Visiting Scholars & Research Fellows

Senior Research Fellows

Human Rights Center Research Fellows

 

Senior Research Fellows

CPBlum headshotCarolyn Patty Blum serves as Senior Legal Adviser to the Center for Justice and Accountability on the Spanish case concerning the 1989 massacre of six Jesuit priests in El Salvador. Professor Blum is a Clinical Professor of Law Emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley, where she founded and directed the International Human Rights Law Clinic. She is a Visiting Clinical Professor of Law at Cardozo School of Law, where she also serves as interim director of the Cardozo Law Institute in Holocaust and Human Rights, and a Visiting Fellow at the University of Oxford. Her areas of expertise and publication are refugee law, transitional justice and accountability, human rights and national security, and human rights and film; in addition, she has litigated dozens of asylum and human rights cases. She holds a JD from Northeastern University.

Charles H. Brenner has been a world leader in calculation of statistical significance for DNA testing since 1977. He received his PhD in Number Theory from UCLA in 1984. The International Commission on Missing Persons uses his DNA software (DNA-VIEW) for assessing the significance of matches. This software is used in 50 laboratories in four continents. Dr. Brenner is widely published in leading forensic science and human genetics journals on both DNA matters and paternity attribution. He is actively involved as a consultant in aspects of the identification of the World Trade Center and tsunami victims.

Sarah Freedman headshotSarah Warshauer Freedman is Professor in the Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Berkeley. She served as Co-Principal Investigator on “Education for Reconciliation: Building a History Curriculum after Genocide,” a project with the National University of Rwanda. Dr. Freedom is a member of the National Academy of Education (NAEd), a fellow of the American Eduational Research Association, and an associate of the National Conference for Research in the Language Arts. She has served as an adviser for many groups, including the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, the National Assessment of Educational Progress, and the Children’s Television Workshop. She has been a fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences and at the Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Study and Conference Center. In recent years, she has added an emphasis on social studies, studying the Role of Education in Reconstructing Societies after Genocide in Rwanda and the former Yugoslavia. Her current research in the divided societies of Northern Ireland, South Africa, and the US is funded by a multi-year award from the Spencer Foundation and involves a partnership with Facing History and Ourselves.

V.Iacopino headshotVincent Iacopino, MD, PhD, is Medical Director at Physicians for Human Rights (PHR) and Adjunct Professor of Medicine with the University of Minnesota Medical School. He has participated in health and human rights research, investigations and advocacy for more than twenty years. Dr. Iacopino has represented PHR and/or supervised medical fact-finding investigations to Afghanistan, Albania, Botswana, Burma, Chad, Chechyna, Iraq, Kashmir, Kosovo, Kyrgyzystan, Macedonia, Kosovo, Macedonia, Mexico, Nigeria, Punjab, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Swaziland, Sudan, Tajikistan, Thailand, Turkey, the United States, and Zimbabwe, and documented the health consequences of a wide range of human rights violations. He is the former Medical Director of Survivors International of Northern California, a non-profit organization providing medical and psychological assistance to survivors of torture from around the world. Dr. Iacopino was the principal organizer of an international effort to develop UN guidelines on effective investigation and documentation of torture and ill treatment (the Istanbul Protocol) and has served as a consultant to the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. He has been one of the pioneers in conceptualizing the relationship between health and human rights. He has taught health and human rights courses at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health since 1995 and is the author of more than sixty health and human rights publications. In 2004, Dr. Iacopino received the Center for Victims of Torture’s Eclipse Award for extraordinary service on behalf of torture survivors. In 2005, he also received the Distinguished Alumni Award from the Department of Medicine of the University of Minnesota.

COrrego headshotCristián Orrego Benavente, PhD, is a forensic expert working in San Salvador, El Salvador, and the former director of the Forensic Program at the Human Rights Center. He is a biochemist and forensic geneticist who served as Assistant Laboratory Director and Criminalist Supervisor at the California Department of Justice, Jan Bashinski DNA Laboratory in Richmond, California, prior to his appointment at the Human Rights Center. Dr. Orrego is a founding member of the volunteer organization, the Alliance of Forensic Scientists for Human Rights and Humanitarian Investigations which has worked closely with HRC since 2003 on the El Salvador DNA Reunification Project. Orrego was appointed Science Advisor to the Presidential Commission on Policies for Human Rights of the Government of Chile in May 2006, and subsequently, member of an International Commission of Experts for the Legal Medical Service, Ministry of Justice, Government of Chile, from May 2007 to February 2010. His involvement in enhancing the scientific capacity of NGOs involved in the defense of human rights dates back to 1984 when he was a member of the Committee on Scientific Freedom and Responsibility of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

