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2004 

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Visiting Scholars 2003-2004


VISITING SCHOLARS - SUMMER 2013

Shahla Ali is an assistant professor of law and deputy director of the LLM in Arbitration and Dispute Resolution in the Faculty of Law at the University of Hong Kong. Dr. Ali is currently working on a 3-year research project funded by the Government of Hong Kong on “New Governance and Post-Disaster Humanitarian Aid” which aims to compare how three models of post-disaster governance (international, domestic and public/private) engage local populations in relief efforts. She is the author of Consumer Financial Dispute Resolution in a Comparative Context (Cambridge U. Press, 2013) and Resolving Disputes in the Asia Pacific Region (Routledge, 2010). Her empirical articles on globalization and access to justice have appeared in the Journal of Legal Pluralism and Unofficial Law, the Harvard Negotiation Law Review, and the Pacific Rim Law and Policy Journal. She has consulted with USAID, IFC/World Bank and the UN Office of Human Resource Management on issues pertaining to peace process negotiation and assessment of community dialogue and is a member of the IBA Drafting Committee on Investor-State Mediation Rules. She received her J.D. and Ph.D in Jurisprudence and Social Policy from the University of California at Berkeley; and her B.A. with honors from Stanford University. She is a member of the State Bar of California and a public arbitrator (FINRA, SCIA). She speaks English, Chinese and Farsi. sali@hku.hk

Clare Chambers is University Senior Lecturer in Philosophy and Fellow of Jesus College, University of Cambridge. Her specialism is contemporary analytical political and legal philosophy, particularly feminist and liberal theory, and issues of equality, autonomy, culture, and personal relationships. She is currently working on the normative issues surrounding the state regulation of marriage, in articles such as "The Marriage-Free State" in Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society (2013), "Political Liberalism, Neutrality and State-Recognised Marriage" (in progress) and "The Limitations of Contract: Regulating Personal Relationships in a Marriage-Free State" (in progress). Clare is the author of two books: Sex, Culture, and Justice: The Limits of Choice (Penn State University Press, 2008), and, with Phil Parvin, Teach Yourself Political Philosophy: A Complete Introduction (Hodder, 2012). She has also published numerous articles on feminist and liberal political and legal philosophy in journals of law, politics, and philosophy, and for publishers such as Oxford University Press, Cambridge University Press, Polity, Routledge, and Penn State University Press. Before joining Cambridge in 2006 she was on the faculties of the University of Oxford and the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). She has been a Visiting Scholar at the CSLS before, in 2009. cec66@cam.ac.uk

Ana Carolina da Matta Chasin is a PhD candidate in the Sociology Department of the University of São Paulo (USP) working on a study of the arbitration system in Brazil. The project intends to discuss the way by which this private remedy system is leading to the restructuring of the Brazilian law field. She holds a Law degree from Catholic University of São Paulo (PUC-SP), a Social Sciences degree and a Master in Sociology (both at USP). Her Master thesis was focused on small claims courts in Brazil. She works with sociology of law, focusing on two major topics: alternative dispute resolution and land rights and quilombolas communities (rural black communities formed by descendants of slaves). She also has just finished the Portuguese translation of the paper “Why the “haves” come out ahead: speculations on the limits of legal change” (author Marc Galanter), which will be published at the beginning of 2013. acchasin@usp.br

Fusheng Chen is Associate Professor of Law at Harbin Engineering University (China). He finished his Post-doctorate research in legal sociology at Chinese Academy of Social Sciences and received both the degree of Master of Law and Ph.D. in Philosophy from Heilongjiang University (China), in 1998 and in 2004. He specializes in sociology of law, intellectual property, and company law. He has finished several research projects, including one of the state-level projects of special funds for fundamental researches in universities. The title of it is: Research on the Legal Issues of the Protection of the Enterprises’ Intellectual Property Rights on Innovation (2010). His publications include some books and papers, such as Rule of Law—Dynamic Balance between Freedom and Order.(Law Press,2006); Fundamentals and Practices of Intellectual Property Law (Heilongjiang People’s Publishing House, 2003); “Research on the Legality of Staff Reduction in Economic Crisis(Academic Exchange, 2010, No.3.); “A Comparative Study of Mode of Law Development in Russia and East Asia Countries—from the Perspective of Different Cultural Modes(Russian Central Asian & East European Studies,2009,No.2.). He plans to work at the Center for the Study of Law and Society on the Comparative Study of Patent Consciousness of Chinese and American Enterprises. cfsycy@126.com

Sharon Cowan is a Senior Lecturer in Criminal Law and Medical Jurisprudence at the University of Edinburgh. Her research interests include: Gender, Sexuality and the Law; Criminal Law; Criminal Justice; Legal Pedagogy; and Asylum and Immigration. Along with Helen Baillot of the Scottish Refugee Council, and Vanessa Munro of the University of Nottingham she recently completed a UK-wide empirical project, funded by the Nuffield Foundation (2009-2012), investigating how women asylum claimaints, whose applications include a claim of rape, are treated by the Asylum and Immigration Appeal Tribunal. Her current project investigates the legal consciousness of transgender people. Recent publications include: Sharon Cowan 'To Buy or Not to Buy? Vulnerability and the Criminalisation of Commercial BDSM' (2012) Feminist Legal Studies 20(3) 263-279; Sharon Cowan, Helen Baillot, Vanessa Munro '‘Hearing the Right Gaps’: Enabling and Responding to Disclosures of Sexual Violence within the UK Asylum Process' (2012) Social & Legal Studies 21(3) 269-296; Sharon Cowan, Suzanne Bouclin, Gillian Calder 'Playing Games with Law' in Zenon Bankowski, Paul Maharg, Maks Del Mar (eds) The Arts and the Legal Academy Beyond Text in Legal Education (Ashgate, 2013) p69-86. scowan1@staffmail.ed.ac.uk

Rose Cuison Villazor is Professor of Law at the University of California, Davis, where she teaches and writes in the areas of property law, immigration law, race, and citizenship. Her articles have been published in the New York University Law Review, Washington University Law Review, and California Law Review, among other leading law journals. She is co-editor of Loving v. Virginia in a Post-Racial World: Rethinking Race, Sex, and Marriage, published by Cambridge University Press in 2012. Prof. Villazor received the 2011 Derrick A. Bell Award given by the Association of American Law Schools (AALS) Minority Section. She obtained an LL.M from Columbia Law School in 2006 and a J.D. from the American University Washington College of Law in 2000. She clerked for Associate Judge Stephen H. Glickman on the District of Columbia Court of Appeals, received an Equal Justice Works Fellowship to work for New York Lawyers for the Public Interest (2001-2004), and served as a Human Rights Fellow at Columbia Law School (2004-2006). While at the Center (Summer 2013 & Spring 2014) she will be researching the ways in which the federal government, through the US military, prohibited African American soldiers from marrying white European women during and a few years after World War II. Through this exploration, she aims to show that the federal government has played a significant role in regulating and restricting interracial marriages. In so doing, her research challenges the conventional view that the regulation and restriction of marriages and family formation has rested only with the state governments. rcvillazor@ucdavis.edu

Chris Elmendorf is Professor of Law at the University of California, Davis. A graduate of the Yale Law School and former clerk to Judge Guido Calabresi, Professor Elmendorf writes primarily in the fields of election law and statutory interpretation. In recent and forthcoming papers, he examines the consequences of election law for political party branding and the performance of low-information electorates; the propriety of categorizing "the electorate" as a state actor under the U.S. Constitution and what this implies for judicial interpretation of the Voting Rights Act; the geography of racial discrimination by voters; and the administration of direct democracy. While at Berkeley, Elmendorf will be working on projects that adapt new statistical techniques and experimental methods from political science to answer longstanding questions under the Voting Rights Act. His work has been published in the Yale Law Journal, the New York University Law Review, the University of Pennsylvania Law Review, the California Law Review, the Duke Law Journal, the Cornell Law Review, and the Election Law Journal, among other leading journals. cselmendorf@ucdavis.edu.

Elisabeth Greif is Assistant Professor at the Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria. She earned her doctorate at the University of Linz in 2005. She also teaches courses in feminist legal doctrine at the Rosa Mayreder College (Vienna). She specializes in gender studies and law as well as in legal history and earned the JKU goes Gender post-doctorate fellowship in 2010. Her research focuses on the construction of (sexual) identities in both historical and contemporary law and on the rights of sexual minorities. In her book Doing Trans/Gender. Rechtliche Dimensionen she has analysed the legal aspects of gender reassignment in Austria with a strong focus on human rights. Her recent publications include the co-editing of a multidisciplinary volume on legal gender studies and the editing of a comparative study on sex work. At the Center she will be working on her habilitation treatise in which she analyses law against unnatural fornication between people of the same sex in Austria’s First Republic (1918-1934) focusing on the judicial treatment of male and female unnatural fornication and the construction of sexual identity in this context. elisabeth.greif@jku.at

Mari Hirayama is excited to return to the Center for the Study of Law and Society, where she was a visiting student researcher nine years ago. She is now Associate Professor of Criminal Procedure & Criminology at Hakuoh University Department of Law (Japan). She received her Master of Laws from Kwansei Gakuin University Graduate School of Law. As a Fulbright Scholar from 2002-2004, she received an LL.M. from the University of Minnesota Law School in 2003, and then was a visiting scholar at the Center for the Study of Law and Society. Professor Hirayama’s specialization is in Criminal Procedure & Criminology. She has conducted research on the impact of victims’ rights and viewpoints on criminal procedure, and on criminal justice policy for sex crimes. Recently, she has also focused on the Saiban-in system (the lay judge system in Japan). At the Center, once again the recipient of a Fulbright Scholarship, she will conduct a comparative study of criminal justice policy for sex crimes in the US and Japan. Her recent publications (in Japanese) include: Criminal Procedure Class (Horitsu- Bunka Publication, forthcoming March 2013), Introduction to Criminal Procedure (Yachiyo Publication 2011), and Direction of Criminology: Challenge of Legal Criminology, 2nd Edition (Horitsu Bunka Press 2007). ma07@fc.hakuoh.ac.jp

Roselyn Hsueh is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Temple University. She received a Ph.D. from the University of California-Berkeley in 2008 and has served as a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Southern California and conducted fieldwork in Asia as a Fulbright scholar. Her research focuses on the politics of market reform, regulation, comparative capitalism, globalization, and the relationship between social and economic control in developing countries. Her recent publications include China’s Regulatory State: A New Strategy for Globalization (Cornell University Press/ Cornell Studies in Political Economy, 2011) and “China and India in the Age of Globalization: Sectoral Variation in Postliberalization Reregulation,” Comparative Political Studies 45 (2012): 32-61. She is also affiliated with the Institute of East Asian Studies as Residential Research Faculty. rhsueh@temple.edu

Sarah E. Igo is Associate Professor of History, with affiliate appointments in Political Science and Sociology, at Vanderbilt University. She received her Ph.D. in History from Princeton University in 2001 and was on the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania from 2001 to 2008. Her primary research interests are in American cultural and intellectual history, the history of the human sciences, the sociology of knowledge, and the history of the public sphere. She is the author of The Averaged American: Surveys, Citizens, and the Making of a Mass Public (2007), which explores the relationship between survey data—opinion polls, sex surveys, consumer research—and modern understandings of self and nation. Professor Igo is at the CSLS on a New Directions Fellowship from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which she is using to pursue training in sociolegal studies and jurisprudence. At the Center she will be working on a cultural history of privacy in the U.S. since the 1890s, examined through legal debates, artistic and architectural movements, technological innovations, professional codes, and shifting social norms. Interested in everyday vocabularies of privacy, her focus is on public debates that had privacy at their core, whether over “instantaneous photographs,” Social Security numbers, suburban home design, reproductive rights, or social media. sarah.igo@vanderbilt.edu

Malcolm Langford is a Research Fellow at the Norwegian Centre for Human Rights, Faculty of Law, University of Oslo. His principal focus is on socio-economic rights, various equality rights, judicial review, civil society, international development and investment law. He is currently completing a thesis on the legitimacy and effectiveness of social rights adjudication. Over the last fifteen years, he has worked for various universities, NGOs, UN agencies and national human rights institutions. He has published in law, economic and politics and his books include: Socio-Economic Rights in South Africa: Symbols or Substance? (Cambridge University Press, 2013, edited with B. Cousins, J. Dugard and T. Madlingozi) and Social Rights Jurisprudence: Emerging Trends in International and Comparative Law (Cambridge University Press, 2008, edited). Malcolm also coordinates a number of international initiatives (Metrics for Human Rights and the Global School on Socio-Economic Rights) and is the Chair of Judgment Watch. Malcolm.langford@nchr.uio.no Home page: http://www.jus.uio.no/smr/english/people/aca/malcolml/index.html

Jiaqi (Anya) Lao is a doctoral candidate in Peking University in China, where she earned her Bachelor’s degree in law (with honors) in 2008 and then entered the Masters-Doctor-combined program in 2009. She is also involved in the human rights Masters program jointly launched by the Research Center for Human Rights and Humanitarian Law of Peking University Law School (RCHRHL) and the Raoul Wallenberg Institute of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law, Lund University of Sweden (RWI) in 2008. Her research interests include criminal justice, sentencing policy and human rights protection. She is involved in several important empirical research projects on criminal law funded by National Funds of Social Science in China and is author of five articles dealing with healthcare-related commercial bribery, sentencing policy for recidivists, and the protection of minorities. Jiaqi Lao plans to complete her doctoral dissertation entitled “The Recidivist Premium in Chinese Sentencing Process” at the Center for the Study of Law and Society. anyalaopku@gmail.163

Tamara Lave is Associate Professor of Law at the University of Miami. Prior to her full-time academic appointment, she was a deputy public defender for ten years in San Diego. She holds a Ph.D. from U.C. Berkeley (Jurisprudence and Social Policy), a J.D. from Stanford Law School, and a B.A. from Haverford College. Her dissertation and subsequent research have focused on sexually violent predator legislation. During her time as a visiting scholar at the Center, she will be working on a project with Professor Frank Zimring and Justin McCrary on the recidivism rates of released sexually violent predators. She will also be working on two articles - one on Stand Your Ground Laws in Florida and another on the Supreme Court's decision in United States v Jones (2012). tlave@law.miami.edu

Zakiya Luna is a UC President’s Postdoctoral Fellow at University of California, Berkeley hosted by the Center on Reproductive Rights and Justice at Berkeley Law. She is also a visiting scholar at the Center for the Study of Law and Society. She earned a joint PhD in Sociology and Women’s Studies from University of Michigan (2011), where she also earned her Masters of Social Work (2009). Her research is in the areas of social movements, law and society, reproduction and identity. Her current research examines why and how marginalized women in the US are engaging international human rights discourse to advance a broader movement for reproductive justice that addresses rights to have children and rights to parent. Her research has been funded by multiple sources including the National Science Foundation. She has published in Research in Social Movements, Conflict and Change; Sociological Inquiry; Feminist Studies and Societies without Borders: Social Science and Human Rights. In 2011-2 she was the Mellon Foundation Sawyer Seminar in Human Rights Postdoctoral Fellow at University of Wisconsin, Madison. zluna@law.berkeley.edu

Anne Meuwese is Associate Professor of European and Comparative Public Law at Tilburg Law School in The Netherlands. After obtaining her doctorate in Law from Leiden University in February 2008 (cum laude) with a thesis on `Impact Assessment in EU Lawmaking' and working as a researcher for several years at the University of Exeter and the University of Antwerp, Anne currently teaches and carries out research on topics at the intersection of public law and regulation. Anne is co-chairing the Standing Group on Regulatory Governance of the European Consortium for Political Research (ECPR), see http://regulation.upf.edu/. Anne’s current research – funded by a personal Veni grant from the Dutch research council NWO – deals with the use of regulatory mechanisms as alternative review of government action. anne.meuwese@tilburguniversity.edu

Frédéric Varone is Full Professor of Political Science at the University of Geneva (Switzerland). He holds a MA in economics, a MA in public administration and a Ph.D. in political science. He is a member of the Research Committee of the Swiss National Science Foundation. His current research interests include comparative public policy (e.g. sustainable management of natural resources, regulation of biotechnologies), program evaluation and, public sector reforms (e.g. New Public Management, liberalization and privatization of public services, Public Service Motivation). At the CSLS, he is launching a new research project focusing on three strategies implemented by interest groups to pursue agenda-setting and policy change: lobbying, litigation and direct legislation. He aims at comparing interest groups' actions and policy impacts in California and in Switzerland, in various policy domains (e.g. health and welfare, economic regulation, environmental protection or morality issues), and over the last two decades. Frederic.varone@unige.ch

Piao Yanhong received her Ph.D. in Jurisprudence from Kyoto University (Japan, 2012), where she also earned her Masters of Law and Society (2007). Before coming to America, she served as a researcher in the Department of Legal and Political Studies at Kyoto University (2012). Piao’s research is in the areas of Law and Social Change in China, Chinese Social Security, and Dispute Resolution. Her scholarly interests have been mainly focused on the interactions between courts, local government and migrant laborers’ protests in or out of courts, as well as how these actors’ activities are influenced by the law and other social institutional environment and how they, in turn, have influenced changes in legal institutions. Her doctoral thesis focused on the workers’ accident compensation insurance (WACI) law system in Guangdong, China, and investigated the institutional evolution of the system from 1983 to 1999. At CSLS, she will continue her research on the institutional formation and transformation of Guangdong’s WACI System since the 1980’s, examining the period from 2000 to 2012. yanhong7480@gmail.com

Lan Zhao is a senior lecturer of British and American Cultures in Central University of Finance and Economics (China). She received her Master’s Degree in English Language and Literature in Beijing Normal University in 2000. Ever since, she’s been teaching undergraduate students introductory courses on the study of American society and culture. In the recent years, she is beginning to see the vast and significant impact of English language acquisition on people’s social behavior and thinking patterns, given the English learning “mania” that has been around for 20 years in China. During her visit in CSLS, she’ll focus on the development of legal consciousness of the increasing population of Chinese college students who already have a good command of English and have been sufficiently exposed to western culture. She will be working with Dr. Su Li at UCB to establish the theoretical framework, and design the data collection methods. zhaolan06@126.com


VISITING SCHOLARS - SPRING 2013

Ian Burney is Senior Lecturer at the University of Manchester’s Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine (CHSTM). He received his PhD in History from the University of California, Berkeley in 1993, and after three years as a junior fellow at the Michigan Society of Fellows he moved to the UK. His principal research focus has been the history of legal medicine and forensic science. He is the author of two books, Bodies of Evidence: Medicine and the Politics of the English Inquest, 1830-1926 (Johns Hopkins, 2000), and Poison, Detection and the Victorian Imagination (Manchester, 2006; paperback ed. 2012). He is currently working on a Wellcome Trust-funded research project on the history of forensic homicide investigation in twentieth-century England. Recent published work from this project includes a special issue on “Forensic Cultures” in Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44(1), 2013, and two articles: “Our Environment in Miniature: Dust and the early Twentieth-Century Forensic Imagination,” Representations 121, Winter 2013, and “Bruised Witness: Bernard Spilsbury and the Performance of early Twentieth-Century Forensic Pathology,” Medical History 55(1) 2011. He is also an editor of the journal Social History of Medicine. ian.burney@manchester.ac.uk

Clare Chambers is University Senior Lecturer in Philosophy and Fellow of Jesus College, University of Cambridge. Her specialism is contemporary analytical political and legal philosophy, particularly feminist and liberal theory, and issues of equality, autonomy, culture, and personal relationships. She is currently working on the normative issues surrounding the state regulation of marriage, in articles such as "The Marriage-Free State" in Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society (2013), "Political Liberalism, Neutrality and State-Recognised Marriage" (in progress) and "The Limitations of Contract: Regulating Personal Relationships in a Marriage-Free State" (in progress). Clare is the author of two books: Sex, Culture, and Justice: The Limits of Choice (Penn State University Press, 2008), and, with Phil Parvin, Teach Yourself Political Philosophy: A Complete Introduction (Hodder, 2012). She has also published numerous articles on feminist and liberal political and legal philosophy in journals of law, politics, and philosophy, and for publishers such as Oxford University Press, Cambridge University Press, Polity, Routledge, and Penn State University Press. Before joining Cambridge in 2006 she was on the faculties of the University of Oxford and the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). She has been a Visiting Scholar at the CSLS before, in 2009. cec66@cam.ac.uk

Ana Carolina da Matta Chasin is a PhD candidate in the Sociology Department of the University of São Paulo (USP) working on a study of the arbitration system in Brazil. The project intends to discuss the way by which this private remedy system is leading to the restructuring of the Brazilian law field. She holds a Law degree from Catholic University of São Paulo (PUC-SP), a Social Sciences degree and a Master in Sociology (both at USP). Her Master thesis was focused on small claims courts in Brazil. She works with sociology of law, focusing on two major topics: alternative dispute resolution and land rights and quilombolas communities (rural black communities formed by descendants of slaves). She also has just finished the Portuguese translation of the paper “Why the “haves” come out ahead: speculations on the limits of legal change” (author Marc Galanter), which will be published at the beginning of 2013. acchasin@usp.br

Fusheng Chen is Associate Professor of Law at Harbin Engineering University (China). He finished his Post-doctorate research in legal sociology at Chinese Academy of Social Sciences and received both the degree of Master of Law and Ph.D. in Philosophy from Heilongjiang University (China), in 1998 and in 2004. He specializes in sociology of law, intellectual property, and company law. He has finished several research projects, including one of the state-level projects of special funds for fundamental researches in universities. The title of it is: Research on the Legal Issues of the Protection of the Enterprises’ Intellectual Property Rights on Innovation (2010). His publications include some books and papers, such as Rule of Law—Dynamic Balance between Freedom and Order.(Law Press,2006); Fundamentals and Practices of Intellectual Property Law (Heilongjiang People’s Publishing House, 2003); “Research on the Legality of Staff Reduction in Economic Crisis” (Academic Exchange, 2010, No.3.); “A Comparative Study of Mode of Law Development in Russia and East Asia Countries—from the Perspective of Different Cultural Modes” (Russian Central Asian & East European Studies, 2009, No.2.). He plans to work at the Center for the Study of Law and Society on the Comparative Study of Patent Consciousness of Chinese and American Enterprises. cfsycy@126.com

Sharon Cowan is a Senior Lecturer in Criminal Law and Medical Jurisprudence at the University of Edinburgh. Her research interests include: Gender, Sexuality and the Law; Criminal Law; Criminal Justice; Legal Pedagogy; and Asylum and Immigration. Along with Helen Baillot of the Scottish Refugee Council, and Vanessa Munro of the University of Nottingham she recently completed a UK-wide empirical project, funded by the Nuffield Foundation (2009-2012), investigating how women asylum claimaints, whose applications include a claim of rape, are treated by the Asylum and Immigration Appeal Tribunal. Her current project investigates the legal consciousness of transgender people. Recent publications include: Sharon Cowan 'To Buy or Not to Buy? Vulnerability and the Criminalisation of Commercial BDSM' (2012) Feminist Legal Studies 20(3) 263-279; Sharon Cowan, Helen Baillot, Vanessa Munro '‘Hearing the Right Gaps’: Enabling and Responding to Disclosures of Sexual Violence within the UK Asylum Process' (2012) Social & Legal Studies 21(3) 269-296; Sharon Cowan, Suzanne Bouclin, Gillian Calder 'Playing Games with Law' in Zenon Bankowski, Paul Maharg, Maks Del Mar (eds) The Arts and the Legal Academy Beyond Text in Legal Education (Ashgate, 2013) p69-86. scowan1@staffmail.ed.ac.uk

Rebecca Curry received the Ph.D. in Jurisprudence and Social Policy from the University of California at Berkeley (2008), where she also earned the J.D. (2002). Her scholarly work investigates interactions between courts and other branches of government, as well as the use of litigation to manage both public policy and the regulation of the private sector. Her research to date has focused on separation of powers, judicial review, election law, and the First Amendment. From 2008 to 2011, Dr. Curry served as Assistant Professor of Public Law in the Political Science Department at Hofstra University. There, she offered courses on constitutional law, civil liberties, the judicial process, and American politics, while also directing the University’s accelerated B.A./J.D. program. At the Center, she will be completing a book entitled, The Paradox of Rights: Unexpected Lessons in the Judicial Review of Campaign Finance Policy. It examines the role of electoral interests and interbranch politics in the development of campaign finance jurisprudence. Dr. Curry is also continuing her work on presidential war powers, investigating how Supreme Court rulings in national security cases are affected by the Court’s interest in preserving its own policymaking authority. Rebecca.s.curry@gmail.com

Omer Dekel is Senior Lecturer at the Academic Center of Law & Business in Israel and the former dean of the Academic Center's Law School. He holds LL.D. from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Direct track). Dr. Dekel topics are Administrative Law and Government Procurement Law. Dr. Dekel's books on government procurement law (in Hebrew) are quoted in hundreds of judgments (district and supreme court) and were the base for a vast legislation regulatory reform. Dr. Dekel served as a Counsel for the Israeli Government for strategic and complex acquisition processes; served as a special consultant to the Israeli Parliament for the reform of Public Procurement Regulations; and represents administrative agencies and private entities before the Israeli Supreme Court, primarily in administrative law cases. Among his recent publications: "The Bankruptcy Auction as a Game - Designing an Optimal Auction in Bankruptcy", REVIEW OF LITIGATION (2012) (with Yaad Rotem); "Should the Acquitted Recover Damages? The Right of an Acquitted Defendant to Receive Compensation for the Injury He Has Suffered", Criminal Law Bulletin (2011); “Modification of a Government Contract Awarded Following a Competitive Procedure”, Public Contracts Law Review (2009); “The Legal Theory Of Competitive Bidding For Government Contracts”, Public Contracts Law Review (2008). Dr. Dekel is also a visiting scholar at the Institute for Jewish Law and Israeli Law, Economy and Society and his current research focuses on the connection between Cognitive Psychology, Economics and Law in the scope of Government Procurement. omerdekel@012.net.il

Thalia González is Assistant Professor of Politics at Occidental College. She holds a JD from Northwestern University Law School. In her teaching and scholarship she has developed an interdisciplinary, multicultural, and community-focused approach to understanding increasingly complex and interdependent relationships between law, race, and society. Her research interests include civil rights, critical race theory, juvenile justice, the organization and experience of community based legal practice, and the intersection between law and organizing. She has authored articles on collaborative models of community problem-solving, racial inequity in education, juvenile justice, economic development, and the use of non-legal strategies for social change. Professor González is currently engaged in a multi-year research project addressing racial disparities in school discipline as part of a research collaborative of the UCLA Center for Civil Rights Remedies at the Civil Rights Project. While at CSLS, she will be completing several projects including an article that considers norm formation and internalization in the context of education reform. The project will explore several dimensions of her research agenda, including community mobilization, the use of framing in legal and non-legal contexts, collaborative models of community problem-solving, and institutional reform. Prior to teaching at Occidental, Professor González was a practicing attorney and community organizer. She has also taught at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law, the University of San Francisco, School of Law, and Arizona State University. thaliagonzalez@oxy.edu

Elisabeth Greif is Assistant Professor at the Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria. She earned her doctorate at the University of Linz in 2005. She also teaches courses in feminist legal doctrine at the Rosa Mayreder College (Vienna). She specializes in gender studies and law as well as in legal history and earned the JKU goes Gender post-doctorate fellowship in 2010. Her research focuses on the construction of (sexual) identities in both historical and contemporary law and on the rights of sexual minorities. In her book Doing Trans/Gender. Rechtliche Dimensionen she has analysed the legal aspects of gender reassignment in Austria with a strong focus on human rights. Her recent publications include the co-editing of a multidisciplinary volume on legal gender studies and the editing of a comparative study on sex work. At the Center she will be working on her habilitation treatise in which she analyses law against unnatural fornication between people of the same sex in Austria’s First Republic (1918-1934) focusing on the judicial treatment of male and female unnatural fornication and the construction of sexual identity in this context. elisabeth.greif@jku.at

Mari Hirayama is excited to return to the Center for the Study of Law and Society, where she was a visiting student researcher nine years ago. She is now Associate Professor of Criminal Procedure & Criminology at Hakuoh University Department of Law (Japan). She received her Master of Laws from Kwansei Gakuin University Graduate School of Law. As a Fulbright Scholar from 2002-2004, she received an LL.M. from the University of Minnesota Law School in 2003, and then was a visiting scholar at the Center for the Study of Law and Society. Professor Hirayama’s specialization is in Criminal Procedure & Criminology. She has conducted research on the impact of victims’ rights and viewpoints on criminal procedure, and on criminal justice policy for sex crimes. Recently, she has also focused on the Saiban-in system (the lay judge system in Japan). At the Center, once again the recipient of a Fulbright Scholarship, she will conduct a comparative study of criminal justice policy for sex crimes in the US and Japan. Her recent publications (in Japanese) include: Criminal Procedure Class (Horitsu-Bunka Publication, forthcoming March 2013), Introduction to Criminal Procedure (Yachiyo Publication 2011), and Direction of Criminology: Challenge of Legal Criminology, 2nd Edition (Horitsu Bunka Press 2007). ma07@fc.hakuoh.ac.jp

Roselyn Hsueh is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Temple University. She received a Ph.D. from the University of California-Berkeley in 2008 and has served as a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Southern California and conducted fieldwork in Asia as a Fulbright scholar. Her research focuses on the politics of market reform, regulation, comparative capitalism, globalization, and the relationship between social and economic control in developing countries. Her recent publications include China’s Regulatory State: A New Strategy for Globalization (Cornell University Press/ Cornell Studies in Political Economy, 2011) and “China and India in the Age of Globalization: Sectoral Variation in Postliberalization Reregulation,” Comparative Political Studies 45 (2012): 32-61. She is also affiliated with the Institute of East Asian Studies as Residential Research Faculty. rhsueh@temple.edu

Lia Kent is a Research Fellow with the State, Society and Governance in Melanesia Program at the Australian National University. She holds a Ph.D. and MPubIntLaw from the University of Melbourne. Her research covers the politics of post-conflict peace-building and transitional justice, with a particular focus on East Timor, where she has worked and conducted research since 2000. She is the author of The Dynamics of Transitional Justice: International Models and Local Realities in East Timor (Routledge: 2012) and has published in journals including Human Rights Quarterly and the International Journal of Transitional Justice. While at CSLS she will be working on a project that investigates how individuals and communities in East Timor remember the past and seek to reconstruct everyday life in the wake of conflict. The project examines how local justice priorities and practices may resonate with, or diverge from, those of the national leadership and international donors. lia.kent@anu.edu.au

 

Malcolm Langford is a Research Fellow at the Norwegian Centre for Human Rights, Faculty of Law, University of Oslo. His principal focus is on socio-economic rights, various equality rights, judicial review, civil society, international development and investment law. He is currently completing a thesis on the legitimacy and effectiveness of social rights adjudication. Over the last fifteen years, he has worked for various universities, NGOs, UN agencies and national human rights institutions. He has published in law, economic and politics and his books include: Socio-Economic Rights in South Africa: Symbols or Substance? (Cambridge University Press, 2013, edited with B. Cousins, J. Dugard and T. Madlingozi) and Social Rights Jurisprudence: Emerging Trends in International and Comparative Law (Cambridge University Press, 2008, edited). Malcolm also coordinates a number of international initiatives (Metrics for Human Rights and the Global School on Socio-Economic Rights) and is the Chair of Judgment Watch. Malcolm.langford@nchr.uio.no Home page: http://www.jus.uio.no/smr/english/people/aca/malcolml/index.html

Jiaqi (Anya) Lao is a doctoral candidate in Peking University in China, where she earned her Bachelor’s degree in law (with honors) in 2008 and then entered the Masters-Doctor-combined program in 2009. She is also involved in the human rights Masters program jointly launched by the Research Center for Human Rights and Humanitarian Law of Peking University Law School (RCHRHL) and the Raoul Wallenberg Institute of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law, Lund University of Sweden (RWI) in 2008. Her research interests include criminal justice, sentencing policy and human rights protection. She is involved in several important empirical research projects on criminal law funded by National Funds of Social Science in China and is author of five articles dealing with healthcare-related commercial bribery, sentencing policy for recidivists, and the protection of minorities. Jiaqi Lao plans to complete her doctoral dissertation entitled “The Recidivist Premium in Chinese Sentencing Process” at the Center for the Study of Law and Society. anyalaopku@gmail.163

Zakiya Luna is a UC President’s Postdoctoral Fellow at University of California, Berkeley hosted by the Center on Reproductive Rights and Justice at Berkeley Law. She is also a visiting scholar at the Center for the Study of Law and Society. She earned a joint PhD in Sociology and Women’s Studies from University of Michigan (2011), where she also earned her Masters of Social Work (2009). Her research is in the areas of social movements, law and society, reproduction and identity. Her current research examines why and how marginalized women in the US are engaging international human rights discourse to advance a broader movement for reproductive justice that addresses rights to have children and rights to parent. Her research has been funded by multiple sources including the National Science Foundation. She has published in Research in Social Movements, Conflict and Change; Sociological Inquiry; Feminist Studies and Societies without Borders: Social Science and Human Rights. In 2011-2 she was the Mellon Foundation Sawyer Seminar in Human Rights Postdoctoral Fellow at University of Wisconsin, Madison. zluna@law.berkeley.edu

Anne Meuwese is Associate Professor of European and Comparative Public Law at Tilburg Law School in The Netherlands. After obtaining her doctorate in Law from Leiden University in February 2008 (cum laude) with a thesis on `Impact Assessment in EU Lawmaking' and working as a researcher for several years at the University of Exeter and the University of Antwerp, Anne currently teaches and carries out research on topics at the intersection of public law and regulation. Anne is co-chairing the Standing Group on Regulatory Governance of the European Consortium for Political Research (ECPR), see http://regulation.upf.edu/. Anne’s current research – funded by a personal Veni grant from the Dutch research council NWO – deals with the use of regulatory mechanisms as alternative review of government action. anne.meuwese@tilburguniversity.edu

Dayna Nadine Scott is an Associate Professor at Osgoode Hall Law School and the Faculty of Environmental Studies at York University in Toronto. Her research is in the areas of environmental law and policy, risk regulation and the distribution of harms from industrial pollution. She is currently working on a SSHRC-funded research project (with Professor Gus Van Harten) entitled Investigating Regulatory Chill: Contemporary Constraints on Regulatory Decision-Making to Protect the Environment. While at Berkeley, Professor Scott intends to work on a project on Pollution Dynamics, investigating the factors that contribute to the patterns and flows of industrial pollution around the world. I will look specifically at ``pollution hotspots``, emphasizing such factors as local enforcement decisions and community characteristics, and backgrounding formal legal differences between jurisdictions. I aim to contribute to debates about regulatory competition and transnational governance by advocating for closer attention to the differences between formal and informal regulation to produce a more open-ended, textured analysis of the linkages between environmental regulations, community characteristics, and pollution intensity. Professor Scott`s writing has appeared in the Canadian Journal of Law & Society, Feminist Perspectives on Tort Law, Loyola Law Review, Feminist Legal Studies, RECIEL and the Osgoode Hall Law Journal, among others. DScott@osgoode.yorku.ca

Satomi Tayama is Associate Professor of Law at Kanagawa University (Japan). She received a Master of Laws from Waseda University. She specializes in criminal law, and her primary research interests lie in the interrelationship between criminal law and civil law. Getting a foothold in interpretation of Japanese criminal law, she has mainly emphasized in her articles that criminal law should remain the last resort of maintaining social control. During her stay at CSLS, she will be working on research into the limits of criminal sanctions, comparing criminal and civil sanctions in terms of a deterrent to unlawful acts. tayama@kanagawa-u.ac.jp

Frédéric Varone is Full Professor of Political Science at the University of Geneva (Switzerland). He holds a MA in economics, a MA in public administration and a Ph.D. in political science. He is a member of the Research Committee of the Swiss National Science Foundation. His current research interests include comparative public policy (e.g. sustainable management of natural resources, regulation of biotechnologies), program evaluation and, public sector reforms (e.g. New Public Management, liberalization and privatization of public services, Public Service Motivation). At the CSLS, he is launching a new research project focusing on three strategies implemented by interest groups to pursue agenda-setting and policy change: lobbying, litigation and direct legislation. He aims at comparing interest groups' actions and policy impacts in California and in Switzerland, in various policy domains (e.g. health and welfare, economic regulation, environmental protection or morality issues), and over the last two decades. frederic.varone@unige.ch

Kenneth Veitch is Lecturer in Law at the University of Sussex, UK. He studied law at the Universities of Aberdeen, Edinburgh and Glasgow, and obtained his PhD in Law from Cardiff University. His research interests lie in the fields of sociology of law, legal and social theory, and law and social policy. His current project explores the relationship between law, neo-liberalism and the welfare state. Recent publications include: “Social Solidarity and the Power of Contract”, Journal of Law and Society (2011) and “Juridification, Medicalisation and the Impact of EU Law: Patient Mobility and the Allocation of Scarce NHS Resources”, Medical Law Review (2012). He is the author of The Jurisdiction of Medical Law (Ashgate, 2007). At Berkeley, he will be researching the historical and contemporary nature of the concept of social law (the law of the welfare state) and, specifically, the relationship between this type of law and the privatisation of welfare services. K.J.Veitch@sussex.ac.uk

Piao Yanhong received her Ph.D. in Jurisprudence from Kyoto University (Japan, 2012), where she also earned her Masters of Law and Society (2007). Before coming to America, she served as a researcher in the Department of Legal and Political Studies at Kyoto University (2012). Piao’s research is in the areas of Law and Social Change in China, Chinese Social Security, and Dispute Resolution. Her scholarly interests have been mainly focused on the interactions between courts, local government and migrant laborers’ protests in or out of courts, as well as how these actors’ activities are influenced by the law and other social institutional environment and how they, in turn, have influenced changes in legal institutions. Her doctoral thesis focused on the workers’ accident compensation insurance (WACI) law system in Guangdong, China, and investigated the institutional evolution of the system from 1983 to 1999. At CSLS, she will continue her research on the institutional formation and transformation of Guangdong’s WACI System since the 1980’s, examining the period from 2000 to 2012. yanhong7480@gmail.com
Lan Zhao is a senior lecturer of British and American Cultures in Central University of Finance and Economics (China). She received her Master’s Degree in English Language and Literature in Beijing Normal University in 2000. Ever since, she’s been teaching undergraduate students introductory courses on the study of American society and culture. In the recent years, she is beginning to see the vast and significant impact of English language acquisition on people’s social behavior and thinking patterns, given the English learning “mania” that has been around for 20 years in China. During her visit in CSLS, she’ll focus on the development of legal consciousness of the increasing population of Chinese college students who already have a good command of English and have been sufficiently exposed to western culture. She will be working with Dr. Su Li at UCB to establish the theoretical framework, and design the data collection methods. zhaolan06@126.com
January 7, 2013


VISITING SCHOLARS - FALL 2012

Ana Carolina da Matta Chasin is a PhD candidate in the Sociology Department of the University of São Paulo (USP) working on a study of the arbitration system in Brazil. The project intends to discuss the way by which this private remedy system is leading to the restructuring of the Brazilian law field. She holds a Law degree from Catholic University of São Paulo (PUC-SP), a Social Sciences degree and a Master in Sociology (both at USP). Her Master thesis was focused on small claims courts in Brazil. She works with sociology of law, focusing on two major topics: alternative dispute resolution and land rights and quilombolas communities (rural black communities formed by descendants of slaves). She also has just finished the Portuguese translation of the paper “Why the “haves” come out ahead: speculations on the limits of legal change” (author Marc Galanter), which will be published at the beginning of 2013. acchasin@usp.br

Fusheng Chen is an Associate Professor of Law at Harbin Engineering University (China). He finished his Post-doctorate research in legal sociology at Chinese Academy of Social Sciences and received both the degree of Master of Law and Ph.D. in Philosophy from Heilongjiang University (China), in 1998 and in 2004. He specializes in sociology of law, intellectual property, and company law. He has finished several research projects, including one of the state-level projects of special funds for fundamental researches in universities. The title of it is: Research on the Legal Issues of the Protection of the Enterprises’ Intellectual Property Rights on Innovation (2010). His publications include some books and papers, such as Rule of Law—Dynamic Balance between Freedom and Order.(Law Press, 2006); Fundamentals and Practices of Intellectual Property Law (Heilongjiang People’s Publishing House, 2003); “Research on the Legality of Staff Reduction in Economic Crisis” (Academic Exchange, 2010, No.3.); “A Comparative Study of Mode of Law Development in Russia and East Asia Countries—from the Perspective of Different Cultural Modes” (Russian Central Asian & East European Studies, 2009,No.2.). He plans to work at the Center for the Study of Law and Society on the Comparative Study of Patent Consciousness of Chinese and American Enterprises. cfsycy@126.com

Rebecca Curry received the Ph.D. in Jurisprudence and Social Policy from the University of California at Berkeley (2008), where she also earned the J.D. (2002). Her scholarly work investigates interactions between courts and other branches of government, as well as the use of litigation to manage both public policy and the regulation of the private sector. Her research to date has focused on separation of powers, judicial review, election law, and the First Amendment. From 2008 to 2011, Dr. Curry served as Assistant Professor of Public Law in the Political Science Department at Hofstra University. There, she offered courses on constitutional law, civil liberties, the judicial process, and American politics, while also directing the University’s accelerated B.A./J.D. program. At the Center, she will be completing a book entitled, The Paradox of Rights: Unexpected Lessons in the Judicial Review of Campaign Finance Policy. It examines the role of electoral interests and interbranch politics in the development of campaign finance jurisprudence. Dr. Curry is also continuing her work on presidential war powers, investigating how Supreme Court rulings in national security cases are affected by the Court’s interest in preserving its own policymaking authority. Rebecca.s.curry@gmail.com

Omer Dekel is a Senior Lecturer at the Academic Center of Law & Business in Israel and the former dean of the Academic Center's Law School. He holds LL.D. from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Direct track). Dr. Dekel topics are Administrative Law and Government Procurement Law. Dr. Dekel's books on government procurement law (in Hebrew) are quoted in hundreds of judgments (district and supreme court) and were the base for a vast legislation regulatory reform. Dr. Dekel served as a Counsel for the Israeli Government for strategic and complex acquisition processes; served as a special consultant to the Israeli Parliament for the reform of Public Procurement Regulations; and represents administrative agencies and private entities before the Israeli Supreme Court, primarily in administrative law cases. Among his recent publications: "The Bankruptcy Auction as a Game - Designing an Optimal Auction in Bankruptcy", Review of Litigation (2012) (with Yaad Rotem); "Should the Acquitted Recover Damages? The Right of an Acquitted Defendant to Receive Compensation for the Injury He Has Suffered", Criminal Law Bulletin (2011); “Modification of a Government Contract Awarded Following a Competitive Procedure”, Public Contracts Law Review (2009); “The Legal Theory Of Competitive Bidding For Government Contracts”, Public Contracts Law Review (2008). Dr. Dekel is also a visiting scholar at the Institute for Jewish Law and Israeli Law, Economy and Society and his current research focuses on the connection between Cognitive Psychology, Economics and Law in the scope of Government Procurement. omerdekel@012.net.il

Jacqueline Gehring is Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Studies at Allegheny College. She received the Ph.D. in Jurisprudence and Social Policy from the University of California at Berkeley (2007). She is especially interested in how ideas of race and nation are currently evolving in Europe, and in the impact of the European Union on state and local equality policies. Her past work includes investigations of race riots in France, and the changing nature of German citizenship and identity. While at CSLS she will be completing “One European Right, Diverse National Realities,” a book investigating the implementation of European racial anti-discrimination policy by labor unions, employers, NGOs and governmental actors. She will also be working on a project that investigates the limitations on the free movement of the Roma in Europe and the use of legal rights and court to remedy discrimination experienced by the Roma. jgehring@allegheny.edu

Ben Golder is a Senior Lecturer in the Faculty of Law at the University of New South Wales (Australia). He has undergraduate degrees in law and English literature from the same institution, and took his PhD in legal theory from the University of London (Birkbeck College) in 2009. Ben works in the fields of law and social theory, legal theory, public law and human rights. He is the author, with Peter Fitzpatrick, of Foucault's Law (Routledge, 2009) and the editor of the collection, Re-reading Foucault: On Law, Power and Rights (Routledge, 2012). His work has been published in journals such as Law, Culture and the Humanities, Social and Legal Studies and the International Journal for the Semiotics of Law. He is presently at work, and will continue this work whilst at the Center, on a manuscript entitled Critical Counter-Conducts: Michel Foucault and the Politics of Rights. b.golder@unsw.edu.au

Thalia González is an Assistant Professor of Politics at Occidental College. She holds a JD from Northwestern University Law School. In her teaching and scholarship she has developed an interdisciplinary, multicultural, and community-focused approach to understanding increasingly complex and interdependent relationships between law, race, and society. Her research interests include civil rights, critical race theory, juvenile justice, the organization and experience of community based legal practice, and the intersection between law and organizing. She has authored articles on collaborative models of community problem-solving, racial inequity in education, juvenile justice, economic development, and the use of non-legal strategies for social change. Professor González is currently engaged in a multi-year research project addressing racial disparities in school discipline as part of a research collaborative of the UCLA Center for Civil Rights Remedies at the Civil Rights Project. While at CSLS, she will be completing several projects including an article that considers norm formation and internalization in the context of education reform. The project will explore several dimensions of her research agenda, including community mobilization, the use of framing in legal and non-legal contexts, collaborative models of community problem-solving, and institutional reform. Prior to teaching at Occidental, Professor González was a practicing attorney and community organizer. She has also taught at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law, the University of San Francisco, School of Law, and Arizona State University. thaliagonzalez@oxy.edu

Elisabeth Greif is Assistant Professor at the Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria. She earned her doctorate at the University of Linz in 2005. She also teaches courses in feminist legal doctrine at the Rosa Mayreder College (Vienna). She specializes in gender studies and law as well as in legal history and earned the JKU goes Gender post-doctorate fellowship in 2010. Her research focuses on the construction of (sexual) identities in both historical and contemporary law and on the rights of sexual minorities. In her book Doing Trans/Gender. Rechtliche Dimensionen she has analysed the legal aspects of gender reassignment in Austria with a strong focus on human rights. Her recent publications include the co-editing of a multidisciplinary volume on legal gender studies and the editing of a comparative study on sex work. At the Center she will be working on her habilitation treatise in which she analyses law against unnatural fornication between people of the same sex in Austria’s First Republic (1918-1934) focusing on the judicial treatment of male and female unnatural fornication and the construction of sexual identity in this context. elisabeth.greif@jku.at

Roselyn Hsueh is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Temple University. She received a Ph.D. from the University of California-Berkeley in 2008 and has served as a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Southern California and conducted fieldwork in Asia as a Fulbright scholar. Her research focuses on the politics of market reform, regulation, comparative capitalism, globalization, and the relationship between social and economic control in developing countries. Her recent publications include China’s Regulatory State: A New Strategy for Globalization (Cornell University Press/ Cornell Studies in Political Economy, 2011) and “China and India in the Age of Globalization: Sectoral Variation in Postliberalization Reregulation,” Comparative Political Studies 45 (2012): 32-61. She is also affiliated with the Institute of East Asian Studies as Residential Research Faculty. rhsueh@temple.edu

Jiaqi (Anya) Lao is a doctoral candidate in Peking University in China, where she earned her Bachelor’s degree in law (with honors) in 2008 and then entered the Masters-Doctor-combined program in 2009. She is also involved in the human rights Masters program jointly launched by the Research Center for Human Rights and Humanitarian Law of Peking University Law School (RCHRHL) and the Raoul Wallenberg Institute of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law, Lund University of Sweden (RWI) in 2008. Her research interests include criminal justice, sentencing policy and human rights protection. She is involved in several important empirical research projects on criminal law funded by National Funds of Social Science in China and is author of five articles dealing with healthcare-related commercial bribery, sentencing policy for recidivists, and the protection of minorities. Jiaqi Lao plans to complete her doctoral dissertation entitled “The Recidivist Premium in Chinese Sentencing Process” at the Center for the Study of Law and Society. mailto:anyalaopku@163.com

Zakiya Luna is a UC President’s Postdoctoral Fellow at University of California, Berkeley hosted by the Center on Reproductive Rights and Justice at Berkeley Law. She is also a visiting scholar at the Center for the Study of Law and Society. She earned a joint PhD in Sociology and Women’s Studies from University of Michigan (2011), where she also earned her Masters of Social Work (2009). Her research is in the areas of social movements, law and society, reproduction and identity. Her current research examines why and how marginalized women in the US are engaging international human rights discourse to advance a broader movement for reproductive justice that addresses rights to have children and rights to parent. Her research has been funded by multiple sources including the National Science Foundation. She has published in Research in Social Movements, Conflict and Change; Sociological Inquiry; Feminist Studies and Societies without Borders: Social Science and Human Rights. In 2011-2 she was the Mellon Foundation Sawyer Seminar in Human Rights Postdoctoral Fellow at University of Wisconsin, Madison. zluna@law.berkeley.edu

Dario Melossi is Full Professor of Criminology in the School of Law of the University of Bologna. After having being conferred a law degree at this University, he went on to do a Ph. D. in sociology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He was then Assistant and thereafter Associate Professor at the University of California, Davis, from 1986 to 1993. He has published The Prison and the Factory (1977, together with Massimo Pavarini), The State of Social Control: A Sociological Study of Concepts of State and Social Control in the Making of Democracy (1990), and Controlling Crime, Controlling Society: Thinking About Crime in Europe and America (2008), plus about 200 other edited books, chapters, and articles. He is Editor of Studi sulla questione criminale and Editor-in-Chief of Punishment and Society, and is member of the boards of many other professional journals. His current research concerns the process of construction of deviance and social control within the European Union, especially with regard to migration processes. dario.melossi@unibo.it

Mathias Siems is Professor of Commercial Law at Durham University, England. He is a graduate of the Universities of Munich, Germany, and Edinburgh, Scotland, and has held visiting research positions at the European University Institute in Florence (as a Jean Monnet Fellow), Harvard Law School (as a Fulbright Scholar), and the Centre for Business Research of the University of Cambridge (ESRC-funded project on Law, Finance and Development). His main research interests lie in comparative and interdisciplinary approaches to private, company and commercial law (see also SSRN author page at http://www.ssrn.com/author=367649). Currently, he is working on a book on Comparative Law, under contract with the Law in Context Series of Cambridge University Press. This book will attempt a detailed contextualized treatment of comparative law, for instance, by way of discussing topics such as legal pluralism and regulatory competition, and by way of incorporating critical, socio-legal and empirical approaches to comparative law. siems@fulbrightmail.org

Satomi Tayama is an Associate Professor of Law at Kanagawa University (Japan). She received a Master of Laws from Waseda University. She specializes in criminal law, and her primary research interests lie in the interrelationship between criminal law and civil law. Getting a foothold in interpretation of Japanese criminal law, she has mainly emphasized in her articles that criminal law should remain the last resort of maintaining social control. During her stay at CSLS, she will be working on research into the limits of criminal sanctions, comparing criminal and civil sanctions in terms of a deterrent to unlawful acts. tayama@kanagawa-u.ac.jp

Frédéric Varone is full professor of political science at the University of Geneva (Switzerland). He holds a MA in economics, a MA in public administration and a Ph.D. in political science. He is a member of the Research Committee of the Swiss National Science Foundation. His current research interests include comparative public policy (e.g. sustainable management of natural resources, regulation of biotechnologies), program evaluation and, public sector reforms (e.g. New Public Management, liberalization and privatization of public services, Public Service Motivation). At the CSLS, he is launching a new research project focusing on three strategies implemented by interest groups to pursue agenda-setting and policy change: lobbying, litigation and direct legislation. He aims at comparing interest groups' actions and policy impacts in California and in Switzerland, in various policy domains (e.g. health and welfare, economic regulation, environmental protection or morality issues), and over the last two decades. frederic.varone@unige.ch

Kenneth Veitch is Lecturer in Law at the University of Sussex, UK. He studied law at the Universities of Aberdeen, Edinburgh and Glasgow, and obtained his PhD in Law from Cardiff University. His research interests lie in the fields of sociology of law, legal and social theory, and law and social policy. His current project explores the relationship between law, neo-liberalism and the welfare state. Recent publications include: “Social Solidarity and the Power of Contract”, Journal of Law and Society (2011) and “Juridification, Medicalisation and the Impact of EU Law: Patient Mobility and the Allocation of Scarce NHS Resources”, Medical Law Review (2012). He is the author of The Jurisdiction of Medical Law (Ashgate, 2007). At Berkeley, he will be researching the historical and contemporary nature of the concept of social law (the law of the welfare state) and, specifically, the relationship between this type of law and the privatisation of welfare services. K.J.Veitch@sussex.ac.uk

 

VISITING SCHOLARS - SUMMER 2012

Ely Aharonson is Assistant Professor at the University of Haifa (Israel). He holds a PhD from the London School of Economics, an LL.M from NYU, and an MA in the history of ideas from Tel Aviv University (summa cum laude). Dr. Aharonson’s scholarship explores historical, sociological and comparative aspects of criminal justice policy, with particular emphasis on the study of criminalization and sentencing. He is currently working on a book on the criminalization of racial violence in American history (under contract with Cambridge University Press). His recent publications have included a comparative study of the use of determinate sentencing laws in the US and Europe (forthcoming in Law and Contemporary Problems) and the co-editing of a special issue of New Criminal Law Review, examining the impact of recent transformations in the idea of citizenship on various aspects of criminalization policy.   aharonso@research.haifa.ac.il

Kitty Calavita
(Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) is Chancellor’s Professor Emerita of Criminology, Law and Society at the University of California, Irvine. She was President of the Law & Society Association in 2000-2001, and is a Thorsten Sellin Fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. She has published widely in the fields of immigration and immigration lawmaking. Her work is both contemporary and historical, U.S.-based and comparative. An early book, Inside the State: The Bracero Program, Immigration, and the INS (1992), used unpublished archival material to document the internal dynamics of the INS in shaping the Bracero Program, and connected structural contradictions in the political economy to the details of agency decisionmaking. Her interest in the interplay of economic forces and state power led to her investigation of white-collar crime in Big Money Crime: Fraud and Politics in the Savings and Loan Crisis (1997, with co-authors Henry Pontell and Robert Tillman). Another book, Immigrants at the Margins: Law, Race, and Exclusion in Southern Europe (2005), examined immigrant marginalization in Italy and Spain, and the formal and informal legal processes that contribute to it. Her most recent book is Invitation to Law & Society: An Introduction to the Study of Real Law (2010). kccalavi@uci.edu

Yukyong Choe received both LL.M. and JSD degrees from the UC Berkeley School of Law, in 2008 and in 2011. Before she came to Berkeley, she received her Master in International Law and was a Ph.D. candidate in Constitutional law at College of Law, Seoul National University in Korea. While her early interest covers multi-culturism and citizenship policy of Korea which is also ongoing, her current research area mainly encompasses legal profession, legal education and legal reform of Northeast Asian countries. Her dissertation, titled “Politics, Conflicts, and Power Redistribution of the Modern Legal Complex: The Legislative Process of Reform of the Korean Legal Profession,” focuses on diverse agencies shown in the reform of the legal professional training system of Korea. Through many in-depth interviews, she highlighted those agencies’ roles, struggles, and choices that have affected the post-reform legal education system, especially from 1995 to 2007, concluding that the Supreme Court and a small group of legal academics played a decisive role in transforming the Korean legal education system to a U.S.-style law school system. At the Center, she is expanding her research on recent legal reform to inter-Asian countries, including Japan, China and Taiwan. She is also participating in a project called “Reforms and Socio-political Changes in Contemporary Korea” sponsored by AKS-UCB in 2011-2012. She is also serving as an advisor of the California Bar Association International Law Section.  yukyong@gmail.com

Rebecca Curry received the Ph.D. in Jurisprudence and Social Policy from the University of California at Berkeley (2008), where she also earned the J.D. (2002).  Her scholarly work investigates interactions between courts and other branches of government, as well as the use of litigation to manage both public policy and the regulation of the private sector.  Her research to date has focused on separation of powers, judicial review, election law, and the First Amendment.  From 2008 to 2011, Dr. Curry served as Assistant Professor of Public Law in the Political Science Department at Hofstra University.  There, she offered courses on constitutional law, civil liberties, the judicial process, and American politics, while also directing the University’s accelerated B.A./J.D. program.  At the Center, she will be completing a book entitled, The Paradox of Rights: Unexpected Lessons in the Judicial Review of Campaign Finance Policy.  It examines the role of electoral interests and interbranch politics in the development of campaign finance jurisprudence.  Dr. Curry is also continuing her work on presidential war powers, investigating how Supreme Court rulings in national security cases are affected by the Court’s interest in preserving its own policymaking authority. Rebecca.s.curry@gmail.com 

David DePianto is Visiting Assistant Professor at the Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law (ASU). His work applies economic insights, both classical and behavioral, to active issues in tort and the study of social norms. A number of his ongoing projects explore the implications of subjective well-being (or "happiness") research to the area of tort damages. Professor DePianto's work has appeared, or is forthcoming in, the Arizona State Law Journal, Law and Psychology Review, Social Science Research, and The Research Handbook on the Economics of Torts. Prior to arriving at the Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law, DePianto received his Ph.D. from the Jurisprudence and Social Policy Program at the University of California, Berkeley. At Berkeley, he was an Olin Fellow in Law and Economics and the recipient of an Outstanding Graduate Student Instructor award. He received his J.D., magna cum laude, from the Georgetown University Law Center, where he was an associate editor of the Georgetown Law Journal. DePianto practiced law at Cooley Godward (now Cooley LLP). depianto@gmail.com  

Christoph B. Graber
is a founding member of the Faculty of Law at the University of Lucerne, since 2001, where he is Professor of Law, Head of the research center i-call (International Communications and Art Law Lucerne) and Director of lucernaiuris, the Institute for Research in the Fundaments of Law. He studied law at the Universities of Bern and St. Gallen, received his admission to the bar in Switzerland, a Ph.D. from the European University Institute (Florence) and his Habilitation from the University of Bern. He teaches in the fields of media law, intellectual property (IP) and art law, international trade law and legal sociology. His main research interests relate to legal challenges of globalisation and a digital networked environment at the intersection of IP, cultural diversity, cultural heritage, human rights and international trade regulation, including issues of indigenous peoples. Christoph is a member of the Swiss Federal Arbitration Commission for the Exploitation of Author’s Rights and Neighbouring Rights and a member of the research commission of the Swiss National Science Foundation at the University of Lucerne. He has been advisor to various branches of the Swiss Government in the fields of IP, trade and culture. He is the author of numerous publications, including Handel und Kultur im Audiovisionsrecht der WTO (Staempfli, 2003), and editor of Free Trade versus Cultural Diversity: WTO Negotiations in the Field of Audiovisual Services (Schulthess, 2004), Digital Rights Management: The End of Collecting Societies? (Staempfli, 2005), Interdisziplinäre Wege in der juristischen Grundlagenforschung (Schulthess, 2007), Intellectual Property and Traditional Cultural Expressions in a Digital Environment (Edward Elgar, 2008) and Governance of Digital Game Environments and Cultural Diversity (Edward Elgar, 2010). He is editor of medialex, the Swiss journal of media law, and a member of the board of directors of the Solothurn Film Festival.  In 2010, Christoph Graber received the Swiss-Academies Award for Transdisciplinary Research (the highest research prize of the Swiss Academies of Arts and Sciences). Christoph-Beat.Graber@unilu.ch

Joseph Gusfield (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) is Professor of Sociology Emeritus at the University of California, San Diego. His books Symbolic Crusade: Status Politics and the American Temperance Movement and The Culture of Public Problems: Drinking, Driving and the Symbolic Order helped define the fields of the sociology of law, the sociology of social movements and the sociology of social problems, bringing the study of culture into the emerging field of law and society.  jgusfield@ucsd.edu

Roselyn Hsueh is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Temple University.  She received a Ph.D. from the University of California-Berkeley in 2008 and has served as a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Southern California and conducted fieldwork in Asia as a Fulbright scholar.  Her research focuses on the politics of market reform, regulation, comparative capitalism, globalization, and the relationship between social and economic control in developing countries.   Her recent publications include China’s Regulatory State: A New Strategy for Globalization (Cornell University Press/ Cornell Studies in Political Economy, 2011) and “China and India in the Age of Globalization: Sectoral Variation in Postliberalization Reregulation,” Comparative Political Studies 45 (2012): 32-61.  She is also affiliated with the Institute of East Asian Studies as Residential Research Faculty. rhsueh@temple.edu

Tamara Lave is Associate Professor of Law at the University of Miami.  Prior to her full-time academic appointment, she was a deputy public defender for ten years in San Diego.  She holds a Ph.D. from U.C. Berkeley (Jurisprudence and Social Policy), a J.D. from Stanford Law School, and a B.A. from Haverford College.  Her dissertation and subsequent research have focused on sexually violent predator legislation.  tlave@law.miami.edu

Raquel Medina-Plana is a Professor of Legal History at the Universidad Complutense Law School (Madrid, Spain). She holds a PhD in Law (Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 2001), as well as degrees in Law (1992) and in Cultural Anthropology (2007). Her current main lines of research deal with the interaction of law and culture in the construction of family legal discourse, both from a socio-legal and historical perspective. Recently published are studies on the early modern Castilian family through the study of successoral mechanisms and practices. Another ongoing research project dealing with judicial discretionary treatment of rape crimes committed through promise of marriage in early modern Castille is to be published in 2012 by the Université de Montpellier. Legal Education is another important area of study in which she addresses the interdependence of theoretical and methodological issues around the relationship of law and social sciences. She has been director of half a dozen research projects on legal education in recent years involving: planning of the socio-legal courses in the new law degrees; analysis of the treatment given to critical thinking in social sciences and law schools; legal culture and professional image in law schools. Recently she has been chair of an International Workshop on “Critical thinking inside law schools” in the Oniati’s International Institute of Sociology of Law, which has reunited prestigious legal scholars from all over the world.  This workshop’s results are available in the online Oniati Socio Legal Series: http://opo.iisj.net/index.php/osls/index. At the CSLS she will be working on an ongoing research project on the subject of monoparental families by choice. Part of two interdisciplinary working groups on the subject, constituted by cultural anthropologists and jurists, her research approaches the subject from a socio-legal perspective, stemming from ethnographies constituted from participant observation, interviews and also archival documentation. Disruptions of the formal line between private and public law appear as soon as gender issues are addressed, and governance issues are advanced in the analysis of public policies and judicial treatment dispensed to these families. She will also be working on a reader volume on Legal Anthropology to be published next year. rmedina@der.ucm.es

Xiaoling Qin is a Ph.D. candidate at Southwestern University of Finance and Economics (SWUFE) in China, working on Human Rights Law and Population Law. Since her study for the Master of Law degree (2002-2005) and during her tenure in the Development and Reform Commission of Sichuan Province (2005-2011), she has been working on a series of research projects, from the regional to the national level, on disadvantaged population’s rights in the workplace, and on social security reform regarding farmers and migrant workers. Xiaoling plans to work at the Center for the Study of Law and Society on exploring workers’ legal consciousness, legal mobilization, and empowerment in the work place. Xiaolingqin2008@gmail.com

James B. Rule (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) earned his Ph.D. at Harvard. University.  He has held research and teaching positions at MIT, Nuffield College, Oxford, the Université de Bordeaux, Clare Hall, Cambridge; and SUNY Stony Brook. His research interests include privacy, technology, and social roles of personal information.  He is author of seven books, monographs, and chapters, including Privacy in Peril; How we are Sacrificing a Fundamental Right in Exchange for Security and Convenience (Oxford 2007) and  “The Once and Future Information Society,” (with Yasemin Besen) in Theory and Society. jrule@notes.cc.sunysb.edu

Satomi Tayama is an Associate Professor of Law at Kanagawa University (Japan). She received a Master of Laws from Waseda University. She specializes in criminal law, and her primary research interests lie in the interrelationship between criminal law and civil law. Getting a foothold in interpretation of Japanese criminal law, she has mainly emphasized in her articles that criminal law should remain the last resort of maintaining social control. During her stay at CSLS, she will be working on research into the limits of criminal sanctions, comparing criminal and civil sanctions in terms of a deterrent to unlawful acts. tayama@kanagawa-u.ac.jp

Zheng Xi is a Ph.D candidate in China University of Political Science and Law (CUPL) working on criminal procedure law and criminal evidence law. He also holds his Master of Laws (with honors) and Bachelor of Laws (with honors) from CUPL. Zheng Xi has published in a variety of law reviews and journals. His research interests include police behavior and human rights protection in criminal investigations and he is now working on his book titled Police’s Temporary Physical Seizure Power in Criminal Investigations. Zheng Xi is planning to use his time at the Center for the Study of Law and Society to explore the issue of police interrogation in order to promote human rights protection during the interrogation. zhengxi-jim@hotmail.com

 

VISITING SCHOLARS - SPRING 2012

Victoria Belco is an Associate professor of Modern European History at Portland State University in Portland Oregon. She has both a JD and a PhD in History from the University of California, Berkeley, and practiced as a criminal defense attorney for a number of years, including seven years at the Federal Public Defenders in San Francisco.  Her 2010 book, War, Massacre, and Recovery in Central Italy, 1943-1948 is an archival study of the transition from war to peace as well as a social history of war and the immediate postwar years in Italy from the fall of Fascism to the inauguration of the Republic. She is currently researching crime and criminal justice in Fascist Italy.  vbelco@pdx.edu

Kitty Calavita (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) is Chancellor’s Professor Emerita of Criminology, Law and Society at the University of California, Irvine. She was President of the Law & Society Association in 2000-2001, and is a Thorsten Sellin Fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. She has published widely in the fields of immigration and immigration lawmaking. Her work is both contemporary and historical, U.S.-based and comparative. An early book, Inside the State: The Bracero Program, Immigration, and the INS (1992), used unpublished archival material to document the internal dynamics of the INS in shaping the Bracero Program, and connected structural contradictions in the political economy to the details of agency decisionmaking. Her interest in the interplay of economic forces and state power led to her investigation of white-collar crime in Big Money Crime: Fraud and Politics in the Savings and Loan Crisis (1997, with co-authors Henry Pontell and Robert Tillman). Another book, Immigrants at the Margins: Law, Race, and Exclusion in Southern Europe (2005), examined immigrant marginalization in Italy and Spain, and the formal and informal legal processes that contribute to it. Her most recent book is Invitation to Law & Society: An Introduction to the Study of Real Law (2010). kccalavi@uci.edu

Mónica Castillejos-Aragón received a J.S.D and LL.M from The University of California, Berkeley School of Law, and earned an LL.B from the Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México (ITAM). Her general areas of research are comparative courts and politics, and justice systems in the developing world. Dr. Castillejos-Aragón clerked at the Mexican Supreme Court for four years. She also interned at the Supreme Court of California (2009) and at the Supreme Court of India (2010). These experiences with high courts inspired her current research on judicial behavior, civil society, and the legal profession. Dr. Castillejos-Aragón is currently drafting an extract of her doctoral dissertation entitled “The Transformation of the Mexican Supreme Court into an arena for political contestation”. castillejosa.m@gmail.com

Leonidas Cheliotis is Lecturer and Deputy Director of the Centre for Criminal Justice at the School of Law, Queen Mary, University of London. He holds MPhil and PhD degrees from the University of Cambridge (his doctoral thesis was awarded the 2010 Nigel Walker Prize by the Cambridge Institute of Criminology). Leonidas is an Associate Editor of the European Journal of Criminology, and the editor of three books: The Arts of Imprisonment: Control, Resistance and Empowerment (2012), Crime and Punishment in Contemporary Greece: International Comparative Perspectives (2011, with Sappho Xenakis), and Roots, Rites and Sites of Resistance: The Banality of Good (2010). He is currently working on a monograph provisionally entitled The Punitive Heart: Neoliberal Capitalism and the Psychopolitics of Crime Control, where he draws on Erich Fromm’s ‘materialistic psychoanalysis’ to account for level and nature of state and public punitiveness in the US and the UK under conditions of neoliberal capitalism. L.Cheliotis@qmul.ac.uk

Yukyong Choe received both LL.M. and JSD degrees from the UC Berkeley School of Law, in 2008 and in 2011. Before she came to Berkeley, she received her Master in International Law and was a Ph.D. candidate in Constitutional law at College of Law, Seoul National University in Korea. While her early interest covers multi-culturism and citizenship policy of Korea which is also ongoing, her current research area mainly encompasses legal profession, legal education and legal reform of Northeast Asian countries. Her dissertation, titled “Politics, Conflicts, and Power Redistribution of the Modern Legal Complex: The Legislative Process of Reform of the Korean Legal Profession,” focuses on diverse agencies shown in the reform of the legal professional training system of Korea. Through many in-depth interviews, she highlighted those agencies’ roles, struggles, and choices that have affected the post-reform legal education system, especially from 1995 to 2007, concluding that the Supreme Court and a small group of legal academics played a decisive role in transforming the Korean legal education system to a U.S.-style law school system. At the Center, she is expanding her research on recent legal reform to inter-Asian countries, including Japan, China and Taiwan. She is also participating in a project called “Reforms and Socio-political Changes in Contemporary Korea” sponsored by AKS-UCB in 2011-2012. She is also serving as an advisor of the California Bar Association International Law Section.
yukyong@gmail.com

Rebecca Curry received the Ph.D. in Jurisprudence and Social Policy from the University of California at Berkeley (2008), where she also earned the J.D. (2002).  Her scholarly work investigates interactions between courts and other branches of government, as well as the use of litigation to manage both public policy and the regulation of the private sector.  Her research to date has focused on separation of powers, judicial review, election law, and the First Amendment.  From 2008 to 2011, Dr. Curry served as Assistant Professor of Public Law in the Political Science Department at Hofstra University.  There, she offered courses on constitutional law, civil liberties, the judicial process, and American politics, while also directing the University’s accelerated B.A./J.D. program.  At the Center, she will be completing a book entitled, The Paradox of Rights: Unexpected Lessons in the Judicial Review of Campaign Finance Policy.  It examines the role of electoral interests and interbranch politics in the development of campaign finance jurisprudence.  Dr. Curry is also continuing her work on presidential war powers, investigating how Supreme Court rulings in national security cases are affected by the Court’s interest in preserving its own policymaking authority. Rebecca.s.curry@gmail.com 

Christoph B. Graber is a founding member of the Faculty of Law at the University of Lucerne, since 2001, where he is Professor of Law, Head of the research center i-call (International Communications and Art Law Lucerne) and Director of lucernaiuris, the Institute for Research in the Fundaments of Law. He studied law at the Universities of Bern and St. Gallen, received his admission to the bar in Switzerland, a Ph.D. from the European University Institute (Florence) and his Habilitation from the University of Bern. He teaches in the fields of media law, intellectual property (IP) and art law, international trade law and legal sociology. His main research interests relate to legal challenges of globalisation and a digital networked environment at the intersection of IP, cultural diversity, cultural heritage, human rights and international trade regulation, including issues of indigenous peoples. Christoph is a member of the Swiss Federal Arbitration Commission for the Exploitation of Author’s Rights and Neighbouring Rights and a member of the research commission of the Swiss National Science Foundation at the University of Lucerne. He has been advisor to various branches of the Swiss Government in the fields of IP, trade and culture. He is the author of numerous publications, including Handel und Kultur im Audiovisionsrecht der WTO (Staempfli, 2003), and editor of Free Trade versus Cultural Diversity: WTO Negotiations in the Field of Audiovisual Services (Schulthess, 2004), Digital Rights Management: The End of Collecting Societies? (Staempfli, 2005), Interdisziplinäre Wege in der juristischen Grundlagenforschung (Schulthess, 2007), Intellectual Property and Traditional Cultural Expressions in a Digital Environment (Edward Elgar, 2008) and Governance of Digital Game Environments and Cultural Diversity (Edward Elgar, 2010). He is editor of medialex, the Swiss journal of media law, and a member of the board of directors of the Solothurn Film Festival.  In 2010, Christoph Graber received the Swiss-Academies Award for Transdisciplinary Research (the highest research prize of the Swiss Academies of Arts and Sciences). Christoph-Beat.Graber@unilu.ch

Joseph Gusfield (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) is Professor of Sociology Emeritus at the University of California, San Diego. His books Symbolic Crusade: Status Politics and the American Temperance Movement and The Culture of Public Problems: Drinking, Driving and the Symbolic Order helped define the fields of the sociology of law, the sociology of social movements and the sociology of social problems, bringing the study of culture into the emerging field of law and society.  jgusfield@ucsd.edu

Daniel E. Martin is an Associate Professor of Management at California State University, East Bay. His research interests include: social capital, ethical behavior, racism and prejudice, human resources assessment, religiosity, spirituality and humor. Formerly a Research Fellow for the U.S. Army Research Institute as well as a Personnel Research Psychologist for the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, He has worked with private, public and non-profit organizations on pre-employment selection, training, and organizational assessment. Dan is published in journals including Personnel Review, Human Organization, Ethics and Behavior, Equal Opportunities International, Management Research Review, Intelligence, Military Psychology, Business Education Forum, and the Journal of Applied Psychology. Dan holds a Ph.D. in Social Psychology from Howard University. While at CSLS, Dan will be working on a research stream that aims to establish the interaction between employment law and potentially higher levels of prejudice/discrimination in members of a Title VII (1964) protected class (religion). An established body of research links prejudicial behavior with higher levels of religiosity. As many organizations have become interested in the application of religion in the workplace, the possibility of religiosity contributing to discriminatory employment decisions has ramifications for employment law. The working title is: Protected and Prosecutorial. daniel.martin@csueastbay.edu

Raquel Medina-Plana
is a Professor of Legal History at the Universidad Complutense Law School (Madrid, Spain). She holds a PhD in Law (Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 2001), as well as degrees in Law (1992) and in Cultural Anthropology (2007). Her current main lines of research deal with the interaction of law and culture in the construction of family legal discourse, both from a socio-legal and historical perspective. Recently published are studies on the early modern Castilian family through the study of successoral mechanisms and practices. Another ongoing research project dealing with judicial discretionary treatment of rape crimes committed through promise of marriage in early modern Castille is to be published in 2012 by the Université de Montpellier. Legal Education is another important area of study in which she addresses the interdependence of theoretical and methodological issues around the relationship of law and social sciences. She has been director of half a dozen research projects on legal education in recent years involving: planning of the socio-legal courses in the new law degrees; analysis of the treatment given to critical thinking in social sciences and law schools; legal culture and professional image in law schools. Recently she has been chair of an International Workshop on “Critical thinking inside law schools” in the Oniati’s International Institute of Sociology of Law, which has reunited prestigious legal scholars from all over the world.  This workshop’s results are available in the online Oniati Socio Legal Series: http://opo.iisj.net/index.php/osls/index. At the CSLS she will be working on an ongoing research project on the subject of monoparental families by choice. Part of two interdisciplinary working groups on the subject, constituted by cultural anthropologists and jurists, her research approaches the subject from a socio-legal perspective, stemming from ethnographies constituted from participant observation, interviews and also archival documentation. Disruptions of the formal line between private and public law appear as soon as gender issues are addressed, and governance issues are advanced in the analysis of public policies and judicial treatment dispensed to these families. She will also be working on a reader volume on Legal Anthropology to be published next year. rmedina@der.ucm.es

Jialu Ou is a Ph.D. candidate at Southwest University of Political Science and Law (SWUPL), where he earned a Bachelor of Law (2006) and his Master of Law (2009). He has been Editorial Commissioner of a Research series on Chinese Real Estate Law since 2006, and also served as Executive Chief Editor of the Law Review of SWUPL from 2007 to 2008 and 2009 to 2010. His interests include civil society, philosophy of property, judicial reform, etc. At SWUPL, he actively participated in a research series covering topics including China’s existing land expropriation policy and legal problems resulting from the reconstruction of earthquake-stricken areas, and co-organized forums about Chinese judicial reform and marketization of land in China. Under the sponsorship of a Fulbright Scholarship, he plans to continue his research on the construction of Chinese civil society and protection of private rights during his stay at CSLS.  oujialu@gmail.com

Xiaoling Qin (pronounced "shiaoling chin") is a Ph.D. candidate at Southwestern University of Finance and Economics (SWUFE) in China, working on Human Rights Law and Population Law. Since her study for the Master of Law degree (2002-2005) and during her tenure in the Development and Reform Commission of Sichuan Province (2005-2011), she has been working on a series of research projects, from the regional to the national level, on disadvantaged population’s rights in the workplace, and on social security reform regarding farmers and migrant workers. Xiaoling plans to work at the Center for the Study of Law and Society on exploring workers’ legal consciousness, legal mobilization, and empowerment in the work place. Xiaolingqin2008@gmail.com

Elizabeth Rapaport is professor of law and philosophy at the University of New Mexico (JD, Harvard, PhD, philosophy, Case Western Reserve University). Rapaport has also held appointments in public policy, political science and women’s studies in the course of a hybridizing academic career.  Her principal endeavor while at the Center in Spring 2012 will be to update her research on gender and capital punishment in the contemporary U.S. dispensation, and to begin work on a book on that subject.   She has written on many facets of the topic, including the history of capital punishment for women, and whether women are more successful than men in avoiding death sentences, gaining judicial relief after a death sentence, and obtaining executive clemency, and the gendered nature of the law of homicide.   Representative of the earlier work she is updating are “Gender Discrimination and the Death Penalty,” 25 Law and Society Review (1991) and “Staying Alive: Executive Clemency, Equal Protection, and the Politics of Gender in Women’s Capital Cases,” 4 Buffalo Criminal Law Review (2001).  Rapaport is also engaged in the study of executive clemency, capital and noncapital (would that there were more of it).  Her other interests include international criminal law and the history and philosophy of religion. rapaport@law.unm.edu

Sidney William Richards is a doctoral candidate in the Law Faculty at the University of Cambridge (Pembroke College). His dissertation deals with the various relationships between the philosophy of law and globalisation, particularly how dominant theories of general jurisprudence and general concepts of law are affected by ongoing work in the fields of global governance, sociology and economics and transnational/global political theory. At the centre, his work will focus on how the interconnected and networked nature of a globalised society challenges the underlying concepts of practical agency, citizenship and collective action in the work of authors such as Hart, Raz and Finnis. Sidney Richards holds degrees in law (LLB/LLM) and political science (BA/MA) from Leyden University and was formerly attached to the Hague Institute for the Internationalisation of Law and Utrecht University. Swr28@cam.ac.uk

Kimberly Richman is Associate Professor of Sociology and Legal Studies at the University of San Francisco.  She received her B.A. at Pitzer College in Claremont, California, and her M.A. and Ph.D. in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at the University of California, Irvine.  Her research interests include gender, sexuality, and law; crime, law, and deviance; family law; legal consciousness; court processes; and reintegrative programming for prison inmates. She is the author of the award winning book Courting Change (NYU Press) and multiple articles and book chapters on the topic of child custody and adoption for gay and lesbian parents, in which she investigates the negotiation of sexual and parental identity in family court, the problematic deployment of rights discourses in the LGBT family law context, and the development of expanded legal definitions of family over time. These articles appear in Law & Society Review, Law & Social Inquiry, Studies in Law, Politics, and Society, Law & Sexuality, and in the edited volume, The New Civil Rights Research. She is also the author of two articles on domestic violence, appearing in Sociological Inquiry and Studies in Law, Politics, and Society. Her current research, the subject of a book under contract with NYU Press as well as an article in the University of San Francisco Law Review, analyzes variation in legal consciousness regarding same sex marriage through interviews with gay and lesbian couples married in California and Massachusetts.  She sits on the Editorial Board for Law & Society Review, was recently elected Council Member for the American Sociological Association Sections on Sociology of Law and Sex and Gender, as well as Executive Counselor for the Western Criminological Association. In addition, she is co-founder and President of the Board of Directors for the San Quentin Alliance for C.H.A.N.G.E., a non-profit and inmate-led rehabilitative and community service program at San QuentinState Prison. kdrichman@usfca.edu

Yaad Rotem is Assistant Professor at the Center of Law & Business in Ramat Gan, Israel; and serves there as the Academic Director of the Business Law Program. He holds an LL.B. (1998, magna cum laude) and a B.A. in economics (1998) from the University of Haifa, and an LL.M. (2000) and LL.D. (2005) from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He served as a law clerk for Justice Dalia Dorner of the Supreme Court of Israel in 1999, and as a senior law clerk for the Justice during the years 2000-2002. Dr. Rotem also served as a special consultant to the State Commission of Inquiry into the Israeli Government's Treatment of Holocaust Survivors (2008). His main areas of research include corporate bankruptcy law, and the conflict of laws (private international law). Among his recent publications: "The Problem of Selective or Sporadic Recognition: A New Economic Rationale for the Law of Foreign Country Judgments," Chicago Journal of International Law (2010); "Company Duplication—Plain Fraud or a 'Poor Man's' Bankruptcy? A Case Study in the Financial Distress of Small Businesses," International Insolvency Review (2011); "Better Positioned Agents: Introducing a New Redeployment Model for Corporate Bankruptcy Law," University of Pennsylvania Journal of Business and Employment Law (2008); "Contemplating a Corporate Governance Model for Bankruptcy Reorganizations: Lessons from Canada," Virginia Law and Business Review (2008); "Pursuing Preservation of Pre-Bankruptcy Entitlements: Corporate Bankruptcy Law's Self-Executing Mechanisms," Berkeley Business Law Journal (2008). yrotem@law.berkeley.edu

James B. Rule (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) earned his Ph.D. at Harvard. University.  He has held research and teaching positions at MIT, Nuffield College, Oxford, the Université de Bordeaux, Clare Hall, Cambridge; and SUNY Stony Brook. His research interests include privacy, technology, and social roles of personal information.  He is author of seven books, monographs, and chapters, including Privacy in Peril; How we are Sacrificing a Fundamental Right in Exchange for Security and Convenience (Oxford 2007) and  “The Once and Future Information Society,” (with Yasemin Besen) in Theory and Society. jrule@notes.cc.sunysb.edu

Jennifer Skeem is Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior at the University of California, Irvine. She also is a member of the MacArthur Research Network on Mandated Community Treatment, and the Centers for Psychology and Law and Evidence-Based Corrections at UCIrvine.  She earned her PhD from the University of Utah and completed postdoctoral training at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Dr. Skeem’s research is designed to inform clinical and legal decision-making about individuals with mental disorder. Specific topics include understanding psychopathic personality disorder, assessing and treating violence risk, and identifying factors that influence the outcomes of offenders who are required to accept psychiatric treatment.  She has authored and coauthored over 70 articles, chapters, and books.  To help research inform policy and practice, she works closely with both national and local agencies. Dr. Skeem received a Saleem Shah Award for Early Career Excellence from the American Psychological Association (Division 41) and a Distinguished Research award from the Academic Senate of UC, Irvine.  skeem@uci.edu

Satomi Tayama is an Associate Professor of Law at Kanagawa University (Japan). She received a Master of Laws from Waseda University. She specializes in criminal law, and her primary research interests lie in the interrelationship between criminal law and civil law. Getting a foothold in interpretation of Japanese criminal law, she has mainly emphasized in her articles that criminal law should remain the last resort of maintaining social control. During her stay at CSLS, she will be working on research into the limits of criminal sanctions, comparing criminal and civil sanctions in terms of a deterrent to unlawful acts. tayama@kanagawa-u.ac.jp

Zheng Xi is a Ph.D candidate in China University of Political Science and Law (CUPL) working on criminal procedure law and criminal evidence law. He also holds his Master of Laws (with honors) and Bachelor of Laws (with honors) from CUPL. Zheng Xi has published in a variety of law reviews and journals. His research interests include police behavior and human rights protection in criminal investigations and he is now working on his book titled Police’s Temporary Physical Seizure Power in Criminal Investigations. Zheng Xi is planning to use his time at the Center for the Study of Law and Society to explore the issue of police interrogation in order to promote human rights protection during the interrogation.
zhengxi-jim@hotmail.com

 

VISITING SCHOLARS - Fall 2011

Victoria Belco is an Associate professor of Modern European History at Portland State University in Portland Oregon. She has both a JD and a PhD in History from the University of California, Berkeley, and practiced as a criminal defense attorney for a number of years, including seven years at the Federal Public Defenders in San Francisco.  Her 2010 book, War, Massacre, and Recovery in Central Italy, 1943-1948 is an archival study of the transition from war to peace as well as a social history of war and the immediate postwar years in Italy from the fall of Fascism to the inauguration of the Republic. She is currently researching crime and criminal justice in Fascist Italy.  vbelco@pdx.edu

Kitty Calavita (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) is Chancellor’s Professor Emerita of Criminology, Law and Society at the University of California, Irvine. She was President of the Law & Society Association in 2000-2001, and is a Thorsten Sellin Fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. She has published widely in the fields of immigration and immigration lawmaking. Her work is both contemporary and historical, U.S.-based and comparative. An early book, Inside the State: The Bracero Program, Immigration, and the INS (1992), used unpublished archival material to document the internal dynamics of the INS in shaping the Bracero Program, and connected structural contradictions in the political economy to the details of agency decisionmaking. Her interest in the interplay of economic forces and state power led to her investigation of white-collar crime in Big Money Crime: Fraud and Politics in the Savings and Loan Crisis (1997, with co-authors Henry Pontell and Robert Tillman). Another book, Immigrants at the Margins: Law, Race, and Exclusion in Southern Europe (2005), examined immigrant marginalization in Italy and Spain, and the formal and informal legal processes that contribute to it. Her most recent book is Invitation to Law & Society: An Introduction to the Study of Real Law (2010). Her current research, with co-author Valerie Jenness, examines the inmate grievance process and legal mobilization in California prisons. kccalavi@uci.edu

Rebecca Curry received the Ph.D. in Jurisprudence and Social Policy from the University of California at Berkeley (2008), where she also earned the J.D. (2002).  Her scholarly work investigates interactions between courts and other branches of government, as well as the use of litigation to manage both public policy and the regulation of the private sector.  Her research to date has focused on separation of powers, judicial review, election law, and the First Amendment.  From 2008 to 2011, Dr. Curry served as Assistant Professor of Public Law in the Political Science Department at Hofstra University.  There, she offered courses on constitutional law, civil liberties, the judicial process, and American politics, while also directing the University’s accelerated B.A./J.D. program.  At the Center, she will be completing a book entitled, The Paradox of Rights: Unexpected Lessons in the Judicial Review of Campaign Finance Policy.  It examines the role of electoral interests and interbranch politics in the development of campaign finance jurisprudence.  Dr. Curry is also continuing her work on presidential war powers, investigating how Supreme Court rulings in national security cases are affected by the Court’s interest in preserving its own policymaking authority. Rebecca.s.curry@gmail.com

Joseph Gusfield (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) is Professor of Sociology Emeritus at the University of California, San Diego. His books Symbolic Crusade: Status Politics and the American Temperance Movement and The Culture of Public Problems: Drinking, Driving and the Symbolic Order helped define the fields of the sociology of law, the sociology of social movements and the sociology of social problems, bringing the study of culture into the emerging field of law and society.  jgusfield@ucsd.edu

Daniel E. Martin
is an Associate Professor of Management at California State University, East Bay. His research interests include: social capital, ethical behavior, racism and prejudice, human resources assessment, religiosity, spirituality and humor. Formerly a Research Fellow for the U.S. Army Research Institute as well as a Personnel Research Psychologist for the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, He has worked with private, public and non-profit organizations on pre-employment selection, training, and organizational assessment. Dan is published in journals including Personnel Review, Human Organization, Ethics and Behavior, Equal Opportunities International, Management Research Review, Intelligence, Military Psychology, Business Education Forum, and the Journal of Applied Psychology. Dan holds a Ph.D. in Social Psychology from Howard University. While at CSLS, Dan will be working on a research stream that aims to establish the interaction between employment law and potentially higher levels of prejudice/discrimination in members of a Title VII (1964) protected class (religion). An established body of research links prejudicial behavior with higher levels of religiosity. As many organizations have become interested in the application of religion in the workplace, the possibility of religiosity contributing to discriminatory employment decisions has ramifications for employment law. The working title is: Protected and Prosecutorial. daniel.martin@csueastbay.edu

Rolf Nygren
, born 1944, is senior professor of legal history, Dept of Law (Law School), Uppsala University. Rolf passed his Ph.D. in history  (Uppsala) in 1977, was promoted assistant professor of history in 1980, archivist-in-chief of Swedish Parliament 1979-1984, professor of  legal history (Uppsala) 1984-2011, senior professor of legal history 2011-. He has been vice dean 1999-2001 including chair of the Law School´s doctoral training, head of the Law School 2001-2007. He has also been member of the Swedish Council for Social Research for six years in the 1990s. Rolf´s main fields in legal history are family law and constitutional law. He has been a visiting scholar/ professor at Minnesota Law School in 1991-1992, and Robbins Collection, Berkeley, in 1999. He hopes to finish two running projects during his stay at Berkeley: 1) Swedish Law and Integration of Jewish Immigrants in the 19th century, and 2) Constitutional values and school curricula 1980-2011. rolf.nygren@jur.uu.se

Jialu Ou
is a Ph.D. candidate at Southwest University of Political Science and Law (SWUPL), where he earned a Bachelor of Law (2006) and his Master of Law (2009). He has been Editorial Commissioner of a Research series on Chinese Real Estate Law since 2006, and also served as Executive Chief Editor of the Law Review of SWUPL from 2007 to 2008 and 2009 to 2010. His interests include civil society, philosophy of property, judicial reform, etc. At SWUPL, he actively participated in a research series covering topics including China’s existing land expropriation policy and legal problems resulting from the reconstruction of earthquake-stricken areas, and co-organized forums about Chinese judicial reform and marketization of land in China. Under the sponsorship of a Fulbright Scholarship, he plans to continue his research on the construction of Chinese civil society and protection of private rights during his stay at CSLS.  oujialu@gmail.com

Jirí Pribán graduated from Charles University in Prague in 1989 and joined Cardiff University as a full-time member of staff in 2001. Jirí received his LLD in 2001 and was appointed visiting professor of legal philosophy and sociology at Charles University in November 2002. He was also visiting professor or scholar at European University Institute in Florence, New York University, University of San Francisco, University of Pretoria, and University of New South Wales, Sydney. He has published extensively in the areas of sociology of law, legal philosophy, constitutional and European comparative law, and theory of human rights. He is an editor of the Journal of Law and Society and a regular contributor to the BBC World Service, the Czech TV, newspapers and review journals. He is author of several monographs and edited volumes, especially Legal Symbolism: On Law, Time and European Identity (Ashgate, 2007), Dissidents of Law: On the 1989 Revolutions, Legitimations, Fictions of Legality and Contemporary Version of the Social Contract (Ashgate, 2002), Liquid Society and Its Law (ed., Ashgate, 2007), Law's New Boundaries: On the Consequences of Legal Autopoiesis (edited with D. Nelken, Ashgate, 2001) and The Rule of Law in Central Europe (edited with J. Young, Ashgate, 1999). priban@cardiff.ac.uk

Xiaoling Qin (pronounced "shiaoling chin") is a Ph.D. candidate at Southwestern University of Finance and Economics (SWUFE) in China, working on Human Rights Law and Population Law. Since her study for the Master of Law degree (2002-2005) and during her tenure in the Development and Reform Commission of Sichuan Province (2005-2011), she has been working on a series of research projects, from the regional to the national level, on disadvantaged population’s rights in the workplace, and on social security reform regarding farmers and migrant workers. Xiaoling plans to work at the Center for the Study of Law and Society on exploring workers’ legal consciousness, legal mobilization, and empowerment in the work place. Xiaolingqin2008@gmail.com

Kimberly Richman is Associate Professor of Sociology and Legal Studies at the University of San Francisco.  She received her B.A. at Pitzer College in Claremont, California, and her M.A. and Ph.D. in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at the University of California, Irvine.  Her research interests include gender, sexuality, and law; crime, law, and deviance; family law; legal consciousness; court processes; and reintegrative programming for prison inmates. She is the author of the award winning book Courting Change (NYU Press) and multiple articles and book chapters on the topic of child custody and adoption for gay and lesbian parents, in which she investigates the negotiation of sexual and parental identity in family court, the problematic deployment of rights discourses in the LGBT family law context, and the development of expanded legal definitions of family over time. These articles appear in Law & Society Review, Law & Social Inquiry, Studies in Law, Politics, and Society, Law & Sexuality, and in the edited volume, The New Civil Rights Research. She is also the author of two articles on domestic violence, appearing in Sociological Inquiry and Studies in Law, Politics, and Society. Her current research, the subject of a book under contract with NYU Press as well as an article in the University of San Francisco Law Review, analyzes variation in legal consciousness regarding same sex marriage through interviews with gay and lesbian couples married in California and Massachusetts.  She sits on the Editorial Board for Law & Society Review, was recently elected Council Member for the American Sociological Association Sections on Sociology of Law and Sex and Gender, as well as Executive Counselor for the Western Criminological Association. In addition, she is co-founder and President of the Board of Directors for the San Quentin Alliance for C.H.A.N.G.E., a non-profit and inmate-led rehabilitative and community service program at San Quentin State Prison. kdrichman@usfca.edu

Yaad Rotem
is Assistant Professor at the Center of Law & Business in Ramat Gan, Israel; and serves there as the Academic Director of the Business Law Program. He holds an LL.B. (1998, magna cum laude) and a B.A. in economics (1998) from the University of Haifa, and an LL.M. (2000) and LL.D. (2005) from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He served as a law clerk for Justice Dalia Dorner of the Supreme Court of Israel in 1999, and as a senior law clerk for the Justice during the years 2000-2002. Dr. Rotem also served as a special consultant to the State Commission of Inquiry into the Israeli Government's Treatment of Holocaust Survivors (2008). His main areas of research include corporate bankruptcy law, and the conflict of laws (private international law). Among his recent publications: "The Problem of Selective or Sporadic Recognition: A New Economic Rationale for the Law of Foreign Country Judgments," Chicago Journal of International Law (2010); "Company Duplication—Plain Fraud or a 'Poor Man's' Bankruptcy? A Case Study in the Financial Distress of Small Businesses," International Insolvency Review (2011); "Better Positioned Agents: Introducing a New Redeployment Model for Corporate Bankruptcy Law," University of Pennsylvania Journal of Business and Employment Law (2008); "Contemplating a Corporate Governance Model for Bankruptcy Reorganizations: Lessons from Canada," Virginia Law and Business Review (2008); "Pursuing Preservation of Pre-Bankruptcy Entitlements: Corporate Bankruptcy Law's Self-Executing Mechanisms," Berkeley Business Law Journal (2008). yrotem@law.berkeley.edu

Antoni Rubi-Puig
is a full time Lecturer in Civil Law at Universitat Pompeu Fabra (Barcelona, Spain). His main interests of research lie in the fields of copyright, commercial speech, tort law and products liability. He holds a Ph.D. in Law from Universitat Pompeu Fabra and is the author of the book Advertising and Freedom of Speech (Publicidad y libertad de expresión, Thomson-Civitas, 2008). Antoni has previously been an Invited Researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Private Law in Hamburg (Germany) and a Visiting Scholar at Yale Law School. At the CSLS he will be working on a volume on the limits of private ordering of information by intellectual property rightholders.
Antoni.rubi-puig@upf.edu


James B. Rule
(Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) earned his Ph.D. at Harvard. University.  He has held research and teaching positions at MIT, Nuffield College, Oxford, the Université de Bordeaux, Clare Hall, Cambridge; and SUNY Stony Brook. His research interests include privacy, technology, and social roles of personal information.  He is author of seven books, monographs, and chapters, including Privacy in Peril; How we are Sacrificing a Fundamental Right in Exchange for Security and Convenience (Oxford 2007) and  “The Once and Future Information Society,” (with Yasemin Besen) in Theory and Society. jrule@notes.cc.sunysb.edu

Jennifer Skeem
is Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior at the University of California, Irvine. She also is a member of the MacArthur Research Network on Mandated Community Treatment, and the Centers for Psychology and Law and Evidence-Based Corrections at UCIrvine.  She earned her PhD from the University of Utah and completed postdoctoral training at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Dr. Skeem’s research is designed to inform clinical and legal decision-making about individuals with mental disorder. Specific topics include understanding psychopathic personality disorder, assessing and treating violence risk, and identifying factors that influence the outcomes of offenders who are required to accept psychiatric treatment.  She has authored and coauthored over 70 articles, chapters, and books.  To help research inform policy and practice, she works closely with both national and local agencies. Dr. Skeem received a Saleem Shah Award for Early Career Excellence from the American Psychological Association (Division 41) and a Distinguished Research award from the Academic Senate of UC, Irvine.  skeem@uci.edu

Zheng Xi is a Ph.D candidate in China University of Political Science and Law (CUPL) working on criminal procedure law and criminal evidence law. He also holds his Master of Laws (with honors) and Bachelor of Laws (with honors) from CUPL. Zheng Xi has published in a variety of law reviews and journals. His research interests include police behavior and human rights protection in criminal investigations and he is now working on his book titled Police’s Temporary Physical Seizure Power in Criminal Investigations. Zheng Xi is planning to use his time at the Center for the Study of Law and Society to explore the issue of police interrogation in order to promote human rights protection during the interrogation.
zhengxi-jim@hotmail.com


VISITING SCHOLARS - SUMMER 2011

Kitty Calavita (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) is Chancellor’s Professor Emerita of Criminology, Law and Society at the University of California, Irvine. She was President of the Law & Society Association in 2000-2001, and is a Thorsten Sellin Fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. She has published widely in the fields of immigration and immigration lawmaking. Her work is both contemporary and historical, U.S.-based and comparative. An early book, Inside the State: The Bracero Program, Immigration, and the INS (1992), used unpublished archival material to document the internal dynamics of the INS in shaping the Bracero Program, and connected structural contradictions in the political economy to the details of agency decision making. Her interest in the interplay of economic forces and state power led to her investigation of white-collar crime in Big Money Crime: Fraud and Politics in the Savings and Loan Crisis (1997, with co-authors Henry Pontell and Robert Tillman). Another book, Immigrants at the Margins: Law, Race, and Exclusion in Southern Europe (2005), examined immigrant marginalization in Italy and Spain, and the formal and informal legal processes that contribute to it. Her most recent book is Invitation to Law & Society: An Introduction to the Study of Real Law (2010). kccalavi@uci.edu

Diarmuid Griffin is a lecturer in law at the National University of Ireland, Galway and a doctoral candidate at the Institute of Criminology, University College Dublin. His research examines the decision-making process used to determine when and under what conditions parole is granted to serious and long term offenders, particularly those serving life sentences. He has acted as a consultant and legal expert for FRALEX, a group which advises the EU Fundamental Rights Agency, the Garda Síochána (Irish Police) Ombudsman Commission, Transparency International Ireland, and the European Forum for Restorative Justice project, “Restorative Justice and Crime Prevention.” diarmuid.griffin@nuigalway.ie

Joseph Gusfield (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) is Professor of Sociology Emeritus at the University of California, San Diego. His books Symbolic Crusade: Status Politics and the American Temperance Movement and The Culture of Public Problems: Drinking, Driving and the Symbolic Order helped define the fields of the sociology of law, the sociology of social movements and the sociology of social problems, bringing the study of culture into the emerging field of law and society. jgusfield@ucsd.edu

Takashi Iida is Associate Professor of Law at Seikei University in Tokyo. He received a Master of Laws at the University of Tokyo in 2002, and worked for the University of Tokyo as Research Associate during 2002-2004. He specializes in law & economics and sociology of law. His main published work is Social Norms and Rationality: A Perspective from Law and Economics (in Japanese, 'Ho to Keizaigaku no Shakaikihan-ron', 2004). He is interested in the impact of social networks on the social functions of the law, especially civil law (including family law), environmental law, and anti-discrimination law. During his residence at Berkeley, he will write his second book which examines the interrelationships among social norms, social networks, and the law. iida-t@mug.biglobe.ne.jp

Tamara Lave is Associate Professor of Law at the University of Miami. Prior to her full-time academic appointment, she was a deputy public defender for ten years in San Diego. She holds a Ph.D. from U.C. Berkeley (Jurisprudence and Social Policy), a J.D. from Stanford Law School, and a B.A. from Haverford College. Her dissertation and subsequent research have focused on sexually violent predator legislation. tlave@law.miami.edu

Mercedes Perez-Manzano is Professor of Criminal Law at the Law School, Autonoma University of Madrid (Spain). She has conducted research in different areas of Criminal Law, Fundamental Rights and Evidence Law, such as Foundations and Goals of Criminal Law, Mens rea, Criminal Law and Gender, White-collar Criminality, Double Jeopardy or Standard of Proof of Subjective Elements. She was also Counsellor-at-Law for the Spanish Constitutional Court. Currently she is participating in a research project dealing with Neuroscience and Criminal Responsibility and is researching the theoretical and constitutional problems of using neuroimaging in courtrooms as evidence of the mental state of violent criminals, such as psychopaths. More information here. mercedesp.manzano@uam.es

Kimberly Richman is Associate Professor of Sociology and Legal Studies at the University of San Francisco. She received her B.A. at Pitzer College in Claremont, California, and her M.A. and Ph.D. in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at the University of California, Irvine. Her research interests include gender, sexuality, and law; crime, law, and deviance; family law; legal consciousness; court processes; and reintegrative programming for prison inmates. She is the author of the award winning book Courting Change (NYU Press) and multiple articles and book chapters on the topic of child custody and adoption for gay and lesbian parents, in which she investigates the negotiation of sexual and parental identity in family court, the problematic deployment of rights discourses in the LGBT family law context, and the development of expanded legal definitions of family over time. These articles appear in Law & Society Review, Law & Social Inquiry, Studies in Law, Politics, and Society, Law & Sexuality, and in the edited volume, The New Civil Rights Research. She is also the author of two articles on domestic violence, appearing in Sociological Inquiry and Studies in Law, Politics, and Society. Her current research, the subject of a book under contract with NYU Press as well as an article in the University of San Francisco Law Review, analyzes variation in legal consciousness regarding same sex marriage through interviews with gay and lesbian couples married in California and Massachusetts. She sits on the Editorial Board for Law & Society Review, was recently elected Council Member for the American Sociological Association Sections on Sociology of Law and Sex and Gender, as well as Executive Counselor for the Western Criminological Association. In addition, she is co-founder and President of the Board of Directors for the San Quentin Alliance for C.H.A.N.G.E., a non-profit and inmate-led rehabilitative and community service program at San Quentin State Prison.

Yaad Rotem is Assistant Professor at the Center of Law & Business in Ramat Gan, Israel; and serves there as the Academic Director of the Business Law Program. He holds an LL.B. (1998, magna cum laude) and a B.A. in economics (1998) from the University of Haifa, and an LL.M. (2000) and LL.D. (2005) from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He served as a law clerk for Justice Dalia Dorner of the Supreme Court of Israel in 1999, and as a senior law clerk for the Justice during the years 2000-2002. Dr. Rotem also served as a special consultant to the State Commission of Inquiry into the Israeli Government's Treatment of Holocaust Survivors (2008). His main areas of research include corporate bankruptcy law, and the conflict of laws (private international law). Among his recent publications: "The Problem of Selective or Sporadic Recognition: A New Economic Rationale for the Law of Foreign Country Judgments," Chicago Journal of International Law (2010); "Company Duplication—Plain Fraud or a 'Poor Man's' Bankruptcy? A Case Study in the Financial Distress of Small Businesses," International Insolvency Review (2011); "Better Positioned Agents: Introducing a New Redeployment Model for Corporate Bankruptcy Law," University of Pennsylvania Journal of Business and Employment Law (2008); "Contemplating a Corporate Governance Model for Bankruptcy Reorganizations: Lessons from Canada," Virginia Law and Business Review (2008); "Pursuing Preservation of Pre-Bankruptcy Entitlements: Corporate Bankruptcy Law's Self-Executing Mechanisms," Berkeley Business Law Journal (2008). yrotem@law.berkeley.edu

Antoni Rubi-Puig is a full time Lecturer in Civil Law at Universitat Pompeu Fabra (Barcelona, Spain). His main interests of research lie in the fields of copyright, commercial speech, tort law and products liability. He holds a Ph.D. in Law from Universitat Pompeu Fabra and is the author of the book Advertising and Freedom of Speech (Publicidad y libertad de expresión, Thomson-Civitas, 2008). Antoni has previously been an Invited Researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Private Law in Hamburg (Germany) and a Visiting Scholar at Yale Law School. At the CSLS he will be working on a volume on the limits of private ordering of information by intellectual property rightholders. Antoni.rubi-puig@upf.edu

James B. Rule (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) earned his Ph.D. at Harvard. University. He has held research and teaching positions at MIT, Nuffield College, Oxford, the Université de Bordeaux, Clare Hall, Cambridge; and SUNY Stony Brook. His research interests include privacy, technology, and social roles of personal information. He is author of seven books, monographs, and chapters, including Privacy in Peril; How we are Sacrificing a Fundamental Right in Exchange for Security and Convenience (Oxford 2007) and “The Once and Future Information Society,” (with Yasemin Besen) in Theory and Society. jrule@notes.cc.sunysb.edu

Jennifer Skeem is Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior at the University of California, Irvine. She also is a member of the MacArthur Research Network on Mandated Community Treatment, and the Centers for Psychology and Law and Evidence-Based Corrections at UCIrvine. She earned her PhD from the University of Utah and completed postdoctoral training at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Dr. Skeem’s research is designed to inform clinical and legal decision-making about individuals with mental disorder. Specific topics include understanding psychopathic personality disorder, assessing and treating violence risk, and identifying factors that influence the outcomes of offenders who are required to accept psychiatric treatment. She has authored and coauthored over 70 articles, chapters, and books. To help research inform policy and practice, she works closely with both national and local agencies. Dr. Skeem received a Saleem Shah Award for Early Career Excellence from the American Psychological Association (Division 41) and a Distinguished Research award from the Academic Senate of UC, Irvine. skeem@uci.edu

Hubert Smekal holds Ph.D. in European Studies from the Faculty of Social Studies, Masaryk University, Brno, where he currently works as an assistant professor. He has also worked as a research fellow in the International Institute of Political Science. He co-founded the Czech Centre for Human Rights and Democratization and serves as an assistant to E.MA Director (E.MA in Human Rights and Democratization, EIUC, Venice) for the Czech Republic. Smekal authored Human Rights in the European Union (MUNI Press, 2009) and his academic interests cover the issue of human rights in the EU, political role of the Court of Justice of the EU and judicialization of international politics. He lectured at the Bilgi University in Istanbul (2009), during the summers of 2005-2008 at University of Toronto and winter 2010 in the Australian International Law and Human Rights Program. He was awarded Fulbright-Masaryk Scholarship for 2010–2011. hsmekal@fss.muni.cz

Mark Suchman is Professor of Sociology at Brown University. Previously, he was Professor of Sociology and Law at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He holds a BA (summa cum laude in Sociology, 1983) from Harvard, a JD from Yale Law School (1989), and a PhD in Sociology from Stanford (1994). From 1999 to 2001, he was a Robert Wood Johnson Scholar in Health Policy Research at Yale, and in 2002-2003 he was a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. During his visit at Berkeley, he will be writing a book on the role of law firms in Silicon Valley. He will also be continuing a multi-year project on the organizational, professional, and legal challenges surrounding new information technologies in health care. In addition to these topics, he has written on organizational legitimacy, on inter-organizational disputing practices, on the "internalization" of law within corporate bureaucracies, and on social science approaches to the study of contracts. He has also served as Chair of the ASA section on Sociology of Law (2005-2006), as a review-panel member for the NSF's Program on Law and Social Science (2004-2006), and as a member of the Law and Society Association's Board of Trustees (2005-2008). mark_suchman@brown.edu

 

VISITING SCHOLARS - SPRING 2011

Kitty Calavita (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) is Chancellor’s Professor Emerita of Criminology, Law and Society at the University of California, Irvine. She was President of the Law & Society Association in 2000-2001, and is a Thorsten Sellin Fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. She has published widely in the fields of immigration and immigration lawmaking. Her work is both contemporary and historical, U.S.-based and comparative. An early book, Inside the State: The Bracero Program, Immigration, and the INS (1992), used unpublished archival material to document the internal dynamics of the INS in shaping the Bracero Program, and connected structural contradictions in the political economy to the details of agency decisionmaking. Her interest in the interplay of economic forces and state power led to her investigation of white-collar crime in Big Money Crime: Fraud and Politics in the Savings and Loan Crisis (1997, with co-authors Henry Pontell and Robert Tillman). Another book, Immigrants at the Margins: Law, Race, and Exclusion in Southern Europe (2005), examined immigrant marginalization in Italy and Spain, and the formal and informal legal processes that contribute to it. Her most recent book is Invitation to Law & Society: An Introduction to the Study of Real Law (2010). kccalavi@uci.edu

Emily Cloatre is a lecturer at Kent Law School (UK). Before taking up this position in July 2010, she worked at the University of Nottingham, as a lecturer at the School of Law and an ESRC Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Institute for Science and Society. Her main research interest lies in the intersection between law and contemporary ‘science and society’ issues, for example patent law and access to health care, and the regulatory networks of climate change. She has a particular interest in studying these issues in the context of developing countries, as exemplified by her previous (and ongoing) work in sub-Saharan Africa and current work on the international scope of climate change regulation and its impact on developing states. This is not an exclusive focus as she has also conducted research at the level of European nation states (analysing the role of bioethicists in clinical research in France, for example) and at the European Union level (looking at the EC/98/44 Biotech Directive). Alongside her core interests, she has been involved in socio-legal projects looking at the EU and social integration, as well as civil justice and the use of courts in the UK. In relation to theory, she is interested in network theories, as well as exploring key approaches from Science and Technology Studies to analyse the links between law, science and society. The theoretical core of her recent and current work aims to clarify how Actor-Network Theory can be used in socio-legal research. E.cloatre@kent.ac.uk

Jennifer Drobac is a tenured professor at the Indiana University-Indianapolis School of Law. She holds her doctoral and J.D. degrees from Stanford Law School and Masters and Bachelors degrees in History from Stanford University. Her recent scholarly work focuses primarily on sexual harassment and juvenile law and has been published in a variety of law reviews and journals. In 2005, she finished her first textbook, Sexual Harassment Law: History, Cases and Theory. A university video profile of her recent research can be found at http://www.youtube.com/user/indylawchannel. While in residence, Jennifer will be researching how new information regarding the neurological and psychosocial development of teenagers might influence the modification of civil law pertaining to youth. jdrobac@iupui.edu

Diarmuid Griffin is a lecturer in law at the National University of Ireland, Galway and a doctoral candidate at the Institute of Criminology, University College Dublin. His research examines the decision-making process used to determine when and under what conditions parole is granted to serious and long term offenders, particularly those serving life sentences. He has acted as a consultant and legal expert for FRALEX, a group which advises the EU Fundamental Rights Agency, the Garda Síochána (Irish Police) Ombudsman Commission, Transparency International Ireland, and the European Forum for Restorative Justice project, “Restorative Justice and Crime Prevention.” diarmuid.griffin@nuigalway.ie

Joseph Gusfield (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) is Professor of Sociology Emeritus at the University of California, San Diego. His books Symbolic Crusade: Status Politics and the American Temperance Movement and The Culture of Public Problems: Drinking, Driving and the Symbolic Order helped define the fields of the sociology of law, the sociology of social movements and the sociology of social problems, bringing the study of culture into the emerging field of law and society.jgusfield@ucsd.edu

Kiyoshi Hasegawa is Professor of Law at Tokyo Metropolitan University. He received a Ph.D. in Law from the University of Tokyo. He specializes in the sociology of law. Hasegawa’s most well-known work is ‘Toshi Komyuniti to Hō’ [The Urban Community and the Law], which received the Research Committee on Sociology of Law (RCSL) Adam Podgorecki Prize in 2006. He is particularly interested in dispute resolutions in neighborhoods, private land-use restrictions, and residential private governments. He also has an interest in the homeless, and in the exclusion from several social sub-systems that is caused by homelessness. While at the Center, he will be conducting a comparative study of homeowners associations in the United States and Japan. The aim of this study is to present an accurate picture of these associations in addition to examining the conditions wherein residents of the two countries take recourse to their respective legal frameworks. At the same time, Hasegawa will be conducting research on the various kinds of exclusion from communities, and on the phenomena of segregation and homelessness. This study aims to focus on the negative side of deliberative or democratic communities, shedding light on the cumulative effects of exclusion from social sub-systems. He can be contacted at k-hase@tmu.ac.jp

Amanda Hollis-Brusky earned her doctorate in Political Science from the University of California, Berkeley in May 2010. She will begin her appointment as an Assistant Professor of Politics at Pomona College in July 2011, where she will teach courses in American Politics, constitutional law, and constitutional theory. Her current research focuses on the role networks of legal elites play in generating, cultivating, and diffusing legal ideas and strategies to decision-makers in government. While in residence at the Center, Amanda will be turning her doctoral dissertation (The Federalist Society and the "Structural Constitution:" An Epistemic Community at Work) into a book manuscript that examines, in much greater detail, how and to what extent actors affiliated with the Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy - a conservative and libertarian legal network - shaped and influenced some of the most critical and controversial decisions of the recent "conservative counterrevolution" in American Supreme Court jurisprudence. She will also be completing an article length manuscript on the origins and impact of the Unitary Executive Theory. ahollis@berkeley.edu

Takashi Iida is Associate Professor of Law at Seikei University in Tokyo. He received a Master of Laws at the University of Tokyo in 2002, and worked for the University of Tokyo as Research Associate during 2002-2004. He specializes in law & economics and sociology of law. His main published work is Social Norms and Rationality: A Perspective from Law and Economics (in Japanese, 'Ho to Keizaigaku no Shakaikihan-ron', 2004). He is interested in the impact of social networks on the social functions of the law, especially civil law (including family law), environmental law, and anti-discrimination law. During his residence at Berkeley, he will write his second book which examines the interrelationships among social norms, social networks, and the law. iida-t@mug.biglobe.ne.jp

Hideyo Matsubara is Associate Professor of Law at Ehime University, Japan. He received his Ph.D. in Law from Kwanseigakuin University. His first book, Controlling Corporate Misconducts through Criminal Sanctions: From Deterrent Function to Defining Function, is based on his doctoral dissertation and won an award from the Japanese Association of Sociological Criminology for Young Scholars in 2000. His research interests lie in the role of criminal justice and punishment in modern societies. While at Berkeley, he is conducting research into the transformation of criminal policy which occurred in the U.S. in the late-20th-century. hideyoma@ehime-u.ac.jp

Antoni Rubi-Puig is a full time Lecturer in Civil Law at Universitat Pompeu Fabra (Barcelona, Spain). His main interests of research lie in the fields of copyright, commercial speech, tort law and products liability. He holds a Ph.D. in Law from Universitat Pompeu Fabra and is the author of the book Advertising and Freedom of Speech (Publicidad y libertad de expresión, Thomson-Civitas, 2008). Antoni has previously been an Invited Researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Private Law in Hamburg (Germany) and a Visiting Scholar at Yale Law School. At the CSLS he will be working on a volume on the limits of private ordering of information by intellectual property rightholders. Antoni.rubi-puig@upf.edu

James B. Rule (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) earned his Ph.D. at Harvard. University. He has held research and teaching positions at MIT, Nuffield College, Oxford, the Université de Bordeaux, Clare Hall, Cambridge; and SUNY Stony Brook. His research interests include privacy, technology, and social roles of personal information. He is author of seven books, monographs, and chapters, including Privacy in Peril; How we are Sacrificing a Fundamental Right in Exchange for Security and Convenience (Oxford 2007) and “The Once and Future Information Society,” (with Yasemin Besen) in Theory and Society (in press). jrule@notes.cc.sunysb.edu

Jennifer Skeem is Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior at the University of California, Irvine. She also is a member of the MacArthur Research Network on Mandated Community Treatment, and the Centers for Psychology and Law and Evidence-Based Corrections at UCIrvine. She earned her PhD from the University of Utah and completed postdoctoral training at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Dr. Skeem’s research is designed to inform clinical and legal decision-making about individuals with mental disorder. Specific topics include understanding psychopathic personality disorder, assessing and treating violence risk, and identifying factors that influence the outcomes of offenders who are required to accept psychiatric treatment. She has authored and coauthored over 70 articles, chapters, and books. To help research inform policy and practice, she works closely with both national and local agencies. Dr. Skeem received a Saleem Shah Award for Early Career Excellence from the American Psychological Association (Division 41) and a Distinguished Research award from the Academic Senate of UC, Irvine. skeem@uci.edu

Hubert Smekal holds Ph.D. in European Studies from the Faculty of Social Studies, Masaryk University, Brno, where he currently works as an assistant professor. He has also worked as a research fellow in the International Institute of Political Science. He co-founded the Czech Centre for Human Rights and Democratization and serves as an assistant to E.MA Director (E.MA in Human Rights and Democratization, EIUC, Venice) for the Czech Republic. Smekal authored Human Rights in the European Union (MUNI Press, 2009) and his academic interests cover the issue of human rights in the EU, political role of the Court of Justice of the EU and judicialization of international politics. He lectured at the Bilgi University in Istanbul (2009), during the summers of 2005-2008 at University of Toronto and winter 2010 in the Australian International Law and Human Rights Program. He was awarded Fulbright-Masaryk Scholarship for 2010–2011. hsmekal@fss.muni.cz

 

Robert J. Steinfeld is Professor of Law at the State University of New York at Buffalo. His most recent book, Coercion, Contract and Free Labor in the Nineteenth Century, was published by Cambridge University Press in 2001. The University of North Carolina Press brought out his earlier book The Invention of Free Labor in 1992. He has published numerous articles on the history of labor law in America and England. Professor Steinfeld has been a Langdell Fellow at Harvard Law School and a Visiting Scholar at the Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History at Harvard University. He is currently at work on a book about the origins of American judicial review. steinfel@buffalo.edu

Mark Suchman is Professor of Sociology at Brown University. Previously, he was Professor of Sociology and Law at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He holds a BA (summa cum laude in Sociology, 1983) from Harvard, a JD from Yale Law School (1989), and a PhD in Sociology from Stanford (1994). From 1999 to 2001, he was a Robert Wood Johnson Scholar in Health Policy Research at Yale, and in 2002-2003 he was a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. During his visit at Berkeley, he will be writing a book on the role of law firms in Silicon Valley. He will also be continuing a multi-year project on the organizational, professional, and legal challenges surrounding new information technologies in health care. In addition to these topics, he has written on organizational legitimacy, on inter-organizational disputing practices, on the "internalization" of law within corporate bureaucracies, and on social science approaches to the study of contracts. He has also served as Chair of the ASA section on Sociology of Law (2005-2006), as a review-panel member for the NSF's Program on Law and Social Science (2004-2006), and as a member of the Law and Society Association's Board of Trustees (2005-2008). mark_suchman@brown.edu.

Rob Tennyson received his doctorate in Berkeley's Jurisprudence and Social Policy program in the Fall of 2009, writing a dissertation on the function of private legislative procedure in the eighteenth-century British parliaments. At the Center, he aims to extend the project, carrying it into the nineteenth century and examining the impact of parliamentary procedures and norms on administrative, corporate and property law. Prior to obtaining his PhD, Robert worked as a law clerk to the Honorable Robert B. Propst and the Honorable Dean Buttram, Jr., (resigned) in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Alabama. He obtained his JD from Tulane Law School in 1996. leytyn@gmail.com

Michael Tolley is associate professor of political science and an affiliated faculty in the Law, Policy and Society Program at Northeastern University. His research interests are at the intersection of law and politics and, in recent years, his work has taken comparative and empirical turns. He was co-editor (and contributor) most recently of a book titled Globalizing Justice: Critical Perspectives on Transnational Law and the Cross-Border Migration of Legal Norms (SUNY, 2010). He is planning to use his time at the Center for the Study of Law and Society to finish two projects. One, called Constituting Social Welfare Rights, examines the judicial protection of socio-economic rights from a comparative perspective and explores the relationship between socio-economic rights in national constitutions, government spending on various social welfare programs, and civic engagement. The second, called Keeping Pace with Brusssels, Luxembourg and Strasbourg, examines the efforts by national courts in several western European countries to harmonize national law with international and supranational law in dealing with asylum and immigration. Michael Tolley is a graduate of Swarthmore College (BA, 1984) and Johns Hopkins University (PhD, 1990). m.tolley@neu.edu

 

VISITING SCHOLARS - FALL 2010

Daniella Beinisch is an SJD candidate at the University of Pennsylvania Law School where she completed her LLM (with honors). She also holds an LLB from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Daniella worked as a criminal prosecutor in the Israeli State Attorney’s office for several years; she also worked for a few NGOs promoting social programs and human rights. Her research interests include the intersections between civil society organizations and governmental agencies, criminal justice, community justice and the social role of courts. While at the Center, she plans to complete her doctoral dissertation exploring the problem solving courts phenomenon and the challenges that it represent to the traditional criminal justice system.  beinisch@law.berkeley.edu

Kitty Calavita (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) is Chancellor’s Professor Emerita of Criminology, Law and Society at the University of California, Irvine. She was President of the Law & Society Association in 2000-2001, and is a Thorsten Sellin Fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. She has published widely in the fields of immigration and immigration lawmaking. Her work is both contemporary and historical, U.S.-based and comparative. An early book, Inside the State: The Bracero Program, Immigration, and the INS (1992), used unpublished archival material to document the internal dynamics of the INS in shaping the Bracero Program, and connected structural contradictions in the political economy to the details of agency decisionmaking. Her interest in the interplay of economic forces and state power led to her investigation of white-collar crime in Big Money Crime: Fraud and Politics in the Savings and Loan Crisis (1997, with co-authors Henry Pontell and Robert Tillman). Another book, Immigrants at the Margins: Law, Race, and Exclusion in Southern Europe (2005), examined immigrant marginalization in Italy and Spain, and the formal and informal legal processes that contribute to it. Her most recent book is Invitation to Law & Society: An Introduction to the Study of Real Law (2010). Interweaving scholarship with personal anecdotes and humor, it is an accessible guide to the prominent issues and distinctive approaches in the field of law & society. Her current research project explores the informal grievance process in California prisons, and what the use of this process can tell us about prisoners’ legal consciousness, as well as about rights consciousness and prison life more generally. Data for the study include prisoners’ written grievances and interviews with prisoners and corrections officials. kccalavi@uci.edu

Jennifer Drobac is a tenured professor at the Indiana University-Indianapolis School of Law. She holds her doctoral and J.D. degrees from Stanford Law School and Masters and Bachelors degrees in History from Stanford University. Her recent scholarly work focuses primarily on sexual harassment and juvenile law and has been published in a variety of law reviews and journals.  In 2005, she finished her first textbook, Sexual Harassment Law: History, Cases and Theory. A university video profile of her recent research can be found at http://www.youtube.com/user/indylawchannel.  While in residence, Jennifer will be researching how new information regarding the neurological and psychosocial development of teenagers might influence the modification of civil law pertaining to youth. jdrobac@iupui.edu

William Gallagher is Associate Professor of Law at the Golden Gate University School of Law. Prior to his full-time academic appointment, he was a partner in a San Francisco law firm where he specialized in intellectual property litigation.  He holds a Ph.D. from U.C. Berkeley (Jurisprudence and Social Policy), a J.D. from the UCLA School of Law, an M.A. from the University of Chicago, and a B.A. from U.C. Berkeley.  His research interests include intellectual property law and policy, the legal profession, and the sociology of law.  He is a co-founder of the Law and Society Association Collaborative Research Network (“CRN”) on Culture, Society, and Intellectual Property.  While serving as a visiting scholar at the CSLS, he will be continuing research on (1) two empirical studies of strategic enforcement of intellectual property claims, (2) an empirical study of patent lawyers, (3) an edited book on “law and society” approaches to intellectual property law, and (4) a study of lawyer regulation in California.  wgallagher@ggu.edu

Joseph Gusfield (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) is Professor of Sociology Emeritus at the University of California, San Diego. His books Symbolic Crusade: Status Politics and the American Temperance Movement and The Culture of Public Problems: Drinking, Driving and the Symbolic Order helped define the fields of the sociology of law, the sociology of social movements and the sociology of social problems, bringing the study of culture into the emerging field of law and society.

Kiyoshi Hasegawa is Professor of Law at Tokyo Metropolitan University. He received a Ph.D. in Law from the University of Tokyo. He specializes in the sociology of law. Hasegawa’s most well-known work is ‘Toshi Komyunitii to Hō’ [The Urban Community and the Law], which received the Research Committee on Sociology of Law (RCSL) Adam Podgorecki Prize in 2006. He is particularly interested in dispute resolutions in neighborhoods, private land-use restrictions, and residential private governments. He also has an interest in the homeless, and in the exclusion from several social sub-systems that is caused by homelessness. While at the Center, he will be conducting a comparative study of homeowners associations in the United States and Japan. The aim of this study is to present an accurate picture of these associations in addition to examining the conditions wherein residents of the two countries take recourse to their respective legal frameworks. At the same time, Hasegawa will be conducting research on the various kinds of exclusion from communities, and on the phenomena of segregation and homelessness. This study aims to focus on the negative side of deliberative or democratic communities, shedding light on the cumulative effects of exclusion from social sub-systems.  k-hase@tmu.ac.jp

Paul Hirschfield is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and in the Program of Criminal Justice at Rutgers University; New Brunswick, New Jersey. He holds a BA in Psychology and Sociology from Kalamazoo College and a PhD in Sociology from Northwestern University, Evanston. Most of his work aims to uncover the causes and social implications of the widespread criminalization of adolescent deviance and school misconduct, especially in the inner-city.  He also has examined criminalization in relation to adolescent mental disorders and symbolic criminalization within news media narratives of deadly force. He is currently conducting a federally-funded study on competing approaches to the reintegration of youth from correctional facilities into New York City schools. During his residency, he will be focused on a project that assesses the impact of neighborhood levels of proactive policing in Chicago on African-American and Latino children’s attitudes toward and compliance with the Law, along with any moderating influence of local participation in community policing. His email address is phirschfield@sociology.rutgers.edu.

