Writing Competitions

Writing competitions offer students the opportunity to publish their writing, gain recognition, and receive generous cash prizes and scholarships. Please see below for a list of writing competitions open to:

We also have organized the competitions by area of law. For more information, details, and deadlines, click on the name of the competition.

Other resources: Suffolk University Law School has a created a comprehensive list of legal writing competitions.  

If you come across other writing competitions or resources, please let us know!

 

Competitions Open to All Law Students

The ABA Commission on Domestic & Sexual Violence Writing Competition

Law students are invited to submit articles addressing domestic and sexual violence and the law from a national or international perspective. Submissions must further the legal needs of victims of domestic and sexual violence or their children, or advance efforts to address the incidence, causes and effects of intimate partner violence. Submissions may not have been previously accepted for publication and, if they have been submitted elsewhere for publication, the first place winner must certify that the first publication of the article will be in the Journal of Gender, Social Policy & the Law. Submissions are typically due in early April.

 

ABA Section of Antitrust Law Student Writing Competition

The Law Student Writing Competition encourages and rewards student-written articles in the area of antitrust law, competition policy, and consumer protection law. Write an article about antitrust. Law students currently enrolled or graduating can write eligible articles of general interest to the antitrust law community, including: Civil and Criminal Antitrust Law, Competition Policy, Consumer Protection, and International Competition Law. Submissions are typically due in late January.

 

ABA Section of Environmental, Energy and Resources Law Student Writing Competitions

 
Law Student Writing Competition: Alternative Dispute Resolution

Entries for the ABA Section of Environment, Energy, and Resources Law Student Writing Competition: Alternative Dispute Resolution should demonstrate original thought on a question of legal and/or policy significance on any issue related to dispute prevention practice, theory or research related to the environment, energy, or natural resource conflicts, and similar themes. Essays should conform to the theme of the competition. Submissions may advocate a position, educate the reader, or analyze one or more cases. The decision of whether a particular essay qualifies as to subject matter is entirely within the discretion of the Section. Submissions are typically due in late May.

Law Student Writing Competition: Public Land and Resources

Entries for the ABA Section of Environment, Energy, and Resources Law Student Writing Competition: Public Land and Resources should demonstrate original thought on a question of legal and/or policy significance relating to the topic of the role of public lands and policy. The topic is not confined to any particular type of public lands issue. Essays should conform to the theme of the competition. Submissions may advocate a position, educate the reader, or analyze one or more cases. The decision of whether a particular essay qualifies as to subject matter is entirely within the discretion of the Section. Submissions are typically due in late May.

Law Student Writing Competition: Energy Law

Entries for the ABA Section of Environment, Energy, and Resources Law Student Writing Competition: Energy Law should demonstrate original thought on a question of legal and/or policy significance on any issue related energy law. Essays should conform to the theme of the competition. Submissions may advocate a position, educate the reader, or analyze one or more cases. The decision of whether a particular essay qualifies as to subject matter is entirely within the discretion of the Section. Submissions are typically due in late May.

Law Student Writing Competition: Endangered Species and Biodiversity Protection

Entries for the ABA Section of Environment, Energy, and Resources Law Student Writing Competition: Endangered Species and Biodiversity Protection should demonstrate original thought on a question of legal and/or policy significance on any issue related to species conservation law, including endangered and threatened species, biodiversity, habitat conservation, and similar themes. Essays should conform to the theme of the competition. Submissions may advocate a position, educate the reader, or analyze one or more cases. The decision of whether a particular essay qualifies as to subject matter is entirely within the discretion of the Section. Submissions are typically due in late May.

 

ABA Section of Real Property, Trust and Estate Law

The goal of the American Bar Association (ABA) Real Property, Trust and Estate Law Student Writing Contest (Contest) is to encourage and reward law student writings on real property, trust and estate law subjects of general and current interest. As part of this effort, the ABA will sponsor the Contest, which invites law school students to submit to the ABA Section of Real Property, Trust and Estate Law (Section), original essays on a current topic dealing with real property, trust and estate law. The essay contest is designed to attract students to the real property, trust and estate law field, and to strongly encourage scholarships in these areas. The first-place winner will receive $2,500 cash , a one-year free membership in the Section, and a free round-trip airfare and weekend accommodations to attend the Section’s Fall Leadership Meeting. Essays must not exceed 50 pages of double spaced typed text, including footnotes. Only one essay is to be submitted for each entrant. Submissions are typically due in June.

 

ACLM Student Writing Competitions

This competition asks individuals to submit a paper for the American College of Legal Medicine’s 2017 Postdoctoral Student Writing Competition and the Student Writing Competition in Law, Medicine and Bioethics. The ACLM will pay the Orr and the Hirsh Award Winners’ costs of reasonable coach airfare and one night of lodging at the host hotel (Bally’s) to present his or her paper at the ACLM 2017 Annual Meeting in Las Vegas, Nevada. All papers submitted will receive consideration for publication in the Journal of Legal Medicine or other medical legal publications. Please encourage your students to submit their papers to the competition. Submissions are typically due in early January.

 

Albert S. Pergam International Law Writing Competition Award

The competition is intended to encourage students of law to write on areas of public or private international law. The Section believes that by providing a forum for students to disseminate their ideas and articles, the professional and academic communities are enriched. Furthermore, the competition presents an opportunity for students to submit law review quality articles to the Section for possible publication in one of its publications. Law students (including J.D., LL.M., Ph.D. and S.J.D. candidates) are cordially invited to submit an entry. Entries will be judges on a variety of factors including significance and timeliness of the subject matter, thoroughness of research and analysis, and clarity of writing style. Submissions are typically due in the middle of November.

 

American Bankruptcy Institute Law Student Writing Competition

The American Bankruptcy Institute (“ABI”) is pleased to invite students to participate in its Ninth Annual ABI Bankruptcy Law Student Writing Competition. First, Second and Third Place prizes will be awarded.We invite papers on current issues regarding bankruptcy jurisdiction, bankruptcy litigation, or evidence in bankruptcy cases or proceedings. The paper may address business or consumer cases and may include matters such as bankruptcy sales, plan confirmation and other topics that involve jurisdiction, litigation or evidence in the bankruptcy courts. Submissions are typically due in early March.

 

Annual Law Student Victims’ Rights Writing Competition

Students are invited to submit a completed paper (or abstract) addressing victims’ rights. Selected papers are eligible for presentation at the Crime Victim Law Conference in Portland, Oregon. Submissions should be no longer than 3500 words (including footnotes), double-spaced with one-inch margins, and the font must be Times New Roman, Submission may be an excerpt of a larger paper. Submissions may not have been previously published or accepted for publication unless accompanied by written authorization for reprint. Authors/presenters must be enrolled in an ABA-accredited law school at the date of their submission or have graduated from such a school within the last 18 months. Submissions are typically due in early March.

 

Brogdon Champion Law School Essay Contest

Brogdon Champion, LLC is an Atlanta personal injury law firm that represents clients who have been seriously injured or lost a loved one due to the negligence of another person or company. Brogdon Champion prides itself on providing superior legal representation to personal injury clients that complies with the highest professional and ethical standards. To encourage and promote awareness of ethical issues and standards in the area of personal injury law, the firm is sponsoring an essay contest for law students that focuses on ethical issues in personal injury cases. The topics for the essay contest can be any ethical issue that arises in the context of representing plaintiffs in personal injury and wrongful death cases. Submissions are typically due in early March.

 

Bruce M. Stargatt Legal Ethics Writing Competition

This writing competition is made possible by an initial generous gift to the Delaware Bar Foundation from Mrs. Barbara Stargatt and her family in memory of her late husband, Bruce M. Stargatt. Bruce was a distinguished Delaware lawyer who, among many other accomplishments, was a founding partner of Young, Conaway, Stargatt & Taylor, LLP, and a past president of the Delaware Bar Foundation and the Delaware State Bar Association. In keeping with Bruce Stargatt’s keen interest in legal writing and the ethical practice of law, we invite scholarly papers concerning ethical issues in the practice of law. Beyond this general description, the precise issue to be dealt with is in the author’s discretion. Cash prizes of $3000, $1000 and $500 will be awarded to the top three papers. The first place paper will be published in “Delaware Lawyer” magazine (a publication of the Delaware Bar Foundation, distributed quarterly without charge to all members of the Delaware Bar).

 

The Burton Awards Writing Competition

This award honors law school students for clear, concise, and comprehensive legal writing. The nominations are submitted for articles written in publications the previous year. The article must have appeared in any publication printed at your law school, including law reviews and journals, and may be a note, a comment, or an article. The subject of the article can be devoted to any legal topic. The length of the article is not limited. Please note: In addition, you must submit a 150 word narrative biographical summary written in the third person and a high resolution photograph at the time of nomination. Submissions are typically due at the end of January.

 

Center for Alcohol Policy Writing Competition

When Prohibition was repealed in 1933, the 21st Amendment put alcohol control in the hands of the states. With this annual essay contest, the Center for Alcohol Policy hopes to foster debate, analysis, and examination of the public policies put in place following the passage of the 21st Amendment and their implications for citizens across the United States. Essay entries must respond to a prompt that changes each year. The format may be formal law review article submissions or nonacademic essays. The contest is open to all persons over the age of 18. Students, academics, practicing attorneys, policymakers, and members of the general public are encouraged to submit essays. Cash prizes will be awarded to the first, second and third place winners in the amount of $5,000, $2,500 and $1,000 respectively. The award will be provided when essay contest winners are announced. Submissions are typically due in early December.

 

The Center for the Study of Dispute Resolution at the University of Missouri School of Law Writing Competition

The University of Missouri’s Center for the Study of Dispute Resolution is pleased to announce the winners of a student writing competition held in association with the symposium “Beyond the FAA:  Arbitration Procedure, Practice, and Policy in Historical Perspective,” which was convened by Professor Carli Conklin. The competition, which carried a $500 prize for the author of the winning paper, sought essays that bore some relationship to the history of dispute or conflict resolution, broadly defined.  The competition was international and interdisciplinary in scope and drew submissions from all over the world. Submissions should bear some relationship to the history of dispute or conflict resolution, broadly defined.  Topics may therefore consider issues relating to the historic development of international or domestic negotiation, mediation, conciliation and/or arbitration, among other things.   There is no requirement that papers discuss U.S. law. Submissions are typically due in early November.

 

Chapman LLC Scholarship for Law Students

This scholarship is for $1,000 to go to paying part of the winner’s education costs. They must complete a 300-500 word essay and enter information about their professional/educational past. All of this is completed online in the spaces provided on the scholarship website. Submissions are typically due in the middle of November.

 

The Crane Writing Competition

The Crane Writing Competition is designed to encourage outstanding student scholarship at the intersection of law and medicine or law and the social sciences that promotes an understanding, furthers the development of legal rights and protections, and improves the lives of those with disabilities. The Crane Writing Competition is open to currently enrolled law students (J.D., LL.M., and J.S.D.), medical students, and doctoral candidates in related fields who attend an accredited graduate program of study in the United States. Submitted papers may be on any topic relating to disability law including, legal issues arising with respect to employment, government services and programs, public accommodations, education, higher education, housing, and health care. Submissions are typically due in the middle of April.

 

Constance Baker Motley National Student Writing Competition

The American Constitution Society’s Constance Baker Motley National Student Writing Competition honors her legacy as a civil rights leader, elected official, and the first African-American woman appointed to the federal bench. ACS welcomes all student papers furthering and promoting a progressive vision of the Constitution, law, and public policy. The judging committee will include judges and leading academics.

The student authors of the top three papers will receive special recognition at the 2018 ACS National Convention. The winner will receive $3,000 and an offer to publish in the University of Pennsylvania Journal of Constitutional Law. The two runners-up will receive $1,000. Submissions are typically due in early February.

 

Davis Wright Tremaine International Law Writing Awards

Through the generosity of Davis Wright Tremaine, LLP a $2,000 stipend will be provided for the best student paper on an international law topic submitted for the Davis Wright Tremaine International Law Writing Award, with a stipend of $500 for the second best student paper. Entries are limited to original research papers written in the past year on any topic in private or public international law, but not comparative law or the law of a foreign nation. Submissions are typically due in the middle of April.

 

Donald C. Alexander Tax Law Writing Competition 

The Federal Bar Association Section on Taxation is once again sponsoring an annual writing competition and invites law students to participate. The Donald C. Alexander Tax Law Writing Competition is named in honor of former IRS Commissioner (1973-1977) Don Alexander, who passed away in 2010. Mr. Alexander was a widely admired role model and advocate for writing skills and style in the area of tax law throughout his career. All full-time and part-time law students currently seeking a juris doctor (J.D.) or a master of laws (LL.M.) at an accredited law school are eligible to enter the competition. Students may submit any original paper concerning federal taxation. Papers must be a minimum of twenty pages and a maximum of fifty pages (double spaced, twelve-point Times New Roman font, one-inch margins) including endnotes (which may be singled-spaced). Submissions are typically due in early January.

 

The Dukeminier Awards Best Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Law Review Articles

The Dukeminier Awards Student Writing Competition annually recognizes the best student note on issues relating to sexual orientation and gender identity in the law. The competition is open to students enrolled in an ABA accredited law school during the 2015-2016 academic year. Students of all backgrounds and identities are encouraged to apply. Entry topics should focus on a cutting-edge legal issue affecting lesbian, gay, bisexual, and/or transgender communities. Entries should have been written during 2016 and should not be previously published or scheduled for publication.  In addition, students who submit notes promise exclusive submission to the Dukeminier Student Writing Competition until January 15, 2017. This means that the submission should not be in consideration at other journals before this date. Submissions are typically due in early December.

 

Ed Mendrzycki Essay Contest for Law Students and Young Writers 

The Ed Mendrzycki Essay Contest for Law Students and Young Writers is an annual writing competition that encourages original and innovative research and writing in the area of legal malpractice law, professional liability insurance and loss prevention. A new contest hypothetical is released each year and participants are to write and submit an essay responding to that year’s prompt. The prize for the best essay is a cash award of $5,000 and an all expense paid trip to the Spring 2016 National Legal Malpractice Conference in New Orleans. Submissions are typically due in late April.

 

The Eisenberg Prize

The American Academy of Appellate Lawyers (AAAL) created the Eisenberg Prize to recognize the publication of high-quality articles in the field of appellate practice and procedure. The award is named in honor of the late Howard B. Eisenberg, Dean of the Marquette University Law School and an early AAAL member. To be considered for the Eisenberg Prize, articles must have been published in a law school journal. AAAL’s Eisenberg Prize Committee reviews all entries and makes a recommendation to the AAAL Board of Directors for its approval. The author receives a $2,000 prize. Submissions are typically due in the middle of July.

 

Employee Benefits Writing Prize

This competition asks students to write an essay on any topic in the field of employee benefits law. It is open to any current J.D. and graduate (L.L.M. or S.J.D.) law students. Winning papers will be selected by the Writing Prize Committee based on the factors they deem relevant. Among other factors, the Committee will consider: (i) depth and creativity of legal analysis; (ii) thoroughness of legal research; (iii) organization and writing style; (iv) difficulty of subject matter; and (v) consideration of employee benefits policy implications. A focused, in depth analysis of a discrete topic generally is considered more favorably than a broad survey piece. Presentation (e.g., organization, proofreading, proper grammar, etc.) also carries substantial weight. The determination of the Committee is final. The College will use its best efforts to arrange for publication of the winning papers in a professional or scholarly publication, if deemed suitable by the Writing Prize Committee and the publication’s editors. In addition, the winning papers will be posted on the College’s website. Submissions are typically due in early June.

 

Endangered Species Writing Competition

This is a writing competition that focuses on endangered species in relation to law. Papers should demonstrate original thought on a question of legal and/or policy significance on any issue related to species conservation law, including endangered and threatened species, biodiversity, habitat conservation, and similar themes. Essays should conform to the theme of the competition. Submissions may advocate a position, educate the reader, or analyze one or more cases. The first place winner received a $1,000 cash prize, the second place winner received $750, and the third place winner received $500. Submissions are typically due in late May.

 

Forum’s Law Student Writing Competition

By virtue of the Forum’s Law Student Writing Competition, The Forum introduces itself to the next generation of construction lawyers and strives towards its mission of Building the Best Construction Lawyers. And, deserving law student writers have the opportunity to demonstrate their talent and meet The Forum at its annual fall meeting. The Law Student Writing Competition comes on the heels of the success of The Forum’s law school textbook, Construction Law, and the increasing number of law school courses dedicated to construction law. Students may submit articles on any topic related to construction law. The format of the articles should resemble the articles published in either of The Forum’s two publications, The Construction Lawyer (law journal format with guidelines in the link below) and Under Construction (newsletter format with articles of 1000-2000 words). Submissions are typically due in early June.

 

Gellhorn-Sargentich Law Student Essay Award Competition

This contest commemorates two men (Ernest Gellhorn and Thomas Sargentich) for their contributions to administrative law. Applicants are to write a paper on administrative law that does not exceed 40 double spaced pages. The winner will receive a $5,000 cash prize and round-trip airfare and accommodation to attend the Section’s Fall Conference in Washington, DC. At the discretion of the Section and the respective editorial boards, the winning entry may be selected for publication in the Administrative and Regulatory Law News and/or the Administrative Law Review. Submissions are typically due in early May.

 

GoJIL Student Essay Competition

Transparency as a legal concept is hard to define and difficult to capture, yet it is one of the major aims in many of today’s societies. In direct relation to (political) legitimacy and accountability, democracy, participation and access to information, it is mainly understood in positive terms. On the national level, transparency has gained significant attention, being presently implemented for example in acts on access to information. Furthermore, it is a regular point of critique in politics. On the international level this concept remains of high relevance, for example, in regard to law-making processes, the structure and proceedings of international organizations etc. Many points can be subject of this discussion. However, the central questions can be summarized as: Is there a lack of transparency in International Law and/or its specific fields or rather the contrary? What does the concept of transparency stand for on the international level? The GoJIL invites you to actively take part in the illumination of the concept and/or reflect on its implementation on the international level. The maximal word count is 5000 words (excluding footnotes). The winning submission will be published in one of the upcoming GoJIL issues. Submissions are typically due in late November.

 

Health Law Writing Competition

The competition is designed to encourage JD and LLM students in the preparation of scholarly papers on current topics of interest relating to health law. Entrants should take advantage of the fact that health law is a very broad and diverse field, encompassing aspects of almost every area of law. Papers may address any traditional area of the law as applied to health care (e.g., antitrust, tax, corporate) or areas of law unique to health care (e.g., fraud and abuse, managed care, Medicare/Medicaid, clinical trials, telehealth/telemedicine). Entries ranked in the top 20 percent of all competition submissions will be considered for publication in the Annals of Health Law, which is published by the Loyola University Chicago School of Law. Submissions are typically due in late January.

 

Henry L. Diamond Constitutional Environmental Law Writing Competition

The U.S. Constitution has long been interpreted by judges and understood by most Americans to support comprehensive environmental protection. However, arguments questioning the constitutional legitimacy or application of environmental law continue to be made. ELI invites law students to submit papers exploring current issues of constitutional environmental law including any topic addressing developments or trends in U.S. environmental law with a significant constitutional, “federalism,” or other cross-cutting component. Submissions are typically due in mid April.

 

Hofstra Law School and the Association of Family and Conciliation Courts

This writing competition is sponsored by  the Hofstra Law and Association of Family and Conciliation Courts. Entrants should write about any aspect of family law though international and interdisciplinary subjects of family law are especially encouraged. Entries cannot exceed 25 pages and cannot be coauthored. The winner of the competition shall receive a $500 cash prize, and there will be up to two submissions given an Honorable Mention which is accompanied by a $250 cash prize. Submissions are typically due in early February.

 

The Hogan/Smoger Access to Justice Essay Competition 

As courts and legislators have made it more difficult to bring effective class actions, can class actions continue to advance environmental objectives and hold polluters accountable? Write a 6,000 to 25,000 word essay on this question or other pre-approved questions pertaining to the environment’s relationship with the law. The competition is open to all current law students and all masters of law students. Co-authored submissions are eligible; if selected, the co-authors will share the prize. Each submission must be an original, unpublished academic work, but simultaneous submissions will be accepted. If a submission has been accepted for publication, the student should include the journal’s written consent to the posting of the paper on Public Citizen’s website, which will feature appropriate attribution. Submissions are typically due in late April.

 

International Association of LGBT Judges Writing Competition

The International Association of LGBT Judges sponsors a writing competition for all law students attending the 2016 Lavender Law® Conference & Career Fair. This is an exciting opportunity for law students to speak directly to members of the United States judiciary. Entrants should write about diversity on the bench or judicial or legal ethics around LGBT issues. The International Association of LGBT Judges and the National LGBT Bar Association will award one applicant with a $1,500 monetary award as well as two $250 honorable mentions. The winner and any recipients of an honorable mention will receive complimentary registration to the 2016 Lavender Law Conference & Career Fair in Chicago. The winning entry may be posted on the American Judges Association’s webpage with excerpts published in their magazine. Submissions are typically due in late May.

 

International Humanitarian Law (IHL) Student Writing Competition

American University Washington College of Law Center for Human Rights & Humanitarian Law (Center), the American Society of International Law’s Lieber Society (ASIL), and the American Red Cross International Humanitarian Law team launched the Fifth Annual International Humanitarian Law (IHL) Student Writing Competition in the Fall of 2015. Each year, this competition is held as part of a joint effort to promote and enhance scholarship in international humanitarian law (IHL) among students. It is part of a multi-pronged initiative to expand and support the teaching and study of IHL among both students and professors in which both the Center and ASIL have been deeply involved. The IHL Student Writing Competition promotes and supports student interest and deepening scholarship in IHL by providing students with a tangible way to become more directly involved in the global discourse around IHL. Submissions are typically due in the middle of June.

 

James Baker Hughes Writing Competition

Students who have written a piece about international economic law may submit their manuscripts to the Journal in competition for the James Baker Hughes Prize. The prizewinner will be awarded $500 and publication in the Journal’s print publication. The manuscript’s focus must be on international economic law. The James Baker Hughes Prize is awarded for manuscripts on no other topic. Submissions are accepted year round and periodically published.

 

James E. Beckley Securities Arbitration and Law Competition

This is a writing competition for students interested in Securities Arbitration and Securities Law sponsored by The PIABA Foundation. First Prize is $1000, Second Prize is $750, and Third Prize is $500. Competition winner(s) will be posted online at www.piabafoundation.org. The PIABA Bar Journal Board-of-Editors will publish the first place paper, and may, at their option, print additional submissions. The submission may address any aspect of Securities Law; Securities Arbitration; The Federal Arbitration Act, Title 9, US Code, Section 1-14; or FINRA Code of Arbitration, effective April 16, 2007 and any changes or proposed changes to that Code. The writing can be based in theory or practice, but should ultimately advocate a position on the topic area chosen. This competition is open to all law students who attend a law school in the United States. Submissions typically are due in early September.

 

K. William Kolbe Law Student Writing Competition

The K. William Kolbe Law Student Writing competitions ask students to respond to a designated prompt with a coherent, well written essay. Papers should address a current topic of general interest in a legal area covered by the Section. The Section of Public Utility, Communications and Transportation Law covers specific industries that provide certain important, in some cases, essential, services to the general public. The Section is organized into industry committees and practice committees that relate to areas of legal specialty (e.g. antitrust, labor, taxation and accounting) as they apply to those industries. These committees are identified on the Section’s website. The Section will interpret the scope of the subject broadly to ensure that the Competition affords a great degree of flexibility in writing on these subject areas, but in any event the decision of whether a particular essay qualifies as to subject matter is entirely within the discretion of the Section. Entrants are encouraged to write on subjects of national interest or significance, not state-specific issues. Entries are typically due in late June.

 

Louis Jackson National Student Memorial Writing Competition in Employment and Labor Law

The Louis Jackson National Student Writing Competition in Employment and Labor Law is an annual law student writing competition that honors the memory of Louis Jackson, a founding partner in Jackson Lewis LLP. Jackson Lewis pioneered the concept of preventive employee relations to help employers shape a positive and productive workplace. The Louis Jackson National Student Writing Competition honors the memory of Louis Jackson, who provided inspiration, guidance, friendship and good humor for 50 years to all associated with Jackson Lewis. The competition is administered by IIT Chicago-Kent’s Institute for Law and the Workplace, a national center for research, training dialogue and reflection on the law that governs the workplace. The Institute pools the resources of leading academic scholars and the practicing professional community to train students and professionals, monitor policies and trends, and reflect upon issues confronting the labor and employment law community in a neutral setting. Entries are typically due in late February.

 

Michael Greenberg Student Writing Competition

The Michael Greenberg Student Writing Competition scholarship recognizes and encourages outstanding law student scholarship on the legal issues affecting lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and intersex persons. The scholarship was established in in memory of Michael Greenberg, a former National LGBT Bar Association board member and Philadelphia attorney who died in 1996 from complications of AIDS. Entrants should write about legal issues affecting the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and/or intersex community. The winner of the contest shall receive $1,000 cash and their submission will be published in the Tulane Journal of Law & Sexuality: A Review of Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in the Law. Submissions are typically due in late May.

 

Mid-Atlantic People of Color (MAPOC) Conference at West Virginia U. Writing Competition

This competition asks its applicants to write on the topic of the rights of children. Our constitutional jurisprudence recognizes children as legal persons, but the rights children possess are ill defined. For example, children have no independent standing to assert rights against those who hurt, endanger, or undermine their emotional, physical, psychological, or spiritual well-being. A child’s may assert a right and seek a remedy against harm only if the state’s agents determine that an adult charged with the child’s protection has violated the statutory framework (itself a recent creation) requiring that adult to protect the child’s best interest and advance the child’s welfare. As such, the history of the law, which has protected children, has been has been a balancing act between constraining parental authority to protect children and recognizing parents’ authority to raise their children as they see fit. Yet, the law still has no clear concept of good-enough parenting. Rather, the law relies on extreme cases in which children have suffered harm, neglect, and death as a basis for determining what is ineffective or bad parenting. Papers should focus on asking and answering questions about these and related topics. Submissions are typically due in late October.

 

Milani Writing Competition

Adam A. Milani – a passionate disability rights activist and accomplished scholar – was well known for his publication of numerous practical books and articles in the field of disability discrimination. He taught legal writing as well as the law of disability discrimination and always encouraged his students to become prolific and outstanding writers. The purposes of the competition are to promote greater interest in and understanding of the field of disability law and to encourage excellent legal writing skills in law students. The competition is open to all students who attend a law school in the United States. Full-time students who are not law students but who write law-related papers as part of a course at an American law school are also eligible. Employees of Mercer University School of Law (except for students working less than 20 hours per week) are not eligible to enter the competition. Submissions are typically due in the middle of June.

 

Mollie and Paul Hill Student Writing Competition

The Florida State University Center for Innovative Collaboration in Medicine and Law, based in both the FSU College of Medicine and the FSU College of Law, will present awards for the outstanding original papers submitted by a law student and a medical student or medical resident in response to a question pertaining to collaboration between the medical and legal professions. This writing competition is made possible by a generous gift from Mollie and Paul Hill. The contest question changes every year, but consistently pertains to the medical field. All authors must be enrolled, at the time of paper submission, in an accredited law school or medical school (M.D. or D.O.) or participating in an accredited medical residency program in the United States. Submissions are typically due in early January.

 

National Association of Chapter 13 Trustees Annual Law Student Writing Competition

The National Association of Chapter 13 Trustees has established an annual student writing competition to encourage and reward original law student writing on issues concerning consumer bankruptcy and the law. Entrants should submit an essay, article, or comment on an issue concerning Chapter 13 of the Bankruptcy Code. Submissions shall not exceed 15 pages of total text. The author of the winning essay shall receive $1,000 cash and the winning essay will be published in the NACTT Quarterly. Submissions are typically due in late April.

 

National Law Review Law Student Writing Competition

The National Law Review (NLR) consolidates practice-oriented legal analysis from a variety of sources for easy access by lawyers, paralegals, law students, business executives, insurance professionals, accountants, compliance officers, human resource managers, and other professionals who wish to better understand specific legal issues relevant to their work. The NLR Law Student Writing Competition offers law students the opportunity to submit articles for publication consideration on the NLR Web site.  No entry fee is required. Applicants can submit an unlimited number of entries each month. Submissions are typically due at the end of each month.

 

The National Moot Court Problem Writing Competition

This competition is open to moot court problems written while the author is a student (JD or graduate) at an accredited law school in the United States. Entries must include a Record including all of the materials to be given to students or competitors using the problem for a moot court activity and a Bench Memo for judges discussing the legal issues raised in the Problem and anticipated arguments to be made in briefs and oral argument. Problems will be screened by members of the NYU Moot Court Board; shortlisted problems will be assessed by a distinguished panel of faculty and judges. Our focus is to find the problem that most effectively explores legal frontiers in a way that makes the problem an exceptional educational tool. The following prizes may be awarded by the Moot Court Board: First Place: $2000, Second Place: $1000, Third Place: $500. The first, second, and third placed Problems will be published in the NYU Moot Court Casebook, the nation’s only compilation of moot court problems. Submissions are typically due in early August.

 

Notre Dame Law School Smith-Doheny Legal Ethics Writing Competition

Notre Dame Law School sponsors an annual writing competition on the topic of legal ethics. All students with an interest in legal ethics are invited and encouraged to participate. The competition is open to all law students in the U.S. and Canadian law schools. Entries should concern any issue within the general category of legal ethics. Submissions are typically due in late April.

 

Pacific Legal Foundation Student Writing Competition

This competition poses several prompts and asks students to respond to one prompt in a coherent essay. Submissions must be original works of publishable quality written by a student currently enrolled full- or part-time in a law school in the United States. All submissions must comply with the Harvard Law Review Association’s Bluebook Uniform System of Citation (20th ed.). There is no page limit for entries, although a word count of 3,000 to 5,000 words is suggested. The first place winner will receive a $5,000 cash prize. The second place winner will receive a $3,000 cash prize and the third place winner will receive a $1,000 cash prize. The winner will also be recognized at the Annual Pacific Legal Foundation Gala. PLF will pay for the winner’s reasonable travel costs to attend the gala and will assist with travel arrangements. Submissions are typically due in the middle of January.

 

Public Contract Law Journal Writing Competition

This annual writing competition provides monetary awards to law students and young lawyers for outstanding papers that address a topical issue of interest to the public contract and grant law community. The entries will be judged by an impartial panel of judges made up of members of the Public Contract Law Journal practitioner editorial board. Entries will be judged based on the overall quality of the paper, including clarity of the theme or thesis presented, significance of the topic to the field, originality and creativity of topic treatment, quality of analysis, quality of research and authority provided, and technical quality of writing, including organization, grammar, syntax and form. Entries are typically due in late September.

 

The Richard D. Cudahy Writing Competition on Regulatory and Administrative Law

The Richard D. Cudahy Writing Competition on Regulatory and Administrative Law is open to a wide array of participants. Practicing lawyers, policymakers, academics, and law students are all welcome to take part. We encourage participants to view this topic broadly and accept submissions on a variety of substantive areas. Submissions should be related to American regulatory or administrative law, broadly construed. Appropriate subjects include empirical or comparative analyses of the effectiveness of specific regulatory regimes or deregulation; doctrinal investigations of the development of administrative law rules or principles by courts and administrative agencies and the effects of that development; and normative analyses of how particular regulatory or administrative regimes or deregulation advance or fail to advance values of fairness, participation, and transparency. Submissions are typically due in early February.

 

Robert T. Matsui Annual Writing Competition

The Robert T. Matsui Annual Writing Competition was established by the Asian Pacific American Bar Association Educational Fund (AEF) in 2005 to honor the late Congressman Robert T. Matsui and his many accomplishments. A graduate of the University of California at Berkeley and the Hastings College of Law, Congressman Matsui was first elected to the United States Congress in 1978 from Sacramento, California. He won re-election to Congress thirteen times. Congressman Matsui was a strong supporter of AEF, serving as the keynote speaker for its Annual Benefit Dinner in 1997 and again in 2003. Through this writing competition, AEF seeks to encourage legal scholarship on issues of importance to the Asian Pacific American legal community and, more generally, the publication of law review articles on topics of relevance to racial and ethnic minorities and the law. The Competition is open to all law students in the United States. The winner of the 2014 Competition will receive a monetary award of $1,500, and the winning entry will be published by the UCLA School of Law’s Asian Pacific American Law Journal. Submissions are typically due in the middle of June.

 

Rona Mears Competition

This competition asks its participants to submit a video or essay on the topic of  international law. Written submissions should be essay quality, must not exceed 2,500 words and should not contain footnotes or endnotes (but can be supported by citations within the body). Video submissions should be recorded on a laptop computer (studio recordings are not permitted) and may not exceed five minutes. Video submissions should be a verbal analysis of the issue and can feature only the participant. Written and video submissions must be in English. Submissions not adhering to these guidelines will not be accepted for consideration. Only original and previously unpublished submissions are eligible.
Submissions prepared for law school credit are eligible, provided they are original works of the participant. Joint authored submissions are NOT eligible. Entrants may have a faculty member or practicing lawyer review and critique their work, but the submission must be the contestants’ own product. Judges and SIL leadership cannot participate in the contest or review/critique contestant entries prior to submission. Students who are employees of the ABA or immediate family members of ABA officers, directors, or employees are not eligible to compete. Submissions are typically due in the middle of August.

 

Roy C. Palmer Civil Liberties Prize

Established in 2007 at Chicago-Kent College of Law by alumnus Roy C. Palmer and his wife, Susan M. Palmer, the prize honors a work of scholarship that explores the tension between civil liberties and national security in contemporary American society. The $10,000 prize is designed to encourage and reward public debate among scholars on current issues affecting the rights of individuals and the responsibilities of governments throughout the world. Articles or books submitted to the competition must be in draft form or have been published within one year prior to the July 1 deadline. As a condition of accepting the award, the winner will present his or her work at Chicago-Kent. Submissions are typically due in early July.

 

Sarah Weddington Writing Prize for New Student Scholarship in Reproductive Rights

If/When/How, the Center for Reproductive Rights, and the Center on Reproductive Rights and Justice at U.C. Berkeley School of Law invite submissions for the twelfth annual Sarah Weddington Writing Prize for New Student Scholarship in Reproductive Rights. The co-sponsoring organizations seek student scholarship exploring reproductive rights and justice issues in the United States. We encourage writing that amplifies lesser-heard voices, suggests innovative solutions, and takes into account the realities and the lived experiences of the people most affected by reproductive oppression. We encourage students to think expansively about reproductive rights and justice (RR/RJ) and to analyze issues using an intersectional lens – considering the impact of demographic and institutional factors such as race, ethnicity, class,
gender, sexuality, and immigration status.

 

Securities Law Writing Competition

This is a writing competition that asks law students to write an essay on  any subject in the field of securities law. Students must be enrolled at any accredited law school in the United States for the 2016 fall semester. Unpublished papers, papers published in any law journal or other publication during calendar year 2016, and papers scheduled for publication in 2016 or 2017 are eligible for submission.  Co-authored papers are not eligible. All submissions must include author’s name and contact information, including e-mail, postal address, telephone number, law school, and year of anticipated graduation.  For submissions which have been published or are scheduled to be published, the name and date of publication should be included.  Receipt of submissions will be acknowledged by e-mail. Submissions are typically due in the middle of November.

 

Selma Moidel Smith Law Student Writing Competition

The mission of the National Association of Women Lawyers is to provide leadership, a collective voice, and essential resources to advance women in the legal profession and advocate for the equality of women under the law. Entrants should submit a paper on an issue concerning women’s rights or the status of women in the law. Entries must not exceed fifteen (15) pages of text, excluding notes, with footnotes placed as endnotes. The author of the winning essay will receive a cash prize of $500. NAWL will also publish the winning essay in the Women Lawyers Journal. Submissions are typically due in early May.

 

Shannon Bybee Scholarship Award

The International Association of Gaming Advisors (IAGA) announced that it will award prizes of $2,500 for each of the two best research papers written by students of accredited or international equivalent law schools as part of their class work. The awards honor the memory of Shannon Bybee, one of IAGA’s founders, who had a distinguished gaming career as a gaming attorney, Nevada regulator, industry executive, and pioneer in the field of education in casino operations and gaming law. Inducted into the American Gaming Association’s Hall of Fame in 2002 because of his significant contributions to responsible gaming, Bybee also played an important role in the development of problem gambling regulations and advocacy. Submissions are typically due in the middle of July.

 

State and Local Government Smith-Babcock-Williams Writing Competition

The Competition, which honors the memory of three leading figures in American City Planning Law (R. Marlin Smith, Richard Babcock, and Norman Williams) is open to law students and planning students writing on a question of significance in planning, planning law, land use, local government law or environmental law. The winning entry will be awarded a prize of $2,000 dollars and submitted for publication in The Urban Lawyer. The second place paper will be awarded $400 dollars and the honorable mention prize shall be $100 dollars. Submissions are typically due in early June.

 

Tort Trial and Insurance Practice (TIPS) Admiralty and Maritime Law Committee Law Student Writing Competition

The goal of the competition is to encourage law students to become involved within the Admiralty & Maritime Law Committee and the Tort Trial & Insurance Practice Section of the ABA. It is also designed to attract students to the civil trial, tort, insurance, and maritime fields, and to encourage scholarship in these areas. Essays must not exceed 20 pages of double-spaced typed text, 12 point Times New Roman font. Only one essay is to be submitted for each entrant. Entrants should write essays in traditional law review style, presenting a scholarly discussion with full citation to authority in footnotes. Submissions are typically due in early April.

 

Tort Trial and Insurance Practice (TIPS) Alternative Dispute Resolution Committee Student Writing Competition

The Alternative Dispute Resolution (“ADR”) Committee of the American Bar Association (“ABA”) Tort Trial & Insurance Practice Section is offering a writing competition, open to all law students who are members of the ABA, attending an ABA accredited law school. Entrants should write about recent developments in alternative dispute resolution. Entrants are encouraged to write about subjects of national interest, not state specific issues. The prize is a $500 reward to the winner, plus up to $500 toward attendance at an ABA TIPS meeting. The winning essay will be published in the ADR newsletter and will also be submitted for consideration for publication to the TIPS Law Journal Board. Submissions are typically due in late April.

