JSP Student Profile

Tobias Smith

portrait

Year: Doctorate in JSP

Email: tobiasjsmith(at)berkeley(dot)edu

Website: https://www.tobiasjsmith.com/

Biography:

Tobias Smith holds a PhD in Jurisprudence and Social Policy (2020) and a JD from Berkeley Law School (2015). His work examines how and why otherwise punitive regimes reduce penal severity. His dissertation, The Contradictions of Chinese Capital Punishment, is a case study of recent death penalty reform measures in China.

Education:

Ph.D., Jurisprudence and Social Policy, University of California, Berkeley, 2020

J.D., University of California, Berkeley Law School, 2015

B.A., Oberlin College of Arts and Sciences, 2005

Concentrations:

Criminal Law; Punishment; China

Selected Publications:
2020 “Body Count Politics: Quantification, Secrecy and Capital Punishment in China” Law & Social Inquiry 45 (3): 706-27.

2020 "Experimental Criminology and the Free-Rider Problem" (with Johann Koehler) British Journal of Criminology https://doi.org/10.1093/bjc/azaa057

2019 “Making Sense of Life without Parole in China” (with Su Jiang) Punishment & Society, 21(1): 70-88.

2019 “Power Surge: China’s New National Supervisory Commission” China Story Yearbook 2018: Power, Golley, J. and Jaivin, L., eds. Acton: ANU Press.

2018 “Book Review: The Will to Punish, by Didier Fassin & The Death Penalty, Vol. II, by Jacques Derrida.” British Journal of Criminology. Online first https://doi.org/10.1093/bjc/azy071

Awards:

2019 Law & Social Inquiry Graduate Student Paper Prize, for “Body Count Politics: Quantification, Secrecy and the Death Penalty in China”

2018 Jiang-Land-Wang Outstanding Student Paper Award, The Association of Chinese Criminology and Criminal Justice in the US, for “Partial Disclosure: Secrecy and Transparency in China’s Death Penalty Decisions”

2015 The Lloyd McCullough Robbins Award (first prize), for “The Other Death: History and Practice of Suspended Execution in China”

2015 Jurisprudence Award, Criminal Law and the Regulation of Vice

2015 Teaching Effectiveness Award, “Attending to Attendance” (invited essay), UC Berkeley Teaching & Resource Center