Amanda Hollis-Brusky earned her doctorate in Political Science from the University of California, Berkeley in May 2010.  She will begin her appointment as an Assistant Professor of Politics at Pomona College in July 2011, where she will teach courses in American Politics, constitutional law, and constitutional theory.  Her current research focuses on the role networks of legal elites play in generating, cultivating, and diffusing legal ideas and strategies to decision-makers in government.  While in residence at the Center, Amanda will be turning her doctoral dissertation (The Federalist Society and the "Structural Constitution:" An Epistemic Community at Work) into a book manuscript that examines, in much greater detail, how and to what extent actors affiliated with the Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy - a conservative and libertarian legal network - shaped and influenced some of the most critical and controversial decisions of the recent "conservative counterrevolution" in American Supreme Court jurisprudence.  She will also be completing an article length manuscript on the origins and impact of the Unitary Executive Theory.  ahollis@berkeley.edu

Takashi Iida is Associate Professor of Law at Seikei University in Tokyo. He received a Master of Laws at the University of Tokyo in 2002, and worked for the University of Tokyo as Research Associate during 2002-2004. He specializes in law & economics and sociology of law. His main published work is Social Norms and Rationality: A Perspective from Law and Economics (in Japanese, 'Ho to Keizaigaku no Shakaikihan-ron', 2004).  He is interested in the impact of social networks on the social functions of the law, especially civil law (including family law), environmental law, and anti-discrimination law.  During his residence at Berkeley, he will write his second book which examines the interrelationships among social norms, social networks, & the law.  iida-t@mug.biglobe.ne.jp

Hideyo Matsubara is Associate Professor of Law at Ehime University, Japan. He received his Ph.D. in Law from Kwanseigakuin University. His first book,  Controlling Corporate Misconducts through Criminal Sanctions: From Deterrent Function to Defining Function, is based on his doctoral dissertation and won an award from the Japanese Association of Sociological Criminology for Young Scholars in 2000. His research interests lie in the role of criminal justice and punishment in modern societies. While at Berkeley, he is conducting  research into the transformation of criminal policy which occurred in the U.S. in the late-20th-century. hideyoma@ehime-u.ac.jp

Dario Melossi is Full Professor of Criminology in the School of Law at the University of Bologna. He received a law degree at Bologna and went on to do a Ph.D.in sociology at UC, Santa Barbara. From 1986 to 1993 he was Assistant and then Associate Professor of Sociology at UC, Davis. He has authored Carcere e fabbrica, 1977 with Massimo Pavarini which was translated as The Prison and the Factory, 1981; The State of Social Control, 1990 (Stato, controllo sociale, devianza, 2002); and Controlling Crime, Controlling Society: Thinking about Crime in Europe and America, 2008.  He has also contributed over 100 chapters and articles to edited books. He is a prominent spokesperson for “critical criminology,” a movement in and outside Italy. He is the main editor of the Italian journal Studi sulla questione criminale, co-editor of Punishment and Society, and a member of the Board of many other professional journals. His current research concerns the construction of deviance and social control in the European Union, especially with regard to migration. He is currently leading a research project on self-reported delinquency in the Italian region of Emilia-Romagna. dario.melossi@unibo.it

Charles O’Mahony is a Ph.D candidate in the Centre for Disability Law and Policy, National University of Ireland Galway working on a comparative study of the diversion of mentally ill persons from the criminal justice system in Ireland, the United States and New Zealand. (His research is supported by a Higher Education Authority of Ireland PRTLI scholarship). He was awarded a LL.M from University College London in 2005 and a LL.M in Public Law from NUI Galway in 2006. Charles worked as a full-time legal researcher for the Law Reform Commission of Ireland from 2006-2008. He was the principal legal researcher for the Commission’s Third Programme of Law Reform 2008-2014 and the Commission’s Consultation Paper on Jury Selection published in March 2010. Charles has taught in the areas of criminal law, human rights, the criminal jury and labour law. He is a regular contributor to the Human Rights in Ireland blog (www.humanrights.ie) where he writes on mental health and disability law. mailto:c.omahoney3@nuigalway.ie

Antoni Rubi-Puig is a full time Lecturer in Civil Law at Universitat Pompeu Fabra (Barcelona, Spain). His main interests of research lie in the fields of copyright, commercial speech, tort law and products liability. He holds a Ph.D. in Law from Universitat Pompeu Fabra and is the author of the book Advertising and Freedom of Speech (Publicidad y libertad de expresión, Thomson-Civitas, 2008). Antoni has previously been an Invited Researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Private Law in Hamburg (Germany) and a Visiting Scholar at Yale Law School. At the CSLS he will be working on a volume on the limits of private ordering of information by intellectual property rightholders. Antoni.rubi-puig@upf.edu

James B. Rule (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) earned his Ph.D. at Harvard. University.  He has held research and teaching positions at MIT, Nuffield College, Oxford, the Université de Bordeaux, Clare Hall, Cambridge; and SUNY Stony Brook. His research interests include privacy, technology, and social roles of personal information.  He is author of seven books, monographs, and chapters, including Privacy in Peril; How we are Sacrificing a Fundamental Right in Exchange for Security and Convenience (Oxford 2007) and  “The Once and Future Information Society,” (with Yasemin Besen) in Theory and Society (in press).  He is teaching Law 209.8 (Privacy Seminar) at Boalt this Fall (2008). jrule@notes.cc.sunysb.edu

Jothi Saunthararaja (Jothie Rajah) has just submitted her doctoral dissertation to the Melbourne Law School, University of Melbourne, for examination. Her dissertation applies critical theory on language and power to study the intersections of law, language and politics. She has studied the manner in which the Singapore state has reframed the liberal idea of the rule of law through legislation and public discourse. Jothie also has research interests in the legal professions, the British colonial state’s formulations of law, and Hindu law. Her earlier degrees are from the National University of Singapore. Jothie2010@gmail.com

Jodi Short is Associate Professor at Georgetown Law.  Her research is on the nexus of public and private institutions in regulatory governance.  She is currently working on a series of empirical papers examining the effects of corporate internal compliance auditing on regulatory performance.  Her work also addresses theoretical justifications for and critiques of regulation, exploring tensions in the U.S. administrative state between cooperation and coercion, expertise and politics, and public and private interests.  While in residence at the Center for the Study of Law and Society this summer, Professor Short will be working on papers that investigate: (1) whether the voluntary disclosure of legal violations can serve as a reliable signal of effective self-policing; (2) the conditions under which self-policing policies get institutionalized within or decoupled from the actual compliance practices of regulated organizations; (3) how sociological  theories of reason-giving can help us better understand practices of administrative justification.  Professor Short teaches courses on administrative law, the regulatory state, and the role that private organizations play in public governance and law.  She can be contacted at jls272@law.georgetown.edu

Hubert Smekal holds a Ph.D. in European Studies from the Faculty of Social Studies, Masaryk University, Brno, (Czech Republic)where he is currently works Assistant Professor. He has also worked as a research fellow at the International Institute of Political Science. He co-founded the Czech Centre for Human Rights and Democratization and serves as an assistant to E.MA Director (E.MA in Human Rights and Democratization, EIUC, Venice) for the Czech Republic. Smekal authored a book Human Rights in the European Union (MUNI Press, 2009) and his academic interests cover the issue of human rights in the EU, the political role of the Court of Justice of the EU and the judicialization of international politics. He lectured at the Bilgi University in Istanbul (2009), at the University of Toronto during the summers of 2005-2008 and in winter 2010 in the Australian International Law and Human Rights Program. He was awarded Fulbright-Masaryk Scholarship for 2010–2011. hsmekal@fss.muni.cz

Mark Suchman is Professor of Sociology at Brown University. Previously, he was Professor of Sociology and Law at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He holds a BA (summa cum laude in Sociology, 1983) from Harvard, a JD from Yale Law School (1989), and a PhD in Sociology from Stanford (1994).  From 1999 to 2001, he was a Robert Wood Johnson Scholar in Health Policy Research at Yale, and in 2002-2003 he was a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. During his visit at Berkeley, he will be writing a book on the role of law firms in Silicon Valley.  He will also be continuing a multi-year project on the organizational, professional, and legal challenges surrounding new information technologies in health care.  In addition to these topics, he has written on organizational legitimacy, on inter-organizational disputing practices, on the "internalization" of law within corporate bureaucracies, and on social science approaches to the study of contracts.  He has also served as Chair of the ASA section on Sociology of Law (2005-2006), as a review-panel member for the NSF's Program on Law and Social Science (2004-2006), and as a member of the Law and Society Association's Board of Trustees (2005-2008).  mark_suchman@brown.edu.

Rob Tennyson received his doctorate in Berkeley's Jurisprudence and Social Policy program in the Fall of 2009, writing a dissertation on the function of private legislative procedure in the eighteenth-century British parliaments.  At the Center, he aims to extend the project, carrying it into the nineteenth century and examining the impact of parliamentary procedures and norms on administrative, corporate and property law.  Prior to obtaining his PhD, Robert worked as a law clerk to the Honorable Robert B. Propst and the Honorable Dean Buttram, Jr., (resigned) in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Alabama.  He obtained his JD from Tulane Law School in 1996. leytyn@gmail.com 

VISITING SCHOLARS - SUMMER 2010

Daniella Beinisch is an SJD candidate at the University of Pennsylvania Law School where she completed her LLM (with honors). She also holds an LLB from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Daniella worked as a criminal prosecutor in the Israeli State Attorney’s office for several years; she also worked for a few NGOs promoting social programs and human rights. Her research interests include the intersections between civil society organizations and governmental agencies, criminal justice, community justice and the social role of courts. While at the Center, she plans to complete her doctoral dissertation exploring the problem solving courts phenomenon and the challenges that it represent to the traditional criminal justice system.  beinisch@law.upenn.edu

Jennifer Drobac is a tenured professor at the Indiana University-Indianapolis School of Law. She holds her doctoral and J.D. degrees from Stanford Law School and Masters and Bachelors degrees in History from Stanford University. Her recent scholarly work focuses primarily on sexual harassment and juvenile law and has been published in a variety of law reviews and journals.  In 2005, she finished her first textbook, SEXUAL HARASSMENT LAW: HISTORY, CASES AND THEORY. A university video profile of her recent research can be found at http://www.youtube.com/user/indylawchannel.  While in residence, Jennifer will be researching how new information regarding the neurological and psychosocial development of teenagers might influence the modification of civil law pertaining to youth. jdrobac@iupui.edu

William Gallagher is Associate Professor of Law at the Golden Gate University School of Law. Prior to his full-time academic appointment, he was a partner in a San Francisco law firm where he specialized in intellectual property litigation.  He holds a Ph.D. from U.C. Berkeley (Jurisprudence and Social Policy), a J.D. from the UCLA School of Law, an M.A. from the University of Chicago, and a B.A. from U.C. Berkeley.  His research interests include intellectual property law and policy, the legal profession, and the sociology of law.  He is a co-founder of the Law and Society Association Collaborative Research Network (“CRN”) on Culture, Society, and Intellectual Property.  While serving as a visiting scholar at the CSLS, he will be continuing research on (1) two empirical studies of strategic enforcement of intellectual property claims, (2) an empirical study of patent lawyers, (3) an edited book on “law and society” approaches to intellectual property law, and (4) a study of lawyer regulation in California.   wgallagher@ggu.edu

Joseph Gusfield, Distinguished Affiliate Scholar.  Professor Emeritus, ECSD.  Research: social movements and social problems

Kiyoshi Hasegawa is Professor of Law at Tokyo Metropolitan University. He received a Ph.D. in Law from the University of Tokyo. He specializes in the sociology of law. Hasegawa’s most well-known work is ‘Toshi Komyunitii to Hō’ [The Urban Community and the Law], which received the Research Committee on Sociology of Law (RCSL) Adam Podgorecki Prize in 2006. He is particularly interested in dispute resolutions in neighborhoods, private land-use restrictions, and residential private governments. He also has an interest in the homeless, and in the exclusion from several social sub-systems that is caused by homelessness. While at the Center, he will be conducting a comparative study of homeowners associations in the United States and Japan. The aim of this study is to present an accurate picture of these associations in addition to examining the conditions wherein residents of the two countries take recourse to their respective legal frameworks. At the same time, Hasegawa will be conducting research on the various kinds of exclusion from communities, and on the phenomena of segregation and homelessness. This study aims to focus on the negative side of deliberative or democratic communities, shedding light on the cumulative effects of exclusion from social sub-systems.  k-hase@tmu.ac.jp

Amanda Hollis-Brusky earned her doctorate in Political Science from the University of California, Berkeley in May 2010.  She will begin her appointment as Assistant Professor of Politics at Pomona College in July 2011, where she will teach courses in American Politics, constitutional law, and constitutional theory.  Her current research focuses on the role networks of legal elites play in generating, cultivating, and diffusing legal ideas and strategies to decision-makers in government.  While in residence at the Center, Amanda will be turning her doctoral dissertation (The Federalist Society and the "Structural Constitution:" An Epistemic Community at Work) into a book manuscript that examines, in much greater detail, how and to what extent actors affiliated with the Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy - a conservative and libertarian legal network - shaped and influenced some of the most critical and controversial decisions of the recent "conservative counterrevolution" in American Supreme Court jurisprudence.  She will also be completing an article length manuscript on the origins and impact of the Unitary Executive Theory.  ahollis@berkeley.edu

Takashi Iida is Associate Professor of Law at Seikei University in Tokyo. He received a Master of Laws at the University of Tokyo in 2002, and worked for the University of Tokyo as Research Associate during 2002-2004. He specializes in law & economics and sociology of law. His main published work is Social Norms and Rationality: A Perspective from Law and Economics (in Japanese, 'Ho to Keizaigaku no Shakaikihan-ron', 2004).  He is interested in the impact of social networks on the social functions of the law, especially civil law (including family law), environmental law, and anti-discrimination law.  During his residence at Berkeley, he will write a second book which examines the interrelationships among social norms, social networks, and the law.  iida-t@mug.biglobe.ne.jp

Anna Kirkland is Associate Professor of Women’s Studies and Political Science at the University of Michigan. She earned her J.D. (2001) and Ph.D. (Jurisprudence and Social Policy, 2003) from the University of California, Berkeley. Her research has focused on the construction of the legal categories that receive civil rights protections in various jurisdictions of the United States as well as the ways in which ordinary people understand and negotiate their identities through the law. Her first book, Fat Rights: Dilemmas of Difference and Personhood, was published in 2008 by New York University Press. Prof. Kirkland has also published work on fat acceptance advocates and their perceptions of law, fatness as disability, transgendered plaintiffs who win their cases, transgender discrimination as sex discrimination, the moral, racial, gendered, and political features of the “obesogenic environment” account of population weight gains, and an analysis of the diversity essay on the undergraduate UM application. With Michigan colleague Jonathan Metzl, Prof. Kirkland edited the forthcoming volume Against Health:  How Health Become the New Morality (New York University Press, 2010).  While at Berkeley, she is working on a second book on vaccination law, politics and activism.  The new research focuses on the ongoing Autism Omnibus Proceedings before the federal vaccine compensation court, in which the Special Masters have found that vaccines did not cause autism spectrum disorder in children.  Prof. Kirkland is also studying movement opposition to the rulings, state-level vaccine controversies and regulation, and the interaction between vaccine safety advocates and policymakers at the federal level. She will spend the 2010-2011 academic year as a Fellow in Princeton University’s Law and Public Affairs Program. akirkland@umich.edu

Joe McGrath graduated with a First Class Honours Bachelor of Civil Law (BCL) from University College Cork, Ireland. He was awarded the title ‘College Scholar’ and a Faculty of Law PhD scholarship. He was subsequently awarded the Government of Ireland PhD scholarship by the Irish Research Council for the Humanities and Social Sciences. His doctoral research employs jurisprudential methodologies, enriched by a criminological, penological and sociological analysis of law, to explore the emergence of a new legal regime addressing corporate deviancy and corporate crime in Ireland and it explores the impact of this regulatory regime on traditional criminal law values and the practice of corporate enforcement. He has also undertaken studies in European business regulation in Bilbao, pursuant to a European Commission scholarship. He has presented papers both domestically and internationally on corporate crime and corporate regulation and published in books and journals on these areas. He was also a visiting researcher at Harvard Law School in 2009. jhmcgrath@gmail.com

Christopher Roberts is a Doctoral Candidate at the University of Michigan in the Joint Program in Public Policy and Sociology.  He holds a B.A. from UCLA and a J.D. from the University of Southern California.  While in residence, Christopher will be working on completing his dissertation project, in which he examines the social origins of the modern international human rights concept.  His work shows how the human rights concept became the site for a series of seminal struggles over competing institutional frameworks for organizing social and political relationships, and how the formidable opposition that developed against human rights between 1944 and 1966 has been influential in shaping the modern human rights concept, itself.  His article (co-authored with Margaret Somers), "Toward a New Sociology of Rights: A Genealogy of 'Buried Bodies' of Citizenship and Human Rights", will appear in the next issue of the Annual Review of Law and Social Science. cnrobert@umich.edu .

Antoni Rubi-Puig is a full time Lecturer in Civil Law at Universitat Pompeu Fabra (Barcelona, Spain). His main interests of research lie in the fields of copyright, commercial speech, tort law and products liability. He holds a Ph.D. in Law from Universitat Pompeu Fabra and is the author of the book Advertising and Freedom of Speech (Publicidad y libertad de expresión, Thomson-Civitas, 2008). Antoni has previously been an Invited Researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Private Law in Hamburg (Germany) and a Visiting Scholar at Yale Law School. At the CSLS he will be working on a volume on the limits of private ordering of information by intellectual property rightholders. antonirubi-puig@upf.edu

James B. Rule (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) earned his Ph.D. at Harvard. University.  He has held research and teaching positions at MIT, Nuffield College, Oxford, the Université de Bordeaux, Clare Hall, Cambridge; and SUNY Stony Brook. His research interests include privacy, technology, and social roles of personal information.  He is author of seven books, monographs, and chapters, including Privacy in Peril; How we are Sacrificing a Fundamental Right in Exchange for Security and Convenience (Oxford 2007) and  “The Once and Future Information Society,” (with Yasemin Besen) in Theory and Society (in press).  jrule@notes.cc.sunysb.edu

Jothi Saunthararaja (Jothie Rajah) has just submitted her doctoral dissertation to the Melbourne Law School, University of Melbourne, for examination. Her dissertation applies critical theory on language and power to study the intersections of law, language and politics. She has studied the manner in which the Singapore state has reframed the liberal idea of the rule of law through legislation and public discourse. Jothie also has research interests in the legal professions, the British colonial state’s formulations of law, and Hindu law. Her earlier degrees are from the National University of Singapore  jothie2010@gmail.com

Jodi Short is Associate Professor at Georgetown Law.  Her research is on the nexus of public and private institutions in regulatory governance.  She is currently working on a series of empirical papers examining the effects of corporate internal compliance auditing on regulatory performance.  Her work also addresses theoretical justifications for and critiques of regulation, exploring tensions in the U.S. administrative state between cooperation and coercion, expertise and politics, and public and private interests.  While in residence at the Center for the Study of Law and Society this fall, Professor Short will be working on papers that investigate: (1) how different regulatory enforcement strategies influence the self-policing practices of regulated organizations; (2) how concerns about state coercion have shaped the debate about regulatory reform; and (3) how agencies administer “public interest” standards in their enabling statutes – how they develop models of and mediate competing claims about what the public’s interest is.  Professor Short teaches courses on administrative law, the regulatory state, and the role that private organizations play in public governance and law.  She will present a talk in the CSLS Speaker Series on Sept. 27 entitled, “Institutionalizing Self-Regulation: The Effect of Threat, Surveillance and Experience."  She can be contacted at jls272@law.georgetown.edu.

Mark Suchman is Professor of Sociology at Brown University. Previously, he was Professor of Sociology and Law at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He holds a BA (summa cum laude in Sociology, 1983) from Harvard, a JD from Yale Law School (1989), and a PhD in Sociology from Stanford (1994).  From 1999 to 2001, he was a Robert Wood Johnson Scholar in Health Policy Research at Yale, and in 2002-2003 he was a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. During his visit at Berkeley, he will be writing a book on the role of law firms in Silicon Valley.  He will also be continuing a multi-year project on the organizational, professional, and legal challenges surrounding new information technologies in health care.  In addition to these topics, he has written on organizational legitimacy, on inter-organizational disputing practices, on the "internalization" of law within corporate bureaucracies, and on social science approaches to the study of contracts.  He has also served as Chair of the ASA section on Sociology of Law (2005-2006), as a review-panel member for the NSF's Program on Law and Social Science (2004-2006), and as a member of the Law and Society Association's Board of Trustees (2005-2008).  mark_suchman@brown.edu.

Rob Tennyson received his doctorate in Berkeley's Jurisprudence and Social Policy program in the Fall of 2009, writing a dissertation on the function of private legislative procedure in the eighteenth-century British parliaments.  At the Center, he aims to extend the project, carrying it into the nineteenth century and examining the impact of parliamentary procedures and norms on administrative, corporate and property law.  Prior to obtaining his PhD, Robert worked as a law clerk to the Honorable Robert B. Propst and the Honorable Dean Buttram, Jr., (resigned) in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Alabama.  He obtained his JD from Tulane Law School in 1996.  leytyn@gmail.com 

VISITING SCHOLARS - SPRING 2010

Megan Allyse is a Wellcome Trust PhD candidate at the Institute for Science and Society in the University of Nottingham. Her doctoral work focuses on the development of models for the political and regulatory stabilization of controversial technologies, with particular emphasis on normative controversy surrounding emerging biotechnologies. Her case study on the stabilization of oocyte contribution to stem cell research compares policy development in the UK, California and China. Other research interests include the emergence of ethical governance structures in developing countries, normative institutionalisation and work in public health ethics. Megan is a member of the UE Framework 6 BIONET project focusing on collaborative development of ethical governance between Europe and China. lbxmaf@nottingham.ac.uk

Daniella Beinisch is an SJD candidate at the University of Pennsylvania Law School where she completed her LLM (with honors). She also holds an LLB from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Daniella worked as a criminal prosecutor in the Israeli State Attorney’s office for several years; she also worked for a few NGOs promoting social programs and human rights. Her research interests include the intersections between civil society organizations and governmental agencies, criminal justice, community justice and the social role of courts. While at the Center, she plans to complete her doctoral dissertation exploring the problem solving courts phenomenon and the challenges that it represent to the traditional criminal justice system.  beinisch@law.upenn.edu

Françoise Briegel is a recipient of a one-year fellowship for Academic Research from the Swiss National Science Foundation. She earned a Ph.D. at the Faculté des Lettres, University of Geneva. She has conducted research in several areas of the history of law and justice in continental Europe, such as recidivism between the 16th and the 18th century, the legalisation of the defence in the Republic of Geneva at the beginning of the 18th century, the negotiation between judges and accused regarding the defence, the impact of the politicization of public and judicial spaces. While at the Center her main goals are to explore the rhetorical dimension of the plea, the elements (facts, evidence, social values, etc.) which are ignored by the accusation and by the defence. Finally, and more generally, what are the consequences of the right to a spoken defence in "inquisitorial" procedure in which the fair hearing concept was previously non-existent?  Does the defence lawyer bring about changes in terms of evidence, the role of judges or the public body; what about the double classification of the defendant made by the accusation and by the defence regarding the concept of "criminal responsibility"?   francoise.briegel@gmail.com  

Mariavittoria Catanzariti is a PhD student at University of Roma, Roma Tre. Her doctoral work focuses on the topic of secrecy within the public/private dichotomy. More deeply, she analyzes the connections between the management and the access to sensitive data and their influences on democratic systems. This great field includes different issues: trail and secret, secret's vote procedures, the problem of emergence, the international terrorism, the right on privacy. It is devoted to a new elaboration of secret as a concept of General Theory that covers all dimensions of public life and politics. Her research project compares two different models: the European one and the Common Law system, specifically the American one. Depending on the point of view, we have at least two different impacts: the 'secret' is considered as an asset, but it ensures also the protection of private life from the public powers. In this perspective the PhD thesis aims to determine a normative definition of 'secret' within the modern Constitutions. mailto:mariavittoriacat@libera.it

Martin Doris is a full time Lecturer in Private and Commercial Law at the University of Glasgow (UK). He holds a Ph.D. in Law from the European University Institute in Florence and his primary research interests lie in the fields of comparative private law and general consumer law. He has written widely on European private law themes and is the author of Dispute Avoidance and European Contract Law (Europa Law, 2008). Martin has previously  been a Visiting Research Fellow at the Institute of European Law at the University of Birmingham (UK) and at the CSLS he will be working on a series of publications, including a planned new work exploring the future of the CISG Advisory Council.  mailto:m.doris@law.gla.ac.uk

Jennifer Drobac
is a tenured professor at the Indiana University-Indianapolis School of Law. She holds her doctoral and J.D. degrees from Stanford Law School and Masters and Bachelors degrees in History from Stanford University. Her recent scholarly work focuses primarily on sexual harassment and juvenile law and has been published in a variety of law reviews and journals.  In 2005, she finished her first textbook, SEXUAL HARASSMENT LAW: HISTORY, CASES AND THEORY. A university video profile of her recent research can be found at http://www.youtube.com/user/indylawchannel.  While in residence, Jennifer will be researching how new information regarding the neurological and psychosocial development of teenagers might influence the modification of civil law pertaining to youth. jdrobac@iupui.edu

William Gallagher is Associate Professor of Law at the Golden Gate University School of Law. Prior to his full-time academic appointment, he was a partner in a San Francisco law firm where he specialized in intellectual property litigation.  He holds a Ph.D. from U.C. Berkeley (Jurisprudence and Social Policy), a J.D. from the UCLA School of Law, an M.A. from the University of Chicago, and a B.A. from U.C. Berkeley.  His research interests include intellectual property law and policy, the legal profession, and the sociology of law.  He is a co-founder of the Law and Society Association Collaborative Research Network (“CRN”) on Culture,Society, and Intellectual Property.  While serving as a visiting scholar at the CSLS, he will be continuing research on (1) two empirical studies of strategic enforcement of intellectual property claims, (2) an empirical study of patent lawyers, (3) an edited book on “law and society” approaches to intellectual property law, and (4) a study of lawyer regulation in California.  wgallagher@ggu.edu

Kiyoshi Hasegawa is Professor of Law at Tokyo Metropolitan University. He received a Ph.D. in Law from the University of Tokyo. He specializes in the sociology of law. Hasegawa’s most well-known work is ‘Toshi Komyunitii to Hō’ [The Urban Community and the Law], which received the Research Committee on Sociology of Law (RCSL) Adam Podgorecki Prize in 2006. He is particularly interested in dispute resolutions in neighborhoods, private land-use restrictions, and residential private governments. He also has an interest in the homeless, and in the exclusion from several social sub-systems that is caused by homelessness. While at the Center, he will be conducting a comparative study of homeowners associations in the United States and Japan. The aim of this study is to present an accurate picture of these associations in addition to examining the conditions wherein residents of the two countries take recourse to their respective legal frameworks. At the same time, Hasegawa will be conducting research on the various kinds of exclusion from communities, and on the phenomena of segregation and homelessness. This study aims to focus on the negative side of deliberative or democratic communities, shedding light on the cumulative effects of exclusion from social sub-systems.  k-hase@tmu.ac.jp

Antoinette (Toni) Hetzler is Professor of Sociology with emphasis on Social Policy at Lund University, Sweden. She is head of a research group in Sweden studying Social Policy, Working Life and Global Welfare (SWG) and is currently president of the Swedish Sociology Association. Her most recent books include Sick-Sweden (Sjuk-Sverige, 2005) and Rehabilitation and Welfare Politics (Rehabilitering och välfärdspolitik, 2004). She has published extensively on welfare state politics including workers compensation in Sweden as well as the role of law in social policy. Currently she is working on two manuscripts. One is "Women, Work and Well-being" and the other is "Regulating the Financial Market."  Antoinette Hetzler received her PhD from the University of California, Santa Barbara, was Assistant Professor at New York University, and post-doctoral fellow at the Center for the Study of Law and Society before she immigrated to Sweden in the late 1970s.  antoinette.hetzler@soc.lu.se

Takashi Iida is Associate Professor of Law at Seikei University in Tokyo. He received a Master of Laws at the University of Tokyo in 2002, and worked for the University of Tokyo as Research Associate during 2002-2004. He specializes in law & economics and sociology of law. His main published work is Social Norms and Rationality: A Perspective from Law and Economics (in Japanese, 'Ho to Keizaigaku no Shakaikihan-ron', 2004).  He is interested in the impact of social networks on the social functions of the law, especially civil law (including family law), environmental law, and anti-discrimination law.  During my residence at Berkeley, he will write a second book which examines the interrelationships among social norms, social networks, and the law.  iida-t@mug.biglobe.ne.jp

Joe McGrath graduated with a First Class Honours Bachelor of Civil Law (BCL) from University College Cork, Ireland. He was awarded the title ‘College Scholar’ and a Faculty of Law PhD scholarship. He was subsequently awarded the Government of Ireland PhD scholarship by the Irish Research Council for the Humanities and Social Sciences. His doctoral research employs jurisprudential methodologies, enriched by a criminological, penological and sociological analysis of law, to explore the emergence of a new legal regime addressing corporate deviancy and corporate crime in Ireland and it explores the impact of this regulatory regime on traditional criminal law values and the practice of corporate enforcement. He has also undertaken studies in European business regulation in Bilbao, pursuant to a European Commission scholarship. He has presented papers both domestically and internationally on corporate crime and corporate regulation and published in books and journals on these areas. He was also a visiting researcher at Harvard Law School in 2009. jhmcgrath@gmail.com

Michael Musheno (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) earned a Ph.D. at American University. He is currently Professor of Criminal Justice Studies at SFSU and Director of the Program in Criminal Justice Studies at San Francisco State University. Formerly  program director of Law and Society at NSF, his interests are in policing, street law, state frontline workforces (currently US Army reservists serving in Iraq), and interpretive field methods, esp. narratives and storytelling.  His book Deployed: How Reservists Bear the Burden of Iraq (with Susan Ross) was published by the University of Michigan Press in 2008.  mmusheno@sfsu.edu .

Christopher Roberts is a Doctoral Candidate at the University of Michigan in the Joint Program in Public Policy and Sociology.  He holds a B.A. from UCLA and a J.D. from the University of Southern California.  While in residence, Christopher will be working on completing his dissertation project, in which he examines the social origins of the modern international human rights concept.  His work shows how the human rights concept became the site for a series of seminal struggles over competing institutional frameworks for organizing social and political relationships, and how the formidable opposition that developed against human rights between 1944 and 1966 has been influential in shaping the modern human rights concept, itself.  His article (co-authored with Margaret Somers), "Toward a New Sociology of Rights: A Genealogy of 'Buried Bodies' of Citizenship and Human Rights", will appear in the next issue of the Annual Review of Law and Social Science. cnrobert@umich.edu .

James B. Rule (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) earned his Ph.D. at Harvard. University.  He has held research and teaching positions at MIT, Nuffield College, Oxford, the Université de Bordeaux, Clare Hall, Cambridge; and SUNY Stony Brook. His research interests include privacy, technology, and social roles of personal information.  He is author of seven books, monographs, and chapters, including Privacy in Peril; How we are Sacrificing a Fundamental Right in Exchange for Security and Convenience (Oxford 2007) and  “The Once and Future Information Society,” (with Yasemin Besen) in Theory and Society (in press).  jrule@notes.cc.sunysb.edu

Jothi Saunthararaja (Jothie Rajah) has just submitted her doctoral dissertation to the Melbourne Law School, University of Melbourne, for examination. Her dissertation applies critical theory on language and power to study the intersections of law, language and politics. She has studied the manner in which the Singapore state has reframed the liberal idea of the rule of law through legislation and public discourse. Jothie also has research interests in the legal professions, the British colonial state’s formulations of law, and Hindu law. Her earlier degrees are from the National University of Singapore  jothie2010@gmail.com

Jacqueline Stevens' work explores harms wrought by the nation-state, as well as possibilities for post-national governance and post-kinship family. She is the author of States Without Nations: Citizenship for Mortals (Columbia Univeristy Press, 2009) and Reproducing the State (Princeton University Press, 1999). Since 2007 Stevens has been conducting research on the unlawful detention and deportation of thousands of U.S. citizens. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) has no jurisdiction over U.S. citizens; these so-called legal removals are often false arrest or kidnapping.  Stevens is an Associate Professor in Law and Society at UC Santa Barbara. She received her PhD in Political Science from the University of California, Berkeley.  For links to her articles and blog, http://www.jacquelinestevens.org.

Rob Tennyson received his doctorate in Berkeley's Jurisprudence and Social Policy program in the Fall of 2009, writing a dissertation on the function of private legislative procedure in the eighteenth-century British parliaments.  At the Center, he aims to extend the project, carrying it into the nineteenth century and examining the impact of parliamentary procedures and norms on administrative, corporate and property law.  Prior to obtaining his PhD, Robert worked as a law clerk to the Honorable Robert B. Propst and the Honorable Dean Buttram, Jr., (resigned) in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Alabama.  He obtained his JD from Tulane Law School in 1996.  leytyn@gmail.com  

Mary Vogel
joined King’s College London School of Law in 2005 and was made Reader in Law and Democratic Transformation in 2007.  She came to King’s from the University of Leicester where she was Postgraduate Tutor and Director of the Master’s Programme in Criminology and Risk Management.  Dr. Vogel’s research focuses on a series of interconnected interests in law, politics, globalization, democracy and governance.  She holds a funded Research Fellowship from the Leverhulme Trust and is Associate Fellow, Rothermere American Institute, University of Oxford and Associate Research Fellow, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, University of London.  Since completing her doctorate at Harvard University in 1988, Dr. Vogel has taught at Northwestern University, the State University of New York, the University of Michigan and the University of California at Santa Barbara, and has been a visiting fellow at a number of institutions.  Dr. Vogel has written Coercion to Compromise:  Plea Bargaining, Courts and the Making of Political Authority (OUP 2007) and edited Crime, Inequality and the State (Routledge 2007).  Coercion to Compromise was a Finalist for the British Society of Criminology Book Prize in 2008.  Her article, “The Social Origins of Plea Bargaining:  Conflict and the Law in the Process of State Formation” (Law and Society Review 1999), won the Law and Society Association’s award for Best Article of 1999 as well as the American Sociological Association, Law Section, Article Prize for 1999-2000.  mary.vogel@kcl.ac.uk

 

VISITING SCHOLARS - FALL 2009

Ely Aharonson is a Candidate for the Ph.D. at London School of Economics and Political Science. He completed his LL.M at NYU, MA (summa cum laude) in philosophy at Tel Aviv University, and LL.B (magna cum laude) at the University of Haifa. His primary areas of scholarship include: historical, sociological, and comparative perspectives on American politics of crime; legal mobilization and social change; sociology and history of racial formations in the US; the dynamics and consequences of the judicialization and juridification of political problems; and sociologically-informed legal theory more broadly.  He has published articles in the Canadian Journal of Law & Technology, Tel Aviv Univ. Law Review, and Law & Government.   In his doctoral dissertation, he explores the genealogy of political and legal discourses on the use of criminalization for protecting Afro-Americans, as they have evolved from the slavery era to the present. He intends to devote his residence at Berkeley to working on two articles based on his doctoral dissertation.  He currently serves on the board of the Israeli Law & Society Association.  E.Aharonson@lse.ac.uk 

Megan Allyse is a Wellcome Trust PhD candidate at the Institute for Science and Society in the University of Nottingham. Her doctoral work focuses on the development of models for the political and regulatory stabilization of controversial technologies, with particular emphasis on normative controversy surrounding emerging biotechnologies. Her case study on the stabilization of oocyte contribution to stem cell research compares policy development in the UK, California and China. Other research interests include the emergence of ethical governance structures in developing countries, normative institutionalisation and work in public health ethics. Megan is a member of the UE Framework 6 BIONET project focusing on collaborative development of ethical governance between Europe and China. lbxmaf@nottingham.ac.uk

Daphne Barak-Erez is Stewart and Judy Colton Chair of Law and Security and Director, Cegla Center for the Interdisciplinary Research of Law, Faculty of Law, Tel Aviv University. Her JSD is from Tel Aviv University. While at the Center she is researching the legal battles surrounding the participation of various social groups in the scheme of mandatory military service in Israel under the Defense Service Law.  barakerz@post.tau.ac.il 

Daniella Beinisch is an SJD candidate at the University of Pennsylvania Law School where she completed her LLM (with honors). She also holds an LLB from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Daniella worked as a criminal prosecutor in the Israeli State Attorney’s office for several years; she also worked for a few NGOs promoting social programs and human rights. Her research interests include the intersections between civil society organizations and governmental agencies, criminal justice, community justice and the social role of courts. While at the Center, she plans to complete her doctoral dissertation exploring the problem solving courts phenomenon and the challenges that it represent to the traditional criminal justice system.  beinisch@law.upenn.eduu 

Françoise Briegel is a recipient of a one-year fellowship for Academic Research from the Swiss National Science Foundation. She earned a Ph.D. at the Faculté des Lettres, University of Geneva. She has conducted research in several areas of the history of law and justice in continental Europe, such as recidivism between the 16th and the 18th century, the legalisation of the defence in the Republic of Geneva at the beginning of the 18th century, the negotiation between judges and accused regarding the defence, the impact of the politicization of public and judicial spaces. While at the Center her main goals are to explore the rhetorical dimension of the plea, the elements (facts, evidence, social values, etc.) which are ignored by the accusation and by the defence. Finally, and more generally, what are the consequences of the right to a spoken defence in "inquisitorial" procedure in which the fair hearing concept was previously non-existent?  Does the defence lawyer bring about changes in terms of evidence, the role of judges or the public body; what about the double classification of the defendant made by the accusation and by the defence regarding the concept of "criminal responsibility"?  fbriegel@aliceadsl.fr

Clare Chambers is University Lecturer in Philosophy and Fellow of Jesus College, University of Cambridge. She specializes in contemporary political and legal philosophy. She is particularly interested in contemporary liberalism, including autonomy, equality, multiculturalism and global justice; feminism, including the body, appearance norms and personal relationship; and theories of social construction, including those of Michel Foucault and Pierre Bourdieu. She is the author of Sex, Culture, and Justice: The Limits of Choice (Penn State UP, 2008). While at CSLS she will be working on a monograph titled Marriage and the State, exploring how marriage should be regulated by the state from liberal and feminist perspectives. cecc66@cam.ac.uk

William Gallagher is Associate Professor of Law at the Golden Gate University School of Law. Prior to his full-time academic appointment, he was a partner in a San Francisco law firm where he specialized in intellectual property litigation.  He holds a Ph.D. from U.C. Berkeley (Jurisprudence and Social Policy), a J.D. from the UCLA School of Law, an M.A. from the University of Chicago, and a B.A. from U.C. Berkeley.  His research interests include intellectual property law and policy, the legal profession, and the sociology of law.  He is a co-founder of the Law and Society Association Collaborative Research Network (“CRN”) on Culture, Society, and Intellectual Property.  While serving as a visiting scholar at the CSLS, he will be continuing research on (1) two empirical studies of strategic enforcement of intellectual property claims, (2) an empirical study of patent lawyers, (3) an edited book on “law and society” approaches to intellectual property law, and (4) a study of lawyer regulation in California.   wgallagher@ggu.edu

Antoinette (Toni) Hetzler is Professor of Sociology with emphasis on Social Policy at Lund University, Sweden. She is head of a research group in Sweden studying Social Policy, Working Life and Global Welfare (SWG) and is currently president of the Swedish Sociology Association. Her most recent books include Sick-Sweden (Sjuk-Sverige, 2005) and Rehabilitation and Welfare Politics (Rehabilitering och välfärdspolitik, 2004). She has published extensively on welfare state politics including workers compensation in Sweden as well as the role of law in social policy. Currently she is working on two manuscripts. One is "Women, Work and Well-being" and the other is "Regulating the Financial Market."  Antoinette Hetzler received her PhD from the University of California, Santa Barbara, was Assistant Professor at New York University, and post-doctoral fellow at the Center for the Study of Law and Society before she immigrated to Sweden in the late 1970s.  antoinette.hetzler@soc.lu.se

Takashi Iida is Associate Professor of Law at Seikei University in Tokyo. He received a Master of Laws at the University of Tokyo in 2002, and worked for the University of Tokyo as Research Associate during 2002-2004. He specializes in law & economics and sociology of law. His main published work is Social Norms and Rationality: A Perspective from Law and Economics (in Japanese, 'Ho to Keizaigaku no Shakaikihan-ron', 2004).  He is interested in the impact of social networks on the social functions of the law, especially civil law (including family law), environmental law, and anti-discrimination law.  During his residence at Berkeley, he will write his second book which examines the interrelationships among social norms, social networks, and the law.  iida-t@law.seikei.ac.jp

Jinee Lokaneeta holds a Ph.D in Political Science from University of Southern California and is currently an Assistant Professor in Political Science at Drew University, New Jersey. Her areas of interest include Political Theory (Postcolonial, Feminist and Marxist theory), Law and Violence, Cultural Studies, and Jurisprudence. Her book manuscript titled Unraveling the Exception: Torture in Liberal Democracies focusing on the legal discourses on torture in the United States and India is currently under review. She has a forthcoming article titled: “A Rose by another Name: Definitions, Sanitized Terms and Imagery of Torture in 24.” in Law, Culture and Humanities. She recently participated in a NEH Summer Institute on the “Rule of Law: Legal Studies and the Liberal Arts” held at the University of New England, Maine. She is presently working on the theoretical implications of the use of brain scan technology by the Indian criminal justice system for the liberal state’s uneasy relationship with excess violence. She is also interested in the relationship of Indian civil liberty groups with the law especially the tension between utilizing law as a site of intervention even while being skeptical about its potential. Broader questions of disciplinarity and interdisciplinarity in legal studies especially the interface between political science and interdisciplinary legal studies are also the focus of her study. jlokanee@drew.edu

Maria Martin Lorenzo earned a Ph.D. in Criminal Law at the Law School, Complutense University, where she is currently Associate Professor of Criminal Law.  She has conducted research in several areas of Criminal Law on some theoretical questions, such as the Foundations of Criminal Law, the differentiation between Justification and Excuse, the legal treatment of the concurrence of offences, and the Theory of Mistakes.  Also, she has worked on more readily practical topics, such as criminal regulation of workplace safety, road safety or the courts’ interpretation and application of drug trafficking offences.  Currently she is part of a research project on the main traits of crime policy in the Western nations in the last few years.  Among other topics, she specializes on child pornography offences.  While at the Center her main goals are to compare the US and Spanish criminal law regulation of child pornography with a special focus on the influence of international documents and to compare the enforcement of said regulations in both countries.  mmlor235@der.ucm.es

Daniel Margolies is Batten Associate Professor of History at Virginia Wesleyan College.  He specializes in the history of United States foreign relations.  He received his Ph.D. and M.A. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and his B.A. from Hampshire College.  He is currently researching extraterritoriality in American empire and migrant transnationalism and globalization in the contemporary South.  In 2007-2008 he was Fulbright Senior Scholar/Lecturer at Sogang University in Seoul, South Korea.  His first book was Henry Watterson and the New South: The Politics of Empire, Free Trade, and Globalization (2006).  He is currently editing the Companion to Harry S. Truman (Blackwell). While at the Center, he will be working on the manuscript of a book examining issues of extraterritorial jurisdiction in American foreign relations through studies of extraterritorial crime, extraterritorial abduction, transboundary incursion, & extradition in the borderlands of the United States. dmargolies@vwc.edu

Michael Musheno (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) earned a Ph.D. at American University. He is currently Professor of Criminal Justice Studies at SFSU and Director of the Program in Criminal Justice Studies at San Francisco State University. Formerly  program director of Law and Society at NSF, his interests are in policing, street law, state frontline workforces (currently US Army reservists serving in Iraq), and interpretive field methods, esp. narratives and storytelling.  His book Deployed: How Reservists Bear the Burden of Iraq (with Susan Ross) was published by the University of Michigan Press in 2008. mmusheno@sfsu.edu .

