Events

In This Section

2012

Friday. January 27, 2012
Safety Net ACOs: Barriers and Benefits
Heyns Room, Faculty Club, University of California, Berkeley

Co-Sponsored with the UC Berkeley School of Public Health

The purpose of our conference was to explore current developments in coordinated care in California's safety net. At this event, we reported on the results of a study on safety net accountable care organizations (ACOs) funded by Blue Shield of California Foundation. We also discussed emerging models of how ACOs might work in the safety net, and how legislatures can fuel care innovations by clearing legal barriers and creating incentives. The conference brought together providers, policymakers and other stakeholders for a productive, wide-ranging conversation.

To view the Symposium page, click here.

2010-2011

Friday, May 6, 2011
Leaves that Pay: Employer and Worker Experiences with Paid Family Leave in California
12:30 - 2:00 pm
Goldberg Room, Boalt Hall

 To view the video recording of the event click here.

Co-Sponsored with the Labor Project for Working Families

A new study shows that California’s Paid Family Leave program – that offers paid leave to workers when they take time off to care for a new child or sick family member – has received high marks from employers and employees alike since its implementation six years ago. The authors call for an expansion of Paid Family Leave to build on its early successes, and for efforts to promote increased awareness of it across California.

Additional Reference Material
Ten Lessons for Practitioners About Family Responsibilities Discrimination and Stereotyping Evidence
Bargaining in the Shadow of Social Institutions
Instiutional Inequality
Institutional Perspectives on Law, Work, and Family
Public Health Benefits of Paid Family Leave for Parental-Infant Bonding

MODERATOR
Ann O'Leary
, Executive Director Berkeley CHEFS

FEATURED SPEAKERS
Ruth Milkan,
City University of New York (CUNY)
Eileen Appelbaum, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR)

COMMENTS BY
Catherine Albiston,
Professor of Law and Professor of Sociology, UC Berkeley
Affiliated Faculty, Berkeley CHEFS

Sylvia Guendelman, Professor of the Department of Community Health and Human
Development and Chair of the Maternal and Child Health Program at the School of Public Health, UC Berkeley

Wednesday, April 13, 2011
Implementing the Affordable Care Act in California
12:45 - 1:45 pm
Room 145, Boalt Hall

To listen to an audio recording of this event click here.

Berkeley Law students will overview their work on regarding law and policy research on continuous healthcare coverage and on accountable care organizations.  Join us for lunch!

The passage of the Accountable Care Act has sharpened the conversation on the possibility of better and more efficient health care delivery and finance in the United States. Berkeley CHEFS has been working on several projects related to ACA implementation -- one involving studying continuous health care insurance as the possible key to improved health care outcomes and the other involving health care delivery and finance redesign as the possible key to reigning in health care costs. 

Presenters
Zach Baron '12
Miles Palley '12
David Vernon '12
Sarah Weinberger '12

Moderators
Ann O'Leary
Ann Marie Marciarille

Thursday, March 17, 2011
What's New: Opportunities for Students
12:45 - 1:50 pm
Room 244, Boalt Hall

Please join the attorneys and project directors of the Chief Justice Earl Warren Institute on Law and Social Policy to learn about their work in the areas of criminal justice, immigration, redistricting, voting rights, educational equity, economic and family security. Ana Henderson, Aarti Kohli, Tia Martinez, Ann O'Leary, and Andrea Russi will share an overview of their work and insights about developing policy‐relevant research.

For further information, contact the Chief Justice Earl Warren Institute on Law and Social Policy at 510.643.7025 or visit our webstie: http://www.law.berkeley.edu/ewi.htm

Friday, March 4, 2011
HIV, Race, and the Obama Administration
5:00-7:00 pm
Room 105, Boalt Hall

This one-day workshop at UC-Berkeley School of Law will meet to engage the following issues. Historically, the government and mainstream media framed HIV/AIDS primarilyas a disease of gay white men. How has this framing harmed men who have sex with men (“MSM”) but do not identify as gay, especially men of color? How has it harmed women of color? President Obama’s National HIV/AIDS Strategy suggests that the traditional framing seems to be shifting to afford greater recognition of the racial impact of the epidemic. What are the advantages and disadvantages of reframing HIV/AIDS as a black and brown disease? To what extent are whites in competition with people of color to control the agenda regarding HIV/AIDS research, activism and policy making? What can federal and state governments do to address HIV-related racial and gender disparities? How can scholars work with activists and policy makers to reveal and attack the raced and gendered dimensions of the epidemic? To register for the event, please follow this link.

Thursday, February 10, 2011
Paid Family and Medical Leave in the United States: Options, Legal Barriers and Prospects for Change
3:30-5:00 pm
Goldberg Room, Boalt Hall

The United States is one of very few developed countries that fails to provide universal paid family and medical leave benefits to workers.  Yet, research shows that paid family and medical leave (PFML) increases the economic security of workers and the health and well-being of children, elderly adults, and disabled workers.  Berkeley CHEFS, in collaboration with Georgetown University Law Center’s Workplace Flexibility 2010 Project, have spent over a year exploring the best policy model for a PFML program in the United States.  Their findings and recommendations were published in a comprehensive report released in Washington, D.C. in December 2010. Come hear about their proposals, current legislative and legal issues in the area of work-family policy,  and the prospects for change.  

Light refreshments will be served at 3:00 pm.

Panelists include:
Ann O'Leary, Executive Director, Berkeley CHEFS
Gillian Lester, Professor and Associate Dean, Berkeley CHEFS
Stephen D. Sugarman, Professor and Faculty Co-Director, Berkeley CHEFS

To view the report, follow this link.

Thursday, January 13, 2011
Leaves That Pay: Employer and Worker Experiences with Paid Family Leave in California
12:30-2:00pm
Center for American Progress
1333 H St. NW, 10th Floor
Washington, DC 20005

CHEFS Executive Director Ann O'Leary will present at a Center for American Progress Action Fund and the Center for Economic and Policy Research's event regarding paid leave in California.

More families now have two parents that are full-time workers, making it increasingly important for them to have access to flexible workplace policies. In 2002, California became the first state to implement a paid family leave insurance program, providing workers with paid leave when they have a new child or need to care for a family member with a serious illness. This policy expanded California's temporary disability insurance program that already provided paid leave to seriously ill workers. Please join the Center for American Progress Action Fund and the Center for Economic and Policy Research for a panel that will showcase the first research on the implementation and effectiveness of California's legislation and discuss what impact it will have on national policymaking.

Click here to view video of the event.
Click here to download the publication.
Click here to download the press release.


Thursday, October 21, 2010
“Reshaping the Work-Family Debate: Why Men and Class Matter”
Joan Williams,
UC, Hastings, College of the Law, Center for Worklife Law
Room 140, Boalt Hall

Berkeley CHEFS hosted a discussion led by Prof. Williams on her new book, Reshaping the Work-Family Debate: Why Men and Class Matter (Harvard University Press, 2010).

Americans report much higher levels of work-family conflict than exist elsewhere; men now report more than women. Corporate workplace flexibility policies are widely touted, little used and typically available only to professionals. In her book, Williams argues that jump-starting the stalled revolution in work and family roles requires adding men and class to the discussion. The first step is a national conversation about gender pressures on men that make it risky for them to change their work commitments in ways that would allow them to play an equal role in family life. The second crucial step is to understand why the U.S. has the most family-hostile public policy in the developed world. Panelists engaged in thought provoking discussion on work-family conflict and potential remedies.

Introduction by Professor Mary Ann Mason, Faculty Co-Director, Berkeley Center on Health, Economic & Family Security, UC Berkeley School of Law (Berkeley CHEFS)
Response by Ann O’Leary, Executive Director, Berkeley CHEFS

Monday, October 11, 2010
What is Health Law?
Ann Marie Marciarille,
UC Berkeley School of Law
Goldberg Room, Boalt Hall

 To view the video recording of the event click here.

*Event was co-sponsored with the Boalt Healthcare & Biotech Law Society (BHBLS) and the Berkeley Center for Law and Technology (BCLT)
Are you interested in law as it relates to antitrust, contracts, corporate/transaction analysis, criminal law, or elder law?  How about bioethics, intellectual property, labor law, administrative law and perhaps litigation?  Then welcome to Health Law! Ann Marie Marciarille offered an overview of some of the practice areas comprising health law.  Ann O'Leary, Executive Director of Berkeley CHEFS and BHBLS representatives also discussed the health law curriculum available in the Spring 2010.

Tuesday, September 21, 2010, 12:00 p.m.
The Moral Underground: How Ordinary Americans Subvert an Unfair Economy
Lisa Dodson,
Boston College
UC Berkeley Labor Center, 2521 Channing Way, Berkeley

A professor of sociology at Boston College, Dodson delivered a surprising tale of people reaching across the economic fault line to restore a sense of justice to the working world. This compelling book reveals the remarkable truth of ordinary people who every day confront the need to create ethical alternatives to rules that ignore the humanity of working parents and put their children at risk. The Moral Underground is a much-needed clarion call-one that is crucial for our society to heed.

Wednesday, September 1, 2010
Are We There Yet?: Does 2010 Health Reform Give Us What We Need?
Marjorie Shultz,
UC Berkeley School of Law
Boalt Hall, Room 110

After decades of frustration and failure, major health care reform passed in the spring of 2010 by the skin of its teeth. Opponents remain active both through litigation and legislative efforts to overturn the new act. Polling shows that less than 50% of the public favors the act although the numbers have been rising slowly and may increase as people begin to receive some of the new benefits. Even assuming it remains in place, the new law establishes a five year track to full implementation. Will the reforms be able to retain and build public support? Will costs be manageable? Will the delivery system adapt sufficiently to deliver good care to larger numbers of people? We’ll identify some of the law’s major strengths and key challenges, as well as discuss some of the significant uncertainties that lie ahead.

2009-2010

April 30, 2010
The Shriver Report: Impacts and Implications

This special discussion took place before the Boalt Hall Women's Celebration.

In the fall of 2009, First Lady of California Maria Shriver and the Center for American Progress released "The Shriver Report: A Woman’s Nation Changes Everything," in partnership with the Berkeley Center on Health, Economic & Family Security at UC Berkeley School of Law (Berkeley CHEFS). The report centered around the fact that for the first time in American history, women are half of all U.S. workers and mothers are the primary breadwinners or co-breadwinners in nearly two-thirds of American families.

A team of Boalt alums, faculty and staff played a major role in producing this report, including Ann O’Leary, Karen Skelton, Maria Echaveste, and Mary Ann Mason, who highlighted the report’s major findings and then discuss policy and societal impacts. Together the panel explored questions including: What implications does the shift have for our major societal institutions, from government and businesses to our faith communities?  What policies are needed to accommodate this major social change?  How have immigrant women been affected?  How has the role of men changed?

"The Shriver Report: A Woman’s Nation Changes Everything" is available at http://www.awomansnation.com/

April 23, 2010
Paving the High Road: Labor Standards and Procurement Policy in the Obama Era
This event was presented by the Berkeley Journal of Employment & Labor Law (BJELL)

Since the year 2000, federal government contracting for goods and services has more than doubled, to over $526 billion dollars per year.  These expenditures create millions of jobs—jobs that are funded with federal tax dollars, but under the control of private employers.  However, unlike federal jobs, economic data show that many of these procurement-based jobs pay low wages and offer few or no benefits.  Such increases in federally funded private employment raise important questions: How well do existing laws and policies ensure that taxpayer dollars spent on federal contractors create good jobs and raise standards in the broader labor market? How might policymakers develop new laws and policies to encourage the development of good jobs in the federal contractor workforce?  What are the legal implications of these tools?  This symposium brought together top national experts in this area to discuss these and other related questions.

To view Agenda, click here.

April 23, 2010
Medical-Legal Partnerships and the Social Determinants of Health: A Showcase of Students' Engaged Scholarship Projects

The Medical-Legal Partnership and the Social Determinants of Health explores the premise that individual risk factors-including biology-play only a small role in predicting health outcomes. At this event law and medical students presented their work on current-day policy issues that affect health outcomes for low-income children: obesity and food access, immigration status, healthy environments, family-friendly workplace policies, and access to health care.

The Medical-Legal Partnership course is supported by the Berkeley Engaged Scholarship Initiative (BESI) faculty program.

Presented by
Students in the Medical-Legal Partnership Seminar and Practicum
Melissa Rodgers, Associate Director, Berkeley CHEFS Gena Lewis, Ambulatory Pediatrician, Children's Hospital & Research Center Oakland and Medical Director, East Bay Medical-Legal Partnership

April 21, 2010
Coming Together: Keeping Women Scientists in the Pipeline 
This conference was funded through the generous support of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. 

In November 2009, Berkeley Center on Health, Economic & Family Security (Berkeley CHEFS) and the Center for American Progress published “Staying Competitive: Patching America’s Leaky Pipelines in the Sciences,” authored by Marc Goulden, Karie Frasch and Mary Ann Mason. Our research identified a number of critical issues contributing to the loss of talented young scientists from fast-track academic careers, particularly women at the graduate and postdoctoral levels. One of the most significant appears to be the family formation, and caregiving and the absence of university-agency synergy in addressing these concerns. At this meeting,  leaders in both higher education and the federal government jointly and creatively considered the problems and potential solutions. Attendance was by invitation only.

To view Agenda click here.

April 19, 2010
Whose Death Is it Anyway: Medical-Legal Conflict in the Implementation of End of Life Decision Making
Ann Marie Marciarille,
University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law
This event was co-sponsored with the Boalt Healthcare & Biotech Law Society. 

 To view the video recording of the event click here.
To view the powerpoint presentation click here.

The debate over the 2010 health care reform legislation sharpened public discussion on end-of-life decision making for many Americans. Attorneys—practitioners and academics alike—emphasize the values of autonomy and independence in end-of-life decision making and the role of attorneys and courts. But the private implementation of legal documents designed to foster these values can be highly problematic for health care practitioners, family members, and even patients themselves. Why is this? Why is there such a powerful disconnect between rhetoric and implementation on end-of-life decision making? What role does the law play in fostering this disconnect? What role might health care payment systems play? This thought-provoking conversation was presented by Professor Marciarille will be teaching Health Care Law at Berkeley Law School in the fall of 2010.

April 12, 2010
"Insider's View on Health Care Reform and on the Prospects for Immigration Reform"
Co-sponsored by the Chief Justice Earl Warren Institute on Race, Ethnicity, & Diversity (Warren Institute).

 To view the video recording of the event click here.

ANDREA LA RUE is a partner at the NVG, where she leads the consulting firm's effort in developing and implementing legislative strategies on a broad range of issues. Previously, Ms. La Rue served as Counsel for Senate Democratic Leader Tom Daschle and for the Senate Rules Committee. In that capacity, she worked directly with Senators and their staff in managing floor action, as well as with both the Clinton and Bush White Houses and members of the House of Representatives, while negotiating compromises on such bills as the USA Patriot Act and the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002. In addition, Ms. La Rue has extensive experience in labor law and political organizing.

March 18, 2010
Health Care Reform: Changing the Health Care Delivery System

 To view the video recording of the event click here.

In 2009, Congress began crafting an overhaul of the U.S. health care system. Much of the conversation has focused on ways to expand coverage to the uninsured and finance that expansion, but successful health care reform requires addressing key delivery system issues: Will there be enough health care providers to care for millions of newly-insured patients? Can innovative payment mechanisms “bend the cost curve”? Can the health care system reorganize itself to deliver higher quality care at a lower cost? What are the legal, political, policy, and practical barriers to change? A panel of UC Berkeley and UCSF experts gave an update on national health care reform and discussed cutting edge issues in reforming the health care delivery system.

Panelists
Stephen Shortell, Dean, UC Berkeley School of Public Health and Co-Director, Berkeley CHEFS
Diane Rittenhouse, Professor, Department of Family & Community Medicine, UC San Francisco and
Richard Scheffler, Director, The Nicholas C. Petris Center on Health Care Markets & Consumer Welfare; Distinguished Professor of Health Economics and Public Policy
Moderator: Melissa Rodgers, Associate Director, Berkeley CHEFS

February 17, 2010
Good Medicine? Race, Gender & Justice in Health Care

As health care reform hangs in the balance, scholars and activists reflect on the racial and gender implications of immigration, colonialism, policy, organizing, and healing as it relates to health care in the U.S. Melissa Rodgers, Associate Director of Berkeley CHEFS presented on the current detabe over health care reform.
This event was co-sponsored by the UC Berkeley, Center for Race & Gender.

February 11, 2010
The Shriver Report: A Woman's Nation Changes Everything 
This event was co-sponsored by the Boalt Hall Women's Association, Boalt Hall Chapter of the American Constitution Society, Berkeley Gender Law Journal and the Goldman School's Women in Public Policy Group.

Click here for an audio recording of this event.

In the fall of 2009, First Lady of California Maria Shriver and the Center for American Progress released The Shriver Report: A Woman’s Nation Changes Everything, edited by Ann O'Leary (Berkeley CHEFS) and Heather Boushey.  For the first time in American history, women are half of all U.S. workers and mothers are the primary breadwinners or co-breadwinners in nearly two-thirds of American families. 

Ann O’Leary, Heather Boushey, and Maria Echaveste, presented highlights of  the report’s major findings and Professors Mary Ann Mason and Melissa Murray responded.  Together the panel explored questions including: What implications does the shift have for our major societal institutions, from government and businesses to our faith communities?  What policies are needed to accommodate this major social change?  How have immigrant women been affected?  How has the role of men changed?

The Shriver Report: A Woman’s Nation Changes Everything is available at http://www.awomansnation.com/ 

Panelists:
Heather Boushey, Senior Economist, Center for American Progress
Ann O’Leary, Executive Director, Berkeley CHEFS
Maria Echaveste, Senior Distinguished Fellow, Chief Justice Earl Warren Institute on Race, Ethnicity and Diversity
Respondents: 
Mary Ann Mason, Professor of Law
Melissa Murray, Assistant Professor of Law

January 21, 2010
Health Care Reform: The Big Issues and Charting the Future

To view the video recording of the event click here.

For the last year, Congress has been working to reform the U.S. health care system.  A panel of UC Berkeley experts gave an update on the politics and big policy issues in national health care reform and a discussed what to expect going forward.  They explored questions such as: What have been the most controversial issues in health care reform and why?  How will health care reform affect insured and uninsured individuals and families?  What role will employers play in the new health care landscape?  What reforms can we expect to the health care delivery system?

November 6, 2009
Bringing National Health Reform to California

This conference was a conversation about health reform and California that addressed pressing questions for the state: What must California do to implement national health reform?  What unique challenges does California face?  What are the implications for California of the gaps in the national proposal?  What lessons can national policy makers take back to Washington?

To view the conference agenda click here.
To view the speaker bios click here.

To view a video of the event
Part I click here
Part II click here
     Part III click here
Part  IV click here
Part V click here


October 16, 2009
Shared Responsibility, Shared Risk: Government, Markets, and Social Policy in the Twenty First Century

The privatization of risk has become all the more stark in recent months with the collapse of the financial market. This conference offereded rigorous and creative solutions on how to improve economic security by rethinking the role of the government, employers and individuals should play in managing risks created by the market. Conference was co-sponsored by the Social Science Research Council and the Center for American Progress.

To view the conference agenda click here. 
To view a copy of the presenters research summary pamphlet click here.
 To view the digital recordings of the conference click here.

May 7-8, 2009
Shared Responsibility, Shared Risk

Berkeley CHEFS held a Roundtable entitled "Shared Responsibility, Shared Risk: Government, Markets and Social Policy in the Twenty-First Century" on the Berkeley campus. Sponsored by a grant from the Social Science Research Council, this gathering of more than 30 experts and academics in the areas of federal contracting, housing security, income protection and health care reform included CHEFS faculty Co-Directors Steve Sugarman and Jacob Hacker, Executive Director Ann O'Leary, many Berkeley faculty, and nationally known experts such as Harvard law professor Martha Minow, CAP's Heather Boushey, Micah Weinberg and Mark Paul from the New American Foundation, Netsy Firestein of the Labor Project for Working Families and Paul Nathanson from the National Senior Citizens Law Center.

April 1, 2009
Health Care Reform: Considerations for the Obama Administration

CHEFS held a lunchtime talk on health reform at Boalt. More than 60 people packed into the Koret Room to hear Steve Shortell (Dean of the School of Public Health at Berkeley), Ken Jacobs (Chair of the Berkeley Labor Center), CHEFS Executive Director Ann O'Leary and moderator Melissa Rodgers, the Associate Director of CHEFS, speak about what is happening in the national health care debate.

Read about the event in the UC Berkeley News online by clicking here.


Pictured: Ken Jacobs, Melissa Rodgers, and Steve Shortell (l to r)
Photo courtesy of Jeffery Kahn, UC Berkeley NewsCenter

November 6, 2008
Post Election Analysis of Economic Security and Health Reform

More than 40 people attended the frst public forum given by CHEFS, held at the Berkeley School of Law. The talk focused on economic security and health care reform, post-election. Faculty Co-Directors Jacob Hacker and Mary Ann Mason, as well as Executive Director Ann O'Leary, spoke at the event.