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CSLS Visiting Scholars Speaker Series – Lilla Farkas & Carrie Rosenbaum

Thursday, April 18, 2019 @ 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

CSLS Visiting Scholars Speaker Series

Friday, April 18, 2019

 

LILLA FARKAS

European University Institute

 

“US Hegemony in the Meaning and Practice of Anti-racist Law in Europe: The Roma Rights Movement, 1989-2018”

The presentation revisits critical narratives about the Open Society Foundations’ role in the Roma Rights Movement, claiming that discursive domination facilitates the transnational governance of the ‘Roma issue’ in the European Union and functions as a self-legitimating tool that also promotes the internationalization of public interest litigation in the US. Through the campaign built around the ‘European Brown’ the philanthropy constructs political and ideological power, diffusing narratives about public interest litigation as a key enforcement tool. Nonetheless, in countries with sizable Roma populations legal and policy reform results from advocacy rather than litigation and takes the shape of statute, rather than precedent. Lawyering is inspired by dissident legalism that simultaneously seeks to constrain and rely on the state for wealth redistribution, while generously transposed ‘EU collective actor legislative requirements’ shape the multi-source and inter-ordinal practice field.

&

 

CARRIE ROSENBAUM

Golden Gate University

 

“Rule of Law in the Real, Real World: An Immigration Law Focused Critical Race Critique”

Within certain contexts, congress is understood to have the authority to act with plenary, or unreviewable power, although this power is not expressly authorized by the U.S. constitution. The plenary power doctrine shields congressional infringement of individual constitutional rights from judicial review in ways that have a longstanding racialized history. Within immigration law scholarship, plenary power has generally been examined as a doctrine unique to immigration law. However, the history of settler colonialism demonstrates the ways in which plenary power has been used to control groups other than noncitizens. I contend that plenary power is not an anomaly in an otherwise equality-oriented democracy adhering to rule of law, but instead, the discriminatory nature of plenary power is a deeply entrenched construct that is at odds with a normative democratic equality-minded understanding of rule of law. 

 

PLACE               Selznick Seminar Room, 2240 Piedmont Avenue
TIME            3:00 – 4:30 p.m.   Beverages and light refreshments provided.
INFO            https://www.law.berkeley.edu/centers/center-for-the-study-of-law-society/
EMAIL            csls@law.berkeley.edu

 

Jonathan Simon, FACULTY DIRECTOR I Rosann Greenspan, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Details

Date:
Thursday, April 18, 2019
Time:
3:00 pm - 4:30 pm
Event Category:

Organizer

Center for the Study of Law and Society
Email:
csls@law.berkeley.edu
Website:
https://www.law.berkeley.edu/centers/center-for-the-study-of-law-society/

Venue

Philip Selznick Seminar Room
2240 Piedmont Ave
Berkeley, CA 94720-2150 United States
+ Google Map
Phone:
510-642-4038

Events are wheelchair accessible. For disability-related accommodations, contact the organizer of the event. Advance notice is kindly requested.

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