Kurt Pärli  is Head of Research and Professor of Labour- and Social Law and European Law at the Institute for Economic Law, School of Management and Law, University of applied Sciences Zuerich (Switzerland). He studied social work as well as law and practiced in the field of Social Law before he wrote his PhD and postdoctoral Thesis and became finally a Professor. In his research projects and publications he focused on challenges in the field of social policy and social law (key words: Integration through Activation) on the one hand and on anti-discrimination law and its effectiveness on the other hand (key words: Integration through non-discrimination). For an overview of his projects and publications see: http://project.zhaw.ch/en/management/nondiscrimination/diskriminierung0.html. Currently he is project leader of the Swiss National Research Foundation funded study “Work reintegration of individuals with long term work disability - a micro sociological investigation into the role of law and social environment” (see: http://www.berufliche-wiedereingliederung.ch). In this study we are interested to learn why some employees find it easier to re-integrate into the employment process after a prolonged phase of work incapacity than others. Our research project is running for several years (2008-2011) and will reveal the complex interplay among individuals, social, legal and societal conditions of context and the involved employers and social institutions. kurt.paerli@zhaw.ch

Christopher Roberts is a Doctoral Candidate at the University of Michigan in the Joint Program in Public Policy and Sociology.  He holds a B.A. from UCLA and a J.D. from the University of Southern California.  While in residence, Christopher will be working on completing his dissertation project, in which he examines the social origins of the modern international human rights concept.  His work shows how the human rights concept became the site for a series of seminal struggles over competing institutional frameworks for organizing social and political relationships, and how the formidable opposition that developed against human rights between 1944 and 1966 has been influential in shaping the modern human rights concept, itself.  His article (co-authored with Margaret Somers), "Toward a New Sociology of Rights: A Genealogy of 'Buried Bodies' of Citizenship and Human Rights", will appear in the next issue of the Annual Review of Law and Social Science.  cnrobert@umich.edu.

James B. Rule (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) earned his Ph.D. at Harvard. University.  He has held research and teaching positions at MIT, Nuffield College, Oxford, the Université de Bordeaux, Clare Hall, Cambridge; and SUNY Stony Brook. His research interests include privacy, technology, and social roles of personal information.  He is author of seven books, monographs, and chapters, including Privacy in Peril; How we are Sacrificing a Fundamental Right in Exchange for Security and Convenience (Oxford 2007) and  “The Once and Future Information Society,” (with Yasemin Besen) in Theory and Society (in press).  mailto:jrule@notes.cc.sunysb.edu

Jacqueline Stevens' work explores harms wrought by the nation-state, as well as possibilities for post-national governance and post-kinship family. She is the author of States Without Nations: Citizenship for Mortals (Columbia Univeristy Press, forthcoming November 2009) and Reproducing the State (Princeton University Press, 1999). Since 2007 Stevens has been conducting research on the unlawful detention and deportation of thousands of U.S. citizens. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) has no jurisdiction over U.S. citizens; these so-called legal removals are often false arrest or kidnapping.  Stevens is Professor in Law and Society at UC Santa Barbara. She received her PhD in Political Science from the University of California, Berkeley.  For links to her articles and blog, http://www.jacquelinestevens.org.

Marco Tabarelli earned a PhD in political science at the University of Bologna, with a dissertation project about the recent reforms of the judicial system in the United Kingdom (Constitutional Reform Act 2005) and, at a more abstract level, with the reasons for which political actors decide to increase the political significance or the independence of the courts. He is currently Researcher at the Department of Political Science, University of Bologna, Italy. His areas of scholarship include judicial power, judicial behaviour and organization and judicial policies.  marco.tabarelli@unibo.it

Judith van Erp is Associate Professor of Criminology at Erasmus University of Rotterdam, the Netherlands. She holds a PhD in Public Administration from the Free University of Amsterdam.  Her field of interest is the regulation and governance of corporations and markets. She is currently working on a grant-funded research project (2006-2009) on naming and shaming in the Dutch financial market, that was inspired by the fact that more and more regulatory agencies in Europe actively publish the names of offending companies as a part of their regulatory strategy. The aim of the project was to empirically establish the effects of naming and shaming on consumers, the companies whose names were published, and market parties in general. A main finding was that naming and shaming fails to fulfill the role of moral education in the financial market, while it creates defiance and distrust of the regulator. While in Berkeley, Judith will work on several publications on this research project and think about future research plans. Judith’s office is at 2240 Piedmont Avenue.  vanerp@frg.eur.nl

 

VISITING SCHOLARS - SUMMER 2009

Ely Aharonson is a Candidate for the Ph.D. at London School of Economics and Political Science. He completed his LL.M at NYU, MA (summa cum laude) in philosophy at Tel Aviv University, and LL.B (magna cum laude) at the University of Haifa. His primary areas of scholarship include: historical, sociological, and comparative perspectives on American politics of crime; legal mobilization and social change; sociology and history of racial formations in the US; the dynamics and consequences of the judicialization and juridification of political problems; and sociologically-informed legal theory more broadly.  He has published articles in the Canadian Journal of Law & Technology, Tel Aviv Univ. Law Review, and Law & Government.   In his doctoral dissertation, he explores the genealogy of political and legal discourses on the use of criminalization for protecting Afro-Americans, as they have evolved from the slavery era to the present. He intends to devote his residence at Berkeley to working on two articles based on his doctoral dissertation.  He currently serves on the board of the Israeli Law & Society Association.  He can be contacted at E.Aharonson@lse.ac.uk

Adam Gearey earned a Ph.D. at Birkbeck College, University of London, where he is currently Reader in Law, Birkbeck College.  He took the Common Professional Examination in Law at the University of Manchester and has held Visiting Professorships in Law at the University of Praetoria, South Africa and at Makarere University in Uganda.  He will be examining law and legal relationships in the European/Anglican traditions that do not reach their final form in the sovereign state, but articulate a "social ontology of plural being." He can be contacted at a.gearey@bbk.ac.uk

Fernando Gascon Inchausti is Professor of procedural law at the Universidad Complutense, Madrid, Spain (Full Professor since 2002). He has published widely on civil and criminal procedure: criminal evidence, the role of under-cover agents in criminal procedure, civil action in criminal procedure, Spain’s recent criminal procedure reforms, judicial cooperation in the European Union in criminal matters. He has also worked as an assistant of the Committee who drafted two important reforms of Spanish criminal procedure in 2002 (fast-track procedure) and in 2003 (new regulation of arrest and detention).  The main researcher of a project dealing with criminal procedure in Spain, which is aimed to raise proposals for its future reform, while at the Center he will analyze 1) the US criminal procedure regulation in behalf of plea bargaining and public prosecutors’ discretionary powers regarding accusation, 2) the social impact of plea bargaining and public prosecutors’ discretionary powers: what influence they have on the social perception of criminal justice’s effectiveness and fairness, and 3) if it is convenient to propose a new regulation of these matters in Spanish law, who could be similar to the US regulation. He can be contacted at fgascon@der.ucm.es .

Sam Kamin is Professor of Law at the University of Denver, Sturm College of Law.  Holding both a J.D. and a Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley, Professor Kamin is active in the Law and Society Association and in the field of law and social science generally. Professor Kamin’s reasearch interests include criminal procedure, death penalty jurisprudence, federal courts, and constitutional remedies. He is the co-author of two books analyzing California’s Three-Strikes-and-You’re-Out Law and has published scholarly articles in the Virginia Law Review, the Indiana Law Journal, the Boston College Law Journal and Law and Contemporary Problems, among others.  He is currently working on three projects:  1. An empirical study of bar pass rates at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law.  2.  Preparing for an empirical study of what public employees know about indemnification.  3. A Criminal Procedure Casebook to be part of the new West Interactive Casebook Series, with co-author Ricardo Bascuas. The book will expose students to the empirical evidence on a number of the questions posed by the law of Constitutional Criminal Procedure. skamin@law.du.edu  

Maria Martin Lorenzo earned a Ph.D. in Criminal Law at the Law School, Complutense University, where she is currently Associate Professor of Criminal Law.  She has conducted research in several areas of Criminal Law on some theoretical questions, such as the Foundations of Criminal Law, the differentiation between Justification and Excuse, the legal treatment of the concurrence of offences, and the Theory of Mistakes.  Also, she has worked on more readily practical topics, such as criminal regulation of workplace safety, road safety or the courts’ interpretation and application of drug trafficking offences.  Currently she is part of a research project on the main traits of crime policy in the Western nations in the last few years.  Among other topics, she specializes on child pornography offences.  While at the Center her main goals are to compare the US and Spanish criminal law regulation of child pornography with a special focus on the influence of international documents and to compare the enforcement of said regulations in both countries. She can be contacted at mmlor235@der.ucm.es

Justin O'Brien is Professor of Corporate Governance at the Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics (An Australian Research Council Special Research Centre and is on the Faculty of Business at Charles Sturt University. He is also Visiting Professor of Law at the School of Law, University of Glasgow (2008-2011). A specialist in the regulation of capital markets, he has written extensively on the global financial crisis. Among his publications are Wall Street on Trial (2003), Redesigning Financial Regulation, The Politics of Enforcement (2007) and Engineering a Financial Bloodbath: How Securitization Destroyed the Legitimacy of Financial Capitalism (forthcoming, 2009). His research at Berkeley will focus on the rise of deferred prosecutions. justin.obrien@anu.edu.au  (April-July 2009)

Christopher Roberts is a Doctoral Candidate at the University of Michigan in the Joint Program in Public Policy and Sociology.  He holds a B.A. from UCLA and a J.D. from the University of Southern California.  While in residence, Christopher will be working on completing his dissertation project, in which he examines the social origins of the modern international human rights concept.  His work shows how the human rights concept became the site for a series of seminal struggles over competing institutional frameworks for organizing social and political relationships, and how the formidable opposition that developed against human rights between 1944 and 1966 has been influential in shaping the modern human rights concept, itself.  His article (co-authored with Margaret Somers), "Toward a New Sociology of Rights: A Genealogy of 'Buried Bodies' of Citizenship and Human Rights", will appear in the next issue of the Annual Review of Law and Social Science. He can be contacted at cnrobert@umich.edu  and at 510-642-0437.

Jodi Short is Associate Professor at Georgetown Law.  Her research is on the nexus of public and private institutions in regulatory governance.  She is currently working on a series of empirical papers examining the effects of corporate internal compliance auditing on regulatory performance.  Her work also addresses theoretical justifications for and critiques of regulation, exploring tensions in the U.S. administrative state between cooperation and coercion, expertise and politics, and public and private interests.  While in residence at the Center for the Study of Law and Society this summer, Professor Short will be working on papers that investigate: (1) whether the voluntary disclosure of legal violations can serve as a reliable signal of effective self-policing; (2) the conditions under which self-policing policies get institutionalized within or decoupled from the actual compliance practices of regulated organizations; (3) how sociological  theories of reason-giving can help us better understand practices of administrative justification.  Professor Short teaches courses on administrative law, the regulatory state, and the role that private organizations play in public governance and law.  She can be contacted at jls272@law.georgetown.edu 

John Stannard is on the staff of the School of Law at the Queen’s University of Belfast, and is visiting the CSLS from March to August 2009 to conduct research in the field of Law and the Emotions.  He graduated from Oxford University in 1973 with a BA in Jurisprudence, and obtained the degree of BCL the following year. From 1974 to 1976 he was a lecturer in Roman Law at the University of Aberdeen, and has been on the staff of Queen's University since 1977.  In 1989 he completed his PhD degree, and in 1992 he was promoted to the rank of Senior Lecturer. He is a member of the Society of Legal Scholars and of the Irish Legal History Society, and a Fellow of the Institute of Teaching and Learning. He is also Past President of the Irish Association of Law Teachers, and has a number of publications to his credit in the fields of Contract and of Criminal Law. j.stannard@qub.ac.uk

Jin Sun is currently Associate Professor of Law and Head of the Department of Women's Rights at the Center for the Protection of the Rights of Disadvantage Citizens at Wuhan University, People's Republic of China.  He earned an LL.D. in Civil and Commercial Law and an LL.B. in Economic Law at Wuhan University Law School.  He teaches commercial, corporate, competition, and economic law.  An author of a number of articles, including "The Dilemma of the Reform in China" and "The Historical Mission of Economic Law" in Social Harmony in Economic Law Theories (Wuhan University), the editor of several books, and the sole-author of the forthcoming book China's Competition Law: A Textbook (Wuhan University Press, 2010), Sun's interests focus on antitrust law, commercial law, and women's rights. He can be contacted at fxysj@whu.edu.cn 

Neta Ziv is currently the director of the Elga Cegla Clinical Legal Education Programs at the Tel Aviv University Faculty of Law. She is the academic supervisor of the Community, Housing and Urban Development Clinic  and teaches course on Legal Ethics and Professional Responsibility, Social Rights, Law and Social Change, and Rights of  People with Disabilities.  Ziv received her LL.B. from the Hebrew University Law Faculty in 1983, and her LL.M. from The American University in Washington, DC in 1986. After ten years of practice as a public interest lawyer, she continued her studies and received her J.S.D. from Stanford Law School in 2001. Between 1986-1996 Ziv practiced as a public interest lawyer for the Association for Civil Rights in Israel, and served as a leading attorney in some of Israel’s major human rights cases litigated before the Israeli Supreme Court. She was among the founding members of the Israel Women’s Network Legal Center and was the chair of Bizchut – The Israel Human Rights center for Persons with Disabilities, and now is the board of Itach – Women Lawyers for Social Justice. Ziv is the VP and board member of The New Israel Fund. zneta@post.tau.ac.il

 

VISITING SCHOLARS - SPRING 2009

Kirk Boyd is the executive director of the 2048 Project, a project at Boalt within the Miller Institute for Global Challenges and the Law. The mission of the 2048 Project is to draft an enforceable international framework of human rights that can be in place by the year 2048, the 100th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.  He completed his B.S. in political science at the University of California, Santa Barbara, (1981), followed by his J.D. (1985), LL.M (1996) and J.S.D. (2000) from Boalt Hall. He has been a litigator with Morrison & Forester and a partner in the firm Boyd, Huffman, Williams and Urla, litigating primarily civil rights and environmental law cases. Kirk has taught at U.C. Santa Barbara, including courses on International Human Rights, International Law, Civil Rights and First Amendment, and he has taught International Human Rights, Legal Studies 154, at Berkeley as well.  His research is the evolution of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights into regional Conventions such as the European Convention on Human Rights and the potential for an International Convention on Human Rights, enforceable in the courts of all countries. The 2048 Project is presently working with a major grant to commission 100 papers from scholars throughout the Middle East to discuss and draft a Middle Eastern Convention on Human Rights.  Kirk is also working on a book: 2048: Humanity’s Written Agreement to Live Together. He is at the 3rd floor of JSP every day and can be reached at kboyd@law.berkeley.edu or 642-8469. People are welcome to stop by, as Kirk appreciates questions and suggestions from fellow visiting scholars and others about his work.

Sandra Marco Colino is a Lecturer at the University of Glasgow. She holds a Ph.D. from the European University Institute in Florence (Italy), and focuses mainly on EU law, competition law and antitrust, telecommunications law and the regulation of gambling. During her time at Berkeley, Sandra will be researching on the topic of gambling from the perspective of the consumer from a comparative standpoint. She is currently finishing a monograph on vertical agreements in the EU and the US, and is starting a new research project on margin squeezes and competition law at Stanford University in the summer of 2009. s.marcocolino@law.gla.ac.uk   510-643-8646

Adam Gearey, earned a Ph.D. at Birkbeck College, University of London, where he is currently Reader in Law, Birkbeck College.  He took the Common Professional Examination in Law at the University of Manchester and has held Visiting Professorships in Law at the University of Praetoria, South Africa and at Makarere University in Uganda.  He will be examining law and legal relationships in the European/Anglican traditions that do not reach their final form in the sovereign state, but articulate a "social ontology of plural being." He can be contacted at a.gearey@bbk.ac.uk and at 510-643-5368.

Antoinette (Toni) Hetzler is Professor of Sociology with emphasis on Social Policy at Lund University, Sweden. She is head of a research group in Sweden studying Social Policy, Working Life and Global Welfare (SWG) and is currently president of the Swedish Sociology Association. Her most recent books include Sick-Sweden (Sjuk-Sverige, 2005) and Rehabilitation and Welfare Politics (Rehabilitering och välfärdspolitik, 2004). She has published extensively on welfare state politics including workers compensation in Sweden as well as the role of law in social policy. Currently she is working on two manuscripts. One is "Women, Work and Well-being" and the other is "Regulating the Financial Market."  Antoinette Hetzler received her PhD from the University of California, Santa Barbara, was Assistant Professor at New York University, and post-doctoral fellow at the Center for the Study of Law and Society before she immigrated to Sweden in the late 1970s.  She can be contacted at antoinette.hetzler@soc.lu.se and 510-643-8646.

Barbara Keys is Lecturer in History at the University of Melbourne.  She received her Ph.D. in International History from Harvard University.  Her research interests lie broadly in intercultural relations and the role of international organizations in global affairs.  Her award-winning first book, Globalizing Sport: National Rivalry and International Community in the 1930s (Harvard University Press, 2006), examined the cultural and political ramifications of the expansion of international sports competitions.  She is current working on two books, one on the international campaign against torture in the 1970s and one on the origins of human-rights diplomacy in the United States. bkeys@unimelb.edu.au  510-643-8269

Michael Musheno (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) earned a Ph.D. at American University. He is currently Professor of Criminal Justice Studies at SFSU and Director of the Program in Criminal Justice Studies at San Francisco State University. Formerly  program director of Law and Society at NSF, his interests are in policing, street law, state frontline workforces (currently US Army reservists serving in Iraq), and interpretive field methods, esp. narratives and storytelling.  His book Deployed: How Reservists Bear the Burden of Iraq (with Susan Ross) was published by the University of Michigan Press in 2008.  He can be contacted at mmusheno@sfsu.edu .

Justin O'Brien, PhD, Political Science, Queen's University, Belfast. Currently Professor of Corporate Governance, Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics, ANU, Canberra, and Faculty of Business, Charles Stuart University. justin.obrien@anu.edu.au  (April-July 2009)

Christopher Roberts is a Doctoral Candidate at the University of Michigan in the Joint Program in Public Policy and Sociology.  He holds a B.A. from UCLA and a J.D. from the University of Southern California.  While in residence, Christopher will be working on completing his dissertation project, in which he examines the social origins of the modern international human rights concept.  His work shows how the human rights concept became the site for a series of seminal struggles over competing institutional frameworks for organizing social and political relationships, and how the formidable opposition that developed against human rights between 1944 and 1966 has been influential in shaping the modern human rights concept, itself.  His article (co-authored with Margaret Somers), "Toward a New Sociology of Rights: A Genealogy of 'Buried Bodies' of Citizenship and Human Rights", will appear in the next issue of the Annual Review of Law and Social Science. He can be contacted at cnrobert@umich.edu  and at 510-642-0437.

James B. Rule (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) earned his Ph.D. at Harvard. University.  He has held research and teaching positions at MIT, Nuffield College, Oxford, the Université de Bordeaux, Clare Hall, Cambridge; and SUNY Stony Brook. His research interests include privacy, technology, and social roles of personal information.  He is author of seven books, monographs, and chapters, including Privacy in Peril; How we are Sacrificing a Fundamental Right in Exchange for Security and Convenience (Oxford 2007) and  “The Once and Future Information Society,” (with Yasemin Besen) in Theory and Society (in press).  He is teaching Law 209.8 (Privacy Seminar) at Boalt this Fall (2008). He can be contacted at jrule@notes.cc.sunysb.edu and at 510-642-9974.

John Stannard is on the staff of the School of Law at the Queen’s University of Belfast, and is visiting the CSLS from March to August 2009 to conduct research in the field of Law and the Emotions.  He graduated from Oxford University in 1973 with a BA in Jurisprudence, and obtained the degree of BCL the following year. From 1974 to 1976 he was a lecturer in Roman Law at the University of Aberdeen, and has been on the staff of Queen's University since 1977.  In 1989 he completed his PhD degree, and in 1992 he was promoted to the rank of Senior Lecturer. He is a member of the Society of Legal Scholars and of the Irish Legal History Society, and a Fellow of the Institute of Teaching and Learning. He is also Past President of the Irish Association of Law Teachers, and has a number of publications to his credit in the fields of Contract and of Criminal Law.

Jin Sun is currently Associate Professor of Law and Head of the Department of Women's Rights at the Center for the Protection of the Rights of Disadvantage Citizens at Wuhan University, People's Republic of China.  He earned an LL.D. in Civil and Commercial Law and an LL.B. in Economic Law at Wuhan University Law School.  He teaches commercial, corporate, competition, and economic law.  An author of a number of articles, including "The Dilemma of the Reform in China" and "The Historical Mission of Economic Law" in Social Harmony in Economic Law Theories (Wuhan University), the editor of several books, and the sole-author of the forthcoming book China's Competition Law: A Textbook (Wuhan University Press, 2010), Sun's interests focus on antitrust law, commercial law, and women's rights. He can be contacted at fxysj@whu.edu.cn and at 510-643-9286.

 

VISITING SCHOLARS - FALL 2008

Kirk Boyd is the executive director of the 2048 Project, a project at Boalt within the Miller Institute for Global Challenges and the Law. The mission of the 2048 Project is to draft an enforceable international framework of human rights that can be in place by the year 2048, the 100th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.  He completed his B.S. in political science at the University of California, Santa Barbara, (1981), followed by his J.D. (1985), LL.M (1996) and J.S.D. (2000) from Boalt Hall. He has been a litigator with Morrison & Forester and a partner in the firm Boyd, Huffman, Williams and Urla, litigating primarily civil rights and environmental law cases. Kirk has taught at U.C. Santa Barbara, including courses on International Human Rights, International Law, Civil Rights and First Amendment, and he has taught International Human Rights, Legal Studies 154, at Berkeley as well.  His research is the evolution of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights into regional Conventions such as the European Convention on Human Rights and the potential for an International Convention on Human Rights, enforceable in the courts of all countries. The 2048 Project is presently working with a major grant to commission 100 papers from scholars throughout the Middle East to discuss and draft a Middle Eastern Convention on Human Rights.  Kirk is also working on a book: 2048: Humanity’s Written Agreement to Live Together. He is at the 3rd floor of JSP every day and can be reached at kboyd@law.berkeley.edu or 642-8469. People are welcome to stop by, as Kirk appreciates questions and suggestions from fellow visiting scholars and others about his work.

Adam Gearey, earned a Ph.D. at Birkbeck College, University of London, where he is currently Reader in Law, Birkbeck College.  He took the Common Professional Examination in Law at the University of Manchester and has held Visiting Professorships in Law at the University of Praetoria, South Africa and at Makarere University in Uganda.  He will be examining law and legal relationships in the European/Anglican traditions that do not reach their final form in the sovereign state, but articulate a "social ontology of plural being." He can be contacted at a.gearey@bbk.ac.uk and at 510-643-5368.

Lakshman Guruswamy, Nicholas Doman Professor of International Environmental Law at the University of Colorado at Boulder, was born in Sri Lanka, and is a recognized expert in International Environmental and Energy Law. Lakshman teaches  International Environmental Law  and International Energy Law at CU. He is also the Director of the Center for Energy & Environment Security (CEES) of the University of Colorado. This is an interdisciplinary Center that seeks to find practical renewable energy solutions for the energy deficits confronting the globe, and pursues environmental justice for peoples of the  developing world.   He is widely published in international energy and environmental law in legal and scientific journals. Prior to joining the University of Colorado, he taught in Sri Lanka, the UK, and the Universities of Iowa and Arizona. Guruswamy, is a frequent speaker at scholarly meetings around the country and the world. He is the author of: International Environmental Law in a Nutshell (3d ed. 2007), and the co-author of:  International Environmental Law and World Order (2nd. 1999), Biological Diversity: Converging Strategies (1998), Arms Control and the Environment (2001), and other books. He has also authored over 40 scholarly articles published in law reviews as well as peer reviewed journals.  He can be contacted at Lakshman Guruswamy@colorado.edu  and 510-643-6582.

Antoinette (Toni) Hetzler is Professor of Sociology with emphasis on Social Policy at Lund University, Sweden. She is head of a research group in Sweden studying Social Policy, Working Life and Global Welfare (SWG) and is currently president of the Swedish Sociology Association. Her most recent books include Sick-Sweden (Sjuk-Sverige, 2005) and Rehabilitation and Welfare Politics (Rehabilitering och välfärdspolitik, 2004). She has published extensively on welfare state politics including workers compensation in Sweden as well as the role of law in social policy. Currently she is working on two manuscripts. One is on Women, Work and Well-being and the other is on Regulating the Financial Market. Antoinette Hetzler received her PhD from the University of California, Santa Barbara, was Assistant Professor at New York University, and post-doctoral fellow at the Center for the Study of Law and Society before she immigrated to Sweden in the late 1970s.  She can be contacted at antoinette.hetzler@soc.lu.se and 510-643-8646.

Livia Holden (MA and Mphil – Paris X, PhD – School of Oriental and African Studies - London) is Research Fellow at Freie University and Adjunct Research Fellow at Griffith University (Socio-Legal  Research Centre). She teaches legal anthropology at Humboldt University and international human rights at Griffith University.She is interested in the processes of social ordering through structured communication, and especially in the legal discourse of non-institutional networks. Her research focuses on the relationship between state and non-state law, human rights and legal anthropology, law and gender, native conceptualization of law and dominant legal discourse, fieldwork methodology. She carries out qualitative and longitudinal fieldwork in India, in Southern Italy and in Australia with a specific stress on collaborative approaches. Livia’s academic publications extend from family law, criminal law, and lawyers' praxis to traditional jurisdiction and custom. Hindu Divorce: A Legal Anthropology, her monograph on matrimonial remedies among Hindus in South Asia and in the context of the Hindu diaspora will be out in October 2008 (Ashgate).  Among her single-authored essays are "Consommation Rituelle et Consommation Physique" (Paris: CNRS), "Custom and Law Practices in Central India" (South Asia Research), and "Official Custom for (Un)official Customs" (Journal of Legal Pluralism). She co-authored various kinds of collaborative publications including Runaway Wives (documentary – film realized with Marius Holden, filmmaker and anthropologist), “Trial and Error” (paper co-authored with the multi-disciplinary team “Micro-Sociology of Criminal Procedures” at Freie University), Doing Nothing Successfully (documentary-film realized in collaboration with Lionello Manfredonia, defence lawyer), and “Cross-fading defence strategies” (essay co-authored with Giovanni Tortora,  defence lawyer specializing with organized crime). Currently Livia is working on two projects, The first is a comparative and concerns socio-legal expertise as evidence in legal procedures related to migration, asylum, and minority groups. The second project is he edition of a comparative volume focusing on the influence of the cost of legal services on the relationship between lawyers and clients. She can be contacted at 510-643-8646 from mid-November to mid January 2009 and at liviaholden@insightsproduction.net or livia.holden@griffith.edu.au.

John Monahan, a psychologist, is the Shannon Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Virginia. Monahan has been a Guggenheim Fellow and a Fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. He also has been a visiting scholar at Harvard Law School, Stanford Law School, New York University School of Law, All Souls College, Oxford, and the American Academy in Rome. His casebook with Laurens Walker, Social Science in Law, is going into its seventh edition and recently was translated into Chinese. He has twice won the Manfred Guttmacher Award of the American Psychiatric Association, for the books The Clinical Prediction of Violent Behavior (1982) and Rethinking Risk Assessment (2002).  Monahan has been elected to membership in the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, and has served on the Committee on Law and Justice of the National Research Council. He currently directs the MacArthur Foundation's Research Network on Mandated Community Treatment.  He will be at CSLS for six weeks beginning October 6th and can be emailed at jmonahan@virginia.edu and 510-642-4582.

Michael Musheno (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) earned a Ph.D. at American University. He is currently Professor of Criminal Justice Studies at SFSU and Director of the Program in Criminal Justice Studies at San Francisco State University. Formerly  program director of Law and Society at NSF, his interests are in policing, street law, state frontline workforces (currently US Army reservists serving in Iraq), and interpretive field methods, esp. narratives and storytelling.  His book Deployed: How Reservists Bear the Burden of Iraq (with Susan Ross) was published by the University of Michigan Press in 2008.  He can be contacted at mmusheno@sfsu.edu .

Christopher Roberts is a Doctoral Candidate at the University of Michigan in the Joint Program in Public Policy and Sociology.  He holds a B.A. from UCLA and a J.D. from the University of Southern California.  While in residence, Christopher will be working on completing his dissertation project, in which he examines the social origins of the modern international human rights concept.  His work shows how the human rights concept became the site for a series of seminal struggles over competing institutional frameworks for organizing social and political relationships, and how the formidable opposition that developed against human rights between 1944 and 1966 has been influential in shaping the modern human rights concept, itself.  His article (co-authored with Margaret Somers), Toward a New Sociology of Rights: A Genealogy of "Buried Bodies" of Citizenship and Human Rights, will appear in the next issue of the Annual Review of Law and Social Science. He can be contacted at cnrobert@umich.edu  and at 510-642-0437.

James B. Rule (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) earned his Ph.D. at Harvard. University.  He has held research and teaching positions at MIT, Nuffield College, Oxford, the Université de Bordeaux, Clare Hall, Cambridge; and SUNY Stony Brook. His research interests include privacy, technology, and social roles of personal information.  He is author of seven books, monographs, and chapters, including Privacy in Peril; How we are Sacrificing a Fundamental Right in Exchange for Security and Convenience (Oxford 2007) and  “The Once and Future Information Society,” (with Yasemin Besen) in Theory and Society (in press).  He is teaching Law 209.8 (Privacy Seminar) at Boalt this Fall (2008). He can be contacted at jrule@notes.cc.sunysb.edu and at 510-642-9974.

Michele Sapignoli, Doctorate in Methodology of Social and Political Science, University of Rome.  He is currently Professor of Political Science, University of Bologna.  His interests focus on research methodologies, social research statistics, judicial behavior and organization, and Italian politics.  He has written several books and numerous articles, including Processo penale e diritti della difesa [The Criminal Process and the Rights of the Defense] (with G. Di Federico).  His current aim is to develop a study of public attitudes to judicial institutions in Europe in light of the importance of building legitimacy in the ECJ (European Court of Justice) among the populations of  the different countries in the European Union. He can be contacted at michele.sapignoli@cesrog.unibo.it and at 510-642-8269 from mid-September to mid-December 2008.

Jin Sun is currently Associate Professor of Law and Head of the Department of Women's Rights at the Center for the Protection of the Rights of Disadvantage Citizens at Wuhan University, People's Republic of China.  He earned an LL.D. in Civil and Commercial Law and an LL.B. in Economic Law at Wuhan University Law School.  He teaches commercial, corporate, competition, and economic law.  An author of a number of articles, including "The Dilemma of the Reform in China" and "The Historical Mission of Economic Law" in Social Harmony in Economic Law Theories (Wuhan University).the editor of several books, and the sole-author of the forthcoming book China's Competition Law: A Textbook (Wuhan University Press, 2010), Sun's interests focus on antitrust law, commercial law, and women's rights. He can be contacted at fxysj@whu.edu.cn and at 510-643-9286.

 

VISITING SCHOLARS - SUMMER 2008

Lisa Blomgren Bingham is the Keller-Runden Professor of Public Service at Indiana University’s School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Bloomington. A graduate of Smith College and the University of Connecticut School of Law, she was a Visiting Professor at UC Hastings College of the Law in Spring 2007. Bingham received the Association for Conflict Resolution’s Abner Award in 2002 for excellence in research for her empirical studies on mediation of discrimination complaints at the USPS, and the Best Book award for The Promise and Performance of Environmental Conflict Resolution from the Natural Resource Administration of the American Society of Public Administration in 2005.  In 2006, she received the Rubin Theory-to-Practice Award from IACM and Harvard Project on Negotiation for research that makes a significant impact on practice. She is an elected fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration. Her current research examines the legal infrastructure for and connections among collaboration, governance, dispute resolution, and public participation.  Her office is in 471 Boalt, tel. 642-8646, email lbingham@indiana.edu.

Kirk Boyd is a co-director of the International Convention on Human Rights Research Project. He completed his B.S. in political science at the University of California, Santa Barbara, (1981), followed by his J.D. (1985), LL.M (1996) and J.S.D. (2000) from Boalt Hall. He has been a litigator with Morrison & Forester and a partner in the firm Boyd, Huffman, Williams and Urla, working mainly in civil rights and environmental law. Boyd has taught at U.C. Santa Barbara, including courses on International Human Rights, International Law, Civil Rights and First Amendment. His research is the evolution of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights into regional Conventions such as the European Convention on Human Rights and the potential for an International Convention on Human Rights, enforceable in the courts of all countries. He is organizing a conference to be held at Boalt Hall, Booth Auditorium, on February 29, 2008, to discuss the future of human rights and is working on a book, Plan for Humanity, which discusses the evolution of social contract into written documents enforceable in courts of law. He can be reached at kboyd@law.berkeley.edu or (415) 690-6687, and welcomes questions from fellow visiting scholars and others about his work.

Fuyong Chen is a Doctoral Candidate at the Law School of Tsinghua University, P. R. China. He received his Masters Degree in Procedural Law from Peking University (2005) and his Bachelor of Law from China University of Political Science and Law (2001). His recent publications include “On Using Vague or Exact Expressions in the Position of China’s Arbitration institutions” (2007); “A New Probe into the Effectiveness of Limitation of Action”(2007); “On the Action Form of Civil Torts Compensation Cases Concerning Negotiable Securities”(2004). During his residency, he will be working on the research entitled "Access to Arbitration: an Empirical Study of China's Practice". Chen’s office is 470 Boalt, 642-4037, email chenfuyong@bjac.org.cn.

Yun-tsai Chen is Professor of Law at Tunghai University in Tunghai, Taiwan.  A graduate of Kobe University in Japan, he received his PhD in Criminal Procedure.  He is a member of the Committee on the Reform of Criminal Procedures at the Judicial Yuan, one of the five branches of government and the highest judicial body of the Republic of China (Taiwan).  Prof Chen is interested in the comparative study of the adoption of the jury system and cultural issues that affect people’s understanding of authority and public expression of opinions.  This summer (08) as a Fulbright Scholar at the Center he will be investigating aspects of jury selection in US criminal courts, such as legal procedures and protections.  Prof. Chen has authored two books, eight chapters, and thirty articles in law journals. He recently spent six months as a visiting scholar studying the introduction of the jury system in Japan.  Prof. Chen’s Office will be in Boalt 470. He can be reached at (510)642-4037 and cwt@thu.edu.tw.

Sora Y. Han is Assistant Professor in Criminology, Law & Society at UC Irvine.  She received her Ph.D. from the Department of History of Consciousness at UC Santa Cruz, and her J.D. from UCLA School of Law with an emphasis in Critical Race Studies.  She is working on a book manuscript, “The Bonds of Representation: Race, Law, and the Feminine in Post-Civil Rights America,” which examines the intersections of racial jurisprudence and popular culture.  Articles include “The Politics of Race in Asian American Jurisprudence” ( UCLA Asian Pacific American Law Journal ), “Intersectionality and the Shudder” ( Feminist Interpretations of Adorno, and “Strict Scrutiny: Race, Sexuality, and the Tragedy of Constitutional Law” (Stanford Journal of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties , forthcoming).  Research interests include the literary imagination of American constitutional law, psychoanalytic theories of law and visual culture, critical prison studies, and racial and feminist politics. Contact Han in 471A Boalt, 643-9286, shan@law.berkeley.edu.

Joe Hermer is Associate Professor of Sociology and Criminology at the University of Toronto. He holds a doctorate in Socio-Legal Studies from the University of Oxford (2000). His research engages the character of everyday forms of regulation, with a particular emphasis on the governance of poor and vulnerable people. He has conducted research on police reform, homelessness and victimization, street begging, and the criminalization of social assistance recipients through the category of 'welfare fraud' http://dspace.dal.ca/dspace/handle/10222/10299. He is the author of /Regulating Eden: The Nature of Order in North American Parks/, and is co-editor (with Janet Mosher) of /Disorderly People: Law and the Politics of Exclusion in Ontario/. His forthcoming book /Policing Compassion: Begging, Law and Power in Public Spaces/ (Hart) explores the place of street begging within the trajectory of anti-social behaviour governance in Britain. A major focus of his current work is how 'status' offences are constituted in the ordering of homeless populations, with a particular interest in the interplay between 'compassionate' welfarist objectives and more punitive policing programs. He has a continuing interest in legal visualisms and the aesthetics of urban order. (http://www.mcgill.ca/irtsl/art/hermer/) Joe's office will be Boalt 473 at 643-6582, j.hermer@utoronto.ca

Antoinette Hetzler is Professor of Sociology with emphasis on Social Policy at Lund University, Sweden. She is head of a research group in Sweden studying Social Policy, Working Life and Global Welfare (SWG) and is currently president of the Swedish Sociology Association. Her most recent books include Sick-Sweden (Sjuk-Sverige,2005) and Rehabilitation and Welfare Politcs (Rehabilitering och välfärdspolitik, 2004). She has published extensively on welfare state politics including workers compensation in Sweden as well as the role of law in social policy. Currently she is working on two manuscripts. One is on Women, Work and Well-being and the other is on Regulating the Financial Market. Antoinette Hetzler received her PhD from the University of California, Santa Barbara, was Assistant Professor at New York University, and post-doctoral fellow at the Center for the Study of Law and Society before she immigrated to Sweden in the late 1970s.  Her office is in 471 Boalt, tel. 643-8646, email antoinette.hetzler@soc.lu.se

Michael Musheno (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) is Professor and Director of the Program in Criminal Justice Studies at San Francisco State University. He is a former program director of Law and the Social Sciences at NSF. His teaching and writing focus on policing, street law, and the state’s frontline workforce, currently US Army reservists serving in Iraq. He draws upon narratives, particularly the storytelling of subjects and agents of the state, and uses interpretive field methods. His book, Cops, Teachers, Counselors: Stories from the Front Lines of Public Service ( University of Michigan Press, 2004) co-authored with Steven Maynard-Moody, is the winner of the American Political Science Association’s 2005 Herbert A. Simon Book Award and winner of the 2005 Best Book of Public Administration Research from the American Society of Public Administration. His book in press, Deployed: How Reservists Bear the Burden of Iraq (University of Michigan Press, 2008) co-authored with Susan Ross, focuses on the life histories of one of the first military police reserve companies deployed after 9.11, including a year running a prison near Baghdad. His email address is mmusheno@sfsu.edu.

Richard Perry is professor of Justice Studies at San Jose State University, where he teaches courses in courts, theory, and cultural studies of law. Before joining the San Jose State faculty, he taught in U.C. Irvine’s Department of Criminology, Law and Society for nine years and also held a two-year research fellowship at the Center for Philosophy of Law of the University of Louvain, Belgium. He has a J.D. from Stanford Law School and B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. in linguistics from U.C. Berkeley. He is co-editor of Globalization under Construction: Law, Identity, and Governmentality ( University of Minnesota Press) and he is currently co-editing a volume on equity and water resources for the MIT Press. In the spring semester, he will present a talk in the CSLS Bag Lunch Speaker Series. His office is in 2240 Piedmont, tel. 3-8269, email rwperry@sbcglobal.net.

James B. Rule (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) was educated at UC Berkeley, Brandeis University, and Harvard, where he completed his Ph.D. in 1969. He has held research and teaching positions at MIT; Nuffield College, Oxford; the Université de Bordeaux; Clare Hall, Cambridge; and the State University of New York Stony Brook.  He has held year-long fellowships from the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford; the J.S. Guggenheim Foundation; the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton; and the Russell Sage Foundation.  His first solely-authored book, Private Lives and Public Surveillance (1973), was co-winner of the C. Wright Mills Award from the Society for the Study of Social Problems.   Since then, he has continued to carry out research and write on subjects relating to privacy, technology, and the social role of information.   He is also author or co-author of seven other books and monographs on diverse subjects.  His latest book is Privacy in Peril; How we are Sacrificing a Fundamental Right in Exchange for Security and Convenience (Oxford University Press, 2007).   This work examines both the forces underling ever-widening collection of and use of personal data by government and private institutions, and the measures adopted around the world to protect people’s interests in use of “their” data.  He continues to do research and writing on the changing social roles of information, particularly personal information.    His most recent article is “The Once and Future Information Society,” with Yasemin Besen, forthcoming in Theory and Society.  He can be e-mailed at: James.Rule@sunysb.edu.

Geir Stenseth is Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Faculty of Law, University of Oslo. He earned his Norwegian Law Degree (Cand. jur., Oslo) in 1990. He practiced law, mainly in the area of real property law. He also appears in court for the Norwegian military prosecuting authority as appointed Judge advocate. In 2001 he returned to academia and earned the Norwegian Doctoral Degree (Dr. juris, Oslo) in 2005, publishing the thesis (in Norwegian, with a English summary) The Janus Face of Common Lands: A comparative legal analysis of common lands and co-ownership in respect of Norwegian outfields. At the Center, he will explore what relevance new advances in such disciplines as psychology, behavioural biology and cognitive neuroscience may have to the understanding of property as a concept. His research is part of a broader project of the Natural Resources Group at the Faculty of Law in Oslo. The project, called Rights to uncultivated land and social change, receives funding from the Research Council of Norway. His office is 473 Boalt, 643-6582, email geir.stenseth@jus.uio.no.

Maartje van der Woude is a PhD-student in the Department of criminal law and criminology of the University of Leyden, the Netherlands. She received both her law degree (2002) and her MSc (2005) at Leyden, specializing in (criminal) law enforcement and safety policies, in particular counterterrorism. Besides teaching various courses, she is currently working on her dissertation with the (working) title “Anti-terrorism legislation in a Culture of Control: An investigation into the Development of the Discourse.” In her research, Maartje focuses on the discrepancy between social/political discourse and legal discourse of counterterrorism. Counter-terrorism legislation shows a tension between the social/political discourse, in which collective security occupies center stage, and the (criminal) legal discourse, where individual legal protection is considered to have the highest value. The prevailing impression of criminal justice scholars is that typical values of criminal law are subordinated to risk control. This research focuses on a comparison of the two discourses in order to establish (a) on which points there is agreement or agreement can be reached, (b) on which points no agreement is possible, so that the legislator must make choices, (c) how – and in which terms – he should substantiate such choices so that they fit in with the present-day culture of control. While in Berkeley, Maartje is working on two chapters of her dissertation as well as on two articles relating to her dissertation.  Her office is in 471A Boalt, tel. 643-9286, email mahvanderwoude@gmail.com.

 

VISITING SCHOLARS - SPRING 2008

Lisa Blomgren Bingham is the Keller-Runden Professor of Public Service at Indiana University’s School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Bloomington. A graduate of Smith College and the University of Connecticut School of Law, she was a Visiting Professor at UC Hastings College of the Law in Spring 2007. Bingham received the Association for Conflict Resolution’s Abner Award in 2002 for excellence in research for her empirical studies on mediation of discrimination complaints at the USPS, and the Best Book award for The Promise and Performance of Environmental Conflict Resolution from the Natural Resource Administration of the American Society of Public Administration in 2005.  In 2006, she received the Rubin Theory-to-Practice Award from IACM and Harvard Project on Negotiation for research that makes a significant impact on practice. She is an elected fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration. Her current research examines the legal infrastructure for and connections among collaboration, governance, dispute resolution, and public participation.  Her office is in 471 Boalt, tel. 642-8646, email lbingham@indiana.edu.

Kirk Boyd is a co-director of the International Convention on Human Rights Research Project. He completed his B.S. in political science at the University of California, Santa Barbara, (1981), followed by his J.D. (1985), LL.M (1996) and J.S.D. (2000) from Boalt Hall. He has been a litigator with Morrison & Forester and a partner in the firm Boyd, Huffman, Williams and Urla, working mainly in civil rights and environmental law. Boyd has taught at U.C. Santa Barbara, including courses on International Human Rights, International Law, Civil Rights and First Amendment. His research is the evolution of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights into regional Conventions such as the European Convention on Human Rights and the potential for an International Convention on Human Rights, enforceable in the courts of all countries. He is organizing a conference to be held at Boalt Hall, Booth Auditorium, on February 29, 2008, to discuss the future of human rights and is working on a book, Plan for Humanity, which discusses the evolution of social contract into written documents enforceable in courts of law. He can be reached at kboyd@law.berkeley.edu or (415) 690-6687, and welcomes questions from fellow visiting scholars and others about his work.

Fuyong Chen is a Doctoral Candidate at the Law School of Tsinghua University, P. R. China. He received his Masters Degree in Procedural Law from Peking University (2005) and his Bachelor of Law from China University of Political Science and Law (2001). His recent publications include “On Using Vague or Exact Expressions in the Position of China’s Arbitration institutions” (2007); “A New Probe into the Effectiveness of Limitation of Action”(2007); “On the Action Form of Civil Torts Compensation Cases Concerning Negotiable Securities”(2004). During his residency, he will be working on the research entitled "Access to Arbitration: an Empirical Study of China's Practice". Chen’s office is 470 Boalt, 642-4037, email chenfuyong@bjac.org.cn.

Yun-tsai Chen is Professor of Law at Tunghai University in Tunghai, Taiwan.  A graduate of Kobe University in Japan, he received his PhD in Criminal Procedure.  He is a member of the Committee on the Reform of Criminal Procedures at the Judicial Yuan, one of the five branches of government and the highest judicial body of the Republic of China (Taiwan).  Prof Chen is interested in the comparative study of the adoption of the jury system and cultural issues that affect people’s understanding of authority and public expression of opinions.  This summer (08) as a Fulbright Scholar at the Center he will be investigating aspects of jury selection in US criminal courts, such as legal procedures and protections.  Prof. Chen has authored two books, eight chapters, and thirty articles in law journals. He recently spent six months as a visiting scholar studying the introduction of the jury system in Japan.  Prof. Chen’s Office will be in Boalt 470. He can be reached at (510)642-4037 and cwt@thu.edu.tw.

David Glick is a fourth year PhD Candidate in the Politics Department at Princeton University focusing on Public Law and American Politics. His dissertation investigates the important role that private organizations play in shaping legal impact by analyzing empirically how they actually learn about the law and decide which concrete internal polices (if any) to enact in the implementation process. He treats these organizations as actors trying to make difficult policy decisions in response to complex and ambiguous laws by building on more general theories of decision making in complex tasks, and finds that legal changes are often turned into concrete policy by organizations which learn from and copy each other's responses to it. He is also the author of the working paper, "Strategic Retreat and the 1935 Gold Clause Cases." David was an undergraduate at Williams College. His office is 470 Boalt, 642-0437, dglick@Princeton.edu.

Sora Y. Han is Assistant Professor in Criminology, Law & Society at UC Irvine.  She received her Ph.D. from the Department of History of Consciousness at UC Santa Cruz, and her J.D. from UCLA School of Law with an emphasis in Critical Race Studies.  She is working on a book manuscript, “The Bonds of Representation: Race, Law, and the Feminine in Post-Civil Rights America,” which examines the intersections of racial jurisprudence and popular culture.  Articles include “The Politics of Race in Asian American Jurisprudence” ( UCLA Asian Pacific American Law Journal ), “Intersectionality and the Shudder” ( Feminist Interpretations of Adorno, and “Strict Scrutiny: Race, Sexuality, and the Tragedy of Constitutional Law” (Stanford Journal of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties , forthcoming).  Research interests include the literary imagination of American constitutional law, psychoanalytic theories of law and visual culture, critical prison studies, and racial and feminist politics. Contact Han in 471A Boalt, 643-9286, shan@law.berkeley.edu.

Antoinette Hetzler is Professor of Sociology with emphasis on Social Policy at Lund University, Sweden. She is head of a research group in Sweden studying Social Policy, Working Life and Global Welfare (SWG) and is currently president of the Swedish Sociology Association. Her most recent books include Sick-Sweden (Sjuk-Sverige,2005) and Rehabilitation and Welfare Politcs (Rehabilitering och välfärdspolitik, 2004). She has published extensively on welfare state politics including workers compensation in Sweden as well as the role of law in social policy. Currently she is working on two manuscripts. One is on Women, Work and Well-being and the other is on Regulating the Financial Market. Antoinette Hetzler received her PhD from the University of California, Santa Barbara, was Assistant Professor at New York University, and post-doctoral fellow at the Center for the Study of Law and Society before she immigrated to Sweden in the late 1970s.  Her office is in 471 Boalt, tel. 643-8646, email antoinette.hetzler@soc.lu.se .

Nick Huls is Professor and Chair of Sociolegal Studies at Erasmus University Rotterdam and the University of Leyden, and Head of the Erasmus Center for Law & Society. He received his law degree at Utrecht University in 1973 and his PhD, on consumer protection law, in 1981. From 1982 -1990 he was project leader of the Consumer Credit Act at the Netherlands Department of Economic Affairs; his recommendations led to the adoption of a new bankruptcy act based on US law. In 1990 Nick returned to academia, initially as Director of the Leyden Institute for Law and Public Policy. While at Berkeley, Nick is working on two books -- an introduction to sociolegal studies and the editing of the papers and proceedings of an international conference in Rotterdam in January 2007 (in English) entitled The Legitimacy of Supreme Courts' Rulings. He will present a paper on judicial power in the Netherlands in the CSLS Sawyer Seminar on October 18 th. His office is in 2240 Piedmont, 642-4038, email huls@frg.eur.nl.

Timothy Kaufman-Osborn received his B.A. from Oberlin College and his Ph.D. from Princeton University. He is the Baker Ferguson Professor of Politics and Leadership at Whitman College. He is the author of three books as well as over twenty articles on topics including capital punishment, the discipline of political science, feminist theory, and American pragmatism. Kaufman-Osborn has served as president of the Western Political Science Association as well as the American Civil Liberties Union of Washington, and he recently completed a term on the Executive Council of the American Political Science Association. He is the recipient of several awards for his scholarship and teaching, including the Western Political Science Association’s Pi Sigma Alpha and Betty Nesvold Women and Politics Awards as well as the Robert Fluno Award for Distinguished Teaching in the Social Sciences. While at the Center, he will be working on various aspects of the political and legal regulation of death in the United States. His office is at 2240 Piedmont, Program in Criminal Justice, Law and Society, 642-4038, kaufmatv@whitman.edu.

Philip Lewis was a Research Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford from 1965 to 1988, and since 1996 has been at the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, Oxford. He has visited Berkeley on two previous occasions, and has also been a Senior Scholar at Stanford. His research interest is in the legal profession, and with Rick Abel, of UCLA, he started the Working Group on Legal Professions, out of which came the three volumes they edited, Lawyers in Society (1988-9). While at Berkeley he will be looking back at research projects he has previously carried out on groups of lawyers in the USA and the UK , and studying the relevance to them of some general themes in legal professions research, such as competition, expertise, ideologies, independence, trust and "communities of practice". Dr. Lewis's office is in 470 Boalt, tel. 642-0437, email philip.lewis@csls.ox.ac.uk .

Michael Musheno (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) is Professor and Director of the Program in Criminal Justice Studies at San Francisco State University. He is a former program director of Law and the Social Sciences at NSF. His teaching and writing focus on policing, street law, and the state’s frontline workforce, currently US Army reservists serving in Iraq. He draws upon narratives, particularly the storytelling of subjects and agents of the state, and uses interpretive field methods. His book, Cops, Teachers, Counselors: Stories from the Front Lines of Public Service ( University of Michigan Press, 2004) co-authored with Steven Maynard-Moody, is the winner of the American Political Science Association’s 2005 Herbert A. Simon Book Award and winner of the 2005 Best Book of Public Administration Research from the American Society of Public Administration. His book in press, Deployed: How Reservists Bear the Burden of Iraq (University of Michigan Press, 2008) co-authored with Susan Ross, focuses on the life histories of one of the first military police reserve companies deployed after 9.11, including a year running a prison near Baghdad. His email address is mmusheno@sfsu.edu.

Richard Perry is professor of Justice Studies at San Jose State University, where he teaches courses in courts, theory, and cultural studies of law. Before joining the San Jose State faculty, he taught in U.C. Irvine’s Department of Criminology, Law and Society for nine years and also held a two-year research fellowship at the Center for Philosophy of Law of the University of Louvain, Belgium. He has a J.D. from Stanford Law School and B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. in linguistics from U.C. Berkeley. He is co-editor of Globalization under Construction: Law, Identity, and Governmentality ( University of Minnesota Press) and he is currently co-editing a volume on equity and water resources for the MIT Press. In the spring semester, he will present a talk in the CSLS Bag Lunch Speaker Series. His office is in 2240 Piedmont, tel. 3-8269, email rwperry@sbcglobal.net.

Daniela Piana , PhD in sociology, Master degree in Philosophy, is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Florence. Visiting Fellow at the College of Natolin in Warsaw, at the University of Marseille III, at the Institute for Sociology of Law in Onati and at the Institute des Hautes Etudes sur la Justice in Paris, she is currently involved in two international research projects, on judicial education and judicial cooperation in Europe. Her research interests include constitutionalism and the constitutional courts of the Central and Eastern European Countries, judicial cooperation in the European Union, the quality of justice and the transnationalization of legal culture. She is author of several articles and essays published in Italian and Foreign reviews and recently of the volumes “The Institutions In Mind, Anchors of Legitimacy of Political Power” and “Building Democracy: Beyond the Borders of the European Public Space”. Her office is 472 Boalt, 643-5368, email danielapiana@hotmail.com.

James B. Rule (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) was educated at UC Berkeley, Brandeis University, and Harvard, where he completed his Ph.D. in 1969. He has held research and teaching positions at MIT; Nuffield College, Oxford; the Université de Bordeaux; Clare Hall, Cambridge; and the State University of New York Stony Brook.  He has held year-long fellowships from the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford; the J.S. Guggenheim Foundation; the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton; and the Russell Sage Foundation.  His first solely-authored book, Private Lives and Public Surveillance (1973), was co-winner of the C. Wright Mills Award from the Society for the Study of Social Problems.   Since then, he has continued to carry out research and write on subjects relating to privacy, technology, and the social role of information.   He is also author or co-author of seven other books and monographs on diverse subjects.  His latest book is Privacy in Peril; How we are Sacrificing a Fundamental Right in Exchange for Security and Convenience (Oxford University Press, 2007).   This work examines both the forces underling ever-widening collection of and use of personal data by government and private institutions, and the measures adopted around the world to protect people’s interests in use of “their” data.  He continues to do research and writing on the changing social roles of information, particularly personal information.    His most recent article is “The Once and Future Information Society,” with Yasemin Besen, forthcoming in Theory and Society.  He can be e-mailed at: James.Rule@sunysb.edu.

Geir Stenseth is Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Faculty of Law, University of Oslo. He earned his Norwegian Law Degree (Cand. jur., Oslo) in 1990. He practiced law, mainly in the area of real property law. He also appears in court for the Norwegian military prosecuting authority as appointed Judge advocate. In 2001 he returned to academia and earned the Norwegian Doctoral Degree (Dr. juris, Oslo) in 2005, publishing the thesis (in Norwegian, with a English summary) The Janus Face of Common Lands: A comparative legal analysis of common lands and co-ownership in respect of Norwegian outfields. At the Center, he will explore what relevance new advances in such disciplines as psychology, behavioural biology and cognitive neuroscience may have to the understanding of property as a concept. His research is part of a broader project of the Natural Resources Group at the Faculty of Law in Oslo. The project, called Rights to uncultivated land and social change, receives funding from the Research Council of Norway. His office is 473 Boalt, 643-6582, email geir.stenseth@jus.uio.no.

Maartje van der Woude is a PhD-student in the Department of criminal law and criminology of the University of Leyden, the Netherlands. She received both her law degree (2002) and her MSc (2005) at Leyden, specializing in (criminal) law enforcement and safety policies, in particular counterterrorism. Besides teaching various courses, she is currently working on her dissertation with the (working) title “Anti-terrorism legislation in a Culture of Control: An investigation into the Development of the Discourse.” In her research, Maartje focuses on the discrepancy between social/political discourse and legal discourse of counterterrorism. Counter-terrorism legislation shows a tension between the social/political discourse, in which collective security occupies center stage, and the (criminal) legal discourse, where individual legal protection is considered to have the highest value. The prevailing impression of criminal justice scholars is that typical values of criminal law are subordinated to risk control. This research focuses on a comparison of the two discourses in order to establish (a) on which points there is agreement or agreement can be reached, (b) on which points no agreement is possible, so that the legislator must make choices, (c) how – and in which terms – he should substantiate such choices so that they fit in with the present-day culture of control. While in Berkeley, Maartje is working on two chapters of her dissertation as well as on two articles relating to her dissertation.  Her office is in 471A Boalt, tel. 643-9286, email mahvanderwoude@gmail.com.

 

VISITING SCHOLARS - FALL 2007

Andreas Abegg is a recipient of a three-year fellowship for Academic Research by the Swiss National Science Foundation and co-editor in chief of a new European Journal on Constellations of Law and Society called Ancilla Iuris: http://www.anci.ch/. His 2003 doctoral dissertation received among other awards the Peter Jaeggi-Award for the best dissertation in private law at the University of Fribourg. Abegg's work is in private and public contract law and in private and public law theory, especially systems theory and evolutionary theory. At the Center, he will be working on his second book, on contracts between public agencies and private parties, also looking at the historical, sociological and theoretical components. Abegg’s office is 473 Boalt, 643-6582, email andreas.abegg@unifr.ch.

Kirk Boyd is a co-director of the International Convention on Human Rights Research Project. He completed his B.S. in political science at the University of California, Santa Barbara, (1981), followed by his J.D. (1985), LL.M (1996) and J.S.D. (2000) from Boalt Hall. He has been a litigator with Morrison & Forester and a partner in the firm Boyd, Huffman, Williams and Urla, working mainly in civil rights and environmental law. Boyd has taught at U.C. Santa Barbara, including courses on International Human Rights, International Law, Civil Rights and First Amendment. His research is the evolution of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights into the European Convention on Human Rights and the potential for development into an International Convention on Human Rights, enforceable in the courts of all countries. He is organizing a conference to be held at Zellerbach Hall on February 29, 2008 to discuss a draft International Convention. He can be reached at kirkboyd@ichr.org, or at (415) 690-6687.

Thomas Burke (PhD, U.C. Berkeley, 1996) is Associate Professor of Political Science at Wellesley College. His research focuses on the place of rights and litigation in public policy. His most recent project examines how organizations respond to social change laws. The first article from this project, “The Diffusion of Rights,” with co-author Jeb Barnes, was published in the fall, 2006 issue of Law and Society Review. Another article, “Political Regimes and the Future of the First Amendment,” is forthcoming in Studies in Law, Politics and Society. Burke has written about the Americans with Disabilities Act, disability politics in the European Union, American campaign finance law, and the place of rights in American politics. He is the co-author, with Lief Carter, of the updated 7th edition of Reason in Law (2007), and the author of Lawyers, Lawsuits and Legal Rights: The Struggle Over Litigation in American Society (2002). His office is at 2240 Piedmont, 642-4038, email tburke@wellesley.edu .

Fuyong Chen is a Doctoral Candidate at the Law School of Tsinghua University, P. R. China. He received his Masters Degree in Procedural Law from Peking University (2005) and his Bachelor of Law from China University of Political Science and Law (2001). His recent publications include “On Using Vague or Exact Expressions in the Position of China’s Arbitration institutions” (2007); “A New Probe into the Effectiveness of Limitation of Action”(2007); “On the Action Form of Civil Torts Compensation Cases Concerning Negotiable Securities”(2004). During his residency, he will be working on the research entitled "Access to Arbitration: an Empirical Study of China's Practice". Chen’s office is 470 Boalt, 642-4037, email chenfuyong@bjac.org.cn.

Ira Mark Ellman is Professor of Law. Willard H. Pedrick Distinguished Research Scholar, and Fellow, Center for the Study of Law, Science, & Technology at Arizona State University. He received his B.A. from Reed College (1967), his M.A. in Psychology from the University of Illinois (1969) and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley (1973). E llman’s principal scholarly interests are in Family Law, and the use of social science in policymaking by legislatures and courts. Among his current projects are an empirical investigation into how people make judgments about the level of child support payments they believe the law should require an absent parent to pay, and a book for Oxford University Press about the difficulties inherent in making family law policy. His article “Intuitive Lawmaking: The Example of Child Support,” with Rob MacCoun and Sanford Braver has been accepted for the 2007 Empirical Legal Studies Conference. His office is 327 North Addition, 642-0130, ira.ellman@asu.edu.

Jian (Jane) Fu is a Senior Lecturer in Law at Deakin University in Melbourne, Australia. She obtained an LLB from Beijing University in 1988 and an LLM from the University of Canberra, Australia. She recently completed a PhD in Law at the University of New South Wales. Professor Fu is the recipient of a Special International Studies Program grant from Deakin University. At the Center, she will work on three articles: "Protection of Shareholders in the PRC, the US and Australia: A Comparative Perspective," "The Reform of Banking Regulation in the PRC: Corporatization and Securitization," and "Law Making in the PRC in a Market Economy: Tradition and Modernization." Her office will be in Boalt 471, tel. 642-8646, email janefu@deakin.edu.au .

David Glick is a fourth year PhD Candidate in the Politics Department at Princeton University focusing on Public Law and American Politics. His dissertation investigates the important role that private organizations play in shaping legal impact by analyzing empirically how they actually learn about the law and decide which concrete internal polices (if any) to enact in the implementation process. He treats these organizations as actors trying to make difficult policy decisions in response to complex and ambiguous laws by building on more general theories of decision making in complex tasks, and finds that legal changes are often turned into concrete policy by organizations which learn from and copy each other's responses to it. He is also the author of the working paper, "Strategic Retreat and the 1935 Gold Clause Cases." David was an undergraduate at Williams College. His office is 470 Boalt, 6420-437, dglick@Princeton.edu.

Sora Y. Han is Assistant Professor in Criminology, Law & Society at UC Irvine.  She received her Ph.D. from the Department of History of Consciousness at UC Santa Cruz, and her J.D. from UCLA School of Law with an emphasis in Critical Race Studies.  She is working on a book manuscript, “The Bonds of Representation: Race, Law, and the Feminine in Post-Civil Rights America,” which examines the intersections of racial jurisprudence and popular culture.  Articles include “The Politics of Race in Asian American Jurisprudence” ( UCLA Asian Pacific American Law Journal ), “Intersectionality and the Shudder” ( Feminist Interpretations of Adorno, and “Strict Scrutiny: Race, Sexuality, and the Tragedy of Constitutional Law” (Stanford Journal of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties , forthcoming).  Research interests include the literary imagination of American constitutional law, psychoanalytic theories of law and visual culture, critical prison studies, and racial and feminist politics. Contact Han in 471A Boalt, 643-9286, shan@law.berkeley.edu.

Nick Huls is Professor and Chair of Sociolegal Studies at Erasmus University Rotterdam and the University of Leyden, and Head of the Erasmus Center for Law & Society. He received his law degree at Utrecht University in 1973 and his PhD, on consumer protection law, in 1981. From 1982 -1990 he was project leader of the Consumer Credit Act at the Netherlands Department of Economic Affairs; his recommendations led to the adoption of a new bankruptcy act based on US law. In 1990 Nick returned to academia, initially as Director of the Leyden Institute for Law and Public Policy. While at Berkeley, Nick is working on two books -- an introduction to sociolegal studies and the editing of the papers and proceedings of an international conference in Rotterdam in January 2007 (in English) entitled The Legitimacy of Supreme Courts' Rulings. He will present a paper on judicial power in the Netherlands in the CSLS Sawyer Seminar on October 18 th. His office is in 2240 Piedmont, 642-4038, email huls@frg.eur.nl.

Timothy Kaufman-Osborn received his B.A. from Oberlin College and his Ph.D. from Princeton University. He is the Baker Ferguson Professor of Politics and Leadership at Whitman College. He is the author of three books as well as over twenty articles on topics including capital punishment, the discipline of political science, feminist theory, and American pragmatism. Kaufman-Osborn has served as president of the Western Political Science Association as well as the American Civil Liberties Union of Washington, and he recently completed a term on the Executive Council of the American Political Science Association. He is the recipient of several awards for his scholarship and teaching, including the Western Political Science Association’s Pi Sigma Alpha and Betty Nesvold Women and Politics Awards as well as the Robert Fluno Award for Distinguished Teaching in the Social Sciences. While at the Center, he will be working on various aspects of the political and legal regulation of death in the United States. His office is at 2240 Piedmont, Program in Criminal Justice, Law and Society, 642-4038, kaufmatv@whitman.edu.

Philip Lewis was a Research Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford from 1965 to 1988, and since 1996 has been at the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, Oxford. He has visited Berkeley on two previous occasions, and has also been a Senior Scholar at Stanford. His research interest is in the legal profession, and with Rick Abel, of UCLA, he started the Working Group on Legal Professions, out of which came the three volumes they edited, Lawyers in Society (1988-9). While at Berkeley he will be looking back at research projects he has previously carried out on groups of lawyers in the USA and the UK , and studying the relevance to them of some general themes in legal professions research, such as competition, expertise, ideologies, independence, trust and "communities of practice". Dr. Lewis's office is in 470 Boalt, tel. 642-0437, email philip.lewis@csls.ox.ac.uk .

Michael Musheno is Professor and Director of the Program in Criminal Justice Studies at San Francisco State University. He is a former program director of Law and the Social Sciences at NSF. His teaching and writing focus on policing, street law, and the state’s frontline workforce, currently US Army reservists serving in Iraq. He draws upon narratives, particularly the storytelling of subjects and agents of the state, and uses interpretive field methods. His book, Cops, Teachers, Counselors: Stories from the Front Lines of Public Service ( University of Michigan Press, 2004) co-authored with Steven Maynard-Moody, is the winner of the American Political Science Association’s 2005 Herbert A. Simon Book Award and winner of the 2005 Best Book of Public Administration Research from the American Society of Public Administration. His book in press, Deployed: How Reservists Bear the Burden of Iraq (University of Michigan Press, 2008) co-authored with Susan Ross, focuses on the life histories of one of the first military police reserve companies deployed after 9.11, including a year running a prison near Baghdad. His email address is mmusheno@sfsu.edu.

Richard Perry is professor of Justice Studies at San Jose State University, where he teaches courses in courts, theory, and cultural studies of law. Before joining the San Jose State faculty, he taught in U.C. Irvine’s Department of Criminology, Law and Society for nine years and also held a two-year research fellowship at the Center for Philosophy of Law of the University of Louvain, Belgium. He has a J.D. from Stanford Law School and B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. in linguistics from U.C. Berkeley. He is co-editor of Globalization under Construction: Law, Identity, and Governmentality ( University of Minnesota Press) and he is currently co-editing a volume on equity and water resources for the MIT Press. In the spring semester, he will present a talk in the CSLS Bag Lunch Speaker Series. His office is 893 Simon, 642-0330, email rwperry@sbcglobal.net.

Daniela Piana, PhD in sociology, Master degree in Philosophy, is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Florence. Visiting Fellow at the College of Natolin in Warsaw, at the University of Marseille III, at the Institute for Sociology of Law in Onati and at the Institute des Hautes Etudes sur la Justice in Paris, she is currently involved in two international research projects, on judicial education and judicial cooperation in Europe. Her research interests include constitutionalism and the constitutional courts of the Central and Eastern European Countries, judicial cooperation in the European Union, the quality of justice and the transnationalization of legal culture. She is author of several articles and essays published in Italian and Foreign reviews and recently of the volumes “The Institutions In Mind, Anchors of Legitimacy of Political Power” and “Building Democracy: Beyond the Borders of the European Public Space”. Her office is 472 Boalt, 643-5368, email danielapiana@hotmail.com.

Jiri Priban graduated from Charles University in Prague in 1989 and joined the faculty of Cardiff Law School, Cardiff University in 2001. In 2001, he received his LLD at Charles University and was appointed professor of sociology of law and jurisprudence at Charles University in 2002. He was appointed professor of law at Cardiff University in 2006. He has been visiting professor or scholar at the European University Institute in Florence, Leuven University in Belgium, University of Pretoria in South Africa and the University of San Francisco. In 2003, he was visiting scholar at Center for the Study of Law and Society. Jiri has published two monographs in English: Dissidents of Law (2002) and Legal Symbolism (2007). He also edited: Liquid Society and Its Law (2007), Systems of Justice in Transition (2003, with P. Roberts and J. Young), Law's New Boundaries (2001 with D. Nelken) and The Rule of Law in Central Europe (1999 with J. Young). His areas of interest are the sociology and social theory of law, jurisprudence, constitutional and European comparative law, theory of human rights. Jiri is an editor of the Journal of Law and Society. His email address is priban@Cardiff.ac.uk.

Amnon Reichman holds an LL.B. from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, an LL.M. from Boalt Hall, and an SJD from the University of Toronto. His main areas of interest are constitutional theory, theories of adjudication, and comparative constitutional law. He is also engaged in the field of law and culture. He clerked for Justice Aharon Barak of the Israeli Supreme Court, and recently served as an advisor to the Israeli Knesset on drafting the Israeli constitution. Reichman has been on the University of Haifa Faculty of Law since 2001. He was a visiting professor at Boalt Hall in 2006, in Cardozo School of Law in 2004, and a faculty fellow at the Edmond J. Safra Foundation Center for Ethics (then the Center for Ethics and the Professions) at Harvard University in 2000-01. His articles include, "Overlooking the Common Law" (Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence), and "A Charter-Free Domain: in Defense of Dolphin Delivery" (University of British Columbia Law Review). He has also written on human rights in times of emergencies (in Torture as Tort: Comparative Perspectives on the Development of Transnational Tort Litigation ). During the Fall term he will be involved with the Sawyer seminar, presenting a paper on the Israeli constitutional system on November 15 th. His office is 471A Boalt, 643-9286, email areichman@law.berkeley.edu.

Geir Stenseth is Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Faculty of Law, University of Oslo. He earned his Norwegian Law Degree (Cand. jur., Oslo) in 1990. He practiced law, mainly in the area of real property law. He also appears in court for the Norwegian military prosecuting authority as appointed Judge advocate. In 2001 he returned to academia and earned the Norwegian Doctoral Degree (Dr. juris, Oslo) in 2005, publishing the thesis (in Norwegian, with a English summary) The Janus Face of Common Lands: A comparative legal analysis of common lands and co-ownership in respect of Norwegian outfields. At the Center, he will explore what relevance new advances in such disciplines as psychology, behavioural biology and cognitive neuroscience may have to the understanding of property as a concept. His research is part of a broader project of the Natural Resources Group at the Faculty of Law in Oslo. The project, called Rights to uncultivated land and social change, receives funding from the Research Council of Norway. His office is 473 Boalt, 643-6582, email geir.stenseth@jus.uio.no.

Ruth Zafran is a lecturer at the Radzyner School of Law in the Herzlia Interdisciplinary Center, Israel, where she teaches courses in family law and children's rights. Ruth's doctoral dissertation examined the Right of Offspring to Seek Out their Biological Parents and she later published on that topic. She received her LL.D. degree from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in 2004. Her current research focuses on the family in the techno-genetic era. In particular, she finds the bio-ethical questions surrounding the beginning of life – pregnancy, birth, reproductive technologies and the legal definition of parenthood – compelling. During her stay at the Center she is writing about the boundaries of the parent's liberty to make decisions pertaining to the genetic makeup of the child he/she is about to have. Dr. Zafran's office is in 471 Boalt, tel. 642-7566, email: rzafran@idc.ac.il.

 

VISITING SCHOLARS - SPRING 2007

Colin Bennett received his Bachelor's and Master's degrees from the University of Wales, and his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Since 1986 he has taught in the Department of Political Science at the University of Victoria, where he is now Professor. From 1999-2000, he was a fellow with the Harvard Information Infrastructure Project, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. His research interests have focused on the comparative analysis of information privacy protection policies at the domestic and international levels. He has published Regulating Privacy: Data Protection and Public Policy in Europe and the United States (Cornell University Press, 1992). He is also co-editor or Visions of Privacy: Policy Choices for the Digital Age (University of Toronto Press, 1999), and co-author of The Governance of Privacy: Policy Instruments in Global Perspective (Ashgate Press, 2003; MIT Press, 2006), and numerous journal articles, policy reports and occasional newspaper pieces. He is currently involved in a comparative project on the subject of “Privacy Advocacy” in advanced industrial states.

 

Kirk Boyd is a co-director of the International Convention on Human Rights Research Project. He completed his B.S. in political science at the University of California, Santa Barbara, (1981), followed by his J.D. (1985), LL.M (1996) and J.S.D. (2000) from Boalt Hall. He has been a litigator with Morrison & Forester and a partner in the firm Boyd,Huffman, Williams and Urla. The majority of his cases have been civil rights and environmental law. He was trained as a trial lawyer, but has also appeared as appellate counsel at every level of court, including the United States Supreme Court. In addition to practice, Boyd has taught for several years at U.C. Santa Barbara, including courses on International Human Rights, International Law, Civil Rights and First Amendment. His research is the evolution of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights into the European Convention on Human Rights and the potential for development into an International Convention on Human Rights, enforceable in the courts of all countries. While visiting for the spring and fall, 2007, Boyd will be dividing his work between two projects. One is research for, and preparation of, a conference to be held at Boalt on October 19 & 20, 2007, to discuss a draft International Convention. Another is writing a manuscript entitled Four Freedoms Plan for Humanity that describes the foundation for an International Convention document, and offers a process for drafting one. He welcomes comments of any kind, and can be reached at kirkboyd@ichr.org, or at (415) 690-6687.

 

Jo Carrillo is the Harry H. and Lillian H. Hastings Research Chair and Professor of Law at UC Hastings College of the Law in San Francisco, where she has taught since 1991. She graduated from Stanford University in 1981, where she studied Modern Latin American Literature. She graduated in 1986 from the University of New Mexico Law School with honors. She earned a J.S.D. in 1996 from Stanford Law School under the guidance of Professors Lawrence Friedman, William Simon, and Richard Roberts (History). She has written about indigenous issues. While at the Center, Carrillo will complete Bonds No. 73: Million Dollar Baseballs, Popular Legal Culture, and the Claim for Cultural Property, a manuscript about the marketability of items with cultural or historical importance – collectible baseballs, indigenous items (tangible and intangible) and spaces, and high-end art being examples – and the law. The book explores the relevance of culturally important items in relation to popular legal culture, market reserves and legal doctrine. Her office is in 473 Boalt, tel. 642-6582, email carrillo@uchastings.edu

 

Jian (Jane) Fu is a Senior Lecturer in Law at Deakin University in Melbourne, Australia. She obtained an LLB from Beijing University in 1988, an LLM from the University of Canberra 1996, Australia, and a PhD in Law at the University of New South Wales in 2005. Before moveing to Australia in 1996, she worked as a legislative affairs officer at the Legislative Affairs Commission of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress of the PRC for eight years. Professor Fu is the recipient of a Special International Studies Program grant from Deakin University in 2005. She has been an academic visitor at Faculty of Law and Oriel College at the University of Oxford. At the Center, she will work on two books: "Corporate Disclosure and Corporate Governance in Listed Chinese Companies" and "Law Making in the PRC: 1979 - 2009." Her office will be in Boalt 471, 642-8646, email janefu@deakin.edu.au.

 

Alessandro de Giorgi is a research fellow in Criminology at the Faculty of Law, University of Bologna ( Italy). He received his PhD in Criminology at Keele University ( United Kingdom) and has spent some periods as visiting scholar at the University of Bern ( Switzerland) and the University of Saarland ( Germany). His recent research interests focus on the transformations of social control in contemporary post-fordist societies, with particular reference to actuarial strategies of penal control in post-industrial economies. On these topics he has published Re-thinking the Political Economy of Punishment: Perspectives on post-Fordism and Penal Politics (Ashgate, 2006). While at the Center, De Giorgi will conduct research around the impact of contemporary punitive strategies of crime and drug control in deprived urban areas across Europe and the United States. Alessandro's office is in Boalt 470, tel. 642-0437, email degiorgi@hotmail.com .

 

Sora Y. Han is a University of California President's Postdoctoral Fellow at Boalt Hall School of Law.  She received her Ph.D. from the Department of History of Consciousness with a parenthetical notation in Feminist Studies at UC Santa Cruz, and her J.D. from UCLA School of Law with an emphasis in Critical Race Studies.   Her dissertation, entitled, "The Bonds of Representation: Race, Law, and the Feminine in Post-Civil Rights America," examines the intersections of racial jurisprudence and popular culture.   She will be revising this dissertation into a book manuscript during her tenure at the Center.  Her general research interests include the literary imagination of American constitutional law, psychoanalytic theories of law and visual culture, critical prison studies, and racial and feminist politics.   She recently published "The Politics of Race in Asian American Jurisprudence," in the UCLA Asian Pacific American Law Journal, and is co-editing a book with Elizabeth Povinelli and Kendall Thomas on contemporary forms of internment.   As part of the movement for prison abolition, Dr. Han has worked at Legal Services for Prisoners with Children ( San Francisco) and Justice Now ( Oakland) as a legal advocate for women prisoners in California. Sora's office is in Boalt 471A Boalt, tel. 643-9286, email syhan@berkeley.edu .

 

Kathryn Harrison is a Professor of Political Science at the University of British Columbia. She has published books and articles on Canadian politics, federalism, and comparative public policy, especially environmental policy. While at the Center as a Fulbright scholar, she will be completing a book on environmental regulation of the paper industry in the context of economic globalization, and directing a collaborative project comparing climate change policies in eight jurisdictions ( Canada , US, Australia , Japan , Russia , China , India , and the European Union). Her own research for the latter will focus on Canadian and US decisions with respect to ratification of the Kyoto Protocol and adoption of climate policies more generally. Kathryn's office this semester is on the 2nd floor of the JSP building, tel. 642-4038, email harrison@politics.ubc.ca .

 

Nick Huls is Professor and Chair of Sociolegal Studies at Erasmus University Rotterdam and the University of Leyden, and Head of the Erasmus Center for Law & Society (ECLS). He received his law degree at Utrecht University in 1973 and his PhD, on consumer protection law, in 1981. From 1982 -1990 he was project leader of the Consumer Credit Act at the Netherlands Department of Economic Affairs; his recommendations led to the adoption of a new bankruptcy act based on US law. In 1990 Nick returned to academia, initially as Director of the Leyden Institute for Law and Public Policy. In 1996 he was appointed Professor of Law and Technology at Delft University, in 1997 as Professor of Sociolegal Studies at Leyden, and in 2000 as Chair at Erasmus University. Presently he leads a research program called 'the judicial domain'. Nick has written about his experiences as a lawyer involved in the legislative process, both on a practical and a theoretical level (negotiated rule making). He is a member of international working groups on legal aid, the legal professions and consumer bankruptcy. While at Berkeley, Nick will work on two books -- an introduction to sociolegal studies and the editing of the papers and proceedings of an international conference in Rotterdam in January 2007 (in English) entitled The Legitimacy of Supreme Courts' Rulings. His office is in Boalt 470, tel. 642-0437,
email huls@frg.eur.nl.

 

Philip Lewis was a Research Fellow at All Souls College , Oxford from 1965 to 1988, and since 1996 has been at the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, Oxford . He has visited Berkeley on two previous occasions, and has also been a Senior Scholar at Stanford.

His research interest is in the legal profession, and with Rick Abel, of UCLA, he started the Working Group on Legal Professions, out of which came the three volumes they edited, Lawyers in Society (1988-9). While at Berkeley he will be looking back at research projects he has previously carried out on groups of lawyers in the USA and the UK , and studying the relevance to them of some general themes in legal professions research, such as competition, expertise, ideologies, independence, trust and "communities of practice". Dr. Lewis's office is in 470 Boalt, tel. 642-0437, email philip.lewis@csls.ox.ac.uk .

 

Mika Matsumoto is a practicing lawyer in Japan, selected by the Japanese Federation of Bar Associations (JFBA) under our agreement by which the Center hosts one visiting scholar annually sponsored by the JFBA, who practices criminal or juvenile defense or public interest law in Japan. Ms. Matsumoto received the law degree from Hitotsubashi University in 1998, and graduated from the Legal Research and Training Institute of Japan in 2000. That year, to address a concern about the concentration of legal services in metropolitan areas and the lack of legal aid benefits in rural areas, the JFBA established Himawari Fund Law Offices nation-wide. Ms Matsumoto became the first General Manager of the Himawari Fund Law Office in Monbetsu, a small city in a rural area that had no legal profession before her arrival, where she served from 2001 to 2003. After returning to Tokyo, she continued to be involved in the issue of rural legal services, raising awareness of the problem in the government and in the legal profession. At the Center, Ms. Matsumoto will research US pro bono activities in rural areas as reference for possible implementation in Japan. She will study the current status and issues of the public defender system in the U.S, as one of the main purposes of the Himawari Fund is to improve the criminal defense system in rural areas. She is also interested in motivating and inspiring new lawyers who are involved in activities for public interest. Ms. Matsumoto's office is in 471 Boalt, tel. 642-7566, email mikam@berkeley.edu .

 

Yoshinori Okada is associate professor of law, Nanzan University , Faculty of Law. He received his PhD (Law), University of Hitotsubashi ( Japan ), in 1997. He regularly lectures on criminal procedure and criminal evidence. His doctoral thesis was a comparative study of the right to counsel and criminal defense systems among the US , UK and Japan . A book based on his dissertation was published in Japan in 2001. At the Center, Professor Okada will conduct research on pre-trial criminal procedure and lay participation in the criminal trial. His other interests are evidence and empirical science, and the role and ethics of the criminal defense lawyer. He was the recipient of a grant from the program for promoting internationalization in university education from the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) in 2005. Professor Okada's office is in 470 Boalt, tel. 642-0437, email Etsutenokada@aol.com .

 

Ken Tanaka is an associate professor in the Faculty of Economics, Nagasaki University , in Japan . Mr. Tanaka received the LL.M. degree from Kobe University in 1997. He completed coursework in the Doctoral Program, Graduate School of Law, Kobe University in 2000. He regularly lectures on administrative law. Prof. Tanaka's specialty is environmental law and administrative law. He is interested in public works projects and information systems in the environmental policies. For example, he has studied about the Land Reclamation Project of Isahaya Bay, PRTR (Pollutant Release and Transfer Register) and environmental label and environmental audit till now. In addition, he is interested in the tobacco regulations. During his stay at the Center, Tanaka will conduct research on the law systems protecting and restoring the marine environment. In addition, he will conduct research on the law systems securing reliable environmental information in the environmental policies. He has received a grant of the internationalization promotion program that supports the advanced study from the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) in 2006. Mr. Tanaka's office is  471 Boalt, tel.  642-7566, email tanaka-k@nagasaki-u.ac.jp .

 

Ruth Zafran is a lecturer at the Radzyner School of Law in the Herzlia Interdisciplinary Center, Israel, where she teaches courses in family law and children's rights. Ruth's doctoral dissertation examined the Right of Offspring to Seek Out their Biological Parents and she later published on that topic. She received her LL.D. degree from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in 2004. Her current research focuses on the family in the techno-genetic era. In particular, she finds the bio-ethical questions surrounding the beginning of life – pregnancy, birth, reproductive technologies and the legal definition of parenthood – compelling. During her stay at the Center she plans to write about the boundaries of the parent's liberty to make decisions pertaining to the genetic makeup of the child he/she is about to have. Dr. Zafran's office is in 471A Boalt, tel. 643-9286, email: rzafran@idc.ac.il.

 

VISITING SCHOLARS - FALL 2006

Kitty Calavita is Professor of Criminology, Law and Society at the University of California , Irvine . She was President of the Law and Society Association in 2000-2001. She has conducted research and published widely in the field of immigration and immigration lawmaking. Her work is both contemporary and historical, U.S.-based and comparative. Her most recent book, Immigrants at the Margins: Law, Race, and Exclusion in Southern Europe ( Cambridge , 2005), examines immigrant marginalization in Italy and Spain , and the formal and informal legal processes that contribute to it.

Calavita has recently launched a new research agenda that will explore some of these issues of race, marginalization, and legal processes within the venue of prisoners' rights. She is interested specifically in the informal grievance process provided by California law to prison inmates in the State. She hopes to contribute to the scholarship on legal consciousness, as well as the literature on the informal, de facto realm of law and "street-level bureaucrats," a theme that has been a centerpiece of all of her work. Kitty's office is on the first floor of the JSP building, telephone 642-4038, email kccalavi@uci.edu .

 

Jo Carrillo is the Harry H. and Lillian H. Hastings Research Chair and Professor of Law at UC Hastings College of the Law in San Francisco . Carrillo graduated from Stanford University in 1981, where she focused on the study of Modern Latin American Literature under Fernando Alegria and Mary Pratt. She graduated in 1986 from the University of New Mexico Law School with honors. She graduated in 1996 from Stanford Law School , earning a J.S.D. under the guidance of Professors Lawrence Friedman, William Simon, and Richard Roberts (History). Carrillo joined the Hastings faculty in 1991. In 1997-1998, she was a Visiting Professor of Law at Stanford Law School . She has written about indigenous issues.

While at the Center, Carrillo will complete Bonds No. 73: Million Dollar Baseballs, Popular Legal Culture, and the Claim for Cultural Property , a manuscript about the marketability of items with cultural or historical importance - collectible baseballs, indigenous items (tangible and intangible) and spaces, and high-end art being examples - and the law. The book explores the relevance of culturally important items in relation to popular legal culture (how a public might perceive, as reflected by accessible (popular) culture, that the law handles a collectible or culturally significant item), markets, market reserves (the negotiated exclusion of a collectible item from the market place) and legal doctrine. Carrillo lives locally. She can be reached by e-mail at carrillo@uchastings.edu or by voice mail at (415) 565-4866.

