Law and Economics Channel Podcast Berkeley Law en-us Education no no http://www.law.berkeley.edu feedback@law.berkeley.edu BBLJ/BCLBE Symposium: Shareholder Activism Panel 1: Shareholder Activism - Bird's-Eye View Berkeley Law Who are the Activists and what do they want? How has the typical activist profile evolved in recent years? What are the means that they use to achieve these objectives? Dealing with an activist from the corporate side – deciding whether to engage or employ defensive measures. Who are the Activists and what do they want? How has the typical activist profile evolved in recent years? What are the means that they use to achieve these objectives? Dealing with an activist from the corporate side – deciding whether to engage or employ defensive measures. no 01:10 no http://www.kaltura.com/index.php/extwidget/preview/partner_id/1368891/uiconf_id/23530672/entry_id/0_tmb3hg9v/embed/auto? Fri, 04 Apr 2014 12:00:00 -0800 feedback@law.berkeley.edu BBLJ/BCLBE Symposium: Shareholder Activism Panel 2: Hot-Button Issues - How Should We Interpret the Current State of Play? Berkeley Law What are some of the recent developments that have shaped the current landscape? Have the recent disclosure regulations changed the way companies deal with activists? Should there be more regulation addressing complexity and transparency of financial derivatives? Is there value to be derived from activist campaigns with a short-term strategy? How do boards assess their options? What has been the effect of activist campaigns on M&A activity? What are some of the recent developments that have shaped the current landscape? Have the recent disclosure regulations changed the way companies deal with activists? Should there be more regulation addressing complexity and transparency of financial derivatives? Is there value to be derived from activist campaigns with a short-term strategy? How do boards assess their options? What has been the effect of activist campaigns on M&A activity? no 00:20 no http://www.kaltura.com/index.php/extwidget/preview/partner_id/1368891/uiconf_id/23530672/entry_id/0_flyd04br/embed/auto? Fri, 04 Apr 2014 12:00:00 -0800 feedback@law.berkeley.edu BBLJ/BCLBE Symposium: Shareholder Activism Panel 3: Future of Shareholder Activism - Where Do We Go From Here? Berkeley Law How has the emergence of private equity funds as activists changed the corporate landscape? How have the tactics evolved in response to the changing activist profile? Are the appraisal/dissenters’ rights the new frontier in litigation? What regulatory and Delaware law changes can we expect in the future? Emergence of shareholder activism in the developing countries – what does this mean for the rest of the world and for trends in global M&A activity?  How has the emergence of private equity funds as activists changed the corporate landscape? How have the tactics evolved in response to the changing activist profile? Are the appraisal/dissenters’ rights the new frontier in litigation? What regulatory and Delaware law changes can we expect in the future? Emergence of shareholder activism in the developing countries – what does this mean for the rest of the world and for trends in global M&A activity?  no 01:19 no http://www.kaltura.com/tiny/d2wfa Fri, 04 Apr 2014 12:00:00 -0800 feedback@law.berkeley.edu Social Enterprise Law Symposium: Financing Social Enterprises: From Start-up through Exit Panel 1: Early-Stage Financing & Mission Preservation Berkeley Law Preserving mission through start-up and early stage financing Preserving mission through start-up and early stage financing no 01:11 no http://www.kaltura.com/tiny/6nke0 Thu, 03 Apr 2014 12:00:00 -0800 feedback@law.berkeley.edu Social Enterprise Law Symposium: Financing Social Enterprises: From Start-up through Exit Panel 2: Exit Berkeley Law Overcoming challenges later stage financing and “exit” present to mission-driven enterprises Overcoming challenges later stage financing and “exit” present to mission-driven enterprises no 00:58 no http://www.kaltura.com/tiny/4gkrf Thu, 03 Apr 2014 12:00:00 -0800 feedback@law.berkeley.edu Regulation and the Future of Money: Mobile Payments and Virtual Currencies Thomas Brown, Paul Hastings Berkeley Law Bitcoin is just one of the technologies that are rapidly disrupting how people store and move value. Mobile communications and cryptography, in particular, are changing how we define value and authenticate transactions. Regulation, for better or worse, is playing and will continue to play a substantial role in how this industry evolves. Thomas Brown brought his decades of experience to describe the evolution of payment systems innovations from credit cards to the new world of mobile payment systems and virtual currencies. Bitcoin is just one of the technologies that are rapidly disrupting how people store and move value. Mobile communications and cryptography, in particular, are changing how we define value and authenticate transactions. Regulation, for better or worse, is playing and will continue to play a substantial role in how this industry evolves. Thomas Brown brought his decades of experience to describe the evolution of payment systems innovations from credit cards to the new world of mobile payment systems and virtual currencies. no 00:50 no http://www.kaltura.com/tiny/5lxqc Wed, 02 Apr 2014 12:00:00 -0800 feedback@law.berkeley.edu Compliance Risks and Pitfalls In China Gregory Wajnowski, GE Energy Berkeley Law What are we to make of the recent GlaxoSmithKline bribery scandal in China? It has brought revenue down 60%, mired its executives in a seemingly endless struggle with the authorities and even forced David Cameron to weigh in on the company's behalf on his recent trip to Beijing. This and other recent scandals in China underscore the need for companies doing business there to understand and manage the risks associated with common business practices that are prohibited by US and Chinese law. Mr. Wajnowski took us through some of these risks and common practices and explained what companies are doing to ensure that they can compete effectively while still being compliant with applicable laws. Gregory Wajnowski is currently Managing Director – Mergers & Acquisitions and Chief Supervisor – Joint Ventures for GE Energy in Greater China and Mongolia. His responsibilities include providing legal guidance and support for mergers, acquisitions and joint ventures and for overseeing GE Energy’s numerous joint ventