meet for 6 classes over two weeks on Thursdays and Fridays, October 13 & 14 and October 20 & 21. Paul Clark was a partner in the Washington, DC, office of Seward & Kissel for over 30 years before founding Grand View Financial Consulting. He has extensive experience working with both traditional financial services companies and non-traditional FinTech companies on new products.


Law 247.3S Regulating Banking and FinTech 1 Units
Summer 2021: Remote due to COVID
Summer 2022: In-Person
Description:
Summer 2021 Description:
This course will provide an overview of U.S. (state and federal) banking law; survey of the emerging FinTech market; and explore case studies and examples of FinTech products and how they are regulated. Note: Real time attendance is required for this course. You must be able to attend and participate through Zoom live. There is no class meeting on June 18th.

Summer 2022 Description:
This course will provide an overview of U.S. (state and federal) banking law; review trends and developments in the emerging FinTech market; explore case studies and examples of FinTech products and how they are regulated; and pose questions about the adequacy of the current regulatory scheme.


Law 247.6 Blockchain Innovation for the Unbanked Billions 1 Units
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2022 Description:
Well before the global pandemic that highlighted the substantial and global divides between the wealthy and poor, plunging many into preventable poverty and hunger, 1.7 billion adults were unbanked - effectively without access to a financial institution. Meanwhile, for those within the global banking system, our traditional financial controls fail to prevent up to 2-5% of global GDP in money laundering - effectively enabling criminal enterprises to launder up to $2 trillion US dollars annually. These challenges are not accidental: the majority of our traditional financial regulations are decades old, put in place long before the internet and modern fintech innovation. We now have the opportunity to explore how innovative technology, such as blockchain and decentralized peer to peer systems, can empower the nearly 2 billion adults who have been left out of traditional financial systems, while leveraging the unique characteristics of these new technologies to improve illicit finance detection through thoughtful revisions to our laws. In this course, we will explore the basic tenets of decentralized blockchain systems and how they can be leveraged to promote financial inclusion and responsible innovation. We will explore how financial system challenges - including money laundering, tax evasion, terrorist financing, fraud, consumer protections, and privacy - may be addressed by new technologies, and how our regulations can better address these concerns leveraging the unique characteristics of blockchain systems.


Law 247.6S Blockchain for Lawyers 1 Units
Summer 2021: Remote due to COVID
Summer 2022: Remote Instruction
Description:
Summer 2021 Description:
Blockchain technologies—decentralized databases utilizing public-private key cryptography and consensus mechanisms that would not normally be of interest beyond protocol engineering circles—have captured the imagination and attention of entrepreneurs, investors, multinational enterprises, and governments because of their transformative potential. Visions of “banking the unbanked,” enhancing democracy, and enabling new forms of global collective action. Fears of fueling illicit activity such as terrorist financing and money laundering. In these early days of this embryonic technology, much of this potential remains theoretical, most of the use cases experimental, and the application of existing legal and regulatory frameworks largely unsettled. This course explores the theoretical potential and practical limitations of blockchain technologies, and the evolving legal and regulatory responses to early applications, with a view to distilling the most legally-salient attributes of blockchain technologies for evaluating their opportunities and risks in a range of practice settings.

Summer 2022 Description:
Blockchain technologies—decentralized databases utilizing public-private key cryptography and consensus mechanisms that would not normally be of interest beyond protocol engineering circles—have captured the imagination and attention of entrepreneurs, investors, multinational enterprises, and governments because of their transformative potential. Visions of “banking the unbanked,” enhancing democracy, and enabling new forms of global collective action. Fears of fueling illicit activity such as terrorist financing and money laundering. In these early days of this embryonic technology, much of this potential remains theoretical, most of the use cases experimental, and the application of existing legal and regulatory frameworks largely unsettled. This course explores the theoretical potential and practical limitations of blockchain technologies, and the evolving legal and regulatory responses to early applications, with a view to distilling the most legally-salient attributes of blockchain technologies for evaluating their opportunities and risks in a range of practice settings. NOTE: This course will meet in-person on May 17th and on Zoom on May 19th, May 24th, May 26th, and May 31st. Real time attendance at all five class meetings in required.


Law 247.9 Disruptive Technologies & Regulation 1 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
Major technological developments have led to the rapid emergence of new markets and upended entire industries. Meanwhile, regulatory frameworks--often developed around older tech, prior business models and existing actors--have moved at a slower pace. This has caused significant social complexity -- it has unearthed legal gray areas and uncertainty, created obstacles to unlocking new innovation, introduced new risks for consumers, and caused clashes between the tech and public sectors. This dynamic will only increase as the rate of innovation quickens and is forcing a rethinking of regulatory frameworks, processes and strategies. Taught by practitioners with a background in both the business and regulatory spheres, the course will take a “case study”-based approach looking at specific examples of the development of new technologies that raise novel cross-cutting questions. Taking the perspective of policymakers, regulators and various business decision-makers, we will explore a set of mixed legal, business, and policy issues raised by the introduction of these new technologies and business models, with a particular focus on the mobility sector. The class will draw on these case studies to tease out a practical understanding of what works well and what does not, and to conceive of and develop more effective regulatory regimes in rapidly changing spaces. The course will be primarily discussion-based rather than lecture based, so students should plan for active participation. The pedagogy will have a mix of instructor presentations, group discussion, role play (e.g., representing a government or a business). Readings will consist of case studies similar to those found in business schools (e.g, reviewing examples like Uber/Lyft), traditional law school practice (e.g., legal cases and law review articles), and articles and stories to provide additional context around specific cases and issues. Credi will be determined by a mix of class participation and a final paper. The paper will consist of writing a memo that relates to analyzing an emerging technology & business model in the context of an existing regulatory regime.

Spring 2021 Description:
Major technological developments have led to the rapid emergence of new products and services, upendeding entire industries and or creating new ones. Meanwhile, regulatory frameworks have moved at a slower pace. This dynamic has caused significant social complexity -- it has unearthed legal gray areas, created obstacles to unlocking new innovation, introduced new risks for consumers and societies, and caused clashes between the tech and public sectors. This trend will only increase as the rate of innovation quickens; and it is forcing a rethinking of regulatory frameworks, processes and strategies. Taught by practitioners with a background in both the business and regulatory spheres, the course will take a “case study”-based approach to tech regulation. Taking the perspective of policymakers, regulators and various business decision-makers, we will explore a set of mixed legal, business, and policy issues raised by the introduction of these new technologies and business models. The class will draw on case studies from the mobility industry and tech platforms to tease out a practical understanding of what works well and what does not, and to conceive of and develop more effective regulatory regimes in rapidly changing spaces. The course will be primarily discussion-based rather than lecture based, so students should plan for active participation in plenary and break-out groups. The pedagogy will have a mix of instructor presentations, group discussion, role play (e.g., representing a government or a business). Readings will consist of case studies similar to those found in business schools (e.g, reviewing examples like Uber/Lyft), traditional law school practice (e.g., legal cases and law review articles), and articles and stories to provide additional context around specific cases and issues. Credit will be determined by a mix of class participation and small individual and group assignments between classes. Class meetings will be every other week on these dates: January 25th, February 8th, February 22nd, March 8th, March 29th, April 12th and April 26th.

Spring 2022 Description:
Major technological developments have led to the rapid emergence of new products and services, upendeding entire industries and or creating new ones. Meanwhile, regulatory frameworks have moved at a slower pace. This dynamic has caused significant social complexity -- it has unearthed legal gray areas, created obstacles to unlocking new innovation, introduced new risks for consumers and societies, and caused clashes between the tech and public sectors. This trend will only increase as the rate of innovation quickens; and it is forcing a rethinking of regulatory frameworks, processes and strategies. Taught by practitioners with a background in both the business and regulatory spheres, the course will take a “case study”-based approach to tech regulation. Taking the perspective of policymakers, regulators and various business decision-makers, we will explore a set of mixed legal, business, and policy issues raised by the introduction of these new technologies and business models. The class will draw on recent case studies from the mobility industry and tech platforms to tease out a practical understanding of what works well and what does not, and to conceive of and develop more effective regulatory regimes in rapidly changing spaces. The course will be primarily discussion-based rather than lecture based, so students should plan for active participation in plenary and break-out groups. The pedagogy will have a mix of instructor presentations, group discussion, role play (e.g., representing a government or a business). Readings will consist of case studies similar to those found in business schools (e.g, reviewing examples like Uber/Lyft), traditional law school practice (e.g., legal cases and law review articles), and articles and stories to provide additional context around specific cases and issues. Credit will be determined by a mix of class participation and small individual assignments between classes.


Law 248 Health Law 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This course will provide an introduction to many of the areas of law that relate to the regulation and structure of, access to, and financing of health care in the United States. Topics covered include health care cost and access; federal and state regulation of private health insurance and managed care; financing of public health programs, including Medicare and Medicaid; the structure of the health care enterprise; and legal issues related to the organization and reform of the deliver of health care, including anti-trust and fraud and abuse. In addition, this course will also cover a number of constitutional issues that arise in health law, from First Amendment issues faced by providers and manufacturers, to preemption issues in drug and device litigation, to federalism issues at the core of challenges to Medicare, Medicaid, and the Affordable Care Act.


Law 248.2 Bioethics: From Nuremberg to Modern Times 3 Units
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Spring 2021 Description:
This course explores the increasingly influential field of bioethics. Students will examine (1) the historical, sociological, public health, and legal contexts from which modern bioethics emerged as a coherent field in the mid 20th century, (2) the biomedical developments, legal engagements, and political controversies that reshaped the enterprise towards the latter part of the century, and (3) contemporary issues in bioethics - from human subject protections to reproductive and genetic technologies - and the role of law and public policy in mediating the relationship between medicine, science, public health, and society. About the Instructor: Osagie K. Obasogie, J.D., Ph.D., is Haas Distinguished Chair and Professor of Bioethics at the University of California, Berkeley, in the Joint Medical Program and School of Public Health. Obasogie's scholarly interests include Constitutional law, bioethics, sociology of law, and reproductive and genetic technologies. His research also looks at the past and present roles of science in both constructing racial meanings and explaining racial disparities. He has a particular interest in developing legal mechanisms that can create the conditions for eliminating health disparities. An additional thread of Obasogie’s research uses novel theoretical and empirical interventions to explore the hidden ways in which racial thinking is central to law, medicine, and science.


Law 248.5 Mergers & Acquisitions 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Spring 2022: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This course introduces students to the law of mergers and acquisitions and the financial and theoretical issues that they present. The principal focus of the course will be on the corporate law and securities regulation aspects of these transactions, the business incentives of the parties to the transactions, and the lawyer's role in documenting and negotiating these deals. We will also discuss ancillary legal matters, such as tax and antitrust. The course will study merger agreements, the litigation that can result from them, and ways to avoid that litigation. Students will explore mergers and acquisitions transactions as attempts by the transaction parties to attain business goals and will learn how legal rules and documentation constrain and create opportunity for the parties’ ability to achieve their objectives. Current topics and policy debates will be discussed throughout.

Fall 2020 Description:
This course introduces students to the law of mergers and acquisitions and the financial and theoretical issues that they present. The principal focus of the course will be on the corporate law and securities regulation aspects of these transactions, the business incentives of the parties to the transactions, and the lawyer's role in documenting and negotiating these deals. We will also discuss ancillary legal matters, such as tax and antitrust. The course will study merger agreements, the litigation that can result from them, and ways to avoid that litigation. Students will explore mergers and acquisitions transactions as attempts by the transaction parties to attain business goals and will learn how legal rules and documentation constrain and create opportunity for the parties’ ability to achieve their objectives. Current topics and policy debates will be discussed throughout.

Spring 2021 Description:
This course introduces students to the fundamentals and critical topics in the law of mergers and acquisitions and the financial and transactional issues that they present. The principal focus of the course will be on the corporate law and securities regulation aspects of these transactions, the business incentives of the parties to the transactions, and the documentation and negotiation of the deals. Ancillary legal areas, such as tax and antitrust, will also be touched upon. The course will study merger agreements and the important contractual issues they present. Students will explore mergers and acquisitions transactions as attempts by the transaction parties to attain business goals and will learn how legal rules and documentation constrain and create opportunity for the parties’ ability to achieve their objectives. The real-world problems faced by parties involved in these transactions, as well as those of judges who must adjudicate these deals, are considered. Current doctrinal and policy debates will be discussed throughout.

Fall 2021 Description:
This course introduces students to the fundamentals and critical topics in the law of mergers and acquisitions and the financial and transactional issues that they present. The principal focus of the course will be on the corporate law and securities regulation aspects of these transactions, the business incentives of the parties to the transactions, and the documentation and negotiation of the deals. Ancillary legal areas, such as tax and antitrust, will also be touched upon. The course will study merger agreements and the important contractual issues they present. Students will explore mergers and acquisitions transactions as attempts by the transaction parties to attain business goals and will learn how legal rules and documentation constrain and create opportunity for the parties’ ability to achieve their objectives. The real-world problems faced by parties involved in these transactions, as well as those of judges who must adjudicate these deals, are considered. Current doctrinal and policy debates will be discussed throughout.

Spring 2022 Description:
This course is a survey of the key concepts and cases in the law of mergers and acquisitions. It will cover central and emerging issues in the practice of M&A including the different ways to structure deals, the negotiation and drafting of merger agreements, the fiduciary standards that govern director conduct, defensive techniques, and the ancillary topics that M&A lawyers should know something about such as relevant securities regulations, tax matters, and antitrust. We will also discuss the economic logic of why parties merge and cover some finance and accounting basics, but the primary focus of the course will be legal rather than financial.

Fall 2022 Description:
This course is a survey of the key concepts and cases in the law of mergers and acquisitions. It will cover central and emerging issues in the practice of M&A including the different ways to structure deals, the negotiation and drafting of merger agreements, the fiduciary standards that govern director conduct, defensive techniques, and the ancillary topics that M&A lawyers should know something about such as relevant securities regulations, tax matters, and antitrust. We will also discuss the economic logic of why parties merge and cover some finance and accounting basics, but the primary focus of the course will be legal rather than financial. Having taken Business Associations previously or taking it concurrently is preferred, but not required.


Law 248.51 IPOs and Going Public Transactions 1 Units
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2022 Description:
This course introduces students to initial public offerings (“IPOs”) from the perspective of a leading practitioner. We will begin with an overview of the IPO process. Then, each class session will focus on a different aspect of the deal, including initial preparatory steps, who the players are, and the various processes and documents involved. The course will utilize various articles and case studies to give students a sense of what the IPO process entails. We will focus on practical applications of the rules to real-world situations, with the goal of preparing students post-graduation to be able to properly advise issuers, investors and underwriters on an IPO.


Law 248.5S Mergers & Acquisitions 3 Units
Summer 2021: Hybrid
Summer 2022: In-Person
Description:
Summer 2021 Description:
This course introduces students to the fundamentals and critical topics in the law of mergers and acquisitions and the financial and transactional issues that they present. The principal focus of the course will be on the corporation law and securities regulations aspects of these transactions, the business incentives of the parties to the transactions, and the documentation and negotiation of the deals. Ancillary legal areas, such as tax and antitrust, will also be touched upon. The course will study merger agreements and the important contractual issues they present. Students will explore mergers and acquisitions transactions as attempts by the transaction parties to attain business goals and will learn how legal rules and documentation constrain and create opportunity for the parties’ ability to achieve their objectives. The real-world problems faced by parties involved in these transactions, as well as those of judges who must adjudicate these deals, are considered. Current doctrinal and policy debates will be discussed throughout. This course will meet in-person on campus on June 14th, 15th, 16th, 17th, and 18th in room 105.

Summer 2022 Description:
This course introduces students to the fundamentals and critical topics in the law of mergers and acquisitions and the financial and transactional issues that they present. The principal focus of the course will be on the corporation law and securities regulations aspects of these transactions, the business incentives of the parties to the transactions, and the documentation and negotiation of the deals. Ancillary legal areas, such as antitrust, will also be touched upon. The course will study merger agreements and the important contractual issues they present. Students will explore mergers and acquisitions transactions as attempts by the transaction parties to attain business goals and will learn how legal rules and documentation constrain and create opportunity for the parties’ ability to achieve their objectives. The real-world problems faced by parties involved in these transactions, as well as those of judges who must adjudicate these deals, are considered. Current doctrinal and policy debates will be discussed throughout.


Law 248.61 The Code of Capital 1 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
The class will give students an opportunity to read and discuss Katherina Pistor's, The Code of Capital: How Law Creates Wealth and Inequality (2019). The book is written for a general audience. It argues that lawyers use private law (e.g., contracts, property, business law, and secured credit) to create wealth and inequality. It offers a critical perspective on aspects of private law that others celebrate. The book also offers a glimpse of what elite transactional lawyers do to serve their clients. This class is among the special Fall 2020 1L elective seminars designed to give entering 1Ls an extra opportunity to form connections despite our remote form of interaction. In light of that goal, these classes will expect real-time attendance and may not be recorded. These classes will all be graded on a Credit/No Credit basis and total written work requirement will be no more than 8 double-spaced pages.

Spring 2021 Description:
The class will give students an opportunity to read and discuss Katherina Pistor's, The Code of Capital: How Law Creates Wealth and Inequality (2019). The book is written for a general audience. It argues that lawyers use private law (e.g., contracts, property, business law, and secured credit) to create wealth and inequality. It offers a critical perspective on aspects of private law that others celebrate. The book also offers a glimpse of what elite transactional lawyers do to serve their clients. An electronic version of the book can be obtained for free through a Library portal. This class is designed to give students an extra opportunity to engage despite our remote form of interaction. In light of that goal, this class will expect real-time attendance and may not be recorded. The total written work requirement will be no more than 8 double-spaced pages.


Law 248.62 The Law and Economics of Complexity 1 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
An important role of business lawyers is to anticipate and to manage complex transactions. In many commercial contexts, we observe contracts becoming increasingly complex over time. What are the fundamental causes of this complexity, what problems does it create, and what strategies are used for managing it and/or exploiting it? The course will be a mix of conceptual and practical. The conceptual part will involve reading and discussing scholarship from economists and legal scholars on how imperfect, “boundedly rational” agents make decisions in complex environments and compare this perspective to the classic, rational perspective that is common in the law and economics field. We will also explore the emerging world of complexity science and discuss applications of those tools in legal applications. The practical part will involve case studies of business transactions and environments where complexity caused unanticipated challenges and responses. No background is necessary, but an interest in business contracts and a willingness to brainstorm and wrestle with complexity will be helpful. One skill we will all work on together is the ability to break down a complex transaction and explain it clearly to a non-expert. This class is among the special Fall 2020 1L elective seminars designed to give entering 1Ls an extra opportunity to form connections despite our remote form of interaction. In light of that goal, these classes will expect real-time attendance and may not be recorded. These classes will all be graded on a Credit/No Credit basis and total written work requirement will be no more than 8 double-spaced pages.

Spring 2021 Description:
An important role of business lawyers is to anticipate and to manage complex transactions. In many commercial contexts, we observe contracts becoming increasingly complex over time. What are the fundamental causes of this complexity, what problems does it create, and what strategies are used for managing it and/or exploiting it? The course will be a mix of conceptual and practical. The conceptual part will involve reading and discussing scholarship from economists and legal scholars on how imperfect, “boundedly rational” agents make decisions in complex environments and compare this perspective to the classic, rational perspective that is common in the law and economics field. We will also explore the emerging world of complexity science and discuss applications of those tools in legal applications. The practical part will involve case studies of business transactions and environments where complexity caused unanticipated challenges and responses. No background is necessary, but an interest in business contracts and a willingness to brainstorm and wrestle with complexity will be helpful. One skill we will all work on together is the ability to break down a complex transaction and explain it clearly to a non-expert. This class is designed to give students an extra opportunity to engage despite our remote form of interaction. In light of that goal, this class will expect real-time attendance and may not be recorded. The total written work requirement will be no more than 8 double-spaced pages.


Law 248.7 Fundamentals of Leveraged Buyouts 2 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
This course will introduce the student to various facets of the planning and execution of a leveraged buyout transaction by a private equity fund formed to pursue such forms of merger & acquisitions. Structure & legal documentation for such transactions will be presented, and the business and economic rationale underlying the transaction and its various components will be discussed. Professor Oetgen has over 25 years of experience as an attorney specializing in such transactions -- first as a senior partner at a multi-national law firm focused on LBOs, and more recently as Chief Legal Officer and Managing Director of a San Francisco-based private equity fund.

Fall 2021 Description:
This course will introduce the student to various facets of the planning and execution of a leveraged buyout transaction by a private equity fund formed to pursue such forms of merger & acquisition transactions. Structure & legal documentation for such transactions will be presented, and the business and economic rationale underlying the transaction and its various components will be discussed. Professor Oetgen has more than 25 years of experience as an attorney specializing in such transactions -- first as a senior partner at a multi-national law firm with a primary focus on LBOs, and more recently as Chief Legal Officer and Managing Director of a San Francisco-based private equity firm.

Fall 2022 Description:
This course will introduce the student to various facets of the planning and execution of a leveraged buyout transaction by a private equity fund formed to pursue such forms of merger & acquisition transactions. Structure and legal documentation for such transactions will be presented, and the business and economic rationale underlying the transaction and its various components will be discussed. Professor Oetgen has more than 25 years of experience as an attorney specializing in such transactions -- first as a senior partner at a multi-national law firm with a primary focus on LBOs, and more recently as Chief Legal Officer and Managing Director of a San Francisco-based private equity firm.


Law 248.8 Evolution of Antitrust, Merger Review, and Enforcement 1 Units
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2022 Description:
Since 1914, mergers and acquisitions that “substantially lessen competition” have been illegal; and since the HSR Act was passed in 1976 the exercise has largely been one of foretelling the future. But what amounts to a substantial lessening of competition, and how do regulators go about predicting which deals will have anticompetitive effects? This seminar will follow the evolution of antitrust law, policy, and economics over the course of its 100+ year history, with a focus on the deals that have (and have not) passed antitrust scrutiny. By considering the key contemporaneous writings – from legislative history, regulator speeches, court decisions, agency guidance, and academic scholarship – we will develop an understanding of where antitrust merger enforcement started, and where its going. As this is ultimately a course about innovation, and how our antitrust policy itself has been disrupted and pivoted over the years, we will also focus on the key “tech” antitrust merger cases and their practical implications for companies looking to do deals at the leading edge of innovation.


Law 248.9 Antitrust and Innovation 2 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
The Bay Area is an amazing place to practice antitrust law! We are home to life changing innovation. This course will cover the real-world application of antitrust law to the industries pioneering tech and life sciences innovation - to businesses that are literally all around us in the Bay Area. Countless local companies large and small have been involved in high-stakes antitrust battles that have shaped the global technology landscape. These matters are not about legal technicalities. They are about business models, ecosystem and lifecycle strategies, and competing visions for the future of innovation and society. We will explore not only the legal questions but also the economic and public policy issues underlying these matters. In our course, we will cover predatory innovation, FRAND, licensing strategies, big data, networks and platforms, mergers, and monopolization. Our cases will focus on U.S. court and agency decisions and bring insights from non-US enforcement, as well as whatever will be hot in the spring of 2020!

Spring 2021 Description:
The Bay Area is an amazing place to practice antitrust law! We are home to life-changing innovation. This course will cover the real-world application of antitrust law to the industries pioneering tech and life sciences innovation - to businesses that are literally all around us in the Bay Area. Countless local companies large and small have been involved in high-stakes antitrust battles that have shaped the global technology landscape. These matters are not about legal technicalities. They are about business models, ecosystem and lifecycle strategies, and competing visions for the future of innovation and society. We will explore not only the legal questions but also the economic and public policy issues underlying these matters. In our course, we will cover predatory innovation, FRAND, licensing strategies, big data, networks and platforms, mergers, and monopolization. Our cases will focus on U.S. court and agency decisions and bring insights from non-US enforcement, as well as whatever will be hot in the spring of 2021!

Spring 2022 Description:
The Bay Area is an amazing place to practice antitrust law! We are home to life-changing innovation. This course will cover the real-world application of antitrust law to the industries pioneering tech and life sciences innovation - to businesses that are literally all around us in the Bay Area. Countless local companies large and small have been involved in high-stakes antitrust battles that have shaped the global technology landscape. These matters are not about legal technicalities. They are about business models, ecosystem and lifecycle strategies, and competing visions for the future of innovation and society. We will explore not only the legal questions but also the economic and public policy issues underlying these matters. In our course, we will cover predatory innovation, FRAND, licensing strategies, big data, networks and platforms, mergers, and monopolization. Our cases will focus on U.S. court and agency decisions and bring insights from non-US enforcement, as well as whatever will be hot in the spring of 2022!

Fall 2022 Description:
The Bay Area is an amazing place to practice antitrust law! We are home to life-changing innovation. This course will cover the real-world application of antitrust law to the industries pioneering tech and life sciences innovation - to businesses that are literally all around us in the Bay Area. Countless local companies large and small have been involved in high-stakes antitrust battles that have shaped the global technology landscape. These matters are not about legal technicalities. They are about business models, ecosystem and lifecycle strategies, and competing visions for the future of innovation and society. We will explore not only the legal questions but also the economic and public policy issues underlying these matters. In our course, we will cover predatory innovation, FRAND, licensing strategies, big data, networks and platforms, mergers, and monopolization. Our cases will focus on U.S. court and agency decisions and bring insights from non-US enforcement, as well as whatever will be hot in the fall of 2022!


Law 249.2 Introduction to Financial Accounting 1 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
This course covers financial statement basics, with the objective to learn to read, understand and analyze balance sheets, income statements, statements of cash flows and notes to financial statements, along with how these statements give you insight into business performance. The course will cover key accounting concepts including generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP), the accounting cycle, independent audits, and valuations. Additional topics will include learning how to read a capitalization table, pre money vs post money, ownership and understanding equity valuations. This course will have 7 class meetings. To allow for a makeup class because of unforeseen circumstances this course has an automatic make-up class scheduled for the 8th week. Students must be able to attend all 8 scheduled meetings to earn credit. Sue Biglieri is the current CFO at Kleiner Perkins, having spent the past 30 years as both the Controller and CFO at the firm. She has also spent time in industry and as an auditor at EY. She is a graduate of the Berkeley School of Business (Haas) and is a CPA (retired).

Fall 2021 Description:
This course covers financial statement basics, with the objective to learn to read, understand and analyze balance sheets, income statements, statements of cash flows, and notes to financial statements, along with how these statements give you insight into business performance. The course will cover key accounting concepts including generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP), the accounting cycle, debits/credits, and journal entries. Additional topics will include learning how to prepare and read a capitalization table, understanding pre-money vs post-money, ownership, and equity valuations. Discussions on current financial trends in Venture Capital and in tech companies will also be incorporated. This course will have 7 class meetings. To allow for a makeup class because of unforeseen circumstances this course has an automatic make-up class scheduled for the 8th week. Students must be able to attend all 8 scheduled meetings to earn credit. Sue Biglieri is the current CFO/COO at Kleiner Perkins, having spent the past 30 years as both the Controller and CFO at the firm. She has also spent time in industry and as an auditor at EY. She is a graduate of the Berkeley School of Business (Haas) and is a CPA (retired).

Fall 2022 Description:
This course covers financial statement basics, with the objective to not only learn to read, understand and analyze balance sheets, income statements, statements of cash flows, and notes to financial statements, but also to prepare them. The focus will also be on how these statements give various readers insight into business performance. The course will cover key accounting concepts including generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP), accruals, debits/credits, and journal and adjusting entries. Additional topics will include learning how to prepare and read a capitalization table, understanding pre-money vs post-money, ownership, and paths to liquidity. Discussions on current financial trends in Venture Capital and in tech companies will also be incorporated. This course will have 7 class meetings. To allow for a makeup class because of unforeseen circumstances this course has an automatic make-up class scheduled for the 8th week. Sue Biglieri is the current CFO/COO at Kleiner Perkins, having spent the past 30 years as both the Controller and CFO at the firm. She has also spent time in industry and as an auditor at EY. She is a graduate of the Berkeley School of Business (Haas) and is a CPA (retired).


Law 249.3 Selected Topics in Venture Capital 2 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This is a practice-oriented course on advising technology and emerging growth companies. It is designed to provide students with an understanding of the legal, business, financial and practical issues that arise in advising startup ventures. We will follow the life-cycle of a startup, starting with advising an entrepreneur considering starting a business and running through choices and details in forming a business entity, venture capital financings, corporate governance and incentivizing employees, culminating in an acquisition or IPO. In each case we will emphasize practical solutions and business realities. We will place special focus on what makes a good startup venture, how an entrepreneur attracts investment and the pros and cons of different types, and how founders and investors interact to allocate rewards of the venture between them. The course is not a theoretical discussion, but rather a nuts-and-bolts approach to advising founders, companies and investors in the start-up ecosystem, with a goal of providing a window into the daily life of a typical Silicon Valley corporate attorney.

Spring 2021 Description:
It's been said that the technology industry -- and to a great extent Silicon Valley -- has been responsible for the greatest creation of wealth in human history. What is it like to be an attorney working with these entrepreneurs, companies and investors on a daily basis? This practice-oriented course is designed to answer that question, by providing students a window into the legal, business, financial and practical issues encountered in advising technology and emerging growth startups. We follow the life-cycle of a typical technology startup, starting with advising the founders as they consider whether and how to start their business, and then running through the choices and challenges they face in selecting a form of business entity, bringing in and incentivizing employees, seeking funding, approaching and negotiating with venture capitalists -- all pointing toward an acquisition or IPO. We go beyond strict legal issues and focus on practical solutions and business realities. We place special emphasis on what makes a good startup business, how entrepreneurs attract investment, the pros and cons of different investment types, and how founders and investors allocate between them both the control and the rewards of the venture. The course takes a nuts-and-bolts approach and includes a number of assignments that mirror those Silicon Valley corporate associates frequently perform, culminating in hands-on negotiation of a venture capital investment term sheet between groups of students. Herb Fockler is a partner at Wilson Sonsini, the nation's leading law firm representing technology and emerging growth companies. He is based in their headquarters office in Palo Alto, where he has represented companies in a broad range of technologies and at all stages of their lives for over 35 years. He is a leading expert both inside and outside of Wilson Sonsini in all aspects of the legal, business and practical issues faced by startup companies. He has taught this and similar courses at Berkeley Law since 2014 and frequently guest lectures at other institutions.

Spring 2022 Description:
It's been said that the technology industry -- and to a great extent Silicon Valley -- has been responsible for the greatest creation of wealth in human history. What is it like to be an attorney working with these entrepreneurs, companies and investors on a daily basis? This practice-oriented course is designed to answer that question, by providing students a window into the legal, business, financial and practical issues encountered in advising technology and emerging growth startups. We follow the life-cycle of a typical technology startup, starting with advising the founders as they consider whether and how to start their business, and then running through the choices and challenges they face in selecting a form of business entity, bringing in and incentivizing employees, seeking funding, approaching and negotiating with venture capitalists -- all pointing toward an acquisition or IPO. We go beyond strict legal issues and focus on practical tasks and problems and business realities. We place special emphasis on what makes a good startup business, how entrepreneurs attract investment, the pros and cons of different investment types, and how founders and investors allocate between them both the control and the rewards of the venture. The course takes a nuts-and-bolts approach and includes a number of assignments that mirror those Silicon Valley corporate associates frequently perform, culminating in hands-on negotiation of a venture capital investment term sheet between groups of students. Herb Fockler is a partner at Wilson Sonsini, the nation's leading law firm representing technology and emerging growth companies. He is based in their headquarters office in Palo Alto, where he has represented companies in a broad range of technologies and at all stages of their lives for over 35 years. He is a leading expert both inside and outside of Wilson Sonsini in all aspects of the legal, business and practical issues faced by startup companies. He has taught this and similar courses at Berkeley Law since 2014 and also at Santa Clara University Law School, and has guest lectured at many other institutions. Kei Nishimura Drake is a senior associate in the Corporate and Securities Department of Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati. She began her corporate career at Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati in 2013 and practiced for 4 years before joining the legal team at Zymergen, a Softbank-backed company specializing in the genetic engineering of microbes. After her stint at Zymergen, she joined Atrium LLP, a hybrid law firm/legal technology startup, working to make legal practice more efficient. She returned to WSGR in April 2020, where her practice covers a broad range of general corporate, securities and transactional matters, with a focus on emerging company and private company representation.


Law 249.4 Financial Management of Non-Profits 1 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
An effective nonprofit leader must be able to analyze and act upon financial information as part of an overall approach to strategic decision making. This course will focus on the core financial management issues faced by managing and senior attorneys, CEOs and board members in nonprofit organizations and social enterprises. Students will learn the foundational tools and techniques for effective financial management, including budget development (i.e. applying a systematic method of allocating financial, physical, and human resources to achieve specific goals), responding to a request for proposal (RFP), program expansion, program portfolio analyses, financial forecasting and overall business model sustainability. This class will meet over three days: Thursday, August 27th from 6:25pm-9:05pm Friday, August 28th from 10:00-12:00pm and 3:10-6:10pm Saturday, August 29th from 9:00-12:00pm and 1:30-4:10pm BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH Brent Copen is dedicated to strengthening the sector by helping social sector businesses develop more robust financial management practices. He has presented hundreds of workshops and training nationally to CEO’s, board members, funders and emerging leaders. Copen brings more than 20 years of executive management and leadership experience, including senior finance roles in technology, health care, management consulting, and community development finance. He was awarded 2018 Bay Area CFO of the Year by the San Francisco Business Times. Copen currently holds four teaching positions at U.C. Berkeley. He co-authored The Nonprofit Business Plan, a practical guide to help nonprofit leaders establish a sustainable, results-driven business plan. He received a Master in Public Administration degree from Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs.

Fall 2021 Description:
An effective nonprofit leader must be able to analyze and act upon financial information as part of an overall approach to strategic decision making. This course will focus on the core financial management issues faced by managing and senior attorneys, CEOs and board members in nonprofit organizations and social enterprises. Students will learn the foundational tools and techniques for effective financial management, including budget development (i.e. applying a systematic method of allocating financial, physical, and human resources to achieve specific goals), responding to a request for proposal (RFP), program expansion, program portfolio analyses, financial forecasting and overall business model sustainability. This class will meet over three days: Thursday, August 19th 6:25 PM - 9:05 PM Friday, August 20th 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM and 3:10 PM - 6:10 PM Saturday, August 21st 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM and 1:30 PM - 4:10 PM Brent Copen is dedicated to strengthening the sector by helping social sector businesses develop more robust financial management practices. He has presented hundreds of workshops and training nationally to CEO’s, board members, funders and emerging leaders. Copen brings more than 20 years of executive management and leadership experience, including senior finance roles in technology, health care, management consulting, and community development finance. He was awarded 2018 Bay Area CFO of the Year by the San Francisco Business Times. Copen currently holds four teaching positions at U.C. Berkeley. He co-authored The Nonprofit Business Plan, a practical guide to help nonprofit leaders establish a sustainable, results-driven business plan. He received a Master in Public Administration degree from Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs.

Fall 2022 Description:
An effective nonprofit leader must be able to analyze and act upon financial information as part of an overall approach to strategic decision making. This course will focus on the core financial management issues faced by managing and senior attorneys, CEOs and board members in nonprofit organizations and social enterprises. Students will learn the foundational tools and techniques for effective financial management, including budget development (i.e. applying a systematic method of allocating financial, physical, and human resources to achieve specific goals), responding to a request for proposal (RFP), program expansion, program portfolio analyses, financial forecasting and overall business model sustainability. This class will meet over three days: Thursday, 6:25 PM - 9:05 PM Friday, 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM and 3:10 PM - 6:10 PM Saturday, 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM and 1:30 PM - 4:10 PM Brent Copen is dedicated to strengthening the sector by helping social sector businesses develop more robust financial management practices. He has presented hundreds of workshops and training nationally to CEOs, board members, funders and emerging leaders. Copen brings more than 20 years of executive management and leadership experience, including senior finance roles in technology, health care, management consulting, and community development finance. He was awarded 2018 Bay Area CFO of the Year by the San Francisco Business Times. Copen currently holds four teaching positions at U.C. Berkeley. He co-authored The Nonprofit Business Plan, a practical guide to help nonprofit leaders establish a sustainable, results-driven business plan. He received a Master in Public Administration degree from Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs.


Law 249.41 Structuring for Impact: Exploring the Role of Tax Exempt Organizations & Hybrid Structures 1 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
The philanthropic and commercial sectors are more interrelated than ever. In recent years, there has been a dramatic shift in the way that tax-exempt, nonprofit organizations leverage the strategies traditionally used by for-profits in order to advance their mission, while commercial actors have become increasingly focused on impact. This course will explore this new landscape from the perspective of the role of tax-exempt, nonprofit organizations. Through a grounding in fundamental legal issues, case studies and highly interactive exercises we will explore how these organizations can - either alone or in tandem with for-profits - navigate and apply commercial and business mechanisms and strategies to achieve and scale environmental and social impact. This course will expose students to the unique history and role of nonprofits in the US, traditional and innovative hybrid forms and structures, including nonprofit/for-profit partnerships, capital aggregation models, investment and funding issues, as well as compliance considerations. This course will blend theory and practice and will be taught by Tomer Inbar, who is widely recognized as an expert in the law applicable to nonprofit/tax-exempt organizations.We will also benefit from the knowledge and experience of practitioners and experts in social enterprises, including Will Fitzpatrick. Course will meet the following days and times: Thursday, October 15th 6:25 PM - 9:05 PM Friday, October 16th 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM and 3:10 PM - 5:30 PM Saturday, October 17th 09:30 AM - 12:30 PM and 2:10 PM - 5:10 PM

Fall 2021 Description:
The philanthropic and commercial sectors are more interrelated than ever. In recent years, there has been a dramatic shift in the way that tax-exempt, nonprofit organizations leverage the strategies traditionally used by for-profits in order to advance their mission, while commercial actors have become increasingly focused on impact. This course will explore this new landscape from the perspective of the role of tax-exempt, nonprofit organizations. Through a grounding in fundamental legal issues, case studies and interactive exercises we will explore how these organizations can - either alone or in tandem with for-profits - navigate and apply commercial and business mechanisms and strategies to achieve and scale environmental and social impact. This course will expose students to the unique history and role of nonprofits in the US, traditional and innovative hybrid forms and structures, including nonprofit/for-profit partnerships, capital aggregation models, investment and funding issues, as well as compliance considerations. This course will blend theory and practice and will be taught by Tomer Inbar, who is widely recognized as an expert in the law applicable to nonprofit/tax-exempt organizations. We will also benefit from the knowledge and experience of practitioners and experts in hybrid structures. Course will meet the following days and times: Friday, November 5th & November 12th 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM and 3:15 PM - 5:00 PM Saturday, November 6th & November 13th 9:30 AM - 12:15 PM

Fall 2022 Description:
The philanthropic and commercial sectors are more interrelated than ever. In recent years, there has been a dramatic shift in the way that tax-exempt, nonprofit organizations leverage the strategies traditionally used by for-profits in order to advance their mission, while commercial actors have become increasingly focused on impact. This course will explore this new landscape from the perspective of the role of tax-exempt, nonprofit organizations. Through a grounding in fundamental legal issues, case studies and interactive exercises we will explore how these organizations can - either alone or in tandem with for-profits - navigate and apply commercial and business mechanisms and strategies to achieve and scale environmental and social impact in a legally compliant manner. This course will expose students to the unique history and role of nonprofits in the US, traditional and innovative corporate forms and structures, capital aggregation models, investment and funding issues, as well as compliance considerations. This course will blend theory and practice and will be taught by Tomer Inbar, who is widely recognized as an expert in the law applicable to nonprofit/tax-exempt organizations. We will also benefit from the knowledge and experience of practitioners and experts in hybrid structures.


Law 249.7 Introduction to the New Financial Regulation 1 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
The 2008 financial crisis spawned the biggest explosion of financial regulation since the Great Depression. The Dodd-Frank Act alone generated over 25,000 pages of new regulations. In addition, the global coordination of this new regulation has been unprecedented. The stated purpose of most of the new regulation around the world has been to make the global and domestic financial systems safer. The primary focus has been on reducing the probability of bank failures by subjecting the largest, most complex and global banking groups to substantially higher capital, liquidity, stress testing and other prudential requirements, imposing new restrictions on their activities and size, and insulating deposit banking from investment banking. Another important focus has been on developing new legal tools and banking structures that will make banks safe to fail without the need for government bailouts. This course will introduce students to the most important provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act and their counterparts around the world. It will also involve a lively debate (we hope) about whether the new regulations have made the system safer, what the tradeoffs are between safety and economic growth, and whether the new regulations strike the right balance. We will also discuss the next frontier of financial regulation and questions raised by financial technology and new entrants into financial services markets. The course will meet over three days: Thursday, October 8th from 6:25-9:05pm Friday, October 9th from 10:00-12:00pm and 3:10-6:10pm Saturday, October 10th from 9:00-12:00 and 1:30-4:10pm The instructors for this course are Randall Guynn and Jai Massari. Randy is a partner at Davis Polk & Wardwell and has been head of its Financial Institutions Group since 1994. He is widely regarded as one of the nation’s leading banking lawyers and a thought leader in financial regulatory reform. He was named the most highly regarded banking lawyer in the world in 2014 and 2017 by the International Who’s Who of Banking Lawyers and one of the 10 most innovative lawyers in the U.S. by the Financial Times in 2013. He is currently ranked as a star banking lawyer in Chambers USA. He has published several books and articles, most recently a book co-authored with U.K lawyer Simon Gleeson and published by Oxford University Press on solving the too-big-to-fail problem. He is also the editor of Regulation of Foreign Banks & Affiliates in the United States, soon to be in its 9th edition. He graduated from UVa law in 1984, and was a law clerk for Justice William H. Rehnquist and 9th Circuit Judge J. Clifford Wallace. Jai is Partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Davis Polk and is a member of its Financial Institutions Group and the Trading and Markets Practice. Since beginning her law practice in 2007, she has represented banking organizations, industry organizations, asset managers, and other financial market participants, focusing on financial regulatory reform. She also advises on the financial regulation of fintech activities, including payments and digital asset activities. Jai received her law degree from the Duke University School of Law. The course will meet over three days.

Fall 2021 Description:
The last several years have seen the fast rise of new entrants into the financial services markets: large and small technology companies seeking to provide financial services in innovative ways. At the same time, banks and other more traditional financial services providers are examining how their business models may be affected, for better or worse, by these new technologies. Policy makers and regulators are themselves considering how best to address new developments. Our course will examine these issues through the lens of financial regulatory policy and law. The course will be grounded in the fundamentals of financial regulation - monetary policy, financial stability, the promotion of safe and open markets, and consumer protection - and will explore these fundamentals in light of new fintech and financial services developments, ranging from new approaches to bank charters, changes how retail consumers trade in securities and commodity markets, and cryptocurrency and payments innovations. This course will take a case-study, interactive approach to developing these themes. It will involve a lively debate (we hope) about the goals of financial regulation, the approaches taken by policy makers and regulators to new developments, and whether and how financial regulation can be improved to promote economic growth, financial stability, and consumer protection. The course will meet over three days: Thursday, September 30th 6:25 PM - 9:05 PM Friday, October 1st 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM and 3:10 PM - 6:10 PM Saturday, October 2nd 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM and 1:30 PM - 4:10 PM The instructors for this course are Jai Massari and Randall Guynn. Jai is Partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Davis Polk and is a member of its Financial Institutions Group and the Trading and Markets Practice. She represents banking organizations, industry groups, asset managers, and other financial market participants, focusing on financial regulatory reform. Her practice more recently focuses on financial regulation of fintech activities, including payments and digital asset activities. She is ranked in Chambers for Fintech, Cryptocurrency & Blockchain and Financial Services Regulation. Jai received her law degree from the Duke University School of Law in 2007. Randy is a partner at Davis Polk & Wardwell and has been head of its Financial Institutions Group since 1994. He is widely regarded as one of the nation’s leading banking lawyers and a thought leader in financial regulatory reform. He was named the most highly regarded banking lawyer in the world in 2014 and 2017 by the International Who’s Who of Banking Lawyers and one of the 10 most innovative lawyers in the U.S. by the Financial Times in 2013. He is currently ranked as a star banking lawyer in Chambers USA. He has published several books and articles, most recently a book co-authored with U.K lawyer Simon Gleeson and published by Oxford University Press on solving the too-big-to-fail problem. He is also the editor of Regulation of Foreign Banks & Affiliates in the United States, soon to be in its 9th edition. He graduated from UVA law in 1984, and was a law clerk for Justice William H. Rehnquist and 9th Circuit Judge J. Clifford Wallace.

Fall 2022 Description:
The last several years have seen the fast rise of new entrants into the financial services markets: large and small technology companies and new types of financial companies seeking to provide financial services in innovative ways. At the same time, banks and other more traditional financial services providers are examining how their business models may be affected, for better or worse, by these new entrants and technologies. Policy makers and regulators are themselves considering how best to address new developments. Our course will examine these issues through the lens of financial regulatory policy and law. The course will be grounded in the fundamentals of financial regulation - monetary policy, financial stability, the promotion of safe and open markets, and consumer protection - and will explore these fundamentals in light of new fintech and financial services developments, ranging from new approaches to bank charters, changes how retail consumers trade in securities and commodity markets, and cryptocurrency and payments innovations. This course will take a case-study, interactive approach to developing these themes. It will involve a lively debate (we hope) about the goals of financial regulation, the approaches taken by policy makers and regulators to new developments, and whether and how financial regulation can be improved to promote economic growth, financial stability, and consumer protection. The course will meet over three days: Thursday, September 29 to Saturday, October 1. The instructors for this course are Jai Massari and Randall Guynn. Jai is partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Davis Polk and is a member of its Financial Institutions Group and the Trading and Markets Practice. She represents banking organizations, industry groups, asset managers, and other financial market participants, focusing on financial regulatory reform. Her practice more recently focuses on financial regulation of fintech activities, including payments and digital asset activities. She is ranked in Chambers for Fintech, Cryptocurrency & Blockchain and Financial Services Regulation. Jai received her law degree from the Duke University School of Law in 2007. Randy is a partner at Davis Polk & Wardwell and has been head of its Financial Institutions Group since 1994. He is widely regarded as one of the nation’s leading banking lawyers and a thought leader in financial regulatory reform. He was named the most highly regarded banking lawyer in the world in 2014 and 2017 by the International Who’s Who of Banking Lawyers and one of the 10 most innovative lawyers in the U.S. by the Financial Times in 2013. He is currently ranked as a star banking lawyer in Chambers USA. He has published several books and articles, most recently a book co-authored with U.K lawyer Simon Gleeson and published by Oxford University Press on solving the too-big-to-fail problem. He is also the editor of Regulation of Foreign Banks & Affiliates in the United States, soon to be in its 9th edition. He graduated from UVA law in 1984, and was a law clerk for Justice William H. Rehnquist and 9th Circuit Judge J. Clifford Wallace.


Law 250 Business Associations 3 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Spring 2022: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
In virtually every area of legal practice, some knowledge about the laws governing business organizations (and particularly corporations) proves helpful. This 4-unit survey course provides much of that orientation, examining the laws governing the modern business organization (with an emphasis on corporations). We will cover a number of topics, including rules of agency law, partnership law, corporate formation, corporate identity, rights of creditors, fiduciary duties, corporate governance, executive compensation, mergers and acquisitions and securities fraud. At core, this is a survey course, so many of the topics we will discuss also have specialized courses offering a more detailed treatment. Consequently, our key goal will be to understand the structure of each topic, and how the topics interrelate and in particular how corporate law regulates relationships among multiple different constituencies of the firm, including owners, managers, creditors, employees, customers, and suppliers. Viewed in this light, the governance of a corporation implicates the same challenges and concerns that affect any multi-party economic relationship, ranging from problems of collective action, free riding, private information, distribution and opportunism. The laws governing business organizations constitute an important set of rules, institutions, and practices that regulate and address these concerns. Business Associations is an upper level class which requires more self-sufficiency than a normal 1L class. 1L students will be permitted to take this course by application only. Students apply by emailing Professor Davidoff Solomon with why they wish to take the course in their 1-L year. Applications are due by January 8.

Fall 2020 Description:
This is a survey course introducing the basic principles of business law, including study of each of the main forms of business entities. The primary focus of the course will be corporate law, including the characteristics and organizational structure of corporations, and the rights and obligations of corporate shareholders, directors, and managers. The course will also introduce agency principles, and other business forms such as partnerships and limited liability companies. No background in business is required.

Spring 2021 Description:
This is a survey course introducing the basic principles of business law, including study of each of the main forms of business entities. The primary focus of the course will be corporate law, including the characteristics and organizational structure of corporations, and the rights and obligations of corporate shareholders, directors, and managers. The course will also introduce agency principles, and other business forms such as partnerships and limited liability companies. No background in business is required.

Fall 2021 Description:
This is a survey course introducing the basic principles of business law, including study of each of the main forms of business entities. The primary focus of the course will be corporate law, including the characteristics and organizational structure of corporations, and the rights and obligations of corporate shareholders, directors, and managers. The course will also introduce agency principles, and other business forms such as partnerships and limited liability companies. No background in business is required.

Spring 2022 Description:
In virtually every area of legal practice, some knowledge about the laws governing business organizations (and particularly corporations) proves helpful. This 4-unit survey course provides much of that orientation, examining the laws governing the modern business organization (with an emphasis on corporations). We will cover a number of topics, including rules of agency law, partnership law, corporate formation, corporate identity, rights of creditors, fiduciary duties, corporate governance, executive compensation, mergers and acquisitions and securities fraud. At core, this is a survey course, so many of the topics we will discuss also have specialized courses offering a more detailed treatment. Consequently, our key goal will be to understand the structure of each topic, and how the topics interrelate and in particular how corporate law regulates relationships among multiple different constituencies of the firm, including owners, managers, creditors, employees, customers, and suppliers. Viewed in this light, the governance of a corporation implicates the same challenges and concerns that affect any multi-party economic relationship, ranging from problems of collective action, free riding, private information, distribution and opportunism. The laws governing business organizations constitute an important set of rules, institutions, and practices that regulate and address these concerns.

Fall 2022 Description:
This is a survey course introducing the basic principles of business law, including study of each of the main forms of business entities. The primary focus of the course will be corporate law, including the characteristics and organizational structure of corporations, and the rights and obligations of corporate shareholders, directors, and managers. The course will also introduce agency principles, and other business forms such as partnerships and limited liability companies. No background in business is required.


Law 250S Business Associations 3 Units
Summer 2021: Hybrid
Summer 2022: In-Person
Description:
Summer 2021 Description:
In virtually every area of legal practice, some rudimentary knowledge about the laws governing business organizations (and particularly corporations) proves helpful. This survey course provides much of that orientation, examining the laws governing the modern business organization (with an emphasis on corporations). We will cover a number of topics, including rules of agency law, partnership law, corporate formation, corporate identity, rights of creditors, fiduciary duties, corporate governance, executive compensation, mergers and acquisitions and securities fraud. At core, this is a survey course, so many of the topics we will discuss also have specialized courses offering a more detailed treatment. Consequently, our key goal will be to understand the rudimentary structure of each topic, and how the topics interrelate and in particular how corporate law regulates relationships among multiple different constituencies of the firm, including owners, managers, creditors, employees, customers, and suppliers. Viewed in this light, the governance of a corporation implicates the same challenges and concerns that affect any multi-party economic relationship, ranging from problems of collective action, free riding, private information, distribution and opportunism. The laws governing business organizations constitute an important set of rules, institutions, and practices that regulate and address these concerns. This course is a prerequisite for Securities Regulation and Mergers and Acquisitions . This course will meet in-person on campus on July 1st, 2nd, 6th, 7th, and 8th in room 105.

Summer 2022 Description:
In virtually every area of legal practice, some knowledge about the laws governing business associations proves helpful. This survey course examines the laws governing the modern American business organization. We will cover a number of topics, including rules of agency law, partnership law (general partnerships, limited partnership, and limited liability partnerships), corporate law, and LLC law. For each type of business association, we will discuss its legal nature and the rules associated with formation, governance, fiduciary duties, and termination. This is a survey course, so many of the topics we will discuss also have specialized courses offering a more detailed treatment. Consequently, our main goal will be to understand the structure of each topic, how the topics interrelate, the role that organizational law plays in regulating relationships among the parties, and the ways in which it interacts with other areas of law.


Law 251.11 Topics in Corporate Governance: A Comparative Analysis of Israel and the US 1 Units
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2022 Description:
What vectors affect the behavior of business corporations? In law school, we tend to focus on corporate and securities laws. But in reality, corporate governance is also (indeed, very much so) a function of reputation concerns, media coverage, cultural norms, and the political environment. In this course we will look at these vectors in action in two different systems of corporate governance, namely, the U.S. and Israel. Tiny Israel is widely considered a global hub for innovation, leading the world in venture-capital investments per capita and startups per capita. But the so-called startup nation also suffers from problems in scaling-up, and from high degrees of economic concentration and a bevy of corporate governance debacles. What is it exactly in the American mix of laws, markets and morals that work differently than the Israeli mix? In the process of answering this question, we will dive into today’s most topical questions: can you hold directors personally accountable for not being attentive enough to increased societal demands (the “ESG” debate)? Are super-large corporations with market power ungovernable (the “anti-bigness” debate)? And so on. The course will be of interest not just to those keen on learning about the comparison between US and Israel, but also more generally to all those with interest in how business corporations operate and their role in, and impact on, society. Reading assignment for first session: watch the documentary film "Downfall: The Case Against Boeing More information about Professor Shapira is in his Faculty Profile.


Law 251.21 Business Strategy in the Global Political Economy 2 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This course, jointly listed in the Haas School of Business and Berkeley Law, focuses on how one should formulate and integrate market and nonmarket strategies in a complex global economy? What are the implications for firm strategies of the anti-globalization backlash? Most business strategy courses focus on the organization of the firm and analysis of the market environment within which companies operate. Yet an important element in pursuing competitive advantage is the ability of a firm to mold or influence the nonmarket business environment - the rules, regulations, domestic institutions, and international regimes that define the context of the market in which they operate. Many actors influence the nonmarket environment including governments, international organizations, the media, non-governmental organizations, and a host of activist groups. This nonmarket environment often determines the profit and loss opportunities for firms in many industries including biotechnology, telecommunications, the automobile industry, and consumer electronics - to name only a few. Firms that take the nonmarket environment as “given” often fall behind their competitors, despite having developed strategies for the market in which they operate. This course focuses on the development of tools to analyze the nonmarket environment of business and considers the policymaking process in the United States, Europe, Japan, China, India, and as well as other emerging markets. Topics include anti-globalization, domestic political institutions and policymaking, corporate political strategies, government regulation and deregulation, industrial policy, trade policymaking, and international institutions. The course focuses on a managerial approach to help executives and consultants design and implement complementary market and nonmarket strategies that will allow them to compete successfully in the global political economy. Grading: 25%: Class participation 25%: Write-up and presentation of a group case 50%: Papers should be no more than 4000 words including references (this works out to about 16 pages at 250 words a page). Bio of Instructor Vinod (Vinnie) Aggarwal is Travers Family Senior Faculty Fellow and Professor in the Travers Department of Political Science, Affiliated Professor at the Haas School of Business, and Director of the Berkeley Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation Study Center (BASC) at the University of California at Berkeley. He is also Editor-in-Chief of the journal Business and Politics. He has held fellowships from the Brookings Institution, Rockefeller Foundation, Council on Foreign Relations, East-West Center, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and was a Japan Foundation Abe Fellow. He has been a Visiting Professor at the Graduate Institute of International Studies in Geneva, the University of Geneva’s IOMBA program, INSEAD, Yonsei University, NTU Singapore, Bocconi University, Chung-Ang University, and the University of Hawaii. He is also an elected lifetime member of the Council on Foreign Relations and founding member of the U.S. Asia Pacific Council. Dr. Aggarwal consults regularly with multinational corporations and government agencies on strategy, trade policy, and international negotiations. In 1997, he won the Cheit Outstanding Teaching Award at the Haas School of Business for PhD teaching; in 2003 he was first runner up for the Cheit Award for MBA teaching and won first place for the MBA program in 2005. He is the author of 21 books and over 100 articles. His most recent book is Responding to the Rise of China. His current research examines comparative regionalism in Europe, North America, and Asia, comparative industrial policy in cybersecurity, disaster management, and the political economy of great power competition. Dr. Aggarwal received his B.A. from the University of Michigan and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Stanford University. Born in Seattle, Washington, he speaks five languages.

Spring 2021 Description:
This course, jointly listed in the Haas School of Business and Berkeley Law, focuses on how one should formulate and integrate market and nonmarket strategies in a complex global economy. What are the implications for firm strategies of the anti-globalization backlash? Most business strategy courses focus on the organization of the firm and analysis of the market environment within which companies operate. Yet an important element in pursuing competitive advantage is the ability of a firm to mold or influence the nonmarket business environment - the rules, regulations, domestic institutions, and international regimes that define the context of the market in which they operate. Many actors influence the nonmarket environment including governments, international organizations, the media, non-governmental organizations, and a host of activist groups. This nonmarket environment often determines the profit and loss opportunities for firms in many industries including biotechnology, telecommunications, the automobile industry, and consumer electronics - to name only a few. Firms that take the nonmarket environment as “given” often fall behind their competitors, despite having developed strategies for the market in which they operate. This course focuses on the development of tools to analyze the nonmarket environment of business and considers the policy making process in the United States, Europe, Japan, China, India, and as well as other emerging markets. Topics include anti-globalization, domestic political institutions and policymaking, corporate political strategies, government regulation and deregulation, industrial policy, trade policymaking, and international institutions. The course focuses on a managerial approach to help executives and consultants design and implement complementary market and nonmarket strategies that will allow them to compete successfully in the global political economy. Grading: 25%: Class participation 25%: Write-up and presentation of a group case 50%: Papers should be no more than 3500 words including references (this works out to about 14 pages at 250 words a page). Bio of Instructor Vinod (Vinnie) Aggarwal is Travers Family Senior Faculty Fellow and Professor in the Travers Department of Political Science, Affiliated Professor at the Haas School of Business, and Director of the Berkeley Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation Study Center (BASC) at the University of California at Berkeley. He is also Editor-in-Chief of the journal Business and Politics. He has held fellowships from the Brookings Institution, Rockefeller Foundation, Council on Foreign Relations, East-West Center, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and was a Japan Foundation Abe Fellow. He has been a Visiting Professor at the Graduate Institute of International Studies in Geneva, the University of Geneva’s IOMBA program, INSEAD, Yonsei University, NTU Singapore, Bocconi University, Chung-Ang University, and the University of Hawaii. He is also an elected lifetime member of the Council on Foreign Relations and founding member of the U.S. Asia Pacific Council. Dr. Aggarwal consults regularly with multinational corporations and government agencies on strategy, trade policy, and international negotiations. In 1997, he won the Cheit Outstanding Teaching Award at the Haas School of Business for PhD teaching; in 2003 he was first runner up for the Cheit Award for MBA teaching and won first place for the MBA program in 2005. He is the author of 21 books and over 120 articles. His most recent book is Responding to the Rise of China. His current research examines comparative regionalism in Europe, North America, and Asia, comparative industrial policy in cybersecurity, disaster management, and the political economy of great power competition. Dr. Aggarwal received his B.A. from the University of Michigan and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Stanford University. Born in Seattle, Washington, he speaks five languages.

Spring 2022 Description:
THIS COURSE WILL BE IN CHOU HALL 270 This course, jointly listed in the Haas School of Business and Berkeley Law, focuses on how one should formulate and integrate market and nonmarket strategies in a complex global economy. What are the implications for firm strategies of the anti-globalization backlash? Most business strategy courses focus on the organization of the firm and analysis of the market environment within which companies operate. Yet an important element in pursuing competitive advantage is the ability of a firm to mold or influence the nonmarket business environment - the rules, regulations, domestic institutions, and international regimes that define the context of the market in which they operate. Many actors influence the nonmarket environment including governments, international organizations, the media, non-governmental organizations, and a host of activist groups. This nonmarket environment often determines the profit and loss opportunities for firms in many industries including biotechnology, telecommunications, the automobile industry, and consumer electronics - to name only a few. Firms that take the nonmarket environment as “given” often fall behind their competitors, despite having developed strategies for the market in which they operate. This course focuses on the development of tools to analyze the nonmarket environment of business and considers the policy making process in the United States, Europe, Japan, China, India, and as well as other emerging markets. Topics include anti-globalization, domestic political institutions and policymaking, corporate political strategies, government regulation and deregulation, industrial policy, trade policymaking, and international institutions. The course focuses on a managerial approach to help executives and consultants design and implement complementary market and nonmarket strategies that will allow them to compete successfully in the global political economy. Grading: 25%: Class participation 25%: Write-up and presentation of a group case 50%: Papers should be no more than 3500 words including references (this works out to about 14 pages at 250 words a page). Bio of Instructor Vinod (Vinnie) Aggarwal is Travers Family Senior Faculty Fellow and Professor in the Travers Department of Political Science, Affiliated Professor at the Haas School of Business, and Director of the Berkeley Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation Study Center (BASC) at the University of California at Berkeley. He is also Editor-in-Chief of the journal Business and Politics. He has held fellowships from the Brookings Institution, Rockefeller Foundation, Council on Foreign Relations, East-West Center, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and was a Japan Foundation Abe Fellow. He has been a Visiting Professor at the Graduate Institute of International Studies in Geneva, the University of Geneva’s IOMBA program, INSEAD, Yonsei University, NTU Singapore, Bocconi University, Chung-Ang University, and the University of Hawaii. He is also an elected lifetime member of the Council on Foreign Relations and founding member of the U.S. Asia Pacific Council. Dr. Aggarwal consults regularly with multinational corporations and government agencies on strategy, trade policy, and international negotiations. In 1997, he won the Cheit Outstanding Teaching Award at the Haas School of Business for PhD teaching; in 2003 he was first runner up for the Cheit Award for MBA teaching and won first place for the MBA program in 2005. He is the author of 21 books and over 150 articles. His most recent book is Responding to the Rise of China. His current research examines comparative regionalism in Europe, North America, and Asia, comparative industrial policy in cybersecurity, high technology competition, and the political economy of great power competition. Dr. Aggarwal received his B.A. from the University of Michigan and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Stanford University. Born in Seattle, Washington, he speaks five languages.


Law 251.5 Corporate Finance 4 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Spring 2022: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
This course explores the financial and legal aspects of a fundamental question for business organizations: how does a firm raise money to finance its operations? In examining this question, the course takes both a theoretical and a practical perspective. As a matter of financial theory, how can a firm use its financial resources as well as various sources of outside financing to enhance its value to investors? Even a cursory look at the Wall Street Journal reveals that firms differ widely in how they choose to finance their operations and utilize their financial resources. Do these differing financial judgments have any systematic effect on the value of a firm? To answer this question, the class will survey modern financial economics and explore the techniques commonly used for understanding, assessing, and computing a firm's value. In addition, the course also examines the practical aspects of executing a particular financing decision. Once a financing strategy has been selected, it is generally left to the deal lawyers to implement it through financial contracts. This component of the course can therefore be thought of as a study in financial contracting strategies, with each strategy being shaped in large part by the type of financing technique used. Specific topics to be covered include: financial statement analysis, valuation, financing through common stock, debt, convertible/hybrid securities, and venture capital finance. The course includes quantitative concepts and exercises, and students. Access to Microsoft Excel is required for this course.

Fall 2020 Description:
Corporate Finance is an introductory finance course for law students. No prior background in finance or accounting (or law, for that matter) is required, but a willingness to work with numbers and financial data is crucial. The objective of the course is to supplement your legal training by introducing the fundamental theoretical principles of finance and of the practical environment in which financial decisions are made. We will cover the following topics: (1) an introduction to accounting terminology and financial statements (2) using financial statements to a) evaluate a company’s performance b) make projections about a company’s future (3) the theory and practice of capital structure decisions (4) using the concept of “discounting” a) to evaluate an investment opportunity b) to value a company (5) advanced topics in finance b) financial and real options c) mergers and acquisitions d) financial distress and bankruptcy e) initial public offerings (IPOs) f) venture capital g) leveraged buyouts The course will consist of approximately one-half lecture and one-half in-class case discussions, for which students should prepare carefully.

Spring 2021 Description:
This course explores the financial and legal aspects of a fundamental question for business organizations: how does a firm raise money to finance its operations? In examining this question, the course takes both a theoretical and a practical perspective. As a matter of financial theory, how can a firm use its financial resources as well as various sources of outside financing to enhance its value to investors? Even a cursory look at the Wall Street Journal reveals that firms differ widely in how they choose to finance their operations and utilize their financial resources. Do these differing financial judgments have any systematic effect on the value of a firm? To answer this question, the class will survey modern financial economics and explore the techniques commonly used for understanding, assessing, and computing a firm's value. In addition, the course also examines the practical aspects of executing a particular financing decision. Once a financing strategy has been selected, it is generally left to the deal lawyers to implement it through financial contracts. This component of the course can therefore be thought of as a study in financial contracting strategies, with each strategy being shaped in large part by the type of financing technique used. Specific topics to be covered include: financial statement analysis, valuation, financing through common stock, debt, convertible/hybrid securities, and venture capital finance. The course includes quantitative concepts and exercises. Access to Microsoft Excel is required for this course. This class is offered on a mandatory credit/no-credit basis.

Fall 2021 Description:
This course explores the financial and legal aspects of a fundamental question for business organizations: how does a firm raise money to finance its operations? In examining this question, the course takes both a theoretical and a practical perspective. As a matter of financial theory, how can a firm use its financial resources as well as various sources of outside financing to enhance its value to investors? Even a cursory look at the Wall Street Journal reveals that firms differ widely in how they choose to finance their operations and utilize their financial resources. Do these differing financial judgments have any systematic effect on the value of a firm? To answer this question, the class will survey modern financial economics and explore the techniques commonly used for understanding, assessing, and computing a firm's value. In addition, the course also examines the practical aspects of executing a particular financing decision. Once a financing strategy has been selected, it is generally left to the deal lawyers to implement it through financial contracts. This component of the course can therefore be thought of as a study in financial contracting strategies, with each strategy being shaped in large part by the type of financing technique used. Specific topics to be covered include: financial statement analysis, valuation, financing through common stock, debt, convertible/hybrid securities, and venture capital finance. The course includes quantitative concepts and exercises. Access to Microsoft Excel is required for this course. This class is offered on a mandatory credit/no-credit basis.

Spring 2022 Description:
Corporate Finance is an introductory finance course for law students. No prior background in finance or accounting (or law, for that matter) is required, but a willingness to work with numbers and financial data is crucial. The objective of the course is to supplement your legal training by introducing the fundamental theoretical principles of finance and of the practical environment in which financial decisions are made. We will cover the following topics: (1) an introduction to accounting terminology and financial statements (2) using financial statements to a) evaluate a company’s performance b) make projections about a company’s future (3) the theory and practice of capital structure decisions (4) using the concept of “discounting” a) to evaluate an investment opportunity b) to value a company (5) advanced topics in finance b) financial and real options c) mergers and acquisitions d) financial distress and bankruptcy e) initial public offerings (IPOs) f) venture capital g) leveraged buyouts The course will consist of approximately one-half lecture and one-half in-class case discussions, for which students should prepare carefully.

Fall 2022 Description:
Corporate Finance is an introductory finance course for law students. No prior background in finance or accounting (or law, for that matter) is required, but a willingness to work with numbers and financial data is crucial. The objective of the course is to supplement your legal training by introducing the fundamental theoretical principles of finance and of the practical environment in which financial decisions are made. We will cover the following topics: (1) an introduction to accounting terminology and financial statements (2) using financial statements to a) evaluate a company’s performance b) make projections about a company’s future (3) the theory and practice of capital structure decisions (4) using the concept of “discounting” a) to evaluate an investment opportunity b) to value a company (5) advanced topics in finance b) financial and real options c) mergers and acquisitions d) financial distress and bankruptcy e) initial public offerings (IPOs) f) venture capital g) leveraged buyouts The course will consist of approximately one-half lecture and one-half in-class case discussions, for which students should prepare carefully.


Law 251.51 Corporations in Crisis 1 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
There seems to be one headline-grabbing corporate crisis after the next in sectors from technology (Facebook), manufacturing (Volkswagon), and Finance (Wells Fargo). When a crisis hits, companies must develop a strategy that takes into account both legal and reputational risk. All too often, companies, even the largest and most iconic, don't have a crisis plan in place. This class will examine the role of different corporate actors (including the Board, CEO, General Counsel, and Chief Communications Officer) in navigating crisis. Through active simulations and case studies, students will learn how to ask the right questions. This course will be taught by: - Berkeley Law Director and Senior Research Fellow, Business in Society Institute(Amelia Miazad) - A corporate crisis communications expert (Aaron Zamost, Head of Communications & Policy at Square) - A general counsel (Dana Wagner, currently General Counsel of Impossible Foods, formerly General Counsel of Square)

Spring 2022 Description:
There seems to be one headline-grabbing corporate crisis after the next. When a crisis hits, companies must develop a strategy that takes into account both legal and reputational risk. All too often, companies, even the largest and most iconic, don't have a crisis plan in place. This class will examine the role of different corporate actors (including the Board, CEO, General Counsel, and Chief Communications Officer) in navigating crisis. Through active simulations and case studies, students will learn how to ask the right questions. This course will be taught by: - Berkeley Law Director and Senior Research Fellow, Business in Society Institute(Amelia Miazad) - A corporate crisis communications expert (Aaron Zamost, former Head of Communications & Policy at Square) - A general counsel (Dana Wagner, currently General Counsel of Impossible Foods, formerly General Counsel of Square)


Law 251.52 Economics of Corporate and Securities Litigation 1 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
This course provides an overview of the application of financial economics to the field of corporate and securities litigation. We will cover specific real-world case types including insider trading, investment advisor cherry-picking, 10b-5 disclosure violations, earnings announcements, merger and acquisition fairness opinion valuations, and valuation of corporate governance improvements. Common statistical techniques will be covered such as testing for statistical significance; explanations and definitions of trading volume, stock prices, and stock returns; use of event studies, regression analysis, and tests for abnormal stock returns, volume, and information leakage; application of Monte Carlo simulation; and various tests for market efficiency. This course assumes no prior experience with finance, economics, or statistics. This class will meet for 4 classes: Thursday, October 1 from 6:25-9:00pm Friday, October 2 from 10:00-12:00pm and 3:10-5:15pm Thursday, October 8 from 6:25-9:00pm Friday, October 9 from 10:00-12:00pm and 3:10-5:15pm Instructor Background: Dr. Matthew D. Cain is a Senior Fellow at the Berkeley Center for Law and Business, University of California. He has provided economic analysis, consulting, and expert witness testimony on behalf of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and other clients, including during investigations, settlement negotiations, and trials. He has experience in a variety of topic areas, including in cases alleging insider trading, foreign bribery, accounting fraud, investment advisor cherry-picking, mutual fund conflicts and violations, disclosure violations, improper valuations, and broker-dealer conflicts. Dr. Cain spent several years working at the SEC, where he served as an advisor to Commissioner Robert J. Jackson, Jr. He also worked as a Financial Economist in the Office of Litigation Economics, part of the Division of Economic and Risk Analysis. Prior to working with the SEC, Dr. Cain was an Assistant Professor of Finance in the Mendoza College of Business at the University of Notre Dame. He holds a Ph.D. in Finance from Purdue University, and prior to academia he worked as a capital markets analyst, assisting companies with capital raisings in relation to M&A and other corporate purposes.