 

Jian (Jane) Fu is a Senior Lecturer in Law at Deakin University in Melobourne , Australia . She obtained an LLB from Beijing University in 1988 and an LLM from the University of Canberra, Australia. She recently completed a PhD in Law at the University of New South Wales . Professor Fu is the recipient of a Special International Studies Program grant from Deakin University . At the Center, she will work on three articles: "Protection of Shareholders in the PRC, the US and Australia : A Comparative Perspective," "The Reform of Banking Regulation in the PRC: Corporatization and Securitization," and "Law Making in the PRC in a Market Economy: Tradition and Modernization." Her office will be in Boalt 470, tel. 642-0437, email janefu@deakin.edu.au .

 

Alessandro de Giorgi is a research fellow in Criminology at the Faculty of Law, University of Bologna ( Italy ). He received his PhD in Criminology at Keele University ( United Kingdom ) and has spent some periods as visiting scholar at the University of Bern ( Switzerland ) and the University of Saarland ( Germany ). His recent research interests focus on the transformations of social control in contemporary post-fordist societies, with particular reference to actuarial strategies of penal control in post-industrial economies. On these topics he has published Re-thinking the Political Economy of Punishment: Perspectives on post-Fordism and Penal Politics (Ashgate, 2006). While at the Center, De Giorgi will conduct research around the impact of contemporary punitive strategies of crime and drug control in deprived urban areas across Europe and the United States . Alessandro's office is in Boalt 470, tel. 642-0437, email degiorgi@hotmail.com .

 

Sora Y. Han is a University of California President's Postdoctoral Fellow at Boalt Hall School of Law.  She received her Ph.D. from the Department of History of Consciousness with a parenthetical notation in Feminist Studies at UC Santa Cruz, and her J.D. from UCLA School of Law with an emphasis in Critical Race Studies.   Her dissertation, entitled, "The Bonds of Representation: Race, Law, and the Feminine in Post-Civil Rights America," examines the intersections of racial jurisprudence and popular culture.   She will be revising this dissertation into a book manuscript during her tenure at the Center for the Study of Law & Society.  Her general research interests include the literary imagination of American constitutional law, psychoanalytic theories of law and visual culture, critical prison studies, and racial and feminist politics.   She recently published the article, "The Politics of Race in Asian American Jurisprudence," in the UCLA Asian Pacific American Law Journal, and is co-editing a book with Elizabeth Povinelli and Kendall Thomas on contemporary forms of internment.   As part of the movement for prison abolition, Dr. Han has worked at Legal Services for Prisoners with Children ( San Francisco , CA ) and Justice Now ( Oakland , CA ) as a legal advocate for women prisoners in California . Sora's office is in Boalt 471A Boalt, tel. 643-9286, email syhan@berkeley.edu .

 

Kathryn Harrison is a Professor of Political Science at the University of British Columbia . She has published books and articles on Canadian politics, federalism, and comparative public policy, especially environmental policy. While at the Center as a Fulbright scholar, she will be completing a book on environmental regulation of the paper industry in the context of economic globalization, and directing a collaborative project comparing climate change policies in eight jurisdictions ( Canada , US, Australia , Japan , Russia , China , India , and the European Union). Her own research for the latter will focus on Canadian and US decisions with respect to ratification of the Kyoto Protocol and adoption of climate policies more generally. Kathryn's office is Boalt 473, tel. 642-6582, email harrison@politics.ubc.ca .

 

Valerie Jenness is a Professor of Criminology, Law and Society at the University of California , Irvine , co-editor of Contemporary Sociology , and the President of the Society for the Study of Social Problems. Her research has focused on the politics of crime control, with an emphasis on the links between intergroup conflict and the development and implementation of crime control policies designed to curb bias-motivated violence. She is the co-editor of one book, Social Movements, Public Policy, and Democracy (with David Meyer and Helen Ingram, 2005), and the author of three books-- Making Hate a Crime: From Social Movement to Law Enforcement Practice (with Ryken Grattet, 2001), Hate Crimes: New Social Movements and the Politics of Violence (with Kendal Broad, 1997), and Making it Work: The Prostitutes' Rights Movement in Perspective (1993).

Professor Jenness is currently working on a multi-year study funded by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to determine the causes, manifestations, and consequences of sexual assault in California prisons; related, she is working on a larger project focused on the development, implementation, and consequences of the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003. In addition, she is initiating research on the relationship between degrees of racial segregation/integration and violence in California prisons. Val's office is on the 2 nd floor of the JSP building, tel. 642-4038, email jenness@uci.edu .

 

Philip Lewis was a Research Fellow at All Souls College , Oxford from 1965 to 1988, and since 1996 has been at the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, Oxford . He has visited Berkeley on two previous occasions, and has also been a Senior Scholar at Stanford.

His research interest is in the legal profession, and with Rick Abel, of UCLA, he started the Working Group on Legal Professions, out of which came the three volumes they edited, Lawyers in Society (1988-9). While at Berkeley he will be looking back at research projects he has previously carried out on groups of lawyers in the USA and the UK , and studying the relevance to them of some general themes in legal professions research, such as competition, expertise, ideologies, independence, trust and "communities of practice". Dr. Lewis's office is in 470 Boalt, tel. 642-0437, email philip.lewis@csls.ox.ac.uk .

 

Mika Matsumoto is a practicing lawyer in Japan . She was selected by the Japanese Federation of Bar Associations (JFBA) under our agreement by which the Center for the Study of Law and Society hosts one visiting scholar annually sponsored by the JFBA, who practices criminal or juvenile defense or public interest law in Japan . Ms. Matsumoto received the law degree from Hitotsubashi University in 1998, and graduated from the Legal Research and Training Institute of Japan in 2000. That year, to address a concern about the concentration of legal services in metropolitan areas and the lack of legal aid benefits in rural areas, the JFBA established Himawari Fund Law Offices nation-wide. Deeply concerned about the issue, Ms Matsumoto became the first General Manager of Monbetsu Himawari Fund Law Office. Monbetsu is a small city in a rural area in Hokkaido that had no legal profession before her arrival. She served the area from 2001 to 2003. After returning to Tokyo , she continued to be involved in the issue of rural legal services, raising awareness of the problem in the government and in the legal profession. During her stay at the Center, Ms. Matsumoto will research US pro bono activities in rural areas as reference for possible implementation in Japan . She will study the current status and issues of the public defender system in the U.S, as one of the main purposes of the Himawari Fund is to improve the criminal defense system in rural areas. She is also interested in motivating and inspiring new lawyers who are involved in activities for public interest. Ms. Matsumoto's office is in 471 Boalt, tel. 642-7566, email mikam@berkeley.edu .

Yoshinori Okada is associate professor of law, Nanzan University , Faculty of Law. He received his PhD (Law), University of Hitotsubashi ( Japan ), in 1997. He regularly lectures on criminal procedure and criminal evidence. His doctoral thesis was a comparative study of the right to counsel and criminal defense systems among the US , UK and Japan . A book based on his dissertation was published in Japan in 2001. At the Center, Professor Okada will conduct research on pre-trial criminal procedure and lay participation in the criminal trial. His other interests are evidence and empirical science, and the role and ethics of the criminal defense lawyer. He was the recipient of a grant from the program for promoting internationalization in university education from the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) in 2005. Professor Okada's office is in 470 Boalt, tel. 642-0437, email Etsutenokada@aol.com .

 

Torsten Strulik is Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Sociology at the University of Bielefeld and Heisenberg-Fellow of the German Research Foundation (DFG). His current research focuses on the (self-) regulation of the global financial system and in particular, cognitive (learning-oriented) forms of financial governance. Since 2004, he has been directing a research project at the Institute for World Society Studies in Bielefeld which investigates to what extent the revised international capital framework for banking supervision (Basel II) and its implementation into national law are encouraging the innovation and risk management competencies of banks and supervisory institutions. Strulik will devote his time at the Center to the analysis of data and writing on this project. Torsten's office is in Boalt 473, email torsten.Strulik@uni-bielefeld.de , tel. 642-6582. His homepage is wwwhomes.uni-bielefeld.de/tstrulik

 

Ken Tanaka is an associate professor in the Faculty of Economics, Nagasaki University , in Japan . Mr. Tanaka received the LL.M. degree from Kobe University in 1997. He completed coursework in the Doctoral Program, Graduate School of Law, Kobe University in 2000. He regularly lectures on administrative law. Prof. Tanaka's specialty is environmental law and administrative law. He is interested in public works projects and information systems in the environmental policies. For example, he has studied about the Land Reclamation Project of Isahaya Bay, PRTR (Pollutant Release and Transfer Register) and environmental label and environmental audit till now. In addition, he is interested in the tobacco regulations. During his stay at the Center, Tanaka will conduct research on the law systems protecting and restoring the marine environment. In addition, he will conduct research on the law systems securing reliable environmental information in the environmental policies. He has received a grant of the internationalization promotion program that supports the advanced study from the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) in 2006. Mr. Tanaka's office is  471 Boalt, tel.  642-7566, email tanaka-k@nagasaki-u.ac.jp .

 

Ruth Zafran is a lecturer at the Radzyner School of Law in the Herzlia Interdisciplinary Center, Israel, where she teaches courses in family law and children's rights. Ruth's doctoral dissertation examined the Right of Offspring to Seek Out their Biological Parents and she later published on that topic. She received her LL.D. degree from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in 2004. Her current research focuses on the family in the techno-genetic era. In particular, she finds the bio-ethical questions surrounding the beginning of life - pregnancy, birth, reproductive technologies and the legal definition of parenthood - compelling. During her stay at the Center she plans to write about the boundaries of the parent's liberty to make decisions pertaining to the genetic makeup of the child he/she is about to have. Dr. Zafran's office is in 471A Boalt, tel. 643-9286, email: rzafran@idc.ac.il .

 

VISITING SCHOLARS - Spring 2006

Andreas Abegg is a lecturer at the University of Fribourg Faculty of Law in Fribourg , Switzerland , the recipient of a Holcim Foundation Fellowship for Academic Research, and co-editor in chief of a new Swiss Journal for Theoretical Analysis of Law. His 2003 doctoral dissertation received the Peter Jäggi Award for the best dissertation in private law at the University of Fribourg . Abegg's work is in private law theory, especially systems theory and evolutionary theory, and in private and public contract law. At the Center, he will be working on his second book, on contracts between public agencies and private parties under Swiss law, looking at the historical, sociological and theoretical components. Dr. Abegg's office is in 473 Boalt, tel. 643-6582, email andreas.abegg@unifr.ch .

 

Maurizio Borghi , Degree in Economics, second degree in Philosophy, PhD in Economic and Social History, is Research fellow at Bocconi University of Milan, where he teaches Cultural history and Philosophy. His recent research activity focuses particularly on intellectual property rights in historical and philosophical perspective. He is also developing research programs on history of philosophy, with special regards to phenomenology and hermeneutics, as member of a research group on translating Martin Heidegger's works in Italian. He has published a book on the history of copyright and of the book trade in Italy ( La manifattura del pensiero: Diritti d'autore e mercato delle lettere in Italia (1801-1865) , Franco Angeli: Milan 2003) and some articles and papers on related subjects. Dr. Borghi's office is in 470 Boalt, tel. 642-0437, maurizio.borghi@unibocconi.it

 

Richard Delgado is University Distinguished Professor of Law & Derrick Bell Fellow at the University of Pittsburgh , where he teaches courses in civil procedure, civil rights, and critical jurisprudence. One of the founding figures of critical race theory, Delgado also pioneered legal scholarship in the areas of hate speech and narrative jurisprudence.  He is the author of over 100 law review articles and 15 books, eight of which have won national book awards and one a Pulitzer Prize nomination.  Delgado returns for a second residency to write a book on postcolonial theory and Latinos with his wife Jean Stefancic, Research Professor of Law & Derrick Bell Scholar at University of Pittsburgh .  The two shared a Rockefeller Bellagio residency in 1993 to write a book on the role of law in social reform, and in 2001 each received a Bogliasco Foundation residency in Genoa , Italy to write separate books. Since 1995, Delgado and Stefancic have served as editors of the book series "Critical America" (NYU Press).  Stefancic's entry appears separately in this list. Professor Delgado's office is in 471A Boalt, tel. 643-9286, delgado@law.pitt.edu .

 

Mayumi Ikawa is a practicing lawyer in Japan . She was selected by the Japanese Federation of Bar Associations (JFBA) under our agreement by which the Center for the Study of Law and Society hosts one visiting scholar annually sponsored by the JFBA, who practices criminal or juvenile defense or public interest law in Japan . Ms. Ikawa received the law degree from Keio University in 1998, and graduated from the Legal Research and Training Institute of Japan in 2000. Since being admitted to the Bar in 2000, as a member of the Anti-Racketeering Special Committee of the Tokyo Bar Association, she has worked on many crime-organization problems: corporate racketeering, loan-sharking, Kabuki-cho problems (Kabuki-cho is a famous town where many Yakuza offices are located), etc. She has also advised Japanese companies regarding corporate social responsibility and corporate ethics.

During her stay at the Center, Ms. Ikawa will study methods of coping with crime organizations. She is especially interested in how the United States has coped with the Mafia and assisted victims of organized crime. In addition to crime-organization problems, she hopes to carry out research in the area of corporate social responsibility. Ms. Ikawa's office is in 471 Boalt, tel. 642-8646, email ikawa@berkeley.edu .

 

Simha F. Landau is Mildred and Benjamin Berger Professor of Criminology at the Institute of Criminology, Faculty of Law, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His research focuses mainly on aggression and violence, and their relationship to stress factors and support systems; victimology; and decision-making in the criminal justice system. He has published extensively on these and other topics in edited books and professional journals, among them Aggressive Behavior, Criminology, British Journal of Criminology, Journal of Quantitative Criminology, Justice Quarterly, Homicide Studies, Israel Law Review, Social Indicators Research.
Landau is currently involved in a NIMH project conducted by a US, Israeli and Palestinian research team, investigating the effects of persistent and extreme exposure to political conflict and violence on Israeli and Palestinian children.  He has recently completed a large scale project on violence against medical and non-medical personnel in emergency wards in all general hospitals in Israel. He will devote his time in the Center to the analysis of data and writing on this project.  Professor Landau's office is on the 2nd floor of the Center/JSP building, tel. 642-4038, email msfredy@mscc.huji.ac.il .

 

Philip Lewis was a Research Fellow at All Souls College , Oxford , from 1965 to 1988, and since 1996 has been at the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, Oxford . He has visited Berkeley on two previous occasions, and has also been a Senior Scholar at Stanford.

His research interest is in the legal profession, and with Rick Abel, of UCLA, he started the Working Group on Legal Professions, out of which came the three volumes they edited, Lawyers in Society (1988-9).

While at Berkeley he will be looking back at research projects he has previously carried out on groups of lawyers in the USA and the UK , and studying the relevance to them of some general themes in legal professions research, such as competition, expertise, ideologies, independence, trust and "communities of practice". Dr. Lewis's office is in 471 Boalt, tel. 642-8646, email philip.lewis@csls.ox.ac.uk .

 

Yoshinori Okada is associate professor of law, Nanzan University , Faculty of Law. He received his PhD (Law), University of Hitotsubashi ( Japan ), in 1997. He regularly lectures on criminal procedure and criminal evidence. His doctoral thesis was a comparative study of the right to counsel and criminal defense systems among the US , UK and Japan . A book based on his dissertation was published in Japan in 2001.

During his year at the Center, Professor Okada will conduct research on pre-trial criminal procedure and the empirical study of lay participation in criminal trial at CSLS. His other interests are evidence and empirical science, and the role and ethics of the criminal defense lawyer. He is the recipient of a grant from the program for promoting internationalization in university education from the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) in 2005. He will conduct research on the theory, legal education and lay participation in criminal procedure. Professor Okawa's office is in 470 Boalt, tel. 642-0437, email Etsutenokada@aol.com .

Joe Rollins is associate professor of political science at Queens College , CUNY, where he teaches courses on American Government, Public Policy, and Politics and Sexuality. He completed a B.A. in political science at Hunter College in New York City and a Ph.D. in political science at the University of California , Santa Barbara . Professor Rollins' research explores the nexus of law, politics, and sexuality, employing both quantitative and qualitative methodologies. His first book, AIDS and the Sexuality of Law: Ironic Jurisprudence (Palgrave/Macmillan 2004), examined the narratives and rhetoric through which judges made sense of AIDS-related litigation. He has published articles in Law & Society Review, Social Politics, Radical Statistics, and several edited volumes. While in residence at the Center for the Study of Law and Society Joe will be working on a project entitled "The Language of Love." A recipient of the Wayne F. Placek Award, Prof. Rollins will devote his time at the Center to a comprehensive analysis of legal, legislative, and media materials produced in the ongoing national debate about marriage, particularly same-sex unions. Professor Rollins will present a talk in the Center's Bag Lunch Speaker Series on March 13th, 2006. Professor Rollins' office is in 473 Boalt, tel. 643-6582, email joerollins@nyc.rr.com .

Rebecca L. Sandefur has been assistant professor of sociology at Stanford University since receiving her PhD in sociology from the University of Chicago in 2001. Her work is at the intersection of the sociology of law and the study of inequality. During her year at the Center, Professor Sandefur will be at work on two projects, a small one on professional inequality and a larger project on social class and civil justice.

The first project grows out of her work, with the Chicago Lawyers Project, on inequality within the American legal profession. Beginning in the early 1970s, wage inequality in many occupations, including professions such as law, began to increase. Her new project on professional inequality investigates the sources of rising inequality in professionals' wages, looking especially at the role of the legal regulation of professional services markets (e.g., non-competition clauses, prohibitions on advertising) and demographic change, particularly change in the age and gender composition of professional occupations.

Her second project examines the role of the civil justice system in social class stratification. When experiencing most kinds of justiciable events -- events that fall within the purview of civil law, but that people may never think of as legal, or even as problematic at all -- poor and working class households are less likely than middle and upper-middle class households to use the civil justice system. The most common responses of middle and upper-middle class households involve the legal system in some way, while the most common response of poor and working class households is to take no action at all. Sandefur seeks not only to contribute to long-standing debates about why social class affects how people respond to commonly experienced, potentially highly consequential problems, but to understand the consequences of those responses for the people that pursue them. Professor Sandefur will present a talk in the Center's Bag Lunch Speaker Series on January 24th, 2006. Professor Sandefur's office is on the 2nd floor of the Center/JSP building, tel. 642-4038, email sandefur@stanford.edu .

Jean Stefancic is Research Professor of Law & Derrick Bell Scholar at the University of Pittsburgh , where she teaches courses on race and civil rights.

Her book, No Mercy: How Conservative Think Tanks and Foundations Changed America's Social Agenda (Temple University Press, 1996), won critical praise in the nonlegal as well as legal community. A second book, co-authored with her husband Richard Delgado , Critical White Studies: Looking Behind the Mirror (Temple University Press, 1997), won a Gustavus Myers award for outstanding book on human rights in North America in 1998.

Her recent publications include How Lawyers Lose Their Way (Duke University Press, 2005) and The Derrick Bell Reader (NYU Press, 2005). She and her husband Richard Delgado co-edit the book series "Critical America" for NYU Press and "Everyday Law" for ParadigmPublishers. Stefancic returns to the Center for a second visit to work on a book on postcolonial theory and Latinos, and edit a new edition of a casebook on comparative civil rights. Professor Stefancic's office is in 471A Boalt, tel. 643-9286, stefancic@law.pitt.edu .

 

VISITING SCHOLARS - Fall 2005

Susan Bandes is Distinguished Research Professor at DePaul University College of Law in Chicago , where she has taught since 1984, concentrating on federal jurisdiction, criminal procedure, civil rights and law and literature. After receiving her J.D. from the University of Michigan Law School in 1976, she began her legal career at the Illinois Office of the State Appellate Defender. In 1980, she became staff counsel for the Illinois A.C.L.U., where she litigated a broad spectrum of civil rights cases. She has written and presented widely on issues of governmental accountability and access to the courts. Her articles on these topics include, among others, The Idea of a Case, (Stanford Law Review 1990); The Negative Constitution: A Critique, (Michigan Law Review 1990), Reinventing Bivens : the Self-Executing Constitution, (Southern California Law Review 1995); Patterns of Injustice: Police Brutality in the Courts, (Buffalo Law Review 1999) and Erie and the History of the One True Federalism (Yale Law Journal 2001).

More recently, beginning with her article Empathy, Narrative, and Victim Impact Statements, (University of Chicago Law Review 1996), she has been exploring the implications of emotion theory for legal jurisprudence and practice. Her first book on the topic, entitled The Passions of Law , was published by the NYU Press in January 2000, and released in paperback in 2001. She is currently writing a book on the role of emotion in death penalty cases, tentatively entitled Repellent Crimes and the Limits of Justice . She has been active in pro bono activities relating to law reform, most recently acting as co-reporter for the Constitution Project's bipartisan Death Penalty Initiative, which produced the report "Mandatory Justice: Eighteen Reforms to the Death Penalty," and serving on the advisory board to the Chicago Council of Lawyers' Appleseed Fund for Justice in its study of the criminal justice system in Cook County, IL.

Professor Bandes will be here for the fall semester only. She will present a talk in the Center's Bag Lunch Speaker Series on November 22 nd on her work on the role of emotion in death penalty cases. Her office is in the Center/JSP building (Edelman's office), tel. 642-4038, email sbandes@depaul.edu .

 

Mayumi Ikawa is a practicing lawyer in Japan . She was selected by the Japanese Federation of Bar Associations (JFBA) under our agreement by which the Center for the Study of Law and Society hosts one visiting scholar annually sponsored by the JFBA, who practices criminal or juvenile defense or public interest law in Japan.

Ms. Ikawa received the law degree from Keio University in 1998, and graduated from the Legal Research and Training Institute of Japan in 2000. Since being admitted to the Bar in 2000, as a member of the Anti-Racketeering Special Committee of the Tokyo Bar Association, she has worked on many crime-organization problems: corporate racketeering, loan-sharking, Kabuki-cho problems (Kabuki-cho is a famous town where many Yakuza offices are located), etc. She has also advised Japanese companies regarding corporate social responsibility and corporate ethics.

During her stay at the Center, Ms. Ikawa will study methods of coping with crime organizations. She is especially interested in how the United States has coped with the Mafia and assisted victims of organized crime. In addition to crime-organization problems, she hopes to carry out research in the area of corporate social responsibility. Ms. Ikawa's office is in 471 Boalt, tel. 642-8646, email ikawa@berkeley.edu .

 

Akiko Ito is Focal Point on Disability of the United Nations, responsible for the programme of the United Nations to promote the human rights of persons with disabilities through law, policies and development cooperation. The programme is currently the Secretariat for the Ad Hoc Committee on an international convention on the rights and dignity of persons with disabilities, the first-ever international process for elaboration of a human rights convention on disability. She has been charged with the disability programme at the United Nations since 1994. Previous to her current position, Ms. Ito worked as Legal Affairs Officer in the Legal Affairs Section of the United Nations Drug Control Programme in Vienna, Austria from 1990-1994.

Ms. Ito's main subject is international human rights law and the area of interest is domestic application of international law, with a focus on the rights of minorities and other disadvantaged groups.

Ms. Ito has an LL.B. in International Legal Studies from Sophia University , Tokyo , Japan, an M.A. in International Relations from the University of Chicago , and an LL.M. from Boalt Hall School of Law at University of California at Berkeley.

She is currently conducting a research project on the human rights of persons with disabilities and development at the CSLS as part of the United Nations Sabbatical Leave Programme, the official programme for staff members of the United Nations to engage in research and networking activities at leading academic institutions worldwide. Her research here will focus on how law and policy-international, regional and domestic- could impact on implementation of the human rights of persons with disabilities in developing countries. Ms. Ito will be here for the fall semester only. Her office is in 471A Boalt, tel. 643-9286, email akikoitoun@yahoo.com .

Stanley Lubman has specialized on China as a scholar and as a practicing lawyer for over thirty years. He has taught on Chinese law, and is currently a Lecturer at the School of Law at the University of California (Berkeley). He has previously taught at Stanford, Columbia, Harvard, the University of Heidelberg and the School of Oriental and African Studies of the University of London, as well as Berkeley. He has been advising clients on the People's Republic of China since 1972 on a wide range of matters and has also been active in representing clients in disputes arbitrated by the China International Economic and Trade Arbitration Commission in Beijing. From 1978 to 1997 he headed the China practices at two major San Francisco law firms and a large English firm of solicitors. He was trained as a China specialist in the United States and in Hong Kong for four years (1963-67) under grants from the Rockefeller Foundation, Columbia University and the Foreign Area Fellowship Program. He has an A.B. degree with honors in history from Columbia College and LL.B., LL.M. and J.S.D. degrees from the Columbia Law School, and also studied at the Faculty of Law and the Institute of Comparative Law of the University of Paris. His writings on Chinese law and related subjects have been widely published, including China's Legal Reforms (Stanley Lubman, ed.), Oxford University Press, 1996 and Bird in a Cage: Legal Reform in China after Mao, Stanford University Press, 2000. He is advisor on China legal projects to The Asia Foundation, and is chair of a committee established by the Foundation to consult with legislative drafters of the National People's Congress Committee on Legislative Affairs on reform of Chinese administrative law. Most recently, in this capacity he organized and was co-chair of a conference in San Francisco in December, 2003 at which a group of American experts on administrative law reviewed a draft administrative procedure law for China together with the Chinese drafters. In September 2002, he co-organized a Conference on Law and Society in China, co-sponsored by the Center, by Boalt, and by the Institute of East Asian Studies, at which a group of scholars who have engaged in field research on Chinese law presented some of their current research. The conference resulted in a volume, Engaging the Law in China: State, Society and the Possibilities for Justice, which will be published by the Stanford University Press early in 2005. Stanley’s office will be in Boalt Room 470, 642-0437, slubman@pacbell.net.

 

Yoshinori Okada is associate professor of law, Nanzan University , Faculty of Law. He received his PhD (Law), University of Hitotsubashi ( Japan ), in 1997. He regularly lectures on criminal procedure and criminal evidence. His doctoral thesis was a comparative study of the right to counsel and criminal defense systems among the US , UK and Japan . A book based on his dissertation was published in Japan in 2001.

During his year at the Center, Professor Okada will conduct research on pre-trial criminal procedure and the empirical study of lay participation in criminal trial at CSLS. His other interests are evidence and empirical science, and the role and ethics of the criminal defense lawyer. He is the recipient of a grant from the program for promoting internationalization in university education from the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) in 2005. He will conduct research on the theory, legal education and lay participation in criminal procedure. Professor Okawa's office is in 470 Boalt, tel. 642-0437, email Etsutenokada@aol.com .

 

Joe Rollins is associate professor of political science at Queens College , CUNY, where he teaches courses on American Government, Public Policy, and Politics and Sexuality. He completed a B.A. in political science at Hunter College in New York City and a Ph.D. in political science at the University of California , Santa Barbara .

Professor Rollins' research explores the nexus of law, politics, and sexuality, employing both quantitative and qualitative methodologies. His first book, AIDS and the Sexuality of Law: Ironic Jurisprudence (Palgrave/Macmillan 2004), examined the narratives and rhetoric through which judges made sense of AIDS-related litigation. He has published articles in Law & Society Review, Social Politics, Radical Statistics, and several edited volumes.

While in residence at the Center for the Study of Law and Society Joe will be working on a project entitled "The Language of Love." A recipient of the Wayne F. Placek Award, Prof. Rollins will devote his time at the Center to a comprehensive analysis of legal, legislative, and media materials produced in the ongoing national debate about marriage, particularly same-sex unions. Professor Rollins' office is in 473 Boalt, tel. 643-6582, email joerollins@nyc.rr.com .

 

Rebecca L. Sandefur has been assistant professor of sociology at Stanford University since receiving her PhD in sociology from the University of Chicago in 2001. Her work is at the intersection of the sociology of law and the study of inequality. During her year at the Center, Professor Sandefur will be at work on two projects, a small one on professional inequality and a larger project on social class and civil justice.

The first project grows out of her work, with the Chicago Lawyers Project, on inequality within the American legal profession. Beginning in the early 1970s, wage inequality in many occupations, including professions such as law, began to increase. Her new project on professional inequality investigates the sources of rising inequality in professionals' wages, looking especially at the role of the legal regulation of professional services markets (e.g., non-competition clauses, prohibitions on advertising) and demographic change, particularly change in the age and gender composition of professional occupations.

Her second project examines the role of the civil justice system in social class stratification. When experiencing most kinds of justiciable events -- events that fall within the purview of civil law, but that people may never think of as legal, or even as problematic at all -- poor and working class households are less likely than middle and upper-middle class households to use the civil justice system. The most common responses of middle and upper-middle class households involve the legal system in some way, while the most common response of poor and working class households is to take no action at all. Sandefur seeks not only to contribute to long-standing debates about why social class affects how people respond to commonly experienced, potentially highly consequential problems, but to understand the consequences of those responses for the people that pursue them. Professor Sandefur's office is on the 2 nd floor of the Center/JSP building, tel. 642-4038, email sandefur@stanford.edu .

 

Claire Valier is a lecturer in the School of Law at Birkbeck, University of London , England . She is a graduate of Queens' College, Cambridge , where she was a Munro Scholar. Her research lies in the area of legal philosophy, particularly issues around the attribution of criminal liability, and the justification of punishment. She has published two books and numerous articles, for instance in the Criminal Law Review , Punishment & Society , Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy , and was recently awarded the Radzinowicz Memorial Prize in recognition of her research. She is founding co-editor of a new international peer-reviewed journal, Criminal Law and Philosophy , to be published by Springer.

Currently she is writing a book that asks some questions about the legitimate personal interest of the victim of crime in the procedures and outcomes of the criminal justice process. While at Berkeley , Valier will be working on two papers: Complicity and the Bystander to Crime, and Compensation to the Victim of Crime. The former is a contribution to the debate on complicity and causation and the latter to the debate around the tort-crime distinction and its underlying political philosophy.

Professor Valier will be at the Center for the month of September only. She will present a talk in the Center's Bag Lunch Speaker Series on September 12 th on her work on Complicity and the Bystander to Crime. Her office is in 470 Boalt, tel. 642-0437, email C.Valier@bbk.ac.uk .

 

VISITING SCHOLARS - SPRING 2005

Sarah Armstrong is a lecturer in criminology at the School of Law , Edinburgh University. Her research is defined by an interest in the social and organizational features of contemporary punishment. She is completing a project that explores the involvement of nonprofit organizations in juvenile justice programs. This work has moved through analysis of the concept and reality of community in treatment, the relationship of mental health and penal systems, and the impact of using contracts to manage and deliver punishment, and the consequences of this for accountability. She will be starting work on the interactive effects of law, probability and risk in penal justice. Part of this entails research into the migration of the precautionary principle from environmental science to criminal justice, and is part of a UK government grant-funded project about transdisciplinary approaches to risk and law. She is co-editing a book (with Lesley McAra) entitled, Perspectives on Punishment: The Contours of Control, to be published later this year ( Oxford University Press).

 

Kirsten Campbell is a lecturer in the Department of Sociology, Goldsmiths College, University of London, where she teaches sociology of law and social theory. She is also the Director of Research in the Law, Justice, and Social Change Research Unit.

Kirsten received her doctorate from the University of Oxford in 1999. She has undergraduate degrees in law and political science from the University of Melbourne, and postgraduate degrees in sociology and social theory from the University of Melbourne and Macquarie University. Kirsten is also a Barrister and Solicitor of the Supreme Court of Victoria, Australia, and has practised commercial litigation in Australia.

Kirsten's current research develops a new social theory to explain and judge war crimes, ultimately arguing for the necessity of humanitarian law as the normative rearticulation of social bonds. This research examines the fundamental concepts of the person and social relations that underpin contemporary humanitarian law, focusing upon the jurisprudence of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. This work expands on Kirsten's interest in justice and social relations explored in her book, Jacques Lacan and Feminist Epistemology, ( Routledge, 2004), which was recently nominated for the British Sociological Association's Philip Abrams Memorial Prize. Her research has been published in various edited collections and journals, such as Economy and Society , Hypatia, Journal of Human Rights, Signs, and Social and Legal Studies . She also co-edited the recent special issue of Social and Legal Studies on the theme of transitional justice.

Kirsten will present a talk in the Bag Lunch Series entitled '"Discovering the truth is a cornerstone of the rule of law and a fundamental step on the way to reconciliation . . .": Models of Justice in the Jurisprudence of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia' on Monday April 4.

 

Lindsay Farmer is professor of law at the University of Glasgow . His research is in the areas of criminal law, legal history and legal theory. He is currently working on two separate, but related, projects. The first is a historical study of the development of the criminal trial in the late nineteenth century, looking particularly at the impact of changes in policing, the law of evidence and criminal procedure on conceptions of criminal responsibility. The second project is a normative investigation of the criminal trial. A collection of essays from this project, entitled The Trial on Trial: Truth and Due Process , was published earlier this year by Hart Publishing. He previously visited the Center in 1998 and 2003.

 

Motoaki Funakoshi is an assistant professor of law at Kyoto University specializing in the sociology of law. His previous research has focused on legal theory and he has published several articles using a critical legal analysis of contract law doctrine. While at the Center, he hopes to develop a focus on the empirical analysis of law. Professor Funakoshi has an LLM degree from Harvard University and he is the recipient of a scholarship from the Kyoto University Foundation to spend 2004-05 studying at the Center.

 

Steven A. Gerencser is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Indiana University South Bend. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota in 1996 where he specialized in political theory. He has published several essays on the 20th century English philospher Michael J. Oakeshott, and also a book titled The Skeptic's Oakeshott (Palgrave 2000). Gerencser comes to the Center to begin a new research program located at the intersection of jurisprudence and political theory. While at the Center he will focus on the corporate form, specifically the status of the corporation as a person, for contemporary democratic theory and practice.

 

Tomoki Ikenaga is a practicing lawyer in Japan. He was selected by the Japanese Federation of Bar Associations in our arrangement under which the Center for the Study of Law and Society hosts an annual visit from a Japanese defense lawyer or public interest lawyer. Mr. Ikenaga received the law degree at Waseda University in 1991 and graduated from the Legal Research and Training Institute of Japan in 1997. Since being admitted to the Bar in 1997, he has practiced in the areas of juvenile and criminal law as a defense lawyer, and family and child abuse law to suspend or terminate the relationship between children and their parents. While at the Center, he will continue his research in these areas, and also in the area of international development and international law, including legal assistance to post-conflicted or developing countries.

Hila Keren has returned for a second year as a visiting scholar at the Center. She is a lecturer and researcher at the School of Law of the Hebrew University (Jerusalem, Israel). Her fields of interest are contract law and feminist jurisprudence. Hila’s doctoral thesis, a feminist analysis of Israeli contract law, was published this year as a book entitled Contract Law from a Feminist Perspective.

Besides teaching the required Contract Law course at her law school, Dr. Keren also adapted her doctoral thesis to an elective course where she used experimental feminist methods of teaching tailored especially to create a different learning experience.

During her first year at the Center Hila completed an article which focuses on a new-historicist and feminist analysis of the parol evidence rule and challenges the traditional approach to contractual interpretation. The article is forthcoming in 13 Am. U. J. Gender, Soc. Pol'y & L. (2005).

Hila is also a practicing lawyer; her practice is primarily dedicated to issues of discrimination and human rights. Her recent achievements include a landmark Supreme Court decision in the matter of discriminatory government funding of educational organizations as well as a landmark Supreme Court decision (by a panel of 11 judges) regarding freedom of religion, which ordered the Ministry of the Interior in Israel to register as Jews non-Orthodox conversions to Judaism. Such legal activity is part of Hila’s belief in the strong connection between law and social change. Hila will be presenting a talk in our Bag Lunch Speaker Series on October 18, entitled: "Textual Harassment: A New Historicist Reappraisal to the Parol Evidence Rule on its Four Hundreth Annivesary."

 

Richard A. Leo received is Ph.D (Jurisprudence and Social Policy) and J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley in 1994. He is an Associate Professor of Criminology, Law and Society, and Psychology and Social Behavior at the University of California, Irvine and a fellow at the Earl Warren Legal Institute at U.C. Berkeley. In 2003-2004, he was a Visiting Scholar at the Center for the Study of Law and Society. He has conducted extensive research and written numerous articles on police interrogation practices, Miranda requirements, false confessions and miscarriages of justice. He is currently working on a book on these subjects – which is tentatively titled Police Interrogation and American Justice -- for Harvard University Press. He regularly lectures about these topics to police, prosecutors, criminal defense attorneys, and judges, and he is frequently contacted about his research by the electronic and print media. He has consulted on numerous criminal and civil cases, and has testified as an expert witness in state, federal and military courts across the country. He is the recipient of The Ruth Shonle Cavan Young Scholar Award from the American Society of Criminology and The Saleem Shah Career Achievement Award from the American Psychological Association and the American Academy of Forensic Psychology. He recently received a Senior Justice Fellowship (2004-2005) from the Open Society Institute of the Soros Foundations Network to complete a book (with Dr. Tom Wells) on a multiple false confession, multiple wrongful conviction rape-murder case in Norfolk, Virginia.

Stanley Lubman has specialized on China as a scholar and as a practicing lawyer for over thirty years. He has taught on Chinese law, and is currently a Lecturer at the School of Law at the University of California (Berkeley). He has previously taught at Stanford, Columbia, Harvard, the University of Heidelberg and the School of Oriental and African Studies of the University of London, as well as Berkeley. He has been advising clients on the People's Republic of China since 1972 on a wide range of matters and has also been active in representing clients in disputes arbitrated by the China International Economic and Trade Arbitration Commission in Beijing. From 1978 to 1997 he headed the China practices at two major San Francisco law firms and a large English firm of solicitors. He was trained as a China specialist in the United States and in Hong Kong for four years (1963-67) under grants from the Rockefeller Foundation, Columbia University and the Foreign Area Fellowship Program. He has an A.B. degree with honors in history from Columbia College and LL.B., LL.M. and J.S.D. degrees from the Columbia Law School, and also studied at the Faculty of Law and the Institute of Comparative Law of the University of Paris. His writings on Chinese law and related subjects have been widely published, including China's Legal Reforms (Stanley Lubman, ed.), Oxford University Press, 1996 and Bird in a Cage: Legal Reform in China after Mao, Stanford University Press, 2000. He is advisor on China legal projects to The Asia Foundation, and is chair of a committee established by the Foundation to consult with legislative drafters of the National People's Congress Committee on Legislative Affairs on reform of Chinese administrative law. Most recently, in this capacity he organized and was co-chair of a conference in San Francisco in December, 2003 at which a group of American experts on administrative law reviewed a draft administrative procedure law for China together with the Chinese drafters. In September 2002, he co-organized a Conference on Law and Society in China, co-sponsored by the Center, by Boalt, and by the Institute of East Asian Studies, at which a group of scholars who have engaged in field research on Chinese law presented some of their current research. The conference resulted in a volume, Engaging the Law in China: State, Society and the Possibilities for Justice, which will be published by the Stanford University Press early in 2005. He will be presenting a talk in the Bag Lunch Speaker Series on Nov. 22 entitled “Law Reform in China: Progress and Problems.”

 

Mona Lynch is an Associate Professor in the Justice Studies Department at San Jose State University, where she teaches courses on courts, punishment, research methods, and the death penalty. Prior to that, she was an assistant professor in the School of Justice Studies at Arizona State University. She received a B.A., M.S., and Ph.D. from University of California, Santa Cruz in Social Psychology and an M.A. from Stanford University in Communication. Her research falls into two distinct but related categories. First, she has collaborated with Craig Haney on a line of experimental research that examines the social and psychological dynamics of capital jury decision-making as it is shaped by contemporary forms of racism. Her second line of research examines penal/legal discourse and practices in a number of settings, especially focusing on the social and cultural dynamics of contemporary punishment. Much of this work seeks to empirically examine the extent to which prevailing theories of state punishment explain current penal and legal practices.

While visiting at the Center, Professor Lynch will work on writing a book length manuscript, tentatively entitled "The making of a post-rehabilitative penal regime: A case study of Arizona 1960-present." This project examines the rapid and somewhat dramatic development of Arizona’s correctional system, as it is imbedded in the recent social, cultural, and political history of the state. The study is also grounded in a broader research question that asks: What happens when a state penal system has in essence been born in the post-rehabilitative age of penal crisis? The overriding goal of this project is to try to tease out the relative influences that shaped the way this penal system has developed in an era of broader penal transformation: To what extent and in what ways did local culture, norms, and historical precedents influence the particular penal style and approach they have taken? How influential was the larger paradigm shift in penality in terms of how this department decided to approach the correctional task? Mona will present a talk in our Bag Lunch Series on this project on Nov. 15.

 

Jonathan Marshall studies the roles of legal professionals, litigants, and legal structures in making politics and public policy in Japan and cross-nationally. He received a Ph.D. in Political Science from UC Berkeley in 2003 and was an Advanced Research Fellow at the Program on US-Japan Relations at Harvard in 2003-2004. His dissertation, "Leveraging Accountability: How Freedom of Information Brought Courts into Governance in Japan" examined the role of legal scholars and litigants in shaping the rules intended to make the state legible to the governed, including administrative procedure, administrative procedure, and spending oversight laws.

 

Sean Pager is a legal scholar who works in international & comparative constitutional law, focusing on the construction of legal identity, for example, by race or gender. A 1998 graduate of Boalt Hall, he earned an LL.M. in Comparative International Law from the European University Institute in Italy, while studying on a Fulbright Fellowship from 2001-2002. He spent last year as a visiting professor at University of San Francisco, teaching in their international curriculum. Prior to his LL.M studies, he clerked for the Hon. James Browning on the Ninth Circuit, U.S. Court of Appeals, and practiced litigation at Howard Rice in San Francisco. He is currently studying the logic of affirmative action categories in the United States and India.

Brad R. Roth is an Associate Professor of Political Science and Law at Wayne State University.  His scholarly work applies legal and political theory to problems in international and comparative public law.  He earned his Ph.D. from the UCB Jurisprudence and Social Policy Program in December 1996; a modified version of his dissertation was published as Governmental Illegitimacy in International Law (Oxford University Press, 1999), and won the 1999 Certificate of Merit from the American Society of International Law as "best work in a specialized area."  More recent articles and book chapters have focused on topics such as pro-democratic and humanitarian intervention, international criminal justice, and socialist and feminist approaches to human rights.  He is currently working on a book that will explore moral, political, and legal aspects of the relationship between state sovereignty and international law. Brad will be visiting from Jan. 24 to March 6.

