Chris Jay Hoofnagle

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Chris Hoofnagle

Chris Jay Hoofnagle

Chris Jay Hoofnagle is the director of the Berkeley Center for Law & Technology's information privacy programs and senior fellow to the Samuelson Law, Technology & Public Policy Clinic. He is an expert in information privacy law.

Hoofnagle's recent work focuses on promoting competition among financial institutions to prevent identity theft. In Identity Theft: Making the Unknown Knowns Known, he discusses the problem of "synthetic identity theft," a form of crime where an impostor fabricates personal information and yet still can obtain credit accounts. Hoofnagle argues that the rise of this form of fraud demonstrates a fundamental failure in banks' anti-fraud gatekeeper function, and proposes market reforms for reducing identity theft.


TitleYearAuthor
The Price of 'Free': Accounting for the Cost of the Internet's Most Popular Price2013Chris Jay Hoofnagle
Privacy and Advertising Mail2012Chris Jay Hoofnagle, Jennifer Urban
Privacy and Modern Advertising: Most US Internet Users Want 'Do Not Track' to Stop Collection of Data about their Online Activities2012Chris Jay Hoofnagle, Jennifer Urban
Behavioral Advertising: The Offer You Cannot Refuse2012Chris Jay Hoofnagle
Mobile Phones and Privacy2012Jennifer Urban, Chris Jay Hoofnagle
Mobile Payments: Consumer Benefits & New Privacy Concerns2012Chris Jay Hoofnagle, Jennifer Urban
Flash Cookies and Privacy II: Now with HTML5 and ETag Respawning2011Chris Jay Hoofnagle
Internalizing Identity Theft2010Chris Jay Hoofnagle
New Challenges to Data Protection Study - Country Report: United States2010Chris Jay Hoofnagle
How Different are Young Adults from Older Adults When it Comes to Information Privacy Attitudes and Policies? 2010Chris Jay Hoofnagle
Beyond Google and Evil: How Policy Makers, Journalists and Consumers Should Talk Differently About Google and Privacy 2010Chris Jay Hoofnagle
Towards a Market for Bank Safety 2010Chris Jay Hoofnagle
Americans Reject Tailored Advertising and Three Activities that Enable It 2009Chris Jay Hoofnagle
Exploring Information Sharing through California’s 'Shine the Light' Law 2009Chris Jay Hoofnagle
An Economic Map of Cybercrime2009Chris Jay Hoofnagle
Flash Cookies and Privacy2009Chris Jay Hoofnagle
What Californians Understand about Privacy Online 2008Chris Jay Hoofnagle
Measuring Identity Theft (Version 2.0) 2008Chris Jay Hoofnagle
A Supermajority of Californians Supports Limits on Law Enforcement Access to Cell Phone Location Information 2008Chris Jay Hoofnagle
Consumer Information Sharing: Where the Sun Still Don't Shine 2008Chris Jay Hoofnagle
Research Report: What Californians Understand About Privacy Offline 2008Chris Jay Hoofnagle
Big Brother's Little Helpers: How Choicepoint and Other Commercial Data Brokers Collect, Process, and Package Your Data for Law Enforcement 2008Chris Jay Hoofnagle
Identity Theft: Making the Known Unknowns Known 2008Chris Jay Hoofnagle
Privacy Self Regulation: A Decade of Disappointment 2008Chris Jay Hoofnagle
Measuring Identity Theft at Top Banks (Version 1.5) 2008Chris Jay Hoofnagle
A Model Regime of Privacy Protection (Version 3.0) 2008Chris Jay Hoofnagle
The Federal Trade Commission and Consumer Privacy in the Coming Decade2007Chris Jay Hoofnagle, Deirdre K. Mulligan
Denialists' Deck of Cards: An Illustrated Taxonomy of Rhetoric Used to Frustrate Consumer Protection Efforts 2007Chris Jay Hoofnagle
Colloquium on Privacy & Security 2006Chris Jay Hoofnagle
A Model Regime of Privacy Protection (Version 2.0) 2005Chris Jay Hoofnagle
Putting Identity Theft on Ice: Freezing Credit Reports to Prevent Lending to Impostors 2005Chris Jay Hoofnagle
A Model Regime of Privacy Protection (Version 1.1) 2005Chris Jay Hoofnagle
Consumer Privacy in the E-Commerce Marketplace 2002 2004Chris Jay Hoofnagle
Matters of Public Concern and the Public University Professor 2004Chris Jay Hoofnagle
Debunking the Commercial Profilers' Claims: A Skeptical Analysis of the Benefits of Personal Information Flows 2004Chris Jay Hoofnagle
Privacy Practices Below the Lowest Common Denominator: The Federal Trade Commission's Initial Application of Unfair and Deceptive Trade Practices Authority to Protect Consumer Privacy (1997-2000) 2001Chris Jay Hoofnagle