Fall 2021 Description:
This course provides an overview of the application of financial economics to the field of corporate and securities litigation. We will cover specific real-world case types including insider trading, investment advisor cherry-picking, 10b-5 disclosure violations, earnings announcements, merger and acquisition fairness opinion valuations, and valuation of corporate governance improvements. Common statistical techniques will be covered such as testing for statistical significance; explanations and definitions of trading volume, stock prices, and stock returns; use of event studies, regression analysis, and tests for abnormal stock returns, volume, and information leakage; application of Monte Carlo simulation; and various tests for market efficiency. This course assumes no prior experience with finance, economics, or statistics. This class will meet over three days: Thursday, August 26th 6:25 PM - 9:05 PM Friday, August 27th 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM and 3:10 PM - 5:30 PM Saturday, August 28th 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM and 2:10 PM - 5:10 PM Instructor Background: Dr. Matthew D. Cain is a Senior Fellow at the Berkeley Center for Law and Business, University of California. He has provided economic analysis, consulting, and expert witness testimony on behalf of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and other clients, including during investigations, settlement negotiations, and trials. He has experience in a variety of topic areas, including in cases alleging insider trading, foreign bribery, accounting fraud, investment advisor cherry-picking, mutual fund conflicts and violations, disclosure violations, improper valuations, and broker-dealer conflicts. Dr. Cain spent several years working at the SEC, where he served as an advisor to Commissioner Robert J. Jackson, Jr. He also worked as a Financial Economist in the Office of Litigation Economics, part of the Division of Economic and Risk Analysis. Prior to working with the SEC, Dr. Cain was an Assistant Professor of Finance in the Mendoza College of Business at the University of Notre Dame. He holds a Ph.D. in Finance from Purdue University, and prior to academia he worked as a capital markets analyst, assisting companies with capital raisings in relation to M&A and other corporate purposes.

Fall 2022 Description:
This course provides an overview of the application of financial economics to the field of corporate and securities litigation. We will cover specific real-world case types including insider trading, investment advisor cherry-picking, 10b-5 disclosure violations, earnings announcements, merger and acquisition fairness opinion valuations, and valuation of corporate governance improvements. Common statistical techniques will be covered such as testing for statistical significance; explanations and definitions of trading volume, stock prices, and stock returns; use of event studies, regression analysis, and tests for abnormal stock returns, volume, and information leakage; application of Monte Carlo simulation; and various tests for market efficiency. This course assumes no prior experience with finance, economics, or statistics. Instructor Background: Dr. Matthew D. Cain is a Senior Fellow at the Berkeley Center for Law and Business, University of California. He has provided economic analysis, consulting, and expert witness testimony on behalf of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and other clients, including during investigations, settlement negotiations, and trials. He has experience in a variety of topic areas, including in cases alleging insider trading, foreign bribery, accounting fraud, investment advisor cherry-picking, mutual fund conflicts and violations, disclosure violations, improper valuations, and broker-dealer conflicts. Dr. Cain spent several years working at the SEC, where he served as an advisor to Commissioner Robert J. Jackson, Jr. He also worked as a Financial Economist in the Office of Litigation Economics, part of the Division of Economic and Risk Analysis. Prior to working with the SEC, Dr. Cain was an Assistant Professor of Finance in the Mendoza College of Business at the University of Notre Dame. He holds a Ph.D. in Finance from Purdue University, and prior to academia he worked as a capital markets analyst, assisting companies with capital raisings in relation to M&A and other corporate purposes.


Law 251.53 Corporate Culture 1 Units
Fall 2021: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2021 Description:
It is widely agreed that corporate culture is an important driver of business value. Policymakers often point to dysfunctional corporate culture in banking as a first order contributor to the financial crisis, and blame toxic cultures for egregious behavior in recent years at firms like VW, Toshiba, Uber, and Pinterest. At the same time, a central theme in legal and economic research is the quest for institutions that promote sustainable growth and superior performance. Building on a broader literature on corporate institutions, students will examine corporate culture through the lens of an informal institution. Students will examine the element of purposeful design inherent in culture and learn how differences in espoused and lived cultural values are associated with various business outcomes. Finally, students will examine how companies can achieve meaningful culture change and meet the evolving regulatory and stakeholder expectations for a lived culture that permeates ethics and compliance. Professor Grennan will be visiting UC-Berkeley for the 2021-2022 academic year from Duke University, where she is an Assistant Professor of Finance at the Fuqua School of Business. She was awarded Fuqua’s excellence in teaching award in 2017. Professor Grennan’s academic interests span corporate finance, law, and innovation. Her research focuses on sustainable value creation and emphasizes the role corporate culture and governance have in its creation. For companies to fully embrace sustainable objectives, they need new tools. To that end, Grennan's research offers novel computational techniques for quantifying the value of corporate culture. Her research has been featured in numerous news outlets including the Wall Street Journal, Forbes, and Fortune and has been awarded the Cubist Systematic Strategies Research Award, the Thomas Edison Innovation Award, and twice the Best Paper in Corporate Governance Award by the Investor Responsibility Research Center Institute. Professor Grennan received her Ph.D. from The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, an M.A. from Georgetown University, and a B.A. from Wellesley College.


Law 251.5S Corporate Finance 3 Units
Summer 2021: Hybrid
Summer 2022: In-Person
Description:
Summer 2021 Description:
This course explores the financial and legal aspects of a fundamental question for business organizations: how does a firm raise money to finance its operations? In examining this question, the course takes both a theoretical and a practical perspective. As a matter of financial theory, how can a firm use its financial resources as well as various sources of outside financing to enhance its value to investors? We will survey modern financial economics and explore the techniques commonly used for understanding, assessing, and computing a firm's value. In addition, the course also examines the practical aspects of executing a particular financing decision to provide insight into financial contracting strategies. This course will meet in-person on campus on July 28th, July 29th, July 30th, August 2nd, and August 3rd in room 105.

Summer 2022 Description:
This course explores the financial and legal aspects of a fundamental question for business organizations: how does a firm raise money to finance its operations? In examining this question, the course takes both a theoretical and a practical perspective. As a matter of financial theory, how can a firm use its financial resources as well as various sources of outside financing to enhance its value to investors? We will survey modern financial economics and explore the techniques commonly used for understanding, assessing, and computing a firm's value. In addition, the course also examines the practical aspects of executing a particular financing decision to provide insight into financial contracting strategies.


Law 251.7 Business in Society 3 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
Society’s expectations of companies are changing, and companies are responding. Many companies today go beyond compliance with the law to implement policies in line with the values of their employees, customers, and other stakeholders. An increasing number are engaging in activities that were traditionally conducted by governments and nonprofits. This new articulation of corporate purpose raises complex legal, ethical, and business questions. In this course we will explore the unique and increasingly central role that legal and compliance professionals are playing in this landscape. This class is taught using the case study method, common in business schools. Each week we will analyze a case study on a particular company and will have an opportunity to discuss that case study with the general counsel or chief compliance officer from that company. The companies we will examine include: Salesforce, Patagonia, Nike, Uber, Lyft, Pepsi, Amazon, ClifBar, and Clorox, among others. The issues we will address include: - The shareholder/stakeholder debate - The risks and opportunities of engaging on political issues, from gun violence prevention to immigration - The increasing trend of CEOs as “moral leaders” - How employees are leveraging their voice to advocate for corporate governance reforms and whether employees should have representation on the board - The private sector’s responsibility to address income inequality through executive compensation reform - The duty of companies/directors to mitigate and disclose the risk of climate change - Corporate tax strategy and alignment and misalignment with public positions on environmental and social issues - Gender and racial equity and business strategy, including social due diligence For the past few years this course has been taught during a bull market, which afforded many companies with the luxury of resourcing environmental and social programs. Given the recent turn of events, and the real tradeoffs that companies are facing, the fate of this new articulation of corporate purpose is in peril. Will companies “build back better” and be guided by a focus on stakeholders? Or will they retreat to an even more aggressive version of short-term profit maximization? What is the role of regulators and investors at this juncture? These are the questions that we will explore with leading general counsel who are facing them for the first time.

Fall 2021 Description:
Society’s expectations of companies are changing, and companies are responding. Many companies today go beyond compliance with the law to implement policies in line with the values of their employees, customers, and other stakeholders. An increasing number are engaging in activities that were traditionally conducted by governments and nonprofits. This new articulation of corporate purpose raises complex legal, ethical, and business questions. In this course we will explore the unique and increasingly central role that legal and compliance professionals are playing in this landscape. This class is taught using the case study method, common in business schools. Each week we will analyze a case study on a particular company and will have an opportunity to discuss that case study with the general counsel or chief compliance officer from that company. The companies we will examine include: Salesforce, Patagonia, Nike, Uber, Lyft, Pepsi, Amazon, ClifBar, and Clorox, among others. The issues we will address include: - The shareholder/stakeholder debate - The risks and opportunities of engaging on political issues, from gun violence prevention to immigration - The increasing trend of CEOs as “moral leaders” - How employees are leveraging their voice to advocate for corporate governance reforms and whether employees should have representation on the board - The private sector’s responsibility to address income inequality through executive compensation reform - The duty of companies/directors to mitigate and disclose the risk of climate change - Corporate tax strategy and alignment and misalignment with public positions on environmental and social issues - Gender and racial equity and business strategy, including social due diligence For the past few years this course has been taught during a bull market, which afforded many companies with the luxury of resourcing environmental and social programs. Given the recent turn of events, and the real tradeoffs that companies are facing, the fate of this new articulation of corporate purpose is in peril. Will companies “build back better” and be guided by a focus on stakeholders? Or will they retreat to an even more aggressive version of short-term profit maximization? What is the role of regulators and investors at this juncture? These are the questions that we will explore with leading general counsel who are facing them for the first time.

Fall 2022 Description:
We are currently experiencing a revolutionary period in business and corporate history. For the first time in decades academics, boards of directors, management teams and investors are beginning to reconsider and redefine corporate purpose and think differently and more expansively about the way business should be conducted. Importantly, this inquiry is not occurring in isolation - it is being influenced by demands of a changing society and influencing how we think about and seek to address foundational economic and social challenges and politics that have rendered government institutions less effective. Corporations have traditionally served the purpose of attracting and assembling capital, creating jobs and scale, driving economic growth, and maximizing long-term shareholder value. Driven by the need for more efficient and equitable capital markets, Milton Friedman presented a case in the 70’s that the sole purpose of a corporation was to increase its profits and, until recently, corporations practiced this philosophy universally and exclusively. But, with the advent of the systemic challenges presented by globalization, climate change, racial injustice and income and opportunity inequality, the increasing concentration of economic power, and the acute polarization of politics, corporations are being challenged to play an expanded role in society. Indeed, some companies are stepping into this role unprompted. This course will begin by establishing the context and evolution of corporate purpose, review and evaluate the current state of affairs, and introduce, distinguish and evaluate the concept of stakeholder capitalism. We will explore how different actors and forces in society such as capital markets, the antitrust law regime, the interests of increasingly diverse shareholders, customers, employees and other stakeholders are influencing the evolution of corporate purpose. In the process we will discuss the interplay between business and government and the impact on, and the opportunities and responsibilities created for business as government becomes increasingly less able to address those systemic challenges and the needs of society. And finally, the course will explore the issues corporations are grappling with in real time, and the economic policies, laws and business practices needed to address those issues and challenges faced by society. NOTE: Attendance at the first class is mandatory for all currently enrolled and waitlisted students; any currently enrolled or waitlisted students who are not present on the first day of class (without prior permission of the instructor) may be dropped without notice. The instructor can continue to take attendance throughout the add/drop period and anyone who moves off the waitlist into the class must continue to attend or have prior permission of the instructor in order not to risk being dropped without notice. Bios Angeli Patel is an attorney in the Sustainability & ESG Advisory Practice at Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP where she advises clients on climate change and social risks. Previously, Angeli held advisory roles at the Obama White House, the UN Global Compact Network Australia, and the Government of Chile's Ministry of Finance. Angeli received her J.D. from UC Berkeley, School of Law and B.S. in International Affairs from the Georgia Institute of Technology. In her free time, Angeli enjoys exercise, fiction reading, travel and movies. Steve Johnson is an Executive Vice President of American Airlines Group Inc. and, during his career in the airline industry, has had responsibility for corporate and legal affairs, corporate governance and sustainability, government and regulatory affairs, labor relations, and real estate development and operations and advised on strategy development and strategic positioning, economics and competition issues. Earlier, Steve was a partner at Indigo Partners LLC, a private equity firm, served as Senior Vice President and General Counsel at GPA Group PLC, a financial services company based in Shannon, Ireland, and practiced corporate law at the Seattle-based firm Bogle & Gates. Steve is a member of the board of directors of Wizz Air Holdings PLC, a Lecturer at Haas and Berkeley Law, and earned his JD and MBA at UC Berkeley.