 

Tina Stevens holds a PhD from UC Berkeley in US History and a masters degree in Jurisprudence and Social Policy with a focus on law and medicine. She lectures in US history at San Francisco State University and has taught courses in Bioethics and Society and UC Berkeley. Her publications, including her book, Bioethics in America: Origins and Cultural Politics (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000), trace the rise of bioethics as a postwar social institution. Her current research focuses on two legal developments that helped give rise to the biotech industry: the Bayh-Dole Act, which allowed universities and non-profit organizations to patent the results of federally funded biotechnological research, and the US Supreme Court case, Diamond vs. Chakrabarty, which permitted the patenting of “human-made” organisms by deeming such organisms to be, merely, “compositions of matter.” While visiting at the Center, she also hopes to analyze and write on the social implications and historical roots of California’s Proposition 71, the November 2004 initiative that seeks $3 billion to publicly finance stem cell research.

Hiroyuki Tanaka is a practicing attorney in Japan. He served as a public prosecutor in District Public Prosecutors Office in Japan, and currently works as an attorney in Criminal Affairs Bureau, Ministry of Justice, Japan,

Mr. Tanaka earned his LLB from the University of Tokyo in Japan and was licensed to practice law in Japan after his graduation from the Legal training and research institute of the supreme court of Japan. He also earned his LLM from the University of Virginia School of Law. His primary research interests are comparative criminal justice and evidentiary rule.

 

VISITING SCHOLARS - Fall 2004

Ira Mark Ellman is a legal scholar whose principal work has been in family law. Professor and Willard H. Pedrick Distinguished Research Scholar at Arizona State University, he received his law degree from Berkeley in 1973. Before law school he did graduate work in experimental child psychology at the University of Illinois. He was the Chief Reporter and the Justice Ammi Cutter Reporter for the Principles of the Law of Family Dissolution, a project of the American Law Institute completed over a ten-year period. The 1200 page volume was published in May of 2002. The Fourth Edition of his widely-used Family Law casebook will appear in October of 2004. Professor Ellman’s articles have frequently drawn upon social science research. His recent articles include an empirical study of the effects on divorced children of their parents’ post-divorce relocation to different cities, jointly authored with two social psychologists, and an examination of the economic analysis employed by the consultants who advise most states in the periodic revisions of their child support guidelines. The relocation study drew considerable attention in the press both here and abroad, and a preliminary report on the child support study prompted the creation of a special committee in Arizona to reconsider that state’s approach to its child support guidelines. Professor Ellman’s current projects include an empirical study with a social psychologist into the fairness principles that people implicitly employ in making judgments about the appropriate level of child support payments, and a book for Oxford University Press that examines the reasons why the creation of appropriate family law rules poses special challenges for policymakers.

Professor Ellman clerked for Justice William O. Douglas of the United States Supreme Court, was a legislative aide to Senator Adlai Stevenson III, practiced law in San Francisco, and drafted a nonprofit corporations code for the for the state of California. He was a founding member of the Bioethics Committee of the Good Samaritan Medical Center in Phoenix, and has also published in bioethics and health care law.

Ira will be presenting a talk in our Bag Lunch Speaker Series on Sept. 20 entitled “Fudging Failure: The Economic Analysis Used to Construct Child Support Guidelines.”

Motoaki Funakoshi is an assistant professor of law at Kyoto University specializing in the sociology of law. His previous research has focused on legal theory and he has published several articles using a critical legal analysis of contract law doctrine. While at the Center, he hopes to develop a focus on the empirical analysis of law. Professor Funakoshi has an LLM degree from Harvard University and he is the recipient of a scholarship from the Kyoto University Foundation to spend 2004-05 studying at the Center.

 

Steven A. Gerencser is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Indiana University South Bend. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota in 1996 where he specialized in political theory. He has published several essays on the 20th century English philospher Michael J. Oakeshott, and also a book titled The Skeptic's Oakeshott (Palgrave 2000). Gerencser comes to the Center to begin a new research program located at the intersection of jurisprudence and political theory. While at the Center he will focus on the corporate form, specifically the status of the corporation as a person, for contemporary democratic theory and practice.

 

Mari Hirayama is a doctoral student of law at Kwansei Gakuin University Graduate School of Law in Japan. In 2002-03 she was in the LLM. Program at the University of Minnesota Law School as a Fulbright Scholarship. Her major areas are Criminal Law, Juvenile Law and Criminology, with a special focus on Restorative Justice. Mari was a visiting scholar at the Center in 2003-04 and will be with us until mid-September 2004.

 

Tomoki Ikenaga is a practicing lawyer in Japan. He was selected by the Japanese Federation of Bar Associations in our arrangement under which the Center for the Study of Law and Society hosts an annual visit from a Japanese defense lawyer or public interest lawyer. Mr. Ikenaga received the law degree at Waseda University in 1991 and graduated from the Legal Research and Training Institute of Japan in 1997. Since being admitted to the Bar in 1997, he has practiced in the areas of juvenile and criminal law as a defense lawyer, and family and child abuse law to suspend or terminate the relationship between children and their parents. While at the Center, he will continue his research in these areas, and also in the area of international development and international law, including legal assistance to post-conflicted or developing countries.

 

Jean-Noel Jouzel is a doctoral student in political science at the Institut d'Etudes Politiques of Grenoble, under the supervision of Pierre Lascoumes, a former CSLS visiting scholar. Jean-Noel studied sociology in the Ecole Normale Superieure of Cachan, and completed a master degree of political science in Sciences-Po, Paris. He teaches courses in sociology to undergraduates in Grenoble.

Jean-Noel will be at the Center through October 2004. During this period he will conduct interviews as part of the fieldwork for his dissertation, which entails a comparison between the ways the controversies raised by the industrial use of toxic chemicals are tackled in France and in California. His approach stands at the crossroad of social study of science and public policy analysis.

 

Hila Keren has returned for a second year as a visiting scholar at the Center. She is a lecturer and researcher at the School of Law of the Hebrew University (Jerusalem, Israel). Her fields of interest are contract law and feminist jurisprudence. Hila’s doctoral thesis, a feminist analysis of Israeli contract law, was published this year as a book entitled Contract Law from a Feminist Perspective.

Besides teaching the required Contract Law course at her law school, Dr. Keren also adapted her doctoral thesis to an elective course where she used experimental feminist methods of teaching tailored especially to create a different learning experience.

Last year Hila participated in the 6th Annual Conference of Law, Culture and the Humanities in New York, where she presented a paper entitled “Beyond the Text: a Feminist Challenge to Contract Interpretation”. During her first year at the Center she developed this work into a paper currently under submission.

Hila is also a practicing lawyer; her practice is primarily dedicated to issues of discrimination and human rights. Her recent achievements include a landmark Supreme Court decision in the matter of discriminatory government funding of educational organizations as well as a landmark Supreme Court decision (by a panel of 11 judges) regarding freedom of religion, which ordered the Ministry of the Interior in Israel to register as Jews non-Orthodox conversions to Judaism. Such legal activity is part of Hila’s belief in the strong connection between law and social change. Hila will be presenting a talk in our Bag Lunch Speaker Series on October 18, entitled: "Textual Harassment: A New Historicist Reappraisal to the Parol Evidence Rule on its Four Hundreth Annivesary."

 

Richard A. Leo received is Ph.D (Jurisprudence and Social Policy) and J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley in 1994. He is an Associate Professor of Criminology, Law and Society, and Psychology and Social Behavior at the University of California, Irvine and a fellow at the Earl Warren Legal Institute at U.C. Berkeley. In 2003-2004, he was a Visiting Scholar at the Center for the Study of Law and Society. He has conducted extensive research and written numerous articles on police interrogation practices, Miranda requirements, false confessions and miscarriages of justice. He is currently working on a book on these subjects – which is tentatively titled Police Interrogation and American Justice -- for Harvard University Press. He regularly lectures about these topics to police, prosecutors, criminal defense attorneys, and judges, and he is frequently contacted about his research by the electronic and print media. He has consulted on numerous criminal and civil cases, and has testified as an expert witness in state, federal and military courts across the country. He is the recipient of The Ruth Shonle Cavan Young Scholar Award from the American Society of Criminology and The Saleem Shah Career Achievement Award from the American Psychological Association and the American Academy of Forensic Psychology. He recently received a Senior Justice Fellowship (2004-2005) from the Open Society Institute of the Soros Foundations Network to complete a book (with Dr. Tom Wells) on a multiple false confession, multiple wrongful conviction rape-murder case in Norfolk, Virginia.

Stanley Lubman has specialized on China as a scholar and as a practicing lawyer for over thirty years. He has taught on Chinese law, and is currently a Lecturer at the School of Law at the University of California (Berkeley). He has previously taught at Stanford, Columbia, Harvard, the University of Heidelberg and the School of Oriental and African Studies of the University of London, as well as Berkeley. He has been advising clients on the People's Republic of China since 1972 on a wide range of matters and has also been active in representing clients in disputes arbitrated by the China International Economic and Trade Arbitration Commission in Beijing. From 1978 to 1997 he headed the China practices at two major San Francisco law firms and a large English firm of solicitors. He was trained as a China specialist in the United States and in Hong Kong for four years (1963-67) under grants from the Rockefeller Foundation, Columbia University and the Foreign Area Fellowship Program. He has an A.B. degree with honors in history from Columbia College and LL.B., LL.M. and J.S.D. degrees from the Columbia Law School, and also studied at the Faculty of Law and the Institute of Comparative Law of the University of Paris. His writings on Chinese law and related subjects have been widely published, including China's Legal Reforms (Stanley Lubman, ed.), Oxford University Press, 1996 and Bird in a Cage: Legal Reform in China after Mao, Stanford University Press, 2000. He is advisor on China legal projects to The Asia Foundation, and is chair of a committee established by the Foundation to consult with legislative drafters of the National People's Congress Committee on Legislative Affairs on reform of Chinese administrative law. Most recently, in this capacity he organized and was co-chair of a conference in San Francisco in December, 2003 at which a group of American experts on administrative law reviewed a draft administrative procedure law for China together with the Chinese drafters. In September 2002, he co-organized a Conference on Law and Society in China, co-sponsored by the Center, by Boalt, and by the Institute of East Asian Studies, at which a group of scholars who have engaged in field research on Chinese law presented some of their current research. The conference resulted in a volume, Engaging the Law in China: State, Society and the Possibilities for Justice, which will be published by the Stanford University Press early in 2005. He will be presenting a talk in the Bag Lunch Speaker Series on Nov. 22 entitled “Law Reform in China: Progress and Problems.”

 

Mona Lynch is an Associate Professor in the Justice Studies Department at San Jose State University, where she teaches courses on courts, punishment, research methods, and the death penalty. Prior to that, she was an assistant professor in the School of Justice Studies at Arizona State University. She received a B.A., M.S., and Ph.D. from University of California, Santa Cruz in Social Psychology and an M.A. from Stanford University in Communication. Her research falls into two distinct but related categories. First, she has collaborated with Craig Haney on a line of experimental research that examines the social and psychological dynamics of capital jury decision-making as it is shaped by contemporary forms of racism. Her second line of research examines penal/legal discourse and practices in a number of settings, especially focusing on the social and cultural dynamics of contemporary punishment. Much of this work seeks to empirically examine the extent to which prevailing theories of state punishment explain current penal and legal practices.

While visiting at the Center, Professor Lynch will work on writing a book length manuscript, tentatively entitled "The making of a post-rehabilitative penal regime: A case study of Arizona 1960-present." This project examines the rapid and somewhat dramatic development of Arizona’s correctional system, as it is imbedded in the recent social, cultural, and political history of the state. The study is also grounded in a broader research question that asks: What happens when a state penal system has in essence been born in the post-rehabilitative age of penal crisis? The overriding goal of this project is to try to tease out the relative influences that shaped the way this penal system has developed in an era of broader penal transformation: To what extent and in what ways did local culture, norms, and historical precedents influence the particular penal style and approach they have taken? How influential was the larger paradigm shift in penality in terms of how this department decided to approach the correctional task? Mona will present a talk in our Bag Lunch Series on this project on Nov. 15. Mona will be here for the fall semester.

 

Jonathan Marshall studies the roles of legal professionals, litigants, and legal structures in making politics and public policy in Japan and cross-nationally. He received a Ph.D. in Political Science from UC Berkeley in 2003 and was an Advanced Research Fellow at the Program on US-Japan Relations at Harvard in 2003-2004. His dissertation, "Leveraging Accountability: How Freedom of Information Brought Courts into Governance in Japan" examined the role of legal scholars and litigants in shaping the rules intended to make the state legible to the governed, including administrative procedure, administrative procedure, and spending oversight laws.

 

Margarita Martinez-Escamilla is Professor in the Department of Criminal Law of the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Her research focuses on three areas of criminal law, criminal justice, and criminology: some problems concerning the domains of actus reus and mens rea; the Spanish correctional system; and poverty as the motive for crime commission and how this circumstance should affect criminal responsibility. Her research has led to the publication of four books and many articles.

Profesor Martinez-Escamilla has been awarded several Spanish and foreign scholarships, including a three-year scholarship from the German Government to conduct her doctoral research at the Universität München (Germany)

In addition to teaching Criminal Law, Martinez-Escamilla has worked as Counsellor-at-Law for the Spanish Constitutional Court and as Director of the Center of Legal Advice for Prison Population at the Municipal Prison in Madrid.

During her stay in Berkeley (May-September 2004) Margarita Martínez is working on the US penitentiary system and on the causes of the huge rates of imprisonment, with special focus on the criminalization of poverty.

 

Sean Pager is a legal scholar who works in international & comparative constitutional law, focusing on the construction of legal identity, for example, by race or gender. A 1998 graduate of Boalt Hall, he earned an LL.M. in Comparative International Law from the European University Institute in Italy, while studying on a Fulbright Fellowship from 2001-2002. He spent last year as a visiting professor at University of San Francisco, teaching in their international curriculum. Prior to his LL.M studies, he clerked for the Hon. James Browning on the Ninth Circuit, U.S. Court of Appeals, and practiced litigation at Howard Rice in San Francisco. He is currently studying the logic of affirmative action categories in the United States and India.

 

Tina Stevens holds a PhD from UC Berkeley in US History and a masters degree in Jurisprudence and Social Policy with a focus on law and medicine. She lectures in US history at San Francisco State University and has taught courses in Bioethics and Society and UC Berkeley. Her publications, including her book, Bioethics in America: Origins and Cultural Politics (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000), trace the rise of bioethics as a postwar social institution. Her current research focuses on two legal developments that helped give rise to the biotech industry: the Bayh-Dole Act, which allowed universities and non-profit organizations to patent the results of federally funded biotechnological research, and the US Supreme Court case, Diamond vs. Chakrabarty, which permitted the patenting of “human-made” organisms by deeming such organisms to be, merely, “compositions of matter.” While visiting at the Center, she also hopes to analyze and write on the social implications and historical roots of California’s Proposition 71, the November 2004 initiative that seeks $3 billion to publicly finance stem cell research.

 

Hiroyuki Tanaka is a practicing attorney in Japan. He served as a public prosecutor in District Public Prosecutors Office in Japan, and currently works as an attorney in Criminal Affairs Bureau, Ministry of Justice, Japan,

Mr. Tanaka earned his LLB from the University of Tokyo in Japan and was licensed to practice law in Japan after his graduation from the Legal training and research institute of the supreme court of Japan. He also earned his LLM from the University of Virginia School of Law. His primary research interests are comparative criminal justice and evidentiary rule.

 

Suzan Verberk continues as a visiting scholar for the Fall Semester 2004. She studied Political Science and Public Administration at the Free University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, and was the recipient of the National Award of the ‘Dutch Association for Public Administration’ for her master’s thesis on administrative corruption, democracy and democratization. Following her undergraduate studies she was a scientific researcher at the department of Political Science and Public Administration of the Free University, participating in the research program on ‘Ethics and public behavior’. Since 1999 she has been working as a researcher and project manager in commercial public policy research. Her fields of expertise are administration of justice, law enforcement and public sector ethics. During her work in the private sector she has continued to hold close ties with the academic world.

Suzan Verberk is continuing with her study of the projects initiated under the California Judicial Council’s Court and Community Collaboration Program. To promote public trust and confidence, this program encourages courts to become more responsive to community concerns and educate the public about the role and function of the court system. Verberk’s research focuses on the extent to which the program’s objectives are met and on the factors contributing to or hampering its success. She is paying special attention to ethical dilemmas confronting judges as a result of increased community involvement, translating the research results to the Dutch situation. Like in California, the Dutch judiciary feels the need for increased responsiveness to the public. There is much to be learned from the experiences with the Court Community Collaboration Program - notwithstanding the many differences between the Californian and Dutch judicial system.. The research is conducted in collaboration with Prof. Dr. Nick Huls from the Erasmus University Rotterdam and Leiden University in the Netherlands.

 

Dvora Yanow is Professor in the Department of Public Administration, California State University, Hayward. Her research is shaped by an overall interest in the communication of meaning in organizational and public policy settings. She has written on public policies as collective identity stories, the role of built space in communicating meaning, and organizational learning from an interpretive-cultural perspective, as well as on organizational metaphors, myths, and culture, and interpretive philosophies and research methods. She is the author of How does a policy mean? Interpreting policy and organizational actions (Georgetown University Press, 1996), Conducting interpretive policy analysis (Sage, 2000), and Constructing "race” and “ethnicity" in America: Category-making in public policy and administration (M. E. Sharpe, 2003, winner of the 2004 Best Book Prize from the Section on Public Administration Research, American Society for Public Administration), and co-editor of Knowing in Organizations: A Practice-based Approach (with Davide Nicolini and Silvia Gherardi; M. E. Sharpe, 2003). Interpretation and Method: Empirical research methods and the interpretive turn will be published next year (M E Sharpe; co-edited with Peregrine Schwartz-Shea). Her articles have been published in such journals as Administration & Society, Administrative Theory & Praxis, the Journal of Architectural and Planning Research, the Journal of Management Inquiry, the Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, Organization, Organization Science, Political Research Quarterly, and Policy Sciences. She is also a Contributing Editor for the quarterly Judaism, a pianist and violinist-fiddler, a folk dancer and singer, and gardener. Dvora was a visiting scholar in 2003-04 and will be here until mid-September.

VISITING SCHOLARS - 2003-2004

Liz Borgwardt is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Utah, where she has taught since 2002. Professor Borgwardt earned her PhD in history from Stanford University, a JD from Harvard Law School and an M.Phil. in International Relations and BA in Modern History from Cambridge University (UK).She served as a law clerk for the Hon. Cecil F. Poole on the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco, and practiced as a litigator and mediator in San Francisco. She spent the academic year 2001-02 on a postdoctoral fellowship, as a Samuel I. Golieb Fellow in Legal History at NYU Law School.

Professor Borgwardt specializes in the history of U.S. foreign relations, constitutional history, the history of international law, and historical perspectives on human rights and globalization. Her articles and reviews have been published in the UCLA Law Review, the New York University Journal of International Law & Politics, Peace & Change, and the New York Times, with work forthcoming in Reviews in American History and Law & Social Inquiry. She is co-author of a textbook on international conflict published by Prentice Hall, adopted at over 50 institutions. She is also a co-author of a handbook on decisionmaking in international crises published by Harvard University Press. Her new manuscript, Inventing Human Rights: The World War II Atlantic Charter and American Multilateralism, is based on her award-winning Stanford dissertation, completed under the supervision of David M. Kennedy, Barton J. Bernstein, and Jack N. Rakove in 2002.

Professor Borgwardt's academic awards and honors include the Stanford History Department's only dissertation award, the Elizabeth Spilman Rosenfield Prize, the Littleton-Griswold Dissertation Research Award from the American Historical Association, the Stuart L. Bernath Dissertation Research Award from the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations, and teaching awards from Stanford and Harvard universities. Professor Borgwardt will be spending her academic year at the CSLS researching her next book, on the transformation of ideas about sovereignty in the interwar era; revising her manuscript on World War II-era international institutions for publication; writing commissioned reviews for Reviews in American History and Law & Social Inquiry; and preparing three conference papers.

Bryna Bogoch is a Senior Lecturer at the Departments of Political Studies and of Interdisciplinary Social Science Studies at Bar Ilan University. She completed her undergraduate studies at McGill University in Montreal, Canada, where she lived until June 1967, and obtained her masters and doctorate from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Her main research interests have been gender and the law and language and the law (and sometimes both of these combined). She recently directed a large scale study of gender bias in the courts of Israel, the results of which were published in Bogoch B. and Don-Yechiye, R. The Gender of Justice: Bias against Women in Israeli Courts (2000). Jerusalem: Jerusalem Institute of Israel Research. In 2000 she was awarded a grant from the Israeli Academy of Sciences to study (with Ruth Halperin-Kaddari of the Faculty of Law) the changing nature of professional practice in divorce that has occurred as a result of the introduction of Family Courts, the promotion of mediation, and the increase of women in the legal profession. Last month she received a grant from the Israel Foundation Trustees (with Yifat Hotzman-Gazit from the Faculty of Law) to study the press coverage of the courts in Israel.

R. Benjamin Brown is an historian with a special interest in nineteenth century property law, particularly the law that protected common use rights in unfenced land in the eastern United States. Ben has a J.D. from Vanderbilt University and a PhD from the University of Michigan. He held a Doctoral Fellowship at the American Bar Foundation and was the Legal History Fellow at the University of Wisconsin School of Law.

During the last year, Ben's chapter, "The Tennessee Supreme Court in Reconstruction and Redemption, 1865-1885," was published in A History of the Tennessee Supreme Court, 1796-1998 by the University of Tennessee Press. His article, "Judging in the Days of the Early Republic," was cited and quoted by the Ninth Circuit in a November 2002 opinion.

He continues his work on his book on the rise and fall of the open range property system in the nineteenth century South this year, particularly working on evaluating the competing explanations for the intense political attacks on that property law system in the post-Reconstruction era.

Ben was a visiting scholar at the Center for the past two years. This year he is teaching a Legal Studies course on 20th Century U.S. Legal and Constitutional History in the fall semester, and a survey of U.S. Legal and Constitutional History in the spring.

Filippa Corneliussen is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow based at the Centre for the Study of Bioscience, Biomedicine, Biotechnology and Society, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Dr. Cornelliussen will be visiting the Center from 1 Oct 2003 - 31 May 2004. During her visit she will be working on her three-year, Wellcome Trust funded research project entitled 'Social and Ethical Aspects of Governing Dual-Use Biomedical R&D'. The project is a comparative study of the UK and the US, and it focuses on three aspects of regulating dual-use biomedical technology: 1) the ethical principles and social objectives underpinning policy and the development of regulatory measures; 2) the impact of the regulatory measures on the biotech industry and firm behaviour; and 3) the implementation and enforcement of the regulatory measures in the private sector.

Filippa obtained her PhD from the Institute for the Study of Genetics, Biorisks and Society, University of Nottingham, and has recently completed a one-year postdoctoral fellowship at the Centre for Analysis of Risk and Regulation, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Ira Mark Ellman - See 2004-05 visiting scholars

Ron Harris is Senior Lecturer in Law and Legal History in the Faculty of Law, Tel Aviv University. Professor Harris is a legal historian who teaches courses on the history of Anglo-American and Israeli law. He is a co-founder and co-organizer of the TAU law & history workshop. His other fields of research and teaching are corporate law, debtor -- creditor law, comparative law and welfare law. He earned an LL.B. from TAU Law School (1987), B.A. and M.A. from TAU History Department (1989), and M.Phil. and Ph.D. in history from Columbia University (1994), where he was the recipient of a four years President''s Fellowship. He joined the TAU Law School faculty in 1993 and has been a Senior Lecturer since 1999. He has received fellowships from Yad Hanadiv (Rothschild Foundation) and the British Council. He spent a year (1997-8) as a visiting scholar at the Center for Law and Society, UC Berkeley and extended research periods in Oxford and London. Ron Harris is the author of Industrializing English Law: Entrepreneurship and Business Organization, 1720 - 1844 (CUP, 2000), the editor of two other books and the author or co-author of numerous articles for law reviews, legal history, economic history, and Israeli history journals. He recently completed a chapter titled "Government and the Economy, 1688 -1850" for the Cambridge Economic History of Britain; an article titled "The Encounters of Economic History and Legal History" for Law and History Review; and an article titled "The Uses of History in Law and Economics" for Theoretical Inquiries in Law. This year Ron Harris visits the Center again, and teaches a course for Boalt Hall in the fall (Corporations I) and a seminar for the JSP Program in the spring (Law and economic change: historical perspectives). While in Berkeley Ron plans to work on projects on the early institutional history of the East India Company and on the history of corporate personality theories.

Mari Hirayama is a doctoral student of law at Kwansei Gakuin University Graduate School of Law in Japan. In 2002-03 she was in the LLM. Program at the University of Minnesota Law School as a Fulbright Scholarship. Her major areas are Criminal Law, Juvenile Law and Criminology, with a special focus on Restorative Justice.

Hiroshi Kawatsu is a practicing lawyer in Japan. He was selected by the Japanese Federation of Bar Associations in our arrangement under which the Center for the Study of Law and Society hosts an annual visit from a Japanese defense lawyer or public interest lawyer.

Mr. Kawatsu earned a law degree at Waseda University, and graduated from the Legal Research and Training Institute in Japan. Since his admission to the Bar, he has been practicing in various areas of law, especially criminal law and criminal procedure as a defense lawyer, and has been appointed as a member of the Criminal Defense Committee of the Bar. In recent years, he has supported the introduction of a jury system into Japan in which lay citizens have previously played no part in the judiciary, and has researched the jury system of the United States. As Japan recently determined to introduce a quasi-jury system, named saiban-in system, into serious criminal trials in the near future, he plans to continue his research on the jury system, focusing on trial techniques and their effect on jury decision-making. He also plans to do research in the area of law and psychology, especially in connection with evidence and decision-making.

Hila Keren - See 2004-05 visiting scholars.

Richard A. Leo - See 2004-05 visiting scholars.

Stanley Lubman - See 2004-05 visiting scholars.

Seongdo Mun is Assistant Professor of Criminal Law and Criminal Procedure at the Korean National Police University in the Republic of Korea. He completed his undergraduate studies at Seoul National University in Seoul, ROK, where he earned his masters and doctorate under the guidance of Prof. Dongwoon Shin.

Professor Mun's main research interests have been Law and Police (strictly speaking, Police in view of Law). He wrote Legal Problems and Improvement of Obtaining Evidence by the Police of an Unlawful Assembly and Demonstration, Research Institute of Police Science in Korean National Police Agency, 2002, "Legal Basis and Problem of Fingerprinting a Criminal Suspect in the Criminal Investigation", 52 Korean Criminological Review 63(2002), "Public Relations of the Police and the Korean Criminal Law", 21 Journal of Korean Police University 163(2001), etc. He recently directed a large scale study of comparative investigation procedure, the results of which will be published in Parkyoungsa. He established the Korean Police Law Association for the purpose of bringing together young legal scholars and police officers to study legal problems of the police and human rights.

During his visit (until August, 2004), Professor Mun will continue work on his book on the warrant-requirement doctrine, particularly comparing the American warrant system and the Korean one in view of the legal nature of the arrest warrant.

Annette Nierobisz completed her doctoral studies in the Department of Sociology at the University of Toronto in March 2001 and is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Carleton College. Annette's research broadly explores legal reactions to workplace issues.

As a graduate student Annette studied the resolution of sexual harassment complaints lodged with the Canadian Human Rights Commission, a "court of last resort" for sexual harassment cases arising in federal workplaces. One dimension of this research examines the impact of legal, extra-legal, and organizational characteristics on the decisions reached by the Commission. A recent article based on this research appears in Social Problems (volume 48, p. 605-623).

In her more recent research, Annette examines the interconnection of economic forces, organizational logics, and legal decisions and discourses. She is currently studying this through analysis of judicial decisions on Canadian wrongful dismissal cases. The cases studied were heard to judgment over a 28-year period (1970-1997) that encompasses the emergence of the "new economy" and a revision of the traditional employment contract. Annette specifically studies how judges navigate the new employment context using a body of law that was developed in a distinctly different economic era with a different set of employment expectations and obligations.

At the Center Annette will be completing two projects. A first project examines the changing impact of legally relevant criteria in wrongful dismissal cases through a period that encompasses the development, implementation, and expansion of downsizing as a corporate logic. A second project examines changing business discourse in newspaper accounts to assess corresponding changes in the language and rational used by judges in later wrongful dismissal decisions.

On October 20th Annette will present her work in the Center's Luncheon Speaker Series. Her talk is entitled "Wrestling with the New Economy: Wrongful Dismissal and the Canadian Courts, 1981-1997."

Jiri Priban is Professor of Jurisprudence and Sociology of Law at Charles University in Prague, and Lecturer at Cardiff Law School, University of Wales. He is the author of Dissidents of Law: on the 1989 Revolutions, Legitimations, Fictions of Legality and Contemporary Version of the Social Contract published in the Law, Justice and Power series edited by Austin Sarat for Ashgate Publishing, Aldershot, 2002. In September, 2003 Professor Priban is a visiting professor at the University of San Francisco Law School, and will also participate as a visiting scholar at the Center.

On Friday, September 12, Professor Priban will present a talk in our Luncheon Speaker Series entitled, "Reconstituting Paradise Lost: The Temporal Dimension of Postcommunist Constitution-Making in Central Europe."

Jellienke Stamhuis has a law degree from Groningen University, the Netherlands and is currently working on her PhD dissertation at the Department of Legal Theory at the University of Groningen. During her visit in Berkeley, she will continue her work on her dissertation research and plans to participate in some graduate courses. Her main research interests are in the field of sociology of law, the interactionist approach to law and legislation and workers participation law. Her dissertation research addresses several problems and questions, both theoretically and empirically, concerning the concept of 'interactive legislation'. The aim of the research is to test the assumptions of a model of legislation in which the legislator does not one-sidedly impose behavioral rules, but where these are the result of interaction between legislator, judiciary, administrators/officials, interests groups, scholars and media. In Berkeley she hopes to explore the American perspective on workers participation and interactive legislation generally. Jellienke Stamhuis has recently worked on three articles that will be published later this year. The first two deal with the phenomenon of self-regulation and corporate responsibility. The other focuses on elements of interactive law in works councils legislation.

Suzan Verberk - See 2004-05 visiting scholars.

Dvora Yanow - See 2004-05 visiting scholars.

 

VISITING SCHOLARS - 2002-2003

Bryna Bogoch. Bryna Bogoch is a Senior Lecturer at the Departments of Political Studies and of Interdisciplinary Social Science Studies at Bar Ilan University. She completed her undergraduate studies at McGill University in Montreal, Canada, where she lived until June 1967, and obtained her masters and doctorate from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Her main research interests have been gender and the law and language and the law (and sometimes both of these combined). She recently directed a large scale study of gender bias in the courts of Israel, the results of which were published in Bogoch B. and Don-Yechiye, R. The Gender of Justice: Bias against Women in Israeli Courts (2000). Jerusalem: Jerusalem Institute of Israel Research. In 2000 she was awarded a grant from the Israeli Academy of Sciences to study (with Ruth Halperin-Kaddari of the Faculty of Law) the changing nature of professional practice in divorce that has occurred as a result of the introduction of Family Courts, the promotion of mediation, and the increase of women in the legal profession. Last month she received a grant from the Israel Foundation Trustees (with Yifat Hotzman-Gazit from the Faculty of Law) to study the press coverage of the courts in Israel.

R. Benjamin Brown. Ben Brown is an historian with a special interest in nineteenth century property law, particularly the law that protected common use rights in unfenced land in the eastern United States. Ben has a J.D. from Vanderbilt University and a PhD from the University of Michigan. He held a Doctoral Fellowship at the American Bar Foundation and was the Legal History Fellow at the University of Wisconsin School of Law.

During the last year, Ben’s chapter, "The Tennessee Supreme Court in Reconstruction and Redemption, 1865-1885," was published in A History of the Tennessee Supreme Court, 1796-1998 by the University of Tennessee Press. His article, "Judging in the Days of the Early Republic," was cited and quoted by the Ninth Circuit in a November 2002 opinion.

He continues his work on his book on the rise and fall of the open range property system in the nineteenth century South this year, particularly working on evaluating the competing explanations for the intense political attacks on that property law system in the post-Reconstruction era.

Ben is teaching a Legal Studies course on 20th Century Legal History in the spring semester.

Mauricio Duce. Some of you will remember Maauricio Duce from his visit in January and February of last year. Professor Duce has a law degree from Diego Portales University in Santiago-Chile (1992), and a JSM from Stanford Law School (1999). Professor and researcher at Diego Portales School of Law (tenure since 1996), he teaches: Criminal Procedure, Due Process and Trial Advocacy, and served as Director of the Center for Juridical Research at Diego Portales Law School from September 2000 to October 2002. He has twice won a Fulbright Scholarship, in 1998 and 2002. Since 1992 Professor Duce has been deeply involved in the process of reform of the criminal justice system in Chile both from his position at the University and in advising governmental and non-governmental organizations in the field. From 1994 to 1995, he was a member of a 4-person team preparing the draft of Chile's new Code of Criminal Procedure as well as the other statutes required to reform the Chilean Criminal Justice System. Subsequently, he was a member of the task force that participated in the design and implementation of the new system (from 1996 to 2000). Currently he is a consultant to the Justice Studies Center of the Americas in criminal justice reform in several countries in Latin America. He has published several books and articles about criminal procedure and criminal justice reform in Chile, Argentina, Mexico, Venezuela, the US. and China.

During his visit (until March 10th, 2003), Professor Duce will be working on a study of the impact of the Chilean criminal justice reform, for his JSD dissetation at Stanford Law School. (Lawrence Friedman is his advisor.) The general context of the study is the reforms made by most Latin American countries since the mid `80s to their inquisitorial models of criminal procedure.

On February 18th, Mauricio will present a talk in the Center's Luncheon Speaker Series entitled "Criminal Justice Reform in Chile: Advances and Perspectives on a Radical Process of Transformation."

Leslie Goldstein. Leslie Goldstein grew up in Cleveland, Ohio, earned Political Science degrees at the University of Chicago and Cornell, and is the Judge Hugh M. Morris Professor of Political Science and International Relations at the University of Delaware. Her research and teaching interests, broadly speaking, are in the areas of public law and political theory, and also in both these topics as they intersect with questions of sex and gender. She has a longstanding interest in the relationship between law and social change and between judicial power and democracy. In recent years she has done work on the European Court of Justice, and that work took her into explorations of comparative federalism, and into her most recent research interest, the rule of law. Her books have included The Constitutional Rights of Women (U of Wisconsin Press, 2d ed. 1988); In Defense of the Text: Democracy and Constitutional Theory (Roman and Littlefield, 1991); Contemporary Cases in Women's Rights (U of Wisconsin Press, 1994); Feminist Jurisprudence: The Diffference Debate (edited, Rowman & Littlefield, 1992); Constituting Federal Sovereignity: The European Union in Comparative Context (Johns Hopkins Press, 2001).

Professor Goldstein plans to spend her time at the Center (until July 31, 2003) working on a couple of conference papers and figuring out what is the rule of law, and working on an updated edition of her Constitutional Rights of Women casebook, and getting started on a casebook on race and the Supreme Court, designed for undergraduate use. Meanwhile she is also teaching an undergraduate constitutional law class for the Political Science Department.

After figuring out what the rule of law is, on April 14th, Leslie will present a talk in the Luncheon Speaker Series entitled, aptly, "The Rule of Law."

Michele Goodwin. Michele Goodwin is Assistant Professor of Law, Depaul University College of Law. She is Director of the Center for the Study of Race & Bioethics and faculty co-chair of the Health Law Institute. She received her B.A., University of Wisconsin; J.D., Boston College; LL.M., University of Wisconsin

Michele's research interests are in law and medicine, bioethics, and education policy. Her work examines physical, behavioral, and social aspects of healthcare, with particular focus on ethnicity, gender, and poverty issues. Before joining the faculty at DePaul, she served as an assistant dean at the University of Wisconsin Law School, where she earned her LL.M. degree and was named a William H. Hastie Fellow. She has lectured and researched internationally. Her most recent publications include: Race, Gender & Mental Health: The Case of Wanda Jean Allen in the Critical Race Feminism 2nd Ed. (NYU Publishers); Intellectual Integration into The Legal Academy (U. Mich. J. Race & Law); Sex, Theory & Practice: Reconciling Davis v. Monroe (DePaul Law Rev); Deconstructing Legislative Consent Law: Organ Taking, Racial Profiling, & Distributive Justice (U Virginia Law & Tech Journal). Her edited book, Race, Democracy & Citizenship: Racial Profiling in America is due to be published with the University of Colorado Press in 2003. She is also a published poet.

Michele is currently completing an article addressing organ commodification and the African American community.

Miriam Gur-Arye. Miri Gur-Arye is Judge Basil Wunsh Professor of Criminal Law, Faculty of Law, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel. She received her LL.B. in 1975 (first in class) and D. Jur. in 1981 (summa cum laude) from the Hebrew University. Miri has been on the Faculty of Law, Hebrew University since 1980. In 1984-5 she was a visiting fellow at University College, Oxford. Miri's main areas of research are: Theories of Criminal Liability,Criminal Law Defences, Legal Responses to Public and Political Corruption, Legal Responses to Social Trauma.

While a visiting scholar at the Center during 2001-02, Miri completed a paper on "Can Freedom of Expression Survive Social Truama – The Israeli Experience" ( forthcoming, Duke Journal of Comparative Law), and another on "Relience on a Lawyer’s Mistaken Advice – Should It Be an Excuse from Criminal Liability" (forthcoming, American Journal of Criminal Law).

In Spring 2003, Miri is teaching a seminar at Boalt Hall on "Topics in Criminal Law – Comparative Perspectives."

Tim Hartnagel. Dean Timothy (Tim) Hartnagel is a Professor in the Sociology Dept at the Univ of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada where he has been teaching and doing research specializing in criminology since 1971. Currently he is in the middle of a 2nd term as Academic Dean of St. Joseph's College, an undergraduate college affiliated with and on the campus of the University. He served as Director of the BA Program in Criminology for 10 years from its inception; he has also served as Associate Chair of the Sociology Dept. Two previous sabbaticals were spent as a Visiting Fellow at the Institute of Criminology, Cambridge University. He has published in a variety of sociology and criminology journals, focusing particularly on the social causes of criminal behavior. With a former PhD student, Steve Baron, he has published several articles dealing with crime among street youth in Edmonton. In recent years he has been turning his attention to the subject of crime and public policy, particularly the topic of public attitudes toward criminal justice policy. He recently published a paper in the Canadian Journal of Criminology dealing with attitudes toward gun control in Alberta; has edited a book of readings on crime control policy in Canada; and has just completed a paper entitled "Youth Crime and Justice in Alberta: Rhetoric and Reality" for the Parkland Institute, a policy research institute at the Univ of Alberta. He will be continuing his research on public attitudes toward criminal justice policy during his time here at the Center. On April 28th, Dean Hartnagel will present this research in the Center's Luncheon Speaker Series.

Stanley Lubman. Stanley Lubman has specialized on China as a scholar and as a practicing lawyer for over thirty years. He has taught on Chinese law, and is currently a Lecturer at the School of Law at the University of California (Berkeley). He has previously taught at Stanford, Columbia, Harvard, the University of Heidelberg and the School of Oriental and African Studies of the University of London, as well as Berkeley. He has been advising clients on the People's Republic of China since 1972 on a wide range of matters and has also been active in representing clients in disputes arbitrated by the China International Economic and Trade Arbitration Commission in Beijing. From 1978 to 1997 he headed the China practices at two major San Francisco law firms and a large English firm of solicitors. He was trained as a China specialist in the United States and in Hong Kong for four years (1963-67) under grants from the Rockefeller Foundation, Columbia University and the Foreign Area Fellowship Program. He has an A.B. degree with honors in history from Columbia College and LL.B., LL.M. and J.S.D. degrees from the Columbia Law School, and also studied at the Faculty of Law and the Institute of Comparative Law of the University of Paris. His writings on Chinese law and related subjects have been widely published, including China's Legal Reforms (Stanley Lubman, ed.), Oxford University Press, 1996 and Bird in a Cage: Legal Reform in China after Mao, Stanford University Press, 2000.He is advisor on China legal projects to The Asia Foundation, and is chair of a committee established by the Foundation to consult with legislative drafters of the National People's Congress Committee on Legislative Affairs on reform of Chinese administrative law. Most recently, in this capacity he organized and was co-chair of a conference in Shanghai in July, 2001 on the effects of Chinese accession to the WTO on Chinese administrative law. In September 2002, he co-organized a Conference on Law and Society in China, held at Boalt Hall Schooll of Law.

Hideyo Matsubara. Dr. Hideyo Matsubara is from Osaka, Japan, where he is a Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, specializing in Criminal Law and Criminology, especially regulation of business corporations.

Hideyo received a Ph.D. in law at Kwanseigakuin University (located in Hyogo, western Japan). His dissertation on the legal control of corporate crime was published as the first book in a series on socio-legal studies edited by Setsuo Miyazawa.

Hideyo's work continues to focus on the control of organizational crime and deviance, especially corporate crime and deviance. During his stay at the Center, he will study the control of organizational and corporate activities using legal or other effective methods, focusing on regulatory enforcement both theoretically and empirically. He will also research the role of criminal sanctions in controlling organizational activities. He would like to take environmental regulation or antitrust laws regulation fields as an object of study. Hideyo is also interested in developing his understanding of the "New Penology" (Feeley and Simon).

Recently, Hideyo has researched the conditions and character of crime after the Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake. He reported on this research at the American Society of Criminology Annual Meeting in Chicago in November 2002.

Elizabeth Rapaport. Liz is Dickason Professor of Law at the University of New Mexico School of Law. Prior to going to New Mexico in 1995, Liz taught at Duke University (Public Policy) and Boston University (Philosophy). She has her J.D from Harvard and her Ph.D. in Philosophy from Case Western Reserve. She has been a visiting professor of philosophy at Brown University, University of Southern California and the University of Sydney. She has been a visiting professor of law at Duke and North Carolina Central University.

Her main areas of interest are criminal law and jurisprudence. She has more than a passing interest in legal ethics. She would love to gain a respectable knowledge of international law and learn something about bio-ethics.

Liz is currently working on a book that expands and revises work she has done on gender and capital punishment; the working title is Capital Punishment and the Domestic Discount: Gender, Family and the Death Penalty. She is also writing about executive clemency and has recently been involved in a project in New Mexico to obtain clemency for nonviolent drug addicted offenders serving long sentences. She will give a talk on her work on executive clemency in the Center's Luncheon Speaker Series this fall.