LL.M. Traditional and Thesis Track Student Handbook 2018

Welcome to Berkeley Law! This handbook will help you navigate Berkeley Law’s academic policies and resources, professional opportunities, and social offerings. It also provides tips and information about student life in and around Berkeley. You are responsible for knowing the school policies that apply to you during your studies here, so read it carefully! Please note that the information in this handbook may change. Throughout this document we will link to websites that will contain the most up-to-date material. Information on our websites will supersede this handbook.

 

Administrative Information

Fall Semester 2018

Orientation for LL.M. Students

Aug. 13, Monday

Term begins

Aug. 13, Monday

Fundamentals of US Law for LL.M. Students

Aug. 15-17, Wednesday-Friday

Instruction Begins

Aug. 20, Monday

Last Day to Add/Drop (online via Calcentral)

Aug. 31, Friday

Labor Day, no classes meet

Sep. 3, Monday

Last Day to Add/Drop (by petition)

Sep. 14, Friday

Veterans Day, no classes meet

Nov. 12, Monday

Last Day of Regularly Scheduled Classes

Nov. 20, Tuesday

Thanksgiving, no classes meet

Nov. 21-23, Wednesday-Friday

Make-up day for Monday classes missed on Labor Day

Nov. 26, Monday

Make-up day for Monday classes missed on Veterans Day

Nov. 27, Tuesday

Make-up day for classes missed on Wednesday, November 21st

Nov. 28, Wednesday

Make-up day for Thursday classes missed on Thanksgiving Day

Nov. 29, Thursday

Make-up day for Friday classes missed on November 23rd, the day after Thanksgiving

Nov. 30, Friday

All Make-Up Classes Concluded

Nov. 30, Friday

Review Sessions/Reading Period

Dec. 3-5, Monday-Wednesday

Final Examinations

Dec. 6-Dec. 8 regular exam day, Thursday-Monday, Sat.

Fall Semester Ends

Dec. 17, Monday

Spring  Semester 2019

Term begins

Dec. 31, Monday

Instruction Begins for Regularly Scheduled Classes

Jan. 7, Monday

Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday, no classes meet

Jan. 21, Monday

Last Day to Add/Drop (by petition)

Feb. 1, Friday

Presidents Day Holiday, no classes meet

Feb. 18, Monday

Cesar Chavez Holiday

Mar. 29, Friday

Spring Recess, no classes meet

Mar. 25-29, Monday-Friday

Last Day of Regularly Scheduled Classes

Apr. 19, Friday

Make-up day for Monday classes missed on Martin Luther King Day

Apr. 22, Monday

Make-up day for Monday classes missed on Presidents Day

Apr. 23, Tuesday

All Make-Up Classes Concluded

Apr. 23, Tuesday

Review Sessions/Reading Period

Apr. 24-26, Wednesday-Friday

Final Examinations

Apr. 29-May 8, Monday-Wednesday, Sat. May 4 regular exam day

Spring Semester Ends

May 8, Wednesday

The ADP office staff will handle the majority of your questions or concerns during your time at Berkeley.

 

Evelyn Borchert, Director of Academic Advising & Student Support
Evelyn advises LL.M. and J.S.D. students on coursework selection, degree requirements and student life matters. She also administers the J.S.D. program and can answer any questions about the program and admission requirements.

  • Contact eborchert@law.berkeley.edu / 510‐642‐7359, or schedule an appointment with Evelyn through bCourses


Rachel Zuraw, J.D., M.Be., Director of LL.M. Professional Development

Rachel advises LL.M. students on academic matters and provides professional development counseling and support. She also collaborates with other members of the ADP staff to organize workshops focused on professional skills and practice areas of interest. Prior to joining Berkeley Law, Rachel worked as an associate attorney at O’Melveny & Myers LLP and Hanson Bridgett LLP in San Francisco. She also taught at the University of Pennsylvania and Drexel University Thomas R. Kline School of Law

  • Contact rzuraw@law.berkeley.edu / 510-642-3218or schedule an appointment with Rachel through bCourses


Peter Landreth, J.D., Director of LL.M. Professional Development
Peter advises LL.M. students on academic matters and provides professional development counseling and support. He also collaborates with other members of the ADP staff to organize workshops focused on professional skills and practice areas of interest. Prior to joining Berkeley Law, Peter practiced environmental law at Holland & Knight LLP and worked in-house at NRG Energy.

  • Contact plandreth@law.berkeley.edu  / 510-664-9877, or schedule an appointment with Peter through bCourses

Liza Jimenez, Associate Director of Student Services
Liza works in admissions and alongside Anya Grossmann on the student ambassador program connecting current LL.M. students and alumni with prospective students. Please talk to her if you’d like to become an ambassador for Berkeley Law!

Administrative Assistant
ADP’s Administrative Assistant runs the front desk in the ADP office, room 214, and is responsible for supporting the day‐to‐day operations of the department. They can help you make an appointment to see an advisor, and answer general questions about the program and administrative processes of the Law School.

Anya Grossmann, Director of Global Outreach and Professional Engagement
Prior to joining Berkeley Law, Anya worked as an associate attorney at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP in New York. She directs global outreach efforts and coordinates the LL.M. ambassador program connecting current LL.M. students and alumni with prospective and admitted students, so please talk to her if you’d like to become an ambassador for Berkeley Law and help recruit the next generation of bears!

Jodi L. Collova, Director of LL.M. Legal Research and Writing
Jodi coordinates the Legal Research and Writing (“LRW”) program for LL.M. students. She develops the curriculum and leads a team of talented instructors who teach LRW. If you have any questions about the LRW program, please feel free to contact Jodi. She also teaches Fundamentals of U.S. Law and Advanced Legal Writing for LL.M. students.

Kara Ganter, Director of Communications and Program Development
Kara leads marketing and communications for the Advanced Degree Programs office.

  • Contact klganter@law.berkeley.edu

Natalie Golden, Associate Director of Admissions
Natalie handles all aspects of the admissions process.

Erin Weldon, Director of Admissions
Erin manages all aspects of the admissions process.

Susan Whitman, Assistant Dean of Academic Planning and Coordination
Assistant Dean Whitman leads Berkeley Law’s LL.M. and J.S.D. programs, and oversees Berkeley Law’s J.D. and LL.M. curriculum. She collaborates with Professor Rob Merges, the Faculty Director of the LL.M. and J.S.D. programs, and with Jodi Collova, the Director of LL.M. Legal Research and Writing. Before joining Berkeley Law in 2008, Assistant Dean Whitman was the Associate Probate Judge for Travis County (Austin) Texas for 8 years, and for 15 years she ran the Elder Law Clinic at the University of Texas School of Law. swhitman@law.berkeley.edu/510‐643‐9566

Dr. Linda Zaruba, Staff Psychologist
Dr. Zaruba is Berkeley Law’s dedicated counselor. She is available to meet with you confidentially to discuss any emotional stress you may be encountering. The stresses of moving to a completely new place can be eased by just sitting down and talking to someone who cares; emergency situations are not the only reason to seek counseling.

  • Schedule an appointment with Dr. Zaruba by calling her at 510‐643‐5447

Appointment System

Appointments can be made through the ADP Office bCourses page.

If you have any technical problems please contact adpoffice@law.berkeley.edu.

Berkeley International Office (BIO)

Berkeley International Office provides knowledge and expertise in advising, immigration services, advocacy, and programming to the UC Berkeley campus community. The BIO office is your primary point of contact for questions regarding your visa status; ADP staff are not permitted to provide visa or immigration advice.

Services provided by BIO:

  • Advising support for nonimmigrant students
      • Visa document production for nonimmigrant students and scholars
      • A wide variety of programs and workshops
      • OPT forms

    Drop‐in Student Advising hours: 10am‐12pm and 1‐4pm (Monday ‐ Friday) Berkeley International Office

2299 Piedmont Avenue Berkeley, CA 94720‐2321 (510) 642‐2818

InternationalOffice@berkeley.edu http://internationaloffice.berkeley.edu

510‐845‐1460

286 Simon Hall

www.berkeleylawshop.com and www.rentatext.com

August 17‐Aug 21 special hours: M‐F 9am‐5pm, books sold in the Goldberg Room

Berkeley Law’s Bookstore is located in 286 Simon Hall and is open M‐TR: 10am ‐ 4.30pm and F: 10am – 3pm. In addition to selling and renting course materials, the bookstore stocks school supplies, commercial outlines, study aids, apparel and gifts, as well as a small assortment of candy, snacks, and beverages.

The bookstore offers new and used (when available) copies of all required and recommended books, for sale and for rent. On average, a little over half of the required titles are available to rent. The rental price on average is ~50% less than the new textbook price. When renting for the first time, you’ll need to provide:

      • A telephone number
      • Email address
      • Government‐issued photo ID
      • Branded credit or debit card to be used as collateral

Students are permitted to take notes and highlight in rented books. We only ask that you don’t cause any structural damage (e.g., cracked spine, torn or missing pages, water damage, to name a few) to the books, as they are reused by your fellow students.

If, at any point during the semester, you decide that you want to keep any of your rented books, just pay the difference between the rental and purchase price (new/used) and the book is yours. This policy also applies to books damaged or lost during the rental period. A thorough explanation of the rental process can be found at rentatext.com

Questions? Please stop by the store and ask, or visit: berkeleylawshop.com

The Berkeley Law Financial Aid Office can assist with questions about your bill or student loans.  Please view the Frequently Asked Questions for LL.M. students.  If you still have questions, contact the Financial Aid Office:

E-mail: financial-aid-law@berkeley.edu (response time typically 12-48 hours)

Phone: 510-642- 1563 (response time typically 12-48 hours)

In-person: Please schedule an appointment in advance when possible. 226 Boalt Hall

bCourses is the online collaboration and learning environment at UC Berkeley. This site will include not only your course websites, but orientation information and videos, announcements from the ADP staff and a link to make appointments with career and academic advisors from the ADP office. We have your @berkeley.edu emails associated with our
“ADP Office – 2018-19 LL.M. Traditional/Thesis Track” bCourses page. To log in, go to https://bcourses.berkeley.edu/ with your CalNet ID and passphrase. Please regularly check the ADP Office bCourses site for important information such as academic resources, events, and links to campus services.

Your Cal 1 Card is your official campus ID. As a student, you’ll use your Cal 1 Card several times a day while you’re on campus. You’ll use this card to sign in at libraries, ride free on local buses, and as a key card to access the Law Library and study lounge.

You may go to the Cal 1 Card office, present your passport and your student ID number, and get your ID issued. You will also receive an AC Transit EasyPass Clipper card with an electronic “Class Pass” that allows you to ride on any city bus (AC Transit) free of charge. Your Clipper card will be available by Wednesday, August 15 at the Cal 1 Office.

180 Cesar Chavez Center, Lower Sproul Plaza Monday‐Friday, 9am‐4:30pm

Phone: 510‐643‐6839

Email: cal1card@berkeley.edu

 

Cal Student Central is your one-stop student services center for information on billing and payments.

120 Sproul Hall Monday-Friday, 9am-noon and 1-4pm
Phone: 510-664-9181
Online: http:/studentcentral.berkeley.edu

 

Fall fees are billed in early August after enrollment and due by August 17, 2018. Spring fees are due January 11, 2019. You will receive an email when fees are assessed each semester.

Accessing Your Fee Details
You can view your fee details in CalCentral.  To access your fee details:

  1. Go to calcentral.berkeley.edu
  2. Log in with your CalNet ID and passphrase
  3. Click on the My Finances tab
  4. Click on Details by Billing Summary Summer 2018

 

Monthly Statement
The Monthly Statement is not a bill, but will display activity that occurred during the previous month.  You will receive an email when the Monthly Statement is generated.

 

E-bill
Payment Options

e-Check: If you have a US bank account, you may choose to pay via e-Check. Log into CalCentral, select My Finances and review the “Billing Summary Summer 2018” box. Click the “Make Payment” button to complete your payment transaction.

Credit Card: 1 2.75% convenience fee applies to credit card payments. Log into CalCentral, select My Finances and review the “Billing Summary Summer 1027” box. Click the “Make Payment” button to complete your payment transaction.

Foreign Funds: Students can pay their charges via International Funds Transfer (IFT). Log into CalCentral, select My Finances and review the “Billing Summary Summer 2018” box.  Click the “Make Payment” button to initiate your wire payment transaction.  Quotes rates are valid for 72 hours.

Check: Payments by check or money orders must be issued in U.S. dollars, drawn on a U.S. bank, and made payable to “UC Regents”. Be sure to include your Student ID number on the memo line of the check. Checks can be left at the drop box at the entrance of University Hall on the 2199 Addison Street side, or mailed to:

University of California, Berkeley
Payment Services
140 University Hall, MC #1111
Berkeley, CA 94720-1111

Cash payments are not accepted.

To see detailed payment options, go to: http://studentbilling.berkeley.edu/PaymentOptions.htm
If payments are not credited to the account by the due date, the following may occur:
•    The account may be charged a late fee
•    A block may be placed on your registration for future terms
•    You may be dropped from the rolls, i.e. grades will not post to your transcript until all registration fees for the term are paid in full

Fee Payment Plan

Enrolling in the Fee Payment Plan (FPP) allows for the fall and spring semester registration fees to be paid in five monthly installments. The deadline to enroll in the FPP is September 17th for fall and February 11th  for spring.  FPP enrollment is established per semester.

A non‐refundable participation fee of $60 per semester will be due with the first installment.

To enroll, log into CalCentral, select My Finances, and select the Fee Payment Plan. Review the installments, complete the agreement, then save the installment schedule. Once enrolled, submit payment according to the installment schedule.

For more information on the FPP, including installment due dates, go to: http://studentbilling.berkeley.edu/deferredPay.htm

Third Party Payments

If a sponsoring agency is paying your tuition and requires an invoice in their name before sending payment, you may request a Third Party Contract. You will need to provide documentation of the third party’s support in order for them to be directly billed. Refer to the Third Party Contract site for more information: http://studentbilling.berkeley.edu/thirdpartycontract.htm

If the e-bill does not need to be in the third party’s name, you can delegate access to an individual who can act on your behalf by paying bills, viewing academic information, etc. Students choose which privileges to delegate, and can change those privileges at any time. You can create or manage delegates at https://calcentral.berkeley.edu/profile/delegate.

Please plan for other non-tuition, non-housing related expenses including:

  • Regalia (the cap and gown you wear for the traditional graduation ceremony) must be rented for an estimated fee of $75.00
  • Optional Practical Training (OPT): there are costs associated with extending your visa after graduation. See http://internationaloffice.berkeley.edu/students/training/f‐1/opt
  • Bar Exam Fees: Both the California and New York Bar examinations have associated application and registration fees. Barbri and other Bar Preparation courses also have separate fees. We will review these fees at the Bar Examination Workshops.
  • Entertainment: There will be many social student activities to participate in and most require a fee for food and beverages.
  • Campus Parking: Student parking is available for an estimated fee of $377 per semester. http://pt.berkeley.edu/parking/student-permits

Please note that the requirements for the California and New York Bar Exams are different from and exceed the requirements for obtaining your LL.M. degree.

LL.M. Traditional Track

All Berkeley Law traditional track LL.M. students must enroll in courses over one year or for two consecutive academic year semesters. There are different requirements for foreign-trained students versus students holding a J.D. degree in common law from a U.S. or Canadian law school.  

For all traditional track students, coursework units that count toward the LL.M. degree include:

  • Regular Law School-scheduled courses (see list below for ineligible coursework units)
  • A maximum of 2 units for participating in a maximum of 1 independent research and writing project (Law 299)
  • A maximum of 2 units for participation in a maximum of 1 group research and writing project (Law 298)
  • A maximum total of 1 unit for participation in a journal
  • Practica, practice projects, or field placements in which the work of the student is supervised by a faculty member at the Law School, including units earned through a seminar course associated with a practicum or field placement. A list of practica that count toward the degree requirements is available on the ADP Office bCourse site.

For all traditional track students, units that do not count toward the LL.M. degree include:

  • Individual research projects (Law 297)
  • Teaching pedagogy coursework (Law 275P)
  • Courses taken outside of the Law School (non-law units)
  • Practica, practice projects, or field placements in which the work of the student is not supervised primarily by a faculty member at the Law School

 

Following are the requirements for the two categories of students in the LL.M. traditional track:

  1. U.S. or Canadian students with a J.D. in common law

  2. Foreign-trained students
  •     Complete a minimum of 21 total units;
  •     Enroll in a minimum of 10 units and a maximum of 16 units per semester; and
  •     Fulfill the LL.M. Capstone Writing Requirement by completing a paper of 15-20 pages in length in any class or through an independent study (Law 299), and submit an LL.M. Capstone Writing Requirement Fulfillment form to the Registrar’s office prior to the spring semester Add/Drop Deadline.

 

  1.       Complete a minimum of 21 units;
  2.       Enroll in a minimum of 10 units and a maximum of 16 units per semester;
  3.       Complete the 3 unit Fundamentals of U.S. Law class (fall semester); and
  4.       Fulfill the LL.M. Capstone Writing Requirement by completing the 2 units of Legal Research and Writing class (fall semester).

Students who have a law degree from a university in which the course of study involved common law principles and was taught in English may file a Request to Waive LL.M. Legal Research and Writing by the end of the first week of classes. The Director of Legal Research and Writing shall administer a legal analysis and writing exam for all petitioners, and shall waive the course requirement only for those petitioners demonstrating mastery of the exam as determined by the Director of Legal Research and Writing. Those students who are granted a waiver for Legal Research and Writing must fulfill the Capstone Writing Requirement by completing a paper of 15-20 pages in length in any class or through an independent study (Law 299), and submit an LL.M. Capstone Writing Requirement Fulfillment form to the Registrar’s office prior to the spring semester Add/Drop Deadline.

 

 

LL.M. Thesis Track Requirements

All Berkeley Law thesis track LL.M. students must enroll in courses over one year or for two consecutive academic year semesters. There are different requirements for foreign-trained students versus students holding a J.D. degree in common law from a U.S. or Canadian law school.  

 

For all thesis-track students, mandatory coursework includes:

  • 206.4A Legal Research and Writing class (2 units, fall semester)
  • 325A and 325B Thesis Track Independent Study (6-8 units, split between fall (325A) and spring (325B) semesters), OR 6-8 units of 325AB  taken all during spring semester)

Additional coursework units that count toward the LL.M. degree include:

  • Regular Law School-scheduled courses (see list below for ineligible coursework units)
  • A maximum of 2 units for participation in a maximum of 1 group research and writing project (Law 298)
  • A maximum total of 1 unit for participation in a journal
  • Practica, practicum clinics or field placements in which the work of the student is supervised by a faculty member at the Law School, including units earned through a seminar course associated with a practicum or field placement. A list of practica that count toward the degree requirements is available on the ADP Office bCourse site.

 

Units that do not count toward the LL.M. degree for thesis track students include:

  • Independent study that is not part of the thesis (Law 299)
  • Individual research projects (Law 297)
  • Teaching pedagogy coursework (Law 275P)
  • Courses taken outside of the Law School (non-Law units)
  • Practica, practice projects, or field placements in which the work of the student is not supervised primarily by a faculty member at the Law School

 

Following are additional requirements for the two categories of thesis-track students:

  1. Foreign-trained students
  2. U.S. or Canadian students with a J.D. in common law
  1. Complete a minimum of 21 total units;
  2. Enroll in a minimum of 10 units and a maximum of 16 units per semester;
  3. Complete the 3 unit Fundamentals of U.S. Law class (fall semester);
  4. Complete 2 units of Legal Research and Writing (fall semester)
  5. Complete an original thesis in the form of a substantial research and writing project that is of publishable quality and roughly 50-60 double-spaced pages. The thesis paper is due by the end of the spring semester.
  1. Complete a minimum of 21 total units;
  2. Enroll in a minimum of 10 units and a maximum of 16 units per semester;
  3. Fulfill the LL.M. Capstone Writing Requirement by completing an original thesis in the form of a substantial research and writing project that is of publishable quality and roughly 50-60 double-spaced pages by the end of the spring semester.

Final Exams

At Berkeley Law each faculty member has discretion over his or her exams. The possible exam types are:

  1. Multiple choice
  2. Essay
  3. A combination of multiple choice and essay (“multi‐modal”)
  4. A final paper or series of papers
  5. A combination of the above

Exams may be given in class or offered as a take‐home. In order to preserve anonymous grading, each semester you will be given an exam number to use in lieu of your name on all of your exams.

 

The instructor has the authority to refuse permission for you to take the final examination if you fail to attend class regularly.

 

You will receive instruction on how to successfully take law school exams in your Fundamentals of US Law course.

Each semester, you can see the overall in‐class final exam schedule here: http://www.law.berkeley.edu/php‐programs/students/examTimesList.php. Take‐home exams are self‐ scheduled during the finals period, but your answer must be uploaded to the online exam interface before the end of the finals period.

For each of your exams (in‐class or take‐home), you will use the online exam interface: http://www.law.berkeley.edu/php‐programs/students/exams/index.php. This can also be found by going to law.berkeley.edu, clicking “For Students” and then “Exams.” You will be asked to log‐in with your CalNet ID.  This webpage includes:

  1. your exam number, to be used on each exam in lieu of your name
  2. your classes
  3. your individual exam schedule
  4. the links to download and upload your exams
  5. in the event any of your exams are rescheduled (see below), you will see the reschedule information on this website as well, as it becomes available

Exams are never rescheduled to accommodate travel plans, employment, or other personal obligations. An individual student’s in‐class final exam will be rescheduled only if a student has:

  • Two in‐class final exams scheduled at the same time;
  • Two in‐class final exams scheduled back-to-back (e.g., two exams on the same day, or one exam in the afternoon and another the following morning); or
  • Three in‐class final exams scheduled on three consecutive days.

Although students may indicate a preference as to which exam is rescheduled, rescheduling decisions will be made at the discretion of the Dean of Students and the Director of Student Services, Kyle Valenti. You will be automatically contacted by email about one month before exams if one or more of your individual exams have been rescheduled due to one of the reasons listed above.

Please contact Kyle Valenti at kvalenti@law.berkeley.edu for exam‐related questions. Rescheduled exams will not be given earlier than the original exam date.

A separate mandatory curve applies to all LL.M. and J.S.D. students in classes and seminars with 11 or more LL.M. and J.S.D. students such that 20% of the LL.M. and J.S.D. students receive High Honors, 30% receive Honors, and 50% receive Pass. The same curve is recommended for LL.M. and J.S.D. students in classes and seminars with 10 or fewer LL.M. and J.S.D. students.  A professor can deviate from the curve in any size class if he or she believes that a Pass-Conditional or No-Credit is the appropriate grade for a student.

Academic Disqualification Policy

(a) In General

If at the end of any one semester an LL.M. student fails two or more classes, or if at the end of an academic year an LL.M. student has received cumulative Substandard Pass designations and No Credit grades either for 30% of his or her total grades or for 30% of his or her total units, then the student shall be disqualified.

(b) Probation

An LL.M. student who fails one class or receives Substandard Pass designations for 30% of his or her total grades or units after the Fall semester shall be subject to conditions of probation as the Dean of Students may impose for the Spring semester immediately following the semester in which the grades were earned. The imposition of conditions of probation may not be appealed.

An LL.M. student may appeal that disqualification to the Disqualification Appeals Committee. The Committee will make a recommendation to the Dean of the Law School regarding each disqualification appeal and the decision of the Dean of the

Law School will be final on all appeals. Students disqualified after first semester of the LL.M. year may appeal to re-enroll the following Fall semester, but not earlier.

(a) The Dean of Students will appoint a Disqualification Appeals Committee consisting of three faculty members to serve as a standing committee for processing appeals. To the extent feasible, at least one faculty member of the Committee should have served on the Committee in the preceding year. Notice of disqualification will include notice of the right of appeal provided herein and of the Committee’s composition.

(b) The student whose appeal is being heard may challenge any faculty member of the Committee for cause, any such challenge to be determined by the Dean of Students, and the student will also have one peremptory challenge. The student must file any challenge in writing with the Dean of Students no later than three calendar days after he or she has filed his or her appeal. In the event of a successful challenge for cause or a peremptory challenge, the Dean of Students shall appoint a faculty member or members as necessary to constitute the Committee, for the purpose of hearing that appeal. In addition, if a member of the Committee has given a student who appeals a substandard designation or a grade of No Credit, he or she need not participate in the hearing and decision on the appeal, and the student may object to his or her participation in the manner provided above. In either event the Dean of Students will appoint a new member of the Committee for the purpose of hearing that appeal.

The Committee may review evidence that includes the student’s own presentation, the student’s file, and any other relevant submissions, including witnesses when necessary. If the student convincingly demonstrates that his or her record resulted

from circumstances beyond his or her control and that he or she can and probably will do proficient law school work in the future, the Committee may, in its discretion, recommend to the Dean of Students of the Law School that the student be readmitted and allowed to continue in law school subject to such conditions of probation as the Dean of Students of the Law School may impose.

(Note: A convincing demonstration to the Disqualification Appeals Committee will normally have to include a showing by the student that he or she had made a conscientious, diligent effort to take full advantage of his or her educational opportunities. Among the factors that may be considered adverse to this showing are: absence from class; unpreparedness in class; failure to consult with professors as to the student’s examinations or required writing assignments; and involvement in time-consuming extra-curricular activities).

A student has the right to be represented during the disqualification appeal process.

Following the hearing the Committee will submit to the Dean of the law school a written explanation of its recommendation.

Following a decision on appeal from disqualification, the student will be notified in writing of the Dean of the Law School’s decision.

Voluntary Withdrawal and Readmission Policy

I. Between Semesters or Prior to Examination Period A Traditional/Thesis Track LL.M. student enrolled in the Law School may voluntarily withdraw from the School between semesters, or at any time during a semester up to the last day of classes by filing with the Dean of Students a Notice of Withdrawal, which should be accompanied by a statement of reasons or circumstances causing the withdrawal.

II. A student may elect to withdraw for any reason. Such leaves may not be taken more than once at the election of the student. A student may apply to the Dean of Students to withdraw for a second time, but such withdrawal will only be granted based upon a demonstration of exceptional circumstances by the student. Students who leave the Law School after a second voluntary leave must re-apply to the Law School as new applicants to the Law School. The granting of a second leave or readmission to the Law School may be conditioned upon a student’s demonstration that issues which caused the student academic difficulty, or documented instances of inappropriate behavior prior to leaving the Law School, have been effectively addressed by the student.

I. Procedures

Former LL.M. students who have withdrawn and who wish to re-enter the School of Law should apply for readmission to the Dean of Students, stating the date of withdrawal and providing a brief statement of activities in the interim, a record of all further studies undertaken, and such other information as may be requested for proper consideration of the application.

II. Criteria

(a) A student who withdrew under A.I. while in good academic standing will normally be readmitted if his or her application for readmission is made within a reasonable time after withdrawal.

(b) A student who withdraws during the fall semester is only eligible to return the following fall semester. If a student withdraws after finals in the fall semester without completing all fall degree requirements, the student may only return in a fall semester.

Under no circumstances may a Traditional Track or Thesis Track  LL.M. student who has withdrawn be readmitted to the Law School after three years from the start of the semester in which he or she began.

Certificates of Specialization

Traditional track students who seek in‐depth training are able to earn Certificates of Specialization in Business Law, Law and Technology, International Law, Energy & Clean Technology, Environmental Law, and Public Interest and Social Justice. The specialization appears on a separate certificate, as well as on your transcript, but not on your degree. Your degree is a general Master of Laws (LL.M.).

 

Please visit this webpage for the most up‐to‐date information on certificate requirements: https://www.law.berkeley.edu/academics/llm/traditional-llm/certificates-of-specialization/

Questions regarding certificates should first be directed to the administrators of those certificates. The ADP office cannot make exceptions to the certificate requirements.

Bar Information

Traditional track LL.M. students may qualify to sit for either the New York or California bar examinations. Every year many of our LL.M. students take one of these exams, as bar membership in a U.S. jurisdiction has become more of an international credential. While bar membership is not always necessary for short‐term employment opportunities in the United States, our students may find that a U.S. bar credential improves their professional development prospects in their home countries while also preserving the opportunity to practice law in the United States at some point in the future.

 

Both the New York and the California bar examinations are offered twice yearly, beginning on the last Tuesday of both February and July.

 

Beyond passing the bar examination, admission to both the New York and the California bars requires a moral character background check, plus satisfactory performance on the independent Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination (MPRE), described below. Admission to the New York Bar also requires proof of completing 50 hours of pro bono service, an on‐demand online course on New York law (New York Law Course), a multiple choice test on New York law (New York Law Examination), and meeting a skills competency requirement pursuant to Section 520.18 of the New York Rules of the Court of Appeals for the Admission of Attorneys and Counselors at Law.

 

The ADP office will offer workshops to guide you through both the New York and the California pre‐qualification process for foreign candidates. For most of our students, there are coursework requirements to become eligible to take the New York and/or California bar exams. We can advise you on course selections, as necessary, to meet each state’s requirements and on courses that may help you to prepare and succeed on these examinations.

 

If you practice in the United States you must be a member of the bar in the state where you intend to practice, so some of our students take bar exams in states other than New York and California. If you are interested in qualifying for another state’s bar exam, we recommend that you meet with Rachel or Peter as early as possible to evaluate that state’s eligibility requirements and develop a plan for meeting them.

 

http://www.nybarexam.org

Candidates interested in sitting for the New York Bar should carefully review Section 520.6 of the Rules of the Court of Appeals for the Admissions of Attorneys and Counselors at Law at the New York Board of Law Examiners (NY BOLE) website: http://www.nybarexam.org/Foreign/ForeignLegalEducation.htm.

All prospective NY Bar applicants who received their undergraduate legal education outside the United States must follow two essential steps to ensure that their pre‐Bar legal education is substantively and durationally equivalent to a U.S. juris doctor (law) degree:

  • Complete and submit the Online Foreign Evaluation Form (https://www.nybarapply.org/feval/) and required supporting documentation, preferably at least one year before sitting for the Bar examination (but no later than October 1, 2018 for the July 2019 exam).
  • If the NY BOLE requires you to “cure” either a substantive or durational deficiency in your foreign legal education prior to taking the Bar, you must obtain an LL.M. degree and complete certain required coursework.
  • You must take 24 units of NY BOLE‐approved classroom courses at an American Bar Association (ABA)‐accredited law school in substantive and procedural law and professional skills.
  • For concrete guidance regarding the course offerings at Berkeley Law that will satisfy these requirements, consult the “New York Bar Examination Worksheet” which is available on bCourses.

Please note that candidates seeking admission to the New York bar must also satisfy a 50‐hour “pro bono” requirement prior to Bar admission. We have confirmed that this work may be done outside the United States, provided that it is actively supervised by an attorney licensed in the jurisdiction in which the work is conducted. Pro bono work done up to a year prior to the commencement of your LL.M. studies may count, and the requirement must be met before you will be admitted to the Bar. For further information, see http://www.nycourts.gov/attorneys/probono/baradmissionreqs.shtml

 

The New York bar also requires the successful completion of the New York Law Course (NYLC) and the New York Law Exam (NYLE). The NYLC is comprised of approximately 15 hours of on‐demand videos with embedded questions on New York law. The NYLE is a 50 question, two‐hour, multiple‐choice test,  offered four times a year on the information taught in the NYLC. Both the NYLC and NYLE must be completed before requesting admission to the New York bar. For more information, please see http://www.nybarexam.org/Content/CourseMaterials.htm.

 

The New York bar has also implemented a new skills competency requirement applicable to those who commence their LL.M. program after August 1, 2018, described in Section 520.18 of the New York Rules of the Court of Appeals for the Admission of Attorneys and Counselors at Law. This new provision requires applicants seeking admission in New York to establish that they have acquired skills and professional values necessary to competently practice law. Applicants may satisfy this requirement by completing one of five separate pathways described in section 520.18.  Most of our students will likely qualify under either pathway 4, requiring a six-month full-time paid or unpaid apprenticeship in a law office in the United States either before or after commencing an LL.M. program, or pathway 5, requiring proof that the applicant has been in good standing and practiced law in another jurisdiction full-time for at least one year or half-time for two years following the applicant’s authorization to practice. For more information please see: http://www.courts.state.ny.us/ctapps/news/nottobar/nottobar121615.pdf.

 

http://admissions.calbar.ca.gov/

Candidates interested in taking the California Bar Exam must first register, and then apply, to take the exam. The pre‐qualification process for the California bar exam differs from New York in that attorneys licensed in jurisdictions outside the United States (“Attorney Applicants”) need only submit a certificate of proof of admission in that jurisdiction to the Section Chief of Eligibility at the California Bar’s Office of Admissions in order to qualify to sit for the exam. We encourage you to begin the registration and pre-qualification process early, and to identify what documentation from your home country you will need to provide so that you have plenty of time to obtain it.  

See https://www.calbar.ca.gov/Admissions/Requirements/Education/Legal-Education/Foreign-Education

LL.M. candidates who are not admitted to practice in any jurisdiction may qualify as “General Applicants” to sit for the Bar exam, provided that they:

  • Have a first degree in law, acceptable to the Committee, from a law school in the foreign state or country and have completed a year of legal education at an ABA‐approved law school or a California accredited law school in subjects tested on the California Bar.

See: http://www.calbar.ca.gov/Admissions/Requirements/Education/Legal-Education/Foreign-Education/Foreign-Educated-Attorneys

  • Obtain from a credential evaluation service approved by the Committee a certificate that the applicant’s first degree in law is substantially equivalent to a juris doctor degree awarded by a law school approved by the ABA or accredited by the Committee; or
  • Obtain from a credential evaluation service approved by the Committee a certificate that the applicant’s first degree in law meets the educational requirements for admission to practice law in the foreign state or country in which it was obtained.

In addition to submitting to the Office of Admissions the certificate required above, the General Applicant must submit a certificate from the ABA‐approved law school (or school accredited by the Committee) certifying that the applicant has:

  • Been awarded a Master of Law degree (LL.M.) based on a minimum of 20 semester or equivalent units of legal education that included a minimum of one course in four separate subjects tested on the California Bar of not less than a total of 12 semester or equivalent units (one of which must be Professional Responsibility that covers the California Rules of Professional Conduct, relevant sections of the California Business and Professions Code, the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct, and leading federal and state case law on the subject); or
  • Successfully completed 20 semester or equivalent units of legal education that included a minimum of one course in four separate subjects tested on the California Bar of not less than a total of 12 semester or equivalent units (one of which must be Professional Responsibility that covers the California Rules of Professional Conduct, relevant sections of the California Business and Professions Code, the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct, and leading federal and state case law on the subject).

For concrete guidance regarding the course offerings at Berkeley Law that will satisfy California’s requirements, consult the “California Bar Examination Worksheet” on bCourses.

Admission to the New York or California bar entails a successful “background check” of your personal and professional history.

 

In New York, this process is called “Character and Fitness” and the process begins after an applicant passes the bar exam. For reference, consult http://www.nybarexam.org/Admission/AdmissionMultiDeptPacket.htm. Prior to bar admission the candidate must also attend a personal interview in New York.

 

The California process is called a “Moral Character Determination” and applicants may complete a form after registering with the State Bar of California. It may be completed either before or after taking the bar exam: see http://www.calbar.ca.gov/Admissions/Moral-Character

 

The state encourages applicants to file the form as soon as possible, as it can take up to 6 months to process the data; however, it is an expensive application so students who may not need California bar membership to practice may decide to wait on submitting their Moral Character application until after they learn whether or not they pass the bar exam. No personal interview is required.

 

Please be advised that any misconduct that takes place while you’re a student at Berkeley Law, including any violations of the Honor Code, is reportable to the relevant state bar and may prevent you from being admitted.

http://www.ncbex.org/exams/mpre/

 

Admission to both the New York and California Bars require satisfactory performance on the MPRE. The MPRE is a two‐hour exam with 60 multiple‐choice questions and it may be taken prior to or after taking the Bar exam.

 

The MPRE is given three times annually in the Spring, Summer, and Fall. The dates and deadlines for registration for 2017‐2018 are found at the below link:

 

http://www.ncbex.org/exams/mpre/registration/

 

The foregoing provides a basic overview of the pre‐qualification requirements for Berkeley Law’s Traditional Track LL.M. candidates to sit for and be admitted to the New York or California bars. We will provide further guidance through specific bar workshops this year and recommend that you practice your own due diligence in investigating the requirements for bar admission if you are interested in joining the State Bar of California or New York.

Frequently Asked Questions

Academic policies may change during the course of the school year. To ensure you have the most recent information about Berkeley Law academic policies, please visit the 2018-2019 bCourses page.

Does Berkeley Law have academic rules?

Yes!  You can find the Academic Rules here: https://www.law.berkeley.edu/academics/registrar/academic-rules/  These rules cover class attendance, independent and faculty-supervised research, writing, and study (297, 298, and 299 units), the Honor Code and disqualification, exam administration and requests for accommodated exams, and other rules not in conflict with LL.M.-specific degree requirements and policies.

 

What is the Honor Code and why is it important?

The Honor Code is an important tradition at Berkeley Law, and it governs the conduct of students during examinations and in all other academic and professional activities. Students may inadvertently violate the Honor Code by insufficiently citing sources when writing (plagiarism) or not strictly following exam instructions. Violation of the Honor Code can have consequences ranging from failing a class to being reported to the state bar authorities and having the violation noted on your transcript. Please carefully review the Honor Code at https://www.law.berkeley.edu/academics/registrar/academic‐ rules/academic‐honor‐code/

 

If you have questions about the Honor Code, your advisors are available to respond.

 

How many units do I need to graduate?

21 units.

 

What is the minimum number of units I must take each semester?

10 units. If you want to take fewer than 10 units in a semester you must complete an Academic Rules Petition (https://www.law.berkeley.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/AcadRulesPet_LLM_revised6-14-1.pdf). Please pick up, complete, and submit this petition to the Registrar’s Office in 270 Simon Hall. The ADP Office will review your request and may request to meet with you. Please note that international students cannot enroll in fewer than 8 units per semester without compromising their visa status.

 

What is the maximum number of units I can take each semester?

16 units without an Academic Rules Petition, and 17 units with an approved Academic Rules Petition. If you wish to take 17 units, please complete an Academic Rules Petition (https://www.law.berkeley.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/AcadRulesPet_LLM_revised6-14-1.pdf) and drop it off at the Registrar’s Office in 270 Simon Hall. The ADP Office will review your request and may request to meet with you.

 

Can I audit (sit in) a course without enrolling in it?

You may audit a course with the professor’s permission, unless the course is full. Academic credit is not given for audited courses, and they will not appear on your transcript.

 

How do I enroll in courses?

CalCentral is the online registration system students use to enroll in classes. The deadline to add/drop courses online through CalCentral is 12:00 noon on August 31st.

 

Can I add/drop courses after the CalCentral add/drop deadline?

After the CalCentral add/drop deadline of August 31st you can use an Add/Drop Petition available in the Registrar’s Office. That form will need to be signed by the instructor of the class you are adding or dropping.  The instructor can refuse to sign the Add/Drop Petition, so we encourage you to add/drop courses prior to August 31st. The last day to add or drop courses using an Add/Drop Petition is September 14th.

 

Can I take a course with the same title or course number (e.g. 202F Contracts) more than once?

No. This includes courses with the same title, but with different units and taught by different professors, in different semesters.

 

Can I take a course that has an overlap in time with another course?

No. Even if a course overlaps with another course by only a few minutes, you may not enroll in both courses. This is a requirement of the American Bar Association.

 

How do I know what courses will be offered this Spring?

Before the course schedule is published online, you can check the 2‐Year Curriculum Plan (https://www.law.berkeley.edu/php‐programs/registrar/2yearCurriculumView.php) to see what courses are being planned for future semesters.

 

How can I look up teaching evaluations for courses or for professors?

Evaluations for courses and professors are accessible to students online at http://www.law.berkeley.edu/php‐programs/tevals/courseSearch.php You can search by professor or course name.

 

How do students evaluate courses?

All students at Berkeley Law have the opportunity to evaluate their instructors during the last two weeks of each semester.  The evaluations are completely anonymous with respect to your professor. Our online course evaluations give the students, the instructors, and the administration valuable feedback about our courses and instructors. Instructors use your evaluations to improve their teaching, the administration uses your evaluations to identify successful teachers and to provide support for those who are struggling in the classroom, and your fellow students use evaluations to choose their

classes. Each semester, more than 80% of our students submit evaluations in all of their classes. We look forward to your participation in this important school‐wide activity.

 

Is class attendance mandatory?

Yes. Academic Rule 7 requires regular and punctual class attendance in order to receive course credit. Each individual faculty member has the discretion to announce more specific and/or restrictive attendance requirements than this at the beginning of the semester.  Please review the syllabus for each course and familiarize yourself with the attendance policy. If the syllabus does not address attendance, please ask the instructor for clarification.

 

When, in the opinion of an instructor, a student enrolled in his or her course has failed to make a good faith effort at regular and punctual class attendance and, after reasonable warning and opportunity to make up and/or correct the deficiencies, continues to fail to make a good faith effort, the instructor may, in his or her discretion, take one of the following steps:

  1. request (in agreement with the Dean of Students) that the student be dropped from the class,
  2. reduce the student’s final grade, or
  3. assign the student a final grade of NC or NP

 

How do I know whether courses have prerequisites?

The course description for each course notes if there are prerequisites.


Where can I find my final exam schedule?

Each semester, you can see the overall in‐class final exam schedule here:

https://www.law.berkeley.edu/php-programs/students/exams/examTimesListFall.php

 

IMPORTANT NOTE: exam schedules may change up until the day before the exam. Do not book air travel until the end of the entire examination period for the semester.

 

Are LL.M. students graded on a curve?

A separate mandatory curve applies to all LL.M. and J.S.D. students in classes and seminars with 11 or more LL.M. and J.S.D. students such that 20% of the LL.M. and J.S.D. students receive HHs, 30% receive Hs, and 50% receive Ps. The same curve is recommended but not required in classes and seminars with 10 or fewer LL.M. and J.S.D. students. LL.M. students are never graded on the same curve as J.D. students. A professor can deviate from the curve in any class if he or she believes that a PC or NC is the appropriate grade for a student.

 

Can I change the grading option in a course?

No. The grading option for a course is set by the instructor, and students don’t have the ability to alter their grading option.

 

Do LL.M. students ever get PC or NC grades?

Yes, if the professor feels that your performance does not warrant a “Pass” or better, you can receive a grade of PC or NC. A PC (Pass‐Conditional) grade means that your performance was “substandard,” but you still receive credit towards your degree for the course. An NC (No‐Credit) grade means that you do not receive credit for the course.

 

Do LL.M. students receive awards or honors?

The top 10% of LLMs receive a Dean’s List designation on their transcript. To be eligible, at least 70% of coursework for the year must be taken for a letter grade vs. credit-only. The registrar’s office calculates a grade point average based on the number of units each student takes and the grades received. There are also Best Memorandum and Best Oral Presentation awards for students with the best-written work or oral presentation in their LRW section, and a High Score Award for the top scoring student in each section of Fundamentals of U.S. Law.

 

What is the difference between 299 Independent Study and a thesis?

Thesis track LL.M. students conduct a substantial research and writing project called a thesis, resulting in a 50‐60 page paper due at the end of the year. This track is appropriate for students considering academic or government careers, or those interested in researching a particular subject in depth. Thesis track students complete 6-8 units of independent study split between fall (325A) and spring (325B) semesters, OR 325AB  taken all during spring semester. Thesis students take fewer courses than students who choose the traditional track; for this reason it can be difficult to qualify for a bar exam or earn a certificate when pursuing the thesis track.

 

Students in the traditional track who want the experience of working on an independent research and writing project can take one 299 independent study course for a maximum of two units. A 15‐30 page paper is due at the end of the semester in which the 299 course is taken.

 

A 299 requires active supervision by a faculty member. Talk to an advisor if you are interested in pursuing a 299.

 

Are independent study courses graded?

325A/B (thesis track independent study) is pass/fail. Your transcript will indicate CR for credit or NC for no credit. 299s can be taken either pass/fail or for a letter grade.

 

How can I find a 299 advisor?

Research faculty members who have expertise in your area of interest. Faculty profiles are featured in the Berkeley Law website. You may also browse the online Schedule of Classes to see which faculty members teach courses in subjects related to your chosen research topic. Once you have identified appropriate faculty members, email them to introduce yourself and your proposed topic, and ask if they are willing to supervise your project.

 

How do I enroll in thesis units?

Thesis track students should submit the Add/Drop form signed by your faculty advisor to the Registrar’s office before the add/drop deadline for the semester. Indicate on the form that you wish to enroll in 3-4 units of 325A (fall) and 3-4 units of 325B (spring) OR or 6-8 units of 325AB all in spring.  All thesis study units are ungraded and taken with your faculty advisor.

 

How do I enroll in a 299 Independent Study course?

Traditional track students should submit an LL.M. 299 Add Petition to the Registrar’s office no later than the last day to add or drop courses for the semester. Your advisor must sign the form. You may take one 299 independent study course for a maximum of two units during the course of the year. Thesis track students may not take 299s; all units in addition to 325A must come from actual courses.

 

When is the thesis due and how should it be submitted?

A near‐to‐final draft of your paper should go to your advisor by early April, so that you will have time to receive feedback and incorporate any changes before the final paper is due. The finalized version of your paper must be submitted by the last day of the Spring semester. Ask your advisor if he or she would prefer a hard or electronic copy. Please also submit an electronic copy to the ADP office via email to adpoffice@law.berkeley.edu.

Can I get credit for working on journals?

A total of one journal credit can count towards your LL.M. degree (regardless of how many journal units in which you enroll).

 

How do I enroll in journal credits?

Prior to the add/drop deadline, obtain the Course Number from the journal editor and enroll yourself online.

 

Where can I find information about the Certificates of Specialization?

Information about Certificates of Specialization for LL.M. students can be found online at https://www.law.berkeley.edu/academics/llm/traditional-llm/certificates-of-specialization/

 

Will the Certificate of Specialization appear on my diploma?

No. The Certificate of Specialization is not noted on the LL.M. diploma.

 

Will the Certificate of Specialization appear on my transcript?

Yes.

 

Can I get more than one certificate?

There are no restrictions on the number of Certificates students may earn, but course scheduling usually prohibits earning more than one. You should also keep in mind that earning more than one certificate may not necessarily improve your career profile as some employers may perceive dual certificates, if unrelated, to dilute the other. If you have questions about this, please make an appointment with an academic advisor through bCourses.

 

Can I fulfill the requirements for the California/NY Bars and obtain one of the certificates?

It may be possible, but course scheduling often precludes satisfying the requirements for both.

 

I want to apply for the J.S.D. program after my LL.M. Can I be admitted if I am a traditional track student?

Many students admitted to the J.S.D. program chose the thesis track LL.M., but it is not a requirement for admission. It can be a good way to start building a relationship with a future J.S.D. dissertation advisor. A supportive J.S.D. dissertation advisor is an element of the J.S.D. application process.

 

How do I learn more about the J.S.D. Program?

General inquiries can be emailed to adpoffice@law.berkeley.edu. You can also meet with Evelyn Borchert in the ADP Office, who administers the J.S.D. program, by making an appointment with her through bCourses.

Can LL.M. students work during the program?

If you are at Berkeley Law on an F-1 Visa, you are not permitted to work off campus.  Some visa statuses will allow students to work on campus, but on-campus work opportunities for graduate students are limited and not high-paying. Check with the Berkeley International Office regarding your visa status and your eligibility to work on-campus.

Traditional or thesis track students may find opportunities to work on campus offered by faculty members on an as-needed basis.  These positions are quite limited in number and often depend on the student’s experience and interest aligning with the professor’s area of research. Students may contact faculty members directly to inquire, or check b‐line for these positions.

 

I received an email about filing a tax return. Are LL.M. students required to file taxes?

It depends. The Berkeley International Office has resources and workshops to help you understand whether you have to file taxes. More information is online at http://internationaloffice.berkeley.edu/tax‐reporting

 

How long will I have access to my Berkeley email account and library services after I graduate?

You will be able to keep your @berkeley.edu email address and account after graduation. Please look out for an email detailing the process required. You can extend your Law Library borrowing privileges until the end of July by emailing circadmin@law.berkeley.edu. Remote access to library databases (proxy server) and borrowing from other campus libraries will be available until August.

Professional Development Services

Berkeley Law’s traditional track LL.M. students enjoy a broad range of career‐related services and events. We strongly believe that your LL.M. credential will play an important role in your career advancement. In particular, LL.M. candidates have several advantages in terms of job‐seeking: language skills; a demonstrated focus on a particular area of the law; and a global network of connections. Although we do not function as a job placement service, we will provide you with resources, training, and tailored advice that will support you in promoting your background and skills to employers in the United States and abroad.

 

First and foremost, our students can consult with our LL.M. career counselors, both of whom are experienced attorneys: Rachel Zuraw and Peter Landreth. We will advise you on your individual professional development strategies and goals. We can also review your resumes and cover letters, conduct mock interviews, and serve as a strategic liaison to employers.

 

Throughout the year, we will present LL.M. career workshops on:

 

  • Resume and cover letter writing;
  • Job search strategies for law firm and public interest opportunities;
  • Interviewing skills;
  • Networking tips, including strategic use of LinkedIn; and
  • Practice‐specific panels (driven by student interest)

 

You can read more about our services at https://www.law.berkeley.edu/academics/llm/professional-development/.

In addition, you have access to a number of career‐related resources developed for Berkeley Law LL.M. job seekers. All of our career‐related content is located on bCourses.

As a Berkeley Law student, you also have access to b‐Line, our online job database. There is a link on the “For Students” section of the main Berkeley Law website. Use the “cdo” username and “cdoaccess” password to access the CalNet ID login screen.

Finally, our international LL.M. students may participate in two job fairs during the school year: the International Student Interview Program (ISIP) in New York (late January) and the UCLA LL.M. Interview Program (late February). Students must apply for interviews and are selected depending on employer preference. Rachel and Peter will guide interested students through the application processes in the Fall. We look forward to providing the services that will help you navigate your career path.

 

Academic Code of Conduct 

The University of California at Berkeley is a community of scholars committed to maintaining an environment that encourages personal and intellectual growth. It is a community with high standards and high expectations for those who choose to become a part of it, including established rules of conduct intended to foster behaviors that are consistent with a civil and educational setting. Members of the University community are expected to comply with all laws, University policies and campus regulations, conducting themselves in ways that support a scholarly environment. Refer to this link below for more specific information about Berkeley’s Campus Code of Student Conduct:

 

http://sa.berkeley.edu/sites/default/files/UCB‐Code‐of‐Conduct‐new%20Jan2012_0.pdf

 

The University of California Policy on Sexual Violence and Sexual Harassment

UC Policy

The University of California is committed to creating and maintaining a community dedicated to the advancement, application and transmission of knowledge and creative endeavors through academic excellence, where all individuals who participate in University programs and activities can work and learn together in an atmosphere free of harassment, exploitation, or intimidation. Every member of the community should be aware that the University prohibits sexual violence and sexual harassment, retaliation, and other prohibited behavior (“Prohibited Conduct”) that violates law and/or University policy. The University will respond promptly and effectively to reports of Prohibited Conduct and will take appropriate action to prevent, to correct, and when necessary, to discipline behavior that violates this policy.

Berkeley Law is committed to supporting anyone who has experienced any form of harassment or discrimination that impedes one’s right to a safe work or learning environment. Sexual Harassment includes unwelcome sexual advances, unwelcome requests for sexual favors, and other unwelcome verbal, nonverbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature.

 

The university provides the following resources for students who believe they have experienced or witnessed sexual harassment, or who have concerns about a potential issue:

 

Berkeley Law Resources to Respond to Sexual Harassment https://www.law.berkeley.edu/harassment/

University of California Sexual Harassment and Violence Policy http://policy.ucop.edu/doc/4000385/SVSH

Office of Prevention of Harassment and Discrimination https://ophd.berkeley.ed

 

Sexual Harassment & Violence Survivor Support http://survivorsupport.berkeley.edu/

 

The University of California requires mandatory training for all students, faculty and staff in Sexual Violence/Sexual Harassment Prevention. Refer to the email you received from UC Berkeley’s Graduate Division about online training and in‐person training, both of which are required in order to enroll in courses. Be sure to complete the in‐person training by the end of September so you can enroll in Spring 2018 courses.

Student Life: Tips and Information

You will want to open a bank account as soon as possible to keep your money in a secure location. To make purchases or pay bills in the U.S., your options include check writing, cash from Automated Teller Machines (ATM), debit or credit cards, and online banking. You should open a checking account to pay bills such as rent or utilities. Most checking accounts include an ATM/debit card so you can withdraw money from your account and use it for purchases.

 

Be aware that some debit cards have credit card logos on them (such as Visa, MasterCard etc.) and can function like a credit card for purchases. However, the payment is drawn from your checking account directly.

 

The following bank locations are within walking distance of the UCB campus. These banks have ATM machines located throughout the city and state:

 

Bank of America Wells Fargo

www.bankofamerica.com www.wellsfargo.com

2347 Telegraph Ave. (510) 273‐5443 2460 Bancroft Way, Berkeley, CA 94709

2129 Shattuck Ave. (510) 273‐5466 (510) 464‐2266

Berkeley, CA 94704

 

If you have a television in your home, you can access three or more channels at no charge. However, you may find that the reception is not clear and it will be difficult to watch. Some people end up purchasing cable television service, which not only makes the free channels clearer, but also gives you access to a greater number of channels. In the Bay Area, Comcast (www.comcast.com/) and AT&T (www.att.com/) are the two main providers of cable television. Many students use streaming devices like Apple TV or Roku and sign up for online streaming services like Netflix or Hulu instead of purchasing cable television service.

 

To have high‐speed internet at home, you will need to purchase either DSL or cable service. Again, the top two companies that serve the Bay Area are Comcast and AT&T. You will need to look at their options to decide what is best for you. Check their websites for more information.

 

Since you already have a mobile phone in your home country, you will need to inquire about its use in the U.S.; many companies have international plans.  However, it may be more economical to purchase a new phone after you arrive here. Do some research in advance by looking at websites of the major cell phone companies such as AT&T, T‐Mobile, Verizon, MetroPCS, Cricket Wireless and Sprint. Find a company that does not require a two year contract

 

New:

Ikea

www.ikea.com

4400 Shellmound St.

Emeryville, CA 94608 (510) 420‐4532

 

Target

www.target.com

1057 Eastshore Hwy Albany, CA 94710 (510) 982‐0512

 

Used

 

Craigslist

www.craigslist.org

 

Search under San Francisco – East Bay for items in the local area. You will likely have to pick up the items yourself. Be sure to read the safety and fraud precautions for using craigslist, as it is not monitored by any authority.

 

The Goodwill Store

http://eastbaygoodwill.org/

2058 University Ave Berkeley CA 94704

(510) 649‐1287

 

Safeway

1444 Shattuck Place

Berkeley, CA 94709 510‐526‐3086

 

Whole Foods

The Whole Foods Market specializes in natural and organic foods. Their prices are higher than other grocery stores.

3000 Telegraph Avenue

Berkeley, CA 94705

(510) 649‐1333

 

Trader Joe’s

1885 University Ave or 5727 College Ave Berkeley, CA 94703 Oakland, CA 94618

(510) 204‐9074 (510) 923‐9428

 

Berkeley Bowl

2020 Oregon St. or 920 Heinz Avenue Berkeley, CA 94703 Berkeley, CA

(510) 843‐6929 (510) 898‐9555

Students with Families

If your spouse or children accompany you during your stay in the U.S., you will need unique services and resources to help your family feel at home.

If your spouse decides to pursue a degree program while in the U.S., speak with an advisor in Berkeley International Office well in advance to make sure it is legally possible to do so.

English as a Second Language (ESL) instruction is offered by many schools in the Bay Area. Below is a partial list of local ESL programs in Berkeley ‐ we do not endorse or recommend any one program over another.

 

 

  • YWCA English in Action (http://www.ywca‐berkeley.org/international‐programs/)

Informal English tutoring/conversation, open to UC students and families.

 

Other Language Courses: http://bas.berkeley.net/languages.html

 

 

 

  • Language Studies International

(http://www.lsi.edu/en/english/united‐states/san‐franciscoberkeley/school)

Making Social Connections

Besides going to school or working, there are other ways to meet new friends and find community. A group called the University Section Club (http://universitysectionclub.berkeley.edu ) sponsors a weekly gathering of international spouses (and some children) at the University YWCA on Bancroft Way called “The Centre.”

 

UC Berkeley Parents Network

 

https://www.berkeleyparentsnetwork.org/

 

A great website to find information related to children, parenting, families and a wide variety of other topics related to living in the Bay Area.

Most child care in the U.S. is not supported by the government and is privately‐owned. Families are responsible for finding suitable child care for their children and paying for it on their own. Two resources of great help to UC Berkeley students and scholars are:

 

University Early Childhood Education Program www.housing.berkeley.edu/child

for infants and pre‐school children at UCB.

 

Bananas Child Care Information and Referral Service

www.bananasinc.org

community‐based service for finding either regular daily care or the occasional babysitter.

 

Parking and Transportation

There are many student parking lots just off of the UCB campus. Visit the Parking and Transportation Office website at http://pt.berkeley.edu for information on obtaining a campus parking permit, campus parking maps, campus shuttle buses / emergency night shuttle buses and other helpful resources.

Campus Parking: Student parking is available for $377 per semester. To purchase parking please visit: http://pt.berkeley.edu/parking/student

 

BART is a local light rail / subway system that serves the entire Bay Area. Stops include San Francisco Airport (SFO), downtown San Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley, Fremont, Richmond, and Concord.  BART runs seven days a week. Fares vary according to the distance to be traveled. The closest BART station to campus is the Downtown Berkeley BART. www.bart.gov

The Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District is the third-largest public bus system in California, serving Berkeley, Albany, El Cerrito, Oakland and Kensington. AC Transit buses run through the UCB campus and also carry passengers across the Bay into San Francisco. UCB students get a bus pass (called the Class Pass) at the beginning of each semester that allows unlimited use on this bus system. www.actransit.org/

There are several bike‐friendly streets (Bicycle Boulevards), a fully accessible campus, and the possibility to take your bike on public transport (bus and BART) and plenty of bike (repair) shops. Bike theft in Berkeley is common, even in populated places. It is wise to invest in a very good lock. Register your bike with the University Police Department: http://pt.berkeley.edu/around/biking/bikinginfo

 

Two well‐known places to buy a (new) bike are:

 

  • Mike’s Bikes (http://mikesbikes.com/) on University Avenue, and
  • Performance Bikes (www.performancebike.com) on San Pablo.

Health

All students at UC Berkeley are required to have health insurance for themselves and any accompanying dependents. Students are covered by the Student Health Insurance Plan (SHIP) upon payment of registration fees. To read more about insurance coverage, see the University Health Service’s web site at www.uhs.berkeley.edu/index.shtml

2222 Bancroft Way, Berkeley, CA

 

All health care services must begin at the Tang Center. Please use the Tang Center just as you would your regular doctor’s office. You may use your student ID card to get services at the Tang Center if you are covered by SHIP. Spouses and family are not covered by SHIP; please contact the SHIP office for insurance options for your dependents.


The Tang Center services include: routine medical exams, lab tests, x‐rays, physical therapy, pharmacy, urgent care, mental health counseling, career counseling, and vision care eye clinic. Please see their web site for a full description of all their services: www.uhs.berkeley.edu/index.shtml

http://recsports.berkeley.edu/

 

2301 Bancroft Way, Berkeley CA

 

Cal Recreational Sports is dedicated to enhancing the knowledge, wellness, fitness, personal skills and quality of life for students, faculty, staff, and the community. By providing facilities, programs, activities and the opportunity for cooperative and competitive play. Student membership is included in your tuition fees.

Wellness at Boalt

 

Some people love every minute of law school. Some people don’t. Most students experience ups and downs as rigorous academic demands intersect with family obligations, daily life, and countless personal and professional events beyond Boalt Hall. As with any major undertaking, you will get more out of law school if you take care of yourself mentally, physically, socially, and emotionally.

 

Especially as an international student, the stresses of law school can become compounded due to the extra stresses of acclimating to a new language and culture. Homesickness may occur, which can lead to feelings of loneliness and isolation. The stresses of moving to a completely new place can be eased by just sitting down and talking to someone who cares. Emergency situations are not the only reason to seek counseling


Personal psychological counseling is provided by Boalt’s dedicated Psychologist, Dr. Linda Zaruba. All counseling is confidential. You can reach Dr. Zaruba by phone (510) 643‐5447 or by email: zaruba@uhs.berkeley.edu

The Disabled Students’ Program (DSP) is committed to ensuring that all students with disabilities have equal access to educational opportunities at UC Berkeley. They offer a wide range of services for students with disabilities. These services are individually designed, and based on the specific needs of each student as identified by our Disability Specialists.

The Disabled Students’ Program (DSP) is committed to ensuring that all students with disabilities have equal access to educational opportunities at UC Berkeley. They offer a wide range of services for students with disabilities. These services are individually designed, and based on the specific needs of each student as identified by our Disability Specialist. All new students seeking services through DSP are responsible for completing the following five (5) steps before they can enroll in DSP:

 

  1. Submit an online application for DSP services at https://dssonline.berkeley.edu/scarab/applicant/studentInfoReview.faces. When you submit your online application, you will be provided information on what type of disability verification to provide, and who to schedule an appointment with. Please print out this page for your records.
  2. Provide DSP with verification of your disability in advance of your “intake appointment” with a Disability Specialist.
  3. Initiate a request to schedule an appointment with a Disability Specialist for an intake interview by calling or contacting the DSP receptionist. The DSP phone number is 510‐642‐0518.
  4. Meet with your Disability Specialist during your “intake appointment,” to discuss the accommodations or services you may be eligible to receive.
  5. After you have been approved for accommodations and services by your Disability Specialist, request accommodation letters and auxiliary services online. Make this request at the beginning of each semester in which you will require accommodation letters or auxiliary services.

 

You must initiate and complete these five (5) steps before you may be approved for DSP services. If you are unable to complete the online application process, you can request assistance in person from the DSP receptionist.

Campus Resources

Counseling and Psychological Services (CPS) provides a variety of services for students to help with personal, academic, career, and crisis concerns. Access to CPS counseling services are free to all registered UC Berkeley students. If you prefer to speak to a counselor outside the law school, professional counselors are available at the Tang Center at 2222 Bancroft Way, (510)642‐9494. More information is online at https://uhs.berkeley.edu/counseling/about

 

In the U.S., it is very common to talk with a counselor about problems or difficulties involving academic work, personal relationships, stress, unhappiness, and an individual’s view of himself or herself, etc. In different cultures, these problems may be viewed and treated differently. For example, if you experience difficulties when you are living in your home country, perhaps you would turn to your family or friends for help and advice. During your stay in the U.S., you may be apart from all family and close

friends, and you may feel the need to find substitute sources of emotional support. A counselor can help you determine what the difficulty is, help you see options that you might not have seen, and help you resolve the difficulty.

 

By law, all conversations are kept confidential.

 

Meditation & Silent Prayer Room

 

Room 239C (across from Room 244) has been designated a space for silent contemplation and/or prayer throughout the day. Please take advantage of this great resource.

 

Lactation Room

 

UC Berkeley maintains several private lactation rooms for nursing mothers, including one in Simon Hall at Berkeley Law. To access the room you must register with the campus Breastfeeding Support Program: https://uhs.berkeley.edu/facstaff/wellness/breastfeeding‐support

 

Student Organizations and Events

To stay current on all events at Berkeley Law, please visit the following:

Berkeley Law supports many opportunities for student engagement within and beyond Boalt Hall. http://www.law.berkeley.edu/227.htm Keep an eye out for an announcement about the Student Activities Fair in early Fall semester where you can learn about all the great student organizations at Berkeley Law.

The Student Organization for Advanced Legal Studies (SOALS) is a student organization for LL.M. and J.S.D. students at Berkeley Law. Visiting Scholars may participate in SOALS organized events as well. The primary goal of the organization is to facilitate the social and professional needs of advanced degree students and scholars while studying at Berkeley Law. Through social, professional, and academic activities, SOALS aspires to build relationships among its members. 

Every year the new SOALS representatives are nominated from the LL.M. and J.S.D. classes. You will receive an announcement during the fall semester with instructions on how to get involved in SOALS.

 

The Boalt Hall Student Association (BHSA), the law school’s student government organization, is composed of all registered law students. BHSA organizes activities of general law school interest and helps new students adjust to life at Berkeley Law by sponsoring social, athletic, and law‐related events. The BHSA council represents student interests in curriculum planning, admissions policy, faculty hiring, administration of the library, professional placement, and many other areas. Every year there are two LL.M. representatives on the BHSA board. You will be notified by email within the first few weeks of fall semester regarding BHSA program information and election dates.

Email: bhsa@law.berkeley.edu https://www.law.berkeley.edu/student‐life/student‐organizations/boalt‐hall‐student‐association/

Best of Berkeley

A list of some of the most popular restaurants, bars, and activities for students:

 

Thai Temple

 

Sunday brunch 10 am‐ 1pm: enjoy delicious authentic Thai food in the garden of a beautiful Buddhist temple. This Sunday event is great community bonding place and way to experience a new culture through food and atmosphere.

 

Location: 1911 Russell St 510‐849‐3419

 

La Note

 

Delicious French‐inspired food, one of the best breakfast experiences in Berkeley. On a sunny day try and get a spot on the back patio and enjoy your Crème Fraiche pancakes and coffee on a cozy porch amidst beautiful leafy foliage.

 

Location: 2377 Shattuck Avenue

 

510‐843‐1525

 

Website: www.lanoterestaurant.com

 

The Albatross Pub

 

Although it is quite a trek from campus, the oldest pub in Berkeley offers an inviting atmosphere in which to hang out with a large group of friends and play a range of board games, pool and darts while eating popcorn and drinking practically any drink you can imagine. Great way to spend a weekend evening!

 

Location: 1822 San Pablo Ave. 510‐843‐2473

Website: www.albatrosspub.com

 

Triple Rock Brewery

Great place to spend a Thursday, the only night on which they sell their famous Monkey Head beer. This bar has a great atmosphere and is always busy with a great mix of Berkeley students, locals, and sports fans.

 

Location: 1920 Shattuck Ave. 510‐843‐2739

Website: http://triplerock.com/

 

Free House

 

This restaurant/bar located directly across the street from Boalt offers good service, a nice front and back patio, and nice drinks and food that will completely satisfy those that are just too tired to trek anywhere farther and just want to socialize without putting in too much effort. Ask for recommendations about the beers that are on tap which rotate often, order a bucket of sweet potato fries or a giant pretzel, and you will not be disappointed.