 

Tort Trial and Insurance Practice (TIPS) Law Student Writing Competition

The ABA Tort Trial & Insurance Practice Section (TIPS) has established an annual Law Student Writing Competition with cash prizes awarded to the first and second place winners. The goal of the competition is to encourage and reward law student writings on legal subjects within the scope of the Section and general and current interest. It is also designed to attract students to the civil trial, tort and insurance fields, and to strongly encourage scholarship in these areas. The competition is open to any law school student in good standing, over the age of 18, who is currently attending an ABA-accredited law school within the United States and its possessions. All authors must be members of the American Bar Association Law Student Division at the time of submission. The first-place winner will receive $1,500 cash, free round-trip airfare and weekend accommodations to attend the ABA Annual Meeting. The first-place winner’s essay will be considered for publication in the Tort Trial & Insurance Practice Law Journal. The first-place winner will be announced in an upcoming issue of The Brief, the Section’s magazine. In addition, the second-place winner will receive $500 cash and honorable mention in The Brief and the third-place winner will receive an honorable mention in The Brief. Submissions are typically due in early March.

 

The Warren E. Burger Prize

The American Inns of Court Warren E. Burger Prize is a writing competition designed to promote scholarship in areas of professionalism, ethics, civility, and excellence. You must submit an original, unpublished essay of 10,000-20,000 words on a topic of your choice addressing the issues of excellence in legal skills, civility, ethics, and professionalism. The author of the winning essay will receive a cash prize of $5,000 and the essay will be published in the South Caroline Law Review.  Submissions are typically due in late July.

Competitions Open to JD Students Only

The ABA Section of Labor and Employment Law and the College of Labor and Employment Lawyers National Student Writing Competition

This competition is open to articles written while the author is a student at an accredited law school in the United States.  Graduate students in law school (LL.M. candidates) are not eligible. Entries should address aspects of public or private sector labor and/or employment law relevant to the American labor and employment bar. Students are encouraged to discuss a public policy issue, practical implications of a leading case or doctrine, a statute or the need for statutory modification, or a common law doctrine.  Articles may address U.S. law, international law of relevance to U.S. labor and employment attorneys, or how a legal topic is treated in states across the country. Papers limited to the law of a single state will not be considered. Papers must be analytical in nature, not merely a summary of the law. Students must present and discuss competing points of view with respect to the issue addressed and must distinguish their conclusions from opposing positions with sound logic and reference to multiple primary and secondary sources. We discourage students from writing articles about recent a Supreme Court decision or a case pending before the Supreme Court unless the article focuses upon case law or statutory developments subsequent to the Supreme Court’s decision. Submissions are typically due in the middle of June.

The following prizes may be awarded by the College of Labor and Employment Lawyers: First Place: $3000, Second Place: $1000, Third Place:  $500. The first-place winning article will be published in the ABA Journal of Labor & Employment Law. In addition, the author will be a guest at the annual CLE program of the ABA Section of Labor and Employment Law and honored at the Annual Induction Dinner of the College of Labor and Employment Lawyers. The College and the Section reserve the right not to select any article for publication or award any prizes if, in their judgment, the submissions do not meet their standards for outstanding legal writing.

 

Alternative Dispute Resolution James Boskey Writing Competition 

The purpose of the competition is to create greater interest in the field of dispute resolution among law students of the nation, particularly those who are members of the Law Student Division of the American Bar. The essay may address any aspect of dispute resolution practice, theory or research that the contestant chooses. Essays must be limited to 15-25 typewritten pages, including footnotes or endnotes. The text of the essay must be double-spaced, with twelve-point font and one-inch margins. Submissions are typically due in the middle of June.

 

The College of Labor and Employment Lawyers and American Bar Association Section of Labor and Employment Law Annual Law Student Writing Competition

The College of Labor and Employment Lawyers and the ABA Section of Labor and Employment Law are pleased to announce their 2016-2017 writing competition. This competition is open to articles written while the author is a student at an accredited law school in the United States. Entries should address aspects of public or private sector labor and/or employment law relevant to the American labor and employment bar. Students are encouraged to discuss a public policy issue, practical implications of a leading case or doctrine, a statute or the need for statutory modification, or a common law doctrine. Articles may address U.S. law, international law of relevance to U.S. labor and employment attorneys, or how a legal topic is treated in states across the country. Papers limited to the law of a single state will not be considered. Papers must be analytical in nature, not merely a summary of the law. Students must present and discuss competing points of view with respect to the issue addressed and must distinguish their conclusions from opposing positions with sound logic and reference to multiple primary and secondary sources. Submissions are typically due in the middle of June.

 

The Expert Institute’s Annual Legal Writing Scholarship

Clear, effective writing is the cornerstone of an exceptional lawyer, and a vital area of education for aspiring attorneys. While traditional forms of legal writing like case briefs and contracts endure, the internet has given legal professionals a new medium of communication that demands mastery as well. Blog posts are a new way for attorneys to educate and persuade, and to participate in a broader legal discourse with their peers. In recognition of the importance of online legal writing, The Expert Institute is offering a $2,000 scholarship for the best legal blog post written by a law student on the topic of expert witnesses.To be considered for the scholarship, you must submit a 1,000 to 2,500 word blog-style article on the use of expert witnesses in litigation. Applicants must be J.D. Students. Submissions are typically due in late December.

 

George Jay Joseph Nominations: Education Law Writing

The purpose of this national competition is to generate increased interest in and recognition of education law among not only graduate students in education schools but also, in particular, to students in law schools. The winner of the competition will be recognized at the annual conference of the Education Law Association (ELA), and the manuscript will be published in the Journal of Law and Education. Additionally, the winner will be invited to present on the topic of the article at the ELA annual conference and receive a commemorative plaque, a year’s membership in ELA, waiver of the registration fee for the annual conference, and national recognition via an ELA press release. The subject matter must address one or more legal issues within any of the various contexts of education, including public and private K-12 schools and institutions of higher education, especially current and emerging issues in elementary and secondary public education. Submissions are typically due in early July.