Law 251.71 Business Basics for Lawyers 2 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
The course is intended to allow law students to understand business from an overview, rather than a transactional, level. Topics will include business stages, different business models, variance across industries, current business theories and topics, and business basics. This material will allow lawyers to move beyond basing practice on transactions. For students who will be pursuing opportunities in the private sector, this course will enhance and extend their role in the value creation process. For those pursuing careers in litigation, regulation, and enforcement, this course will deepen their understanding of underlying business issues. An emphasis will be placed on current topics and real-life examples.

Spring 2021 Description:
The course is intended to allow law students to understand business from an overview level. Topics will include business basics, corporate evolution, different business models, variance across industries and current business theories and topics. This material will allow legal practitioners to move beyond basing practice on transactions. In the event of pursuing opportunities in the private sector, this will enhance and extend their role in the value creation process and for those pursuing careers in judiciary, regulation or enforcement, outcomes should be more easily reached with better results.

Spring 2022 Description:
The course is intended to allow law students to understand business from an overview level. Topics will include business basics, corporate evolution, different business models, variance across industries and current business theories and topics. This material will allow legal practitioners to move beyond basing practice on transactions. In the event of pursuing opportunities in the private sector, this will enhance and extend their role in the value creation process and for those pursuing careers in judiciary, regulation or enforcement, outcomes should be more easily reached with better results.


Law 251.72 The Court of Public Opinion: Storytelling for Corporate Lawyers 1 Units
Spring 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2020 Description:
NOTE: This class will be highly interactive. Please only enroll if you are prepared to be an active participant. Good communications skills have always been a critical part of successful legal counsel. This is especially true in companies, where in-house counsel must partner with their Corporate Communications colleagues to buttress legal arguments with compelling storytelling related to litigation, mergers and acquisitions, crises, and policy issues. And they must do so while addressing varied audiences, including the media, regulators, internal stakeholders, and others. This class will explore the relationship between the legal profession and its more-public counterparts in successfully telling stories that advance the interests of clients.

Fall 2021 Description:
NOTE: This class will be highly interactive. Please only enroll if you are prepared to be an active participant. Good communications skills have always been a critical part of successful lawyering. This is especially true in companies, where in-house counsel must partner with their corporate communications colleagues to buttress legal arguments with compelling storytelling related to litigation, mergers and acquisitions, finance, crises, and policy issues. And they must do so while addressing varied audiences, including the media, regulators, Wall Street, and others. This class will explore the relationship between the legal profession and its more-public counterparts in successfully telling stories that advance the interests of clients.

Fall 2022 Description:
NOTE: This class will be highly interactive. Please only enroll if you are prepared to be an active participant. Good communications skills have always been a critical part of successful lawyering. This is especially true in companies, where in-house counsel must partner with their corporate communications colleagues to buttress legal arguments with compelling storytelling related to litigation, mergers and acquisitions, finance, crises, and policy issues. And they must do so while addressing varied audiences, including the media, regulators, Wall Street, and others. This class will explore the relationship between the legal profession and its more-public counterparts in successfully telling stories that advance the interests of clients.


Law 251.73 Being General Counsel 3 Units
Fall 2020: Remote due to COVID
Fall 2021: In-Person
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2020 Description:
This course will dive deep into the role of general counsel. We’ll look at what a GC does every day, who they work with and what types of issues come across their desks, including an array of social and political issues. Through lecture, readings and a series of exercises, students will learn who the GC is accountable to, how they act as a corporate leader and strategist, and what qualities world-class general counsels share. We will also focus on the human aspects of the role - how does a GC deal with individual and organizational issues, manage through crisis events, layoffs, and other difficult conversations, how do they work with outside counsel, how and when should the GC do what’s right, even when it’s not popular. Grading 1. Class participation in discussions, exercises and role plays 2. Written evaluation of scenarios and self-reflective analysis of performance and alternatives Instructors • Mark LeHocky, retired public company general counsel (Dreyer's Grand Ice Cream, Inc.; Ross Stores, Inc.); Mediator and Arbitrator; and adjunct professor at Haas Graduate School of Business (MBA 275: Managing the Legal Environment of Business). JD, Berkeley Law. See http://www.marklehocky.com. • Seth Jaffe, Executive Vice President and General Counsel, Levi Strauss & Co.; formerly general counsel to William-Sonoma, Inc.; and formerly practicing at the McCutchen law firm in San Francisco. JD, Michigan School of Law. See http://www.levistrauss.com/who-we-are/leadership/seth-jaffe/.

Fall 2021 Description:
This course takes a deep dive into the role of general counsel and their work with internal and external clients and colleagues. We look at what a GC does every day and what types of issues come across their desks, including an array of business, social and political issues. Through guest presentations, lecture, readings and a series of exercises, students learn who the GC is accountable to, their role as a corporate leader and strategist, and what qualities world-class general counsels share. We also address the behavioral science impacting decision-making, communications issues, and the human aspects of the role. This includes how a GC deals with individual and organizational issues, manages through crisis events, layoffs, and other difficult conversations, how to assess and work with outside counsel, and how to address the legal and ethical issues around doing what’s right, even when it’s not popular. We also look at the various career paths toward becoming a general counsel. Grading 1. Class participation in discussions, exercises and simulations 2. Written, oral, and video evaluations of scenarios and presentation of alternatives and advice, including self-reflective analysis Instructors • Mark LeHocky, Former public company general counsel (Dreyer's Grand Ice Cream, Inc.; Ross Stores, Inc.); Mediator and Arbitrator; and Adjunct Faculty at Haas Graduate School of Business. JD, Berkeley Law. See http://www.marklehocky.com. • Seth Jaffe, Executive Vice President and General Counsel, Levi Strauss & Co.; formerly general counsel to William-Sonoma, Inc.; and formerly practicing at the McCutchen law firm in San Francisco. JD, University of Michigan Law School. See http://www.levistrauss.com/who-we-are/leadership/seth-jaffe/.

Fall 2022 Description:
This course will dive deep into the role of general counsel. We’ll look at what a general counsel (GC) does every day, who they work with and what types of issues come across their desks, including an array of social and political issues. Through lecture, readings and a series of exercises, students will learn to whom the GC is accountable, how they act as a corporate leader and strategist, and what qualities world-class general counsels share. We will also focus on the human aspects of the role - how a GC deal with individual and organizational issues; how they manage through crisis events, layoffs, and have difficult and courageous conversations; what group and individual behaviors and psychological issues they face; how they work with outside counsel; and how and when should the GC do what’s right, even when it’s unpopular. We also look at the various career paths toward becoming a general counsel. The course objectives are to: Understand the role and responsibilities of the modern GC and how it differs from private practice, and critical skill sets for attorneys seeking to become and work with GCs as well as those wishing to be hired and retained by GCs Map a path toward a future GC position Experiential learning to deal with the issues, challenges and nuances of the role Apply behavioral science data and expertise to optimize individual and group relationships, manage difficult conversations with internal teams and outside counsel and the emotional aspects of the role Review successful and unsuccessful examples of GCs prioritizing work, managing critical issues and handling crisis events. Grading 1. Class participation in discussions, exercises and simulations 2. Written, oral, and video evaluations of scenarios and presentation of alternatives and advice, including self-reflective analysis Instructors •Seth Jaffe, Executive Vice President and General Counsel, Levi Strauss & Co.; former general counsel of William-Sonoma, Inc. and CareThere, Inc.; and formerly practicing at the McCutchen law firm in San Francisco. JD, University of Michigan Law School. See a href=http://www.levistrauss.com/who-we-are/leadership/seth-jaffe/ http://www.levistrauss.com/who-we-are/leadership/seth-jaffe//a. • Mark LeHocky, Former public company general counsel (Dreyer's Grand Ice Cream, Inc.; Ross Stores, Inc.); Mediator and Arbitrator; and Adjunct Faculty at Haas Graduate School of Business. JD, Berkeley Law. See a href=http://www.marklehocky.com http://www.marklehocky.com/a.


Law 251.74 Corporate Social Responsibility and Social Entrepreneurship 2 Units
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2022 Description:
This class will critically evaluate the law and policies underlying recent developments that have allowed or required firms to take on a more active role in social and environmental issues. The class covers a range of topics, including the economic structure of nonprofit firms, the debate on corporate purpose and the profit-maximization norm, the rise of ESG investing, the proliferation of new legal hybrid forms, recent developments in the law of managerial fiduciary duties, the role of microfinance and fair trade in promoting development, and tax and subsidy policies to encourage corporations to pursue social goals, including the recent Opportunity Zone program. The inquiry will focus primarily on what types of structures best align investors’ interest in profit-making with different social purposes.


Law 251.75 Climate Change and Corporate Governance Reform 1 Units
Fall 2022: In-Person
Description:
Fall 2022 Description:
This course will focus on Climate Change - from the perspective of compliance, financing and governance. COMPLIANCE. We will evaluate the current (and rapidly changing) regulatory framework for GHG emissions, including voluntary (SASB, GRI, ISSB) and required (SEC) disclosure and the steps that companies and investors must take to meet net zero and carbon neutral targets. We will study carbon off-sets and insets, exploring how environmental attributes are being valued, verified and commoditized. We will also review how companies and investors evaluate climate risk using climate risk scenarios and investigate which of the tools introduced by the Task Force for Climate Related Financial Disclosure are most effective in achieving climate goals. We will examine green-washing and associated risks from employees, shareholders, customers, regulators and NGOs. CLIMATE FINANCE. The United Nations estimates that $1.5T per year must be invested in climate solutions and infrastructure to have any hope of meeting the 1.5C goal set by the Paris Climate Accord. What are the legal tools available to investors and companies that will help in ensuring that capital dedicated to the goals actually reduces emissions? We will explore new forms for aggregating capital for climate as well as mechanisms that can be employed by asset managers to align financial with climate goals. We will examine the various types of securities - from green bonds to performance-linked bonds to pay -for performance impact securities - that are being employed in this space. GOVERNANCE. Finally, we will do a deep dive into corporate governance as a driver of value but more importantly as a driver of climate solutions. We will discuss how boards are - and should be - considering climate change in exercising their oversight over management and operations. We will explore the tools available to management, including golden shares, side car public charities, partnership arrangements and licensing models and impact-linked compensation. And we will consider the rise of the public benefit corporation - with dual fiduciary duties - and stakeholder activism - as agents for change.


Law 251.9 Venture Funds: Structuring, Advising and Regulating 2 Units
Spring 2021: Remote due to COVID
Spring 2022: In-Person
Description:
Spring 2021 Description:
This course will introduce students to U.S. legal and regulatory issues relating to venture capital funds and venture capital fund managers. Among other things, the course will cover venture capital fund structuring and formation; the exclusions from I