 

Location:  2700 Bancroft Way

 

510‐647‐2300

 

Website: http://berkeleyfreehouse.com/

 

Jupiter

 

What could be better than delicious and pizza and delicious beer in one wonderfully inviting place? In the summer or on a warm night take a seat on the eclectic back patio and listen to some live music amongst the twinkling garden lights with friends or a date, you will probably leave with a smile on your face.

 

Location:  2181 Shattuck Avenue (at Center Street)

 

510‐THE‐ROCK

 

Website: www.jupiterbeer.com

 

Cheeseboard

 

Truly a Berkeley must, this cooperative pizza joint sells one type of pizza a day that will never leave you disappointed. Choose between a slice, a half, or a whole pizza and take it over to the grass of the center divider to experience a classic Gourmet Ghetto picnic. On the weekend evenings they will host live music that will keep you hanging around on a warm summer night. If you have a craving for mind‐blowing cheese head next door to their cheese shop which will allow you to travel the world through the

medium of cheese.

 

Location: 1504 / 1512 Shattuck Ave

510‐549‐3183

Website: http://www.cheeseboardcollective.coop/

 

Philz Coffee

 

Right down the street from Cheeseboard, this cute coffee shop allegedly serves the best coffee in Berkeley. The classic Mint Mojito with fresh mint will be a refreshing way to quench your thirst while studying on the upper level of this fun café.

 

Location: 1600 Shattuck Ave

 

510‐705‐1083

 

Website: http://www.philzcoffee.com/

 

Brazil Café

 

On the West Side of campus resides a small and colorful hut serving authentic Brazilian food that no one would miss walking by. If you fancy a stroll through the redwoods on the western part of campus, you will be rewarded by your efforts with a delicious tri‐tip sandwich or rice bowl that you can take away to the grass on campus, or can eat outside next to this colorful stand.

 

Location: 2162 University Ave.

 

510‐845‐8011

 

Website: http://brazilcafeberkeley.com/

 

Fire Trails
Looking for a great outdoor atmosphere to get some exercise? Head over to the Clark Kerr campus and keep heading uphill until you reach one of the dirt paths leading up into the Claremont Regional Preserve where you will not only gain great exercise from walking up steep hills, but also the most rewarding views of the entire Bay Area. Getting to the top of the hill from Clark Kerr takes only about twenty minutes and will leave you feeling as if you have conquered the world and stumbled upon one of Berkeley’s hidden treasures.
Location & Website: www.ebparks.org/parks/claremont_canyon

Tilden Park
If you are tired of the urban atmosphere or bogged down by excessive studying, head up to Tilden Park for a few hours to take in some awe-inspiring views and nature that will leave you feeling refreshed and motivated to continue on in your work with a more positive outlook. You can swim in the lake for a few dollars or you can hike up into the hills to get exercise, breath the fresh air, and gain a geographical perspective of the East Bay. Location & Website:  http://www.ebparks.org/parks/tilden

College Avenue
An area that many miss as it is located on the south side of campus, but truly is worth spending an afternoon strolling down. Explore the different local ma and pa shops and grab some ice cream at Ici’s where you will always find a line waiting for some delicious handmade ice cream. Keep walking downhill and you will pass delicious restaurants like Wood Tavern and Southie in addition to The Trappist, a specialty beer shop. You will also pass Cole coffee, which has a very dedicated following. After a decently long walk down College you will probably be hungry and will be graciously rewarded by a slice of deep-dish pizza at Zachary’s, one of Berkeley’s oldest and most well-known pizza places. If you are feeling crazy, head over to Smitten where you will be able to get liquid nitrogen ice cream made right in front of you. Walking back up college you will hit The Graduate, a famous Berkeley bar on Claremont and College that offers cheap drinks, a fun dive-bar atmosphere, and free popcorn!

Emergency and Safety Information

Emergency Contact Information

  • Call 911 or, if on campus dial 642-3333
    In the event of an emergency, call 911 from anywhere on campus, or from a cell phone call 642-3333. For non-emergencies or information, call UCPD at 642-6760. 
  • UC Berkeley Police Department Address:
    1 Sproul Hall
    Berkeley, CA 94720-1199

nightsafety.berkeley.edu\


The Campus offers free night safety services to get you safely from campus locations to destinations within our service area. The Night Safety Shuttles run until 4 AM and you can see where a shuttle is on the online map. For information about all night safety services, go to nightsafety.berkeley.edu. To see shuttles on their routes on an online map, go to bearwalk.berkeley.edu/shuttles after 7:30 PM.

Night Safety Escorts (BearWALK)
Uniformed, trained, and radio-equipped Community Service Officers (CSOs) provide a walking escort to nearby residences, public transportation, or parking lots. The service is available from dusk to 1:45 a.m. To request an escort, call 642-WALK (510-642-9255); a CSO will arrive in 15 minutes.


Night Safety Shuttles (Bear Transit)
The Night Safety Shuttle service is an extension of the BearTransit daytime service, and provides safe nighttime transit to and from the campus. Bear Transit Night Safety Shuttles are free to all and operate year-round*. From 7:30pm to 4am shuttles run on one of two set routes between campus, BART, Clark Kerr Campus and residence halls.

Night Time Personal Safety

  • Utilize the free Night Safety Services located at http://nightsafety.berkeley.edu 
  • Travel with a friend or in a group
  • Be alert and aware of your surroundings
  • Avoid dark, vacant or deserted areas
  • Use well-lit, well-traveled routes
  • Dial 510-642-3333 or use a Blue Light emergency phone if you need help

The campus home page is your first stop for emergency information; if the home page isn’t available, go to the campus emergency website. News and instructions will also be updated regularly on an emergency hotline, 800/705‐9998, and on radio broadcasts in the Bay Area from KALX 90.7FM or KCBS 740AM.

 

Tips for Campus Safety

 

If you feel you’ve been a victim of a crime, please report it. It’s for your protection and the protection of others. Your report, along with others like it, might show a crime trend, or give UCPD clues to stop other crimes. If someday the police recover your property, your report could help them return it to you.

 

The most important thing to know about walking at night: Be alert! If you’re not aware of your surroundings, you may be a walking target. When you’re walking alone at night, don’t walk with headphones in your ears or have a long conversation on your cell phone. The campus itself is relatively safe, but in this urban area, we are NOT immune to crime.

 

Three easy ways to make a report

  1. Use your cell phone, in an EMERGENCY. On or near campus, dial UCPD (510/642-3333). If elsewhere in the city, call Berkeley Police Department (510/981-5911). Program ahead of time, so it’s a one-button call.
  2. You can ALWAYS dial 911 from any phone anywhere! A landline (including a code blue phone) on campus will get you direct to UCPD dispatch.
  3. For non-emergency reports, call UCPD 24-hours (510/642-6760) or report an ongoing crime anonymously online using CalTip Info: police.berkeley.edu/caltip/

Lockers

All students are assigned a locker, which will be shared with another LL.M. student. If you lose your locker combination, ask the Student Services office in 280 Simon Hall for assistance. Please do not leave valuables or food in your lockers.

Bike Safety Tips

  • Always lock your bike to a bicycle rack.
  • Use a high quality “U” shaped lock. Avoid using lightweight cables or chains.
  • Always lock your bicycle through the frame and both wheels to a bicycle parking rack.
  • Lock all free parts of bike or take them with you.
  • Avoid leaving your bicycle locked outside overnight.
  • Always wear a helmet. For night riding, use a headlight, a red rear reflector, two side reflectors on each wheel and reflector pedals.

Protect your laptop

  • Do not leave laptops unattended. Do not walk away from it, even for “a minute.”
  • Secure your laptop with quality software and hardware (cable locks, storage cabinets).
  • Try to keep laptop computers and other portable electronics with you.

Automatic Teller Machine (ATM) Safety

  • Try to use the ATM during daylight hours. If you have to get cash at night, go with someone else and only use machines that are visible from a major street and well lit.
  • When entering your secret code, cover the pad with your hand.
  • Always take your transaction receipts and statements.
  • Do not count or display money at the ATM.
  • Do not accept offers of help from anyone you don’t know. If you have problems or questions contact your bank.

Vehicle Safety

  • Park in well-lit, heavily populated areas. Trust your instincts, if something doesn’t feel right, find another place to park.
  • Avoid parking next to occupied vehicles.
  • Do not leave valuable items visible in your car.
  • Always roll up all windows and lock all doors before leaving your vehicle.

Phone Safety

  • Avoid making your phone visible walking down the street at night.  People around you may notice you while you are focusing on your phone and could surprise you by taking it.
  • Avoid showing your phone’s earphones at night.  If you want to listen to music, choose a dark color of earphones that is hard to see or get dark wireless earphones to make it even harder to spot.
  • Download the “Find My Droid” app in the Google Play Store for Android or setup “Find My iPhone” in your iPhone iCloud settings to be able to locate your phone remotely.
  • In the City of Berkeley, rental units must have deadbolt locks on all doors leading to the outside. Make sure all hallways, entrances, garages, and grounds are well lit. Leave spare keys with friends-not under the doormat, in mailboxes, or in common sense hiding places. 
  • Lock your apartment door and windows when you leave.

Berkeley Law is committed to supporting anyone who has experienced any form of harassment or discrimination that impedes one’s right to a safe work or learning environment. Sexual Harassment includes unwelcome sexual advances, unwelcome requests for sexual favors, and other unwelcome verbal, nonverbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature.  

The university provides the following resources for students who believe they have experienced or witnessed sexual harassment, or who have concerns about a potential issue:

Berkeley Law Resources to Respond to Sexual Harassment https://www.law.berkeley.edu/harassment/

University of California Sexual Harassment and Violence Policy
http://policy.ucop.edu/doc/4000385/SVSH

Office of Prevention of Harassment and Discrimination
https://ophd.berkeley.edu/

Sexual Harassment & Violence Survivor Support
http://survivorsupport.berkeley.edu/

APPENDIX: Law School Academic Honor Code