JSP Student Profile

Melissa McCall

Year: Advanced to Candidacy (ABD) - JSP

Concentrations:

Law and Psychology
Public Law

Education:

BS, Political Science, Portland State University (summa cum laude), 2013

JD, UC Berkeley Law, 2020

Awards:

William K. Coblentz Civil Rights Fellowship, Center for the Study of Law and Society (2018)
Miller Institute-American Society for International Law Fellowship (2018)
Outstanding Graduate Student Instructor Award, UC Berkeley (2017)
Dean's Award for Academic Achievement, Portland State University (2013)

Employment Experiences:

Summer Associate, WilmerHale (2019)
Advanced Clinical Student, Samuelson Law, Technology, and Public Policy Clinic (2019)
Judicial Extern to Associate Justice Mariano-Florentino Cuéllar, Supreme Court of California (2018)

Academic Experiences:

Graduate Student Research Assistant, Professor Kristin Luker (2018)
Graduate Student Research Assistant, Professor Calvin Morrill (2018)
Graduate Student Research Assistant, Professor Ian Haney López (2017)
Graduate Student Research Assistant, Professor Chris Kutz (2016)
Graduate Student Research Assistant, Professor Lauren Edelman (2015)
Graduate Student Instructor, Psychology and the Law (2019)
Graduate Student Instructor, Teaching Learning in Higher Education (2019)
Graduate Student Instructor, Law, Politics, and Society (2015; 2016; 2018)
Graduate Student Instructor, Foundations of Legal Studies (2016; 2018)
Graduate Student Instructor, Supreme Court and Public Policy (2016 & 2017)

Dissertation Abstract:

Laws that govern child neglect rely on subjective judgments about risk to a child. Where laws are ambiguous, people may be influenced by culturally embedded stereotypes about a parent’s intersecting social identities. For Black mothers who work outside the home, these stereotypes create a double bind, because Black mothers are simultaneously expected to work and to care for their children. Although psychological research has addressed the intersecting roles of race and gender bias in shaping attitudes about working mothers in their capacities as workers, there is a dearth of research on attitudes about working mothers in their capacities as mothers. In two experiments and one qualitative study, this dissertation project examines the role of race and gender stereotypes in shaping punitive attitudes about working parents whose choices or actions might be perceived as exposing their children to risk.