Recent Books

Listed below are books written by our Study Group members.

If you would like to have your book featured, please contact David Gutierrez Colominas at David.Gutierrez@uab.cat

 

Australian Anti-Discrimination and Equal Opportunity Law, 2018

Authors: Dominique Allen, Neil Rees, Simon Rice

Publisher: The Federation Press

Language: English

About: This new edition of Australia’s most comprehensive book on anti-discrimination law has been fully revised and updated, re-written and reformatted to enhance its accessibility. It continues to offer both a substantial text for a specialist audience, and a powerful critique of anti-discrimination law in Australia. The authors support their analysis and explanation of legislation and case law with carefully selected extracts from a broad range of decisions, law reform reports, and academic writers and commentators.

EU Anti-Discrimination Law beyond Gender, 2018

Authors: Uladzislau Belavusau, Kristin Henrard

Publisher: Hart Publishing

Language: English

About: The EU has slowly but surely developed a solid body of equality law that prohibits different facets of discrimination. While the Union had initially developed anti-discrimination norms that served only the commercial rationale of the common market, focusing on nationality (of a Member State) and gender as protected grounds, the Treaty of Amsterdam (1997) supplied five additional prohibited grounds of discrimination to the EU legislative palette, in line with a much broader egalitarian rationale. In 2000, two EU Equality Directives followed, one focusing on race and ethnic origin, the other covering the remaining four grounds introduced by the Treaty of Amsterdam, namely religion, sexual orientation, disabilities and age.

Eighteen years after the adoption of the watershed Equality Directives, it seems timely to dedicate a book to their limits and prospects, to look at the progress made, and to revisit the rise of EU anti-discrimination law beyond gender. This volume sets out to capture the striking developments and shortcomings that have taken place in the interpretation of relevant EU secondary law. Firstly, the book unfolds an up-to-date systematic reappraisal of the five ‘newer’ grounds of discrimination, which have so far received mostly fragmented coverage. Secondly, and more generally, the volume captures how and to what extent the Equality Directives have enabled or, at times, prevented the Court of Justice of the European Union from developing even broader and more refined anti-discrimination jurisprudence. Thus, the book offers a glimpse into the past, present and – it is hoped – future of EU anti-discrimination law as, despite all the flaws in the Union’s ‘Garden of Earthly Delights’, it offers one of the highest standards of protection in comparative anti-discrimination law.

Global Perspectives on Legal Capacity Reform: Our Voices, Our Stories, 2018

Authors: Clíona de Bhailís, Eilionóir Flynn, Anna Arstein-Kerslake, Maria Laura Serra

Publisher: Routledge

Language: English

About:  This edited collection is the result of the Voices of Individuals: Collectively Exploring Self-determination (VOICES) based at the Centre for Disability Law and Policy, National University of Ireland Galway. Focusing on the exercise of legal capacity under Article 12 of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, the stories of people with disabilities are combined with responses from scholars, activists and practitioners, addressing four key areas: criminal responsibility, contracts, consent to sex, and consent to medical treatment. Sustainable law and policy reforms are set out based on the storytellers’ experiences, promoting a recognition of legal capacity and supported decision-making. The perspectives are from across a wide range of disciplines (including law, sociology, nursing, and history) and 13 countries.

The volume is a valuable resource for researchers, academics and legislators, judges or policy makers in the area of legal capacity and disability. It is envisaged that the book will be particularly useful for those engaged in legal capacity law reform processes worldwide and that this grounded work will be of great interest to legislators and policy makers who must frame new laws on supported decision making in compliance with the UNCRPD.

Women, Poverty, Equality: The Role of CEDAW, 2018

Authors: Meghan Campbell

Publisher: Hart Publishing

Language: English

About: The stark reality is that throughout the world, women disproportionately live in poverty. This indicates that gender can both cause and perpetuate poverty, but this is a complex and cross-cutting relationship.The full enjoyment of human rights is routinely denied to women who live in poverty. How can human rights respond and alleviate gender-based poverty? This monograph closely examines the potential of equality and non-discrimination at international law to redress gender-based poverty. It offers a sophisticated assessment of how the international human rights treaties, specifically the Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), which contains no obligations on poverty, can be interpreted and used to address gender-based poverty. An interpretation of CEDAW that incorporates the harms of gender-based poverty can spark a global dialogue. The book makes an important contribution to that dialogue, arguing that the CEDAW should serve as an authoritative international standard setting exercise that can activate international accountability mechanisms and inform the domestic interpretation of human rights.