GPerress headshotGilles Peress is an internationally renowned photographer and recipient of the 1996 International Center of Photography Infinity Award among many others. He has been with Magnum Photos, the prestigious photography agency founded by Robert Capa, since 1971. His photographs are exhibited in and collected by the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Chicago Art Institute; and the Minneapolis Institute of Art, among others. His books include Telex Iran: In the Name of the Revolution, The Silence, Farewell to Bosnia, The Graves: Srebrenica and Vukovar (with Eric Stover), and A Village Destroyed, May 14, 1999: War Crimes in Kosovo (with Fred Abrahams and Eric Stover).

Bio pic, Victor PeskinVictor Peskin, PhD, is an Associate Professor in the School of Politics and Global Studies at Arizona State University. He is the author of International Justice in Rwanda and the Balkans: Virtual Trials and the Struggle for State Cooperation (2008), which examined the conditions under which states implicated in atrocities cooperate with international tribunals. Professor Peskin is also co-author (with Eric Stover and Alexa Koenig) of Hiding in Plain Sight: The Pursuit of War Criminals from Nuremberg to the War on Terror (2016). His current work builds on this project by examining the political and legal dimensions of the International Criminal Court.

HReyes headshot.Hernán Reyes, MD, is former medical coordinator for Health in Prisons for the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), a post he occupied from 1984–2012. A graduate of Geneva University Medical School (Switzerland), with a doctorate in Medicine and FMH specialization in Obstetrics and Gynaecology (Foederatio Medicorum Helveticorum: Swiss medical federation), he joined the ICRC in 1982 as medical doctor, specifically for health activities related to persons in custody. Dr. Reyes documented prison health as well as ill-treatment, human rights violations, and torture for the ICRC in more than 45 countries around the world during his 28 years with the institution Dr. Reyes has taught two generations of ICRC medical staff on health in prison issues, torture and its consequences, solitary confinement and other forms of abuse, on management and mismanagement of hunger strikes, and many other related subjects. Since 1991, he has been medical Observer for the ICRC to the World Medical Association (WMA) and its Ethics Committee, working closely with the WMA on many ethical issues of concern in prisons.

Patricia Viseur Sellers is an international criminal attorney and a special advisor for prosecution strategies to the prosecutor of the International Criminal Court. Ms. Sellers is also a Visiting Fellow at Kellogg College of Oxford University, where she lectures on international criminal law. She was the Legal Advisor for Gender, Acting Head of the Legal Advisory Section and a prosecutor at the Yugoslav (ICTY) Tribunal from 1994 until February 2007.  She developed the legal strategies and was a member of the trial teams of Akayesu, Furundzija, and Kunarac. These landmark decisions remain the pre-imminent legal standards for the interpretation of sexual violence as war crimes, crimes against humanity, genocide, torture and enslavement. She has served as a legal advisor and a trial attorney at the International Criminal Tribunals in the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda. She has also served as an expert consultant to UN bodies addressing children and armed conflict, gender and women’s rights, and internal investigations. Ms. Sellers advises governments, such as Colombia, Guatemala, Libya, and Kenya, international institutions, such as the UN and OSCE, and civil society organisations on international criminal law and humanitarian law. Ms. Sellers has lectured extensively and authored many articles on gender and sexual violence under international criminal law. She has received multiple awards for her work, including the American Society of International Law’s Prominent Women in Law award. She holds a JD from the University of Pennsylvania and a BA from Rutgers University.

HWeinstein headshotHarvey Weinstein, MD, MPH, is a retired Clinical Professor in the School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley. From 1998 to 2005, Dr. Weinstein was Associate Director of the Human Rights Center, where he directed the Forced Migration and Health Project. He worked in the Balkans (Bosnia-Herzegovina, Serbia, and Croatia) and Rwanda for more than five years. He was Co-Principal Investigator on three recent projects: “Communities in Crisis: Justice, Accountability, and Social Reconstruction in Rwanda and the former Yugoslavia,” “Intrastate Conflict and Social Reconstruction,” and “Education for Reconciliation.” With Eric Stover, he co-edited the book My Neighbor, My Enemy: Justice and Community in the Aftermath of Mass Atrocity (2004). He has worked on projects in South Africa, Kenya, Indonesia, Albania, Uganda, Sri Lanka, the Maldives, and Iraq. He authored a book on U.S. experimentation on unwitting human subjects entitled Psychiatry and the CIA: Victims of Mind Control (1990). He is editor-in-chief emeritus of the International Journal of Transitional Justice, a collaboration of the Human Rights Center and the Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation in Johannesburg.

 

Human Rights Center Research Fellows

HRC.patrick ballPatrick Ball, PhD, is the Executive Director of the Human Rights Data Analysis Group. He previously directed the Human Rights Program at Benetech. Since 1991, Dr. Ball has designed information management systems and conducted statistical analysis for large-scale human rights data projects used by truth commissions, nongovernmental organizations, tribunals and United Nations missions in Chad, Colombia, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, East Timor, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Haiti, Kosovo, Liberia, Perú, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Sri Lanka, and Syria. Dr. Ball holds a PhD from the University of Michigan and a bachelor’s from Columbia University. He is also a Visiting Fellow at the Center for Human Rights Science of Carnegie Mellon University.

Blank profileMychelle Balthazard, PhD, is an independent researcher who has collaborated with the Human Rights Center’s Initiative on Vulnerable Populations as a co-author of studies on attitudes, knowledge, and perception of social reconstruction and justice in Cambodia, and contributor to a 2007 study on the Lord’s Resistance Army’s forced conscription in Northern Uganda. Most recently, she co-authored the International Criminal Court victim participation study with Stephen Smith Cody, Eric Stover, and Alexa Koenig. Dr. Balthazard holds a PhD from the Payson Center for International Development at Tulane University.

Stephen Smith Cody, PhD, is a visiting assistant professor of law at McGeorge University, where he teaches criminal law, international criminal law, and civil procedure and supervises legal research on human rights. He formerly directed the Atrocity Response Program at the Human Rights Center, UC Berkeley School of Law, where he designed and managed research on the International Criminal Court. Cody has conducted fieldwork in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, Kenya, the Netherlands, and northern Uganda. His interviews with hundreds of atrocity crime survivors have helped determine how best to prepare, support, and protect victims and witnesses who testify against perpetrators of mass violence. Cody’s scholarship combines legal analysis and empirical methodologies—including computer-based coding, semi-structured interviews, and statistical analysis. He has authored reports and academic publications on various topics in human rights and international criminal law and served as an expert consultant on victim participation and witness protection at the International Criminal Court. Cody earned a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of California, Berkeley and a J.D. from Berkeley Law. As a Fulbright Scholar, he also received an M.Phil. in social anthropology at Cambridge University. Cody graduated summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa from Temple University, where he was named a Truman Scholar in 2000.

HRC.Camille_Crittenden_headshot_2014jpgCamille Crittenden, PhD, serves as Deputy Director of CITRIS, Director of the CITRIS Connected Communities Initiative, and Executive Director of the CITRIS Social Apps Lab. Prior to coming to CITRIS in 2012, she was Executive Director of the Human Rights Center at Berkeley Law, where she helped to develop its program in human rights, technology, and new media. She has written and spoken widely on these topics, as well as technology applications for civic engagement, government transparency and accountability, and the digital divide. She held previous positions as Assistant Dean for Development with International and Area Studies at UC Berkeley and in development and public relations at University of California Press and San Francisco Opera. She earned an MA and PhD from Duke University.

Rohini HaarRohini J. Haar, MD, MPH, is an emergency medicine physician with expertise in health and human rights. Her work focuses on the protection of human rights in times of complex humanitarian crisis and conflict. She is particularly interested in the protection of health workers and health services. As an emergency medicine physician, she has worked both as academic emergency medicine faculty in New York City and Oakland, as well as on numerous international projects including in Haiti, Senegal, Ghana, Morocco, Palestine/Israel, India and the Thai/Burma border. Dr. Haar has published articles on issues including health in post-conflict states and the reconstruction of health systems after humanitarian disasters. She is particularly interested in developing strong research methodology in fragile contexts. Dr. Haar serves on the board of the SF Bay Area Chapter of Physicians for Social Responsibility and is a consultant for the International Rescue Committee and Physicians for Human Rights.

eliot-higginsEliot Higgins is an award winning investigative journalist, and founder of the Brown Moses Blog and Bellingcat. He publishes the work of an international alliance of fellow investigators using freely available online information. He has helped inaugurate open-source and social media investigations by trawling through vast amounts of data uploaded constantly on to the web and social media sites. His inquiries have revealed extraordinary findings on subjects such as the downing of flight MH17 in Ukraine and the August 2013 Sarin attacks in Damascus. He is currently a visiting research associate at the Centre for Science and Security Studies (CSSS) at the Department of War Studies at King’s College London. In addition to his academic work he is also a nonresident senior fellow at the Atlantic Council’s Future Europe Initiative, where he has produced major report investigating Russia’s involvement in the conflicts in Syria and Ukraine drawing on open source investigation.

keith-hiatt-headshot

Keith Hiatt is the Vice President of Benetech’s Human Rights Program where he leads Benetech’s efforts to empower human rights defenders around the world by providing technology solutions and capacity building. Hiatt is currently a member of the Technology Advisory Board of the International Criminal Court’s Office of the Prosecutor and an Affiliate at the Data and Society Research Institute in NYC. He previously served as Director of the Human Rights and Technology Program at the Human Rights Center, UC Berkeley School of Law. After graduating from Berkeley Law, Hiatt clerked for Judge Ronald Gould of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. In 2014, as a community lawyer in East Palo Alto, he received the California Bar Association President’s Award for Pro Bono Service. Prior to attending law school at UC Berkeley, Hiatt worked as a software engineer at Microsoft and a systems analyst at Boeing.

BNSchiff headshotBenjamin N. Schiff, PhD, is the James Monroe Professor of Politics at Oberlin College. He teaches courses on various aspects of international relations including the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, arms control, war, international organizations and international law. Professor Schiff has published three books on international organizations: International Nuclear Technology Transfer: Dilemmas of Dissemination and Control (1982) about the International Atomic Energy Agency; Refugees unto the Third Generation: UN Aid to Palestinians (1995) about the UN Relief and Works Agency; and Building the International Criminal Court (2008), which won the International Studies Association’s Chadwick Alger Award and the Academic Council on the UN System’s Best Book of 2009 award. With his wife, June Goodwin, he also published Heart of Whiteness: Afrikaners Face Black Rule in the New South Africa (Scribner, 1995).

HRC.Karl shoenbergerKarl Schoenberger is an independent researcher whose work focuses on human rights and the corporation. He is the author of Levi’s Children: Coming to Terms with Human Rights in the Global Marketplace (2000), which investigated corporate social responsibility and human rights policy in the apparel and shoe industries. His current work builds on this project by examining trends in the high-technology sector.

DTuller headshotDavid Tuller, DrPH, is academic coordinator of UC Berkeley’s joint masters program in the School of Public Health and the Graduate School of Journalism. He was a reporter and editor for 10 years at the San Francisco Chronicle, served as health editor at Salon.com and frequently writes about health for the New York Times. Dr. Tuller is working on a research project spearheaded by UCSF looking at the impact of food insecurity on HIV transmission and adherence to medication regimens in Uganda.

CZimmerman headshotCathy Zimmerman, PhD, is a senior staff member of the Gender, Violence and Health Centre (GVHC), of the Social and Mathematical Epidemiology Group (SaME) at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. Dr. Zimmerman has conducted some of the first-ever research on health and human trafficking, including two studies in Europe on the health of women in post-trafficking service settings. She is currently leading a program of global research on human trafficking, including a multi-site intervention evaluation of the International Labour Organization’s complex trafficking prevention program in South Asia and the Middle East, multi-country studies on health and human trafficking in the Mekong subregion, South America, Central Asia and research in the United Kingdom for the UK Department of Health. She is a co-author of the WHO Ethical and Safety Recommendations for Interviewing Trafficked Women and co-editor of Caring for Trafficked Persons: Guidance for Health Care Providers (2009). She also conducts research on gender-based violence among asylum-seeking women and in conflict-affected settings and coordinates regularly with organizations providing services for vulnerable migrants. Before coming to LSHTM, Dr. Zimmerman carried out some of the first-ever research on domestic violence in Cambodia and founded a local NGO, Project Against Domestic Violence.