Publications

THE FEDERAL SECURE COMMUNITIES PROGRAM & YOUNG MEN OF COLOR IN CALIFORNIA

As the state with the largest foreign-born population, California has been on the front lines of many immigration issues and is currently facing a deepening crisis because of federal enforcement policies, specifically a program named Secure Communities.  Secure Communities is a program in which fingerprints of individuals detained by local police are collected at county jails and sent to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) for an immigration check in addition to the usual criminal background checks with the FBI.

This program, active in all California jails, has snared hundreds of thousands of men of color, many of whom are eventually deported for relatively minor infractions, leaving behind children, spouses, parents and other close family members.  This DATA brief examines the special challenges faced by immigrant boys, young men, and their families caught in the crosshairs of U.S. immigration policy and politics.  It provides one of the first data-informed analyses of the impact of the Secure Communities program on men of color in California.  

To download this report, click here.

REPORT FINDS BIOMETRIC ID CARD COULD COST TAXPAYERS AT LEAST $40 BILLION

 

A new report, released by the Chief Justice Earl Warren Institute on Law & Social Policy at UC Berkeley School of Law, is a first-ever in-depth analysis of the costs of establishing a biometric employment identity card. Hard to BELIEVE: The High Cost of a Biometric Identity Card finds that a biometric ID card would not only have a price tag of over $40  billion in initial costs, but also $3 billion in ongoing annual expenditures.  The study finds that such a card would infringe on Americans’ civil liberties, and fail to stop the employment of undocumented immigrants. 

For media release, click here.

To download the report, click here.

SECURE COMMUNITIES BY THE NUMBERS: AN ANALYSIS OF DEMOGRAPHICS AND DUE PROCESS

 

A new report Secure Communities by the Numbers: An Analysis of Demographics and Due Process provides the first-ever analysis of federal data on people who are arrested and placed in deportation proceedings under the Secure Communities immigration enforcement program.  The majority of people arrested in a fast-growing federal immigration enforcement program are jailed without bond, without access to a lawyer, and without a court hearing, according to this research.  The report also finds that the Secure Communities program has led to thousands of wrongful arrests of U.S. citizens, while tens of thousands of families are split apart. 

To download the report, click here.

Note: The report available for downloading contains two minor revisions on pages 2 and 13 and supersedes the previous version.

 

 

CUTTING OFF THE FLOW: EXTRATERRITORIAL CONTROLS TO PREVENT MIGRATION

 

This new report highlights and explains the increasing use of offshore immigration barriers and checks to prevent the arrival of migrants and asylum-seekers into the EU and the United States. While much attention has been given to individual extraterritorial mechanisms, such as maritime interdiction, this brief considers a range of other mechanisms being used on both sides of the Atlantic, such as offshore detention, visa requirements and diplomatic agreements. As well as potentially preventing asylum-seekers from reaching safety, the author, Eleanor Taylor-Nicholson, argues that extraterritorial controls generally lack transparency and oversight mechanisms. The paper offers recommendations for review of extraterritorial control laws, policies and agreements to ensure that those who require protection receive it.  To download the report, click here.

 

BORDERS, JAILS AND JOBSITES: AN OVERVIEW OF FEDERAL IMMIGRATION ENFORCEMENT PROGRAMS IN THE U.S.

The Warren Institute is pleased to announce the release of a new report that analyzes the complex legal and policy issues surrounding U.S. immigration enforcement in the U.S. The new report, Borders, Jails, and Jobsites: An Overview of Federal Immigration Enforcement Programs in the U.S. explains the intent of federal programs that target noncitizens---and the unintended consequences.

Co-authors Aarti Kohli and Deepa Varma describe the primary actors and programs; present specific concerns identified by scholars, advocates and researchers; and offer substantive reform recommendations.  To download the report, click here.

AN ALTERNATIVE TO OPERATIONS STREAMLINE: BORDER ENFORCEMENT IN THE SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA

A supplement to the Warren Institute report on the mandatory federal prosecutions of first-time border crossers, this Snapshot demonstrates that a jurisdiction without Operation Streamline can conduct targeted border enforcement without draining the resources of our judicial system.  The Snapshot is available here

IN THE CHILD'S BEST INTEREST?

A new policy brief, “In the Child’s Best Interest? The Consequences of Losing a Lawful Immigrant Parent to Deportation,” estimates that the U.S. deported the lawful permanent resident parents of more than 100,000 children between 1997 and 2007.  At least 88,000 of those children are U.S. citizens.  This report, a project of the Warren Institute and the International Human Rights Law Clinic at UC Berkeley School of Law and the Immigration Law Clinic at UC Davis School of Law, examines the impact of parental deportation on the children left behind and recommends restoring judicial discretion in deportation cases involving lawful permanent resident parents of citizen children.  The report is available here



POLICY AND AMICUS BRIEFS

RESEARCH BRIEFS AND REPORTS