Working Law: Courts, Corporations, and Symbolic Civil Rights, 2016

Authors: Lauren B. Edelman

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

Language: English

About: Since the passage of the Civil Rights Act, virtually all companies have antidiscrimination policies in place. Although these policies represent some progress, women and minorities remain underrepresented within the workplace as a whole and even more so when you look at high-level positions. They also tend to be less well paid. How is it that discrimination remains so prevalent in the American workplace despite the widespread adoption of policies designed to prevent it?

One reason for the limited success of antidiscrimination policies, argues Lauren B. Edelman, is that the law regulating companies is broad and ambiguous, and managers therefore play a critical role in shaping what it means in daily practice. Often, what results are policies and procedures that are largely symbolic and fail to dispel long-standing patterns of discrimination. Even more troubling, these meanings of the law that evolve within companies tend to eventually make their way back into the legal domain, inconspicuously influencing lawyers for both plaintiffs and defendants and even judges. When courts look to the presence of antidiscrimination policies and personnel manuals to infer fair practices and to the presence of diversity training programs without examining whether these policies are effective in combating discrimination and achieving racial and gender diversity, they wind up condoning practices that deviate considerably from the legal ideals.

Religion as Empowerment: Global Legal Perspectives, 2016

Authors: Lauren Fielder, Kyriaki Topidi

Publisher: Routledge

Language: English

About: This volume shows how and why legal empowerment is important for those exercising their religious rights under various jurisdictions, in conditions of legal pluralism. At the same time, it also questions the thesis that as societies become more modern, they also become less religious.

The authors look beyond the rule of law orthodoxy in their consideration of the freedom of religion as a human right and place this discussion in a more plurality-sensitive context. The book sheds more light on the informal and/or customary mechanisms that explain the limited impact of law on individuals and groups, especially in non-Western societies. The focus is on discussing how religion and the exercise of religious rights may or may not empower individuals and social groups and improve access to human rights in general.

This book is important reading for academics and practitioners of law and religion, religious rights, religious diversity and cultural difference, as well as NGOs, policy makers, lawyers and advocates at multicultural jurisdictions. It offers a contemporary take on comparative legal studies, with a distinct focus on religion as an identity marker.

Comparative Equality and Anti-Discrimination Law Web-course

Authors: Richard T. Ford, David B. Oppenheimer, Colin Reeves-Fortney

Publisher: Berkeley Law and Stanford Law

Language: English

About: The Comparative Equality and Anti-Discrimination Law Web-course uses a problem-based approach to examine a global view of equality and anti-discrimination law, comparing US, European, and other national, regional and international legal systems, including those of India, Brazil and South Africa.

Topics Include

  • theories and sources of equality law
  • employment discrimination and harassment (race, sex, age, disability)
  • affirmative action (race, caste, origin)/gender parity
  • marriage equality (race, sexual orientation)
  • hate speech (race, sex, religion)
  • reproductive rights
  • secularism and the rights of religious minorities

The course material will be delivered through online presentations that mix brief lectures with recordings of group discussions, debates, and interviews with 36 scholars and activists from six continents. The on-line materials are supplemented by a textbook, Oppenheimer, Foster, Han & Ford, Comparative Equality & Anti-Discrimination Law (second edition 2017), which is available as a paperback or in Kindle format. It will take approximately 20 hours to complete this course.

Comparative Human Rights Law, 2018

Authors: Sandra Fredman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

Language: English

About: Courts in different jurisdictions face similar human rights questions. Does the death penalty breach human rights? Does freedom of speech include racist speech? Is there a right to health? This book uses the prism of comparative law to examine the fascinating ways in which these difficult questions are decided. On the one hand, the shared language of human rights suggests that there should be similar solutions to comparable problems. On the other hand, there are important differences. Constitutional texts are worded differently; courts have differing relationships with the legislature; and there are divergences in socio-economic development, politics, and history. Nevertheless, there is a growing transnational conversation between courts, with cases in one jurisdiction being cited in others. 

Part I sets out the cross-cutting themes which shape the ways judges respond to challenging human rights issues. It examines when it is legitimate to refer to foreign materials; how universality and cultural relativity are balanced in human rights law; the appropriate role of courts in adjudicating human rights in a democracy; and the principles judges use to interpret human rights texts. The book is unusual in transcending the distinction between socio-economic rights and civil and political rights. Part II applies these cross-cutting themes to comparing human rights law in the US, UK, South Africa, Canada, and India. Its focus is on seven particularly challenging issues: the death penalty, abortion, housing, health, speech, education and religion, with the aim of inspiring further comparative examination of other pressing human rights issues.

Comparative Equality & Anti-Discrimination Law, 2017

Authors:  Sora Y. Han, Richard T. Ford, Sheila R. Foster, David B. Oppenheimer

Publisher: Comparative Equality Press

Language: English

About: Comparative Equality & Anti-Discrimination Law uses a problem-based approach to examine a global view of equality and anti-discrimination law, comparing U.S., European, and other national, regional and international legal systems, including those of India, China, Brazil and South Africa.

The book covers nine topic modules:
· Theories of Equality
· Sources of Anti-discrimination Law
· Employment Discrimination and Harassment (race, sex, age, disability)
· Marriage Equality (race, same-sex)
· Affirmative Action (race, caste, origin)/Gender Parity
· Hate Speech (race, sex, religion)
· Reproductive Rights
· Secularism and the Rights of Religious Minorities
· Rights of Persons with Disabilities (available only on the comparative equality website).

The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in Practice, 2018

Authors: Anna Lawson, Lisa Waddington

Publisher: Oxford University Press

Language: English

About: Introduced in 2008, the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities has existed for nearly a decade. This comprehensive study examines how courts in thirteen different jurisdictions make use of the Convention. The first sustained comparative international law analysis of the CRPD, Waddington and Lawsons ground breaking text illuminates the intersection between human rights law, disability law and international law through an examination of the role of courts. The first part of the book contains chapters specific to each jurisdiction. The second part consists of comparative chapters which draw on the rich analysis of the jurisdiction-specific chapters. These chapters reflect on emerging patterns of judicial usage and interpretation of the CRPD and on the wider implications for human rights theory and the nascent field of international comparative human rights law. This volume is a vital and thought-provoking addition to the literature on comparative international law and disability rights.

Comparative Perspectives on the Enforcement and Effectiveness of Anti-Discrimination Law, 2018

Authors: Marie Mercat-Bruns, David B. Oppenheimer, Cady Sartorius

Publisher: Springer International Publishing

Language: English

About: This book focuses on anti-discrimination law in order to identify commonalities and best practices across nations. Almost every nation in the world embraces the principle of equality and non-discrimination, in theory if not in practice. As the authors’ expert contributions establish, the sources of the principle vary considerably, from international treaties to religious law, traditions and more. There are many approaches to methods of enforcement and other variables, but the principle is nearly universal. What does a comparison of the laws and approaches across different lands reveal? 

Readers may explore the enforcement and effectiveness of anti-discrimination law from 25 nations, across six continents. Esteemed authors examine national, regional and international systems looking for common and best practices, identifying innovative approaches to long-standing problems. The many ways that anti-discrimination law is enforced are brought to light, from criminal or civil prosecution through to community resolution processes, amongst others. Through comparing the approaches of different lands, the authors consider which methods of enforcement are effective.

These enriching national and international perspectives highlight the need for more creative, concrete and coordinated means of enforcement to ensure the effectiveness of anti-discrimination law, regardless of the legal tradition concerned, but in light of these traditions. Readers will find each nation remarkable, and learn something new and interesting from each report. 

Discrimination as Stigma: A Theory of Anti-discrimination Law, 2016

Authors: Iyiola Solanke

Publisher: Hart Publishing

Language: English

About: This monograph re-conceptualizes discrimination law as fundamentally concerned with stigma. Using sociological and socio-psychological theories of stigma, the author presents an ‘anti-stigma principle’, promoting it as a method to determine the scope of legal protection from discrimination. The anti-stigma principle recognizes the role of institutional and individual action in the perpetuation of discrimination. Setting discrimination law within the field of public health, it frames positive action and intersectional discrimination as the norm in this field of law rather than the exception. In developing and applying this new theory for anti-discrimination law, the book draws upon case law from jurisdictions including the UK, Australia, New Zealand, the USA and Canada, as well as European law