 

Howard C. Schwab Memorial Essay Contest

The subject may be any aspect of family law. The primary focus of each essay should be an issue of law, although some interdisciplinary material may be useful in addressing a legal issue. Family law includes dissolution of marriage and other intimate relationships, relationships of persons of the same sex, parentage, custody, child support, division of property, alimony (maintenance), attorney’s fees, adoption, dependency, termination of parental rights, rights pertaining to procreation, and alternative dispute resolution of Family Law issues. Family Law generally does not include Juvenile Justice, Probate, Labor, Immigration Law, and sociology topics unless those topics are related to more traditional Family Law subjects. Since winning entries may be published in Family Law Quarterly, entrants are encouraged to write on subjects of national interest. Essays on such subjects usually include citations to the law of several jurisdictions. However, if the law in one state reflects a significant development or trend, that too could be an appropriate subject for an entry. Essays should be limited to approximately 5,000 words (25 double-spaced, typewritten pages including footnotes). Longer essays will be judged unfavorably, and those longer than 28 pages will be disqualified. Essays scheduled to be published, and essays that have previously been published, are ineligible for consideration. The essay format was selected to stimulate creativity of thought. Entries will be judged on the basis of originality, quality of analysis, quality of research, style and organization, and practicality and timeliness of subject. Submissions are typically due in the middle of April.

 

The IEL Hartrick Scholar Writing Competition

The Institute for Energy Law of The Center for American and International Law announces its 2017 Hartrick Scholar writing competition. All eligible students are invited to participate. Students enrolled in law school anywhere in the world as of December 2016, and seeking a first degree in law, such as a juris doctor, LL. B. or an equivalent, are eligible to submit an article for consideration in the IEL Hartrick Scholar competition. The general subject for this year’s competition is any topic related to energy development. This includes, for example, topics concerning oil and gas law, alternative energy resources, energy regulation, and environmental regulation of the energy industries. Submissions are typically due in early December.

 

International Association of Defense Counsel Legal Writing Contest

All J.D. candidates currently enrolled in accredited law schools are eligible to participate in the IADC Legal Writing Contest. Entrants must write on subjects in the fields of tort law, insurance law, civil procedure, evidence or other areas of the law of practical concern to lawyers engaged in the defense, or management of the defense of civil litigation. The contest is judged by a committee of the IADC. Submissions are typically due in late May.

 

Judge John R. Brown Award

The Judge John R. Brown Scholarship Foundation is pleased to announce the twenty-third annual Brown Award. The Award is in recognition of Excellence in Legal Writing in American Law Schools. Any law student currently enrolled in an accredited law school in the United States seeking a J.D. or LL.B degree is eligible to submit a paper for the Award. There is no page limitation or restriction on the topic except that the writing must be on a legal subject. The Foundation will appoint a final judging panel consisting of a law school dean, a federal judge, and a law school professor. This year the stipend for the winner is $10,000. Submissions are typically due in the middle of August.

 

Law School Admission Council (LSAC) Writing Competition

The Law School Admission Council (LSAC) is committed to fostering diversity in law schools and the legal profession. Currently, through its Diversity Committee, LSAC sponsors and funds a number of initiatives aimed at increasing the diversity of the legal profession.For decades, studies consistently have shown that students of color, students living with a disability, and LGBTQ students are underrepresented in most law schools. As a consequence, smaller percentages of persons who represent these groups are graduating from law school and entering the legal profession. This writing competition is designed to reinvigorate the dialogue about the recruitment and retention strategies that law schools should deploy to yield a more diverse class of graduates who will enter the legal profession.One winning paper will be selected from each of the three (3) qualifying categories of eligible students (1L, 2L, 3L/4L). Each winner will receive a $5,000 cash prize and the winning essays will be posted at DiscoverLaw.org. In addition, one winning paper will be submitted for publication in the Journal of Legal Education or similar publication. Submissions are typically due in late March.

 

National Native American Law Students Association Writing Competition

The competition aims to recognize excellence in legal research and writing related to Indian law; actively encourage the development of writing skills of National NALSA members; and enhance
substantive knowledge in the fields of Federal Indian Law, Tribal Law, and traditional forms of governance. Current NNALSA members who are matriculated law students at any point in their lawschool career may enter the competition. Eligible paper topics are Federal Indian law and policy, Tribal law and policy, International law and policy concerning indigenous peoples, and comparative law (i.e inter-tribal or government-to-government studies). Existing work is welcome.Each competitor must be enrolled in a Juris Doctorate program at an accredited law school and be in good standing at their law school during the spring semester of the year of the competition. Each competitor must be a current NNALSA member in good standing throughout the competition. Submissions are typically due in early February.

 

Student Law and Technology Writing Competition

This writing competition allows current students from ABA-accredited law schools to compete for cash prizes as well as the opportunity to have their work published in the University of Richmond’s Journal of Law and Technology. The Student Law and Technology Writing Competition includes three separate awards offered to law students who have submitted exemplary papers. The first place article will receive $1,500 and the second place article will receive $700. In addition, one law student from The University of Richmond School of Law will receive the Rick Klau Prize of $300. The topic of the paper MUST deal with a topic at the intersection of both law and technology. Submissions are typically due in late January.

 

Thomas Austern Writing Competition

The H. Thomas Austern Writing Competition is intended to encourage law student interest in the areas of law that affect food, drugs, biologics, cosmetics, dietary supplements, medical devices, and tobacco. Top papers will be considered for publication in the Food and Drug Law Journal and award winners will receive a monetary prize. Papers should provide an indepth analysis of a current legal or regulatory issue concerning FDA regulated industries: food, drugs, animal drugs, biologics, cosmetics, diagnostics, dietary supplements, medical devices or tobacco. FDLI welcomes the submission of papers prepared for course work, but entrants must pay attention to competition details and edit such papers accordingly. Submissions are typically due in the middle of June.

Competitions Open to LL.M. Students Only

Human Rights Essay Award

The Human Rights Essay Award is an annual competition sponsored by the Academy and seeks to stimulate the production of scholarly work in international human rights law. Participants have the flexibility to choose any subject related to the assigned topic. The essay has to be a legal article. Candidates must hold a law degree and have demonstrated experience or interest in international human rights law.

 

S. James Anaya Award for Excellence in International Legal Scholarship

Inspired by S. James Anaya’s commitment to promoting international human rights around the world and his significant contribution to legal scholarship, the Arizona Journal of International and Comparative Law created this award. The S. James Anaya Award for Excellence in International Legal Scholarship aims to recognize exceptional contributions to the field of international and comparative law through dissertations and legal writings, especially in those of international students seeking an SJD or LLM in the United States. Our hope is that promoting the written legal work of students of international and comparative law we will help foster a legal community rooted in diverse and principled viewpoints. Submissions are typically due in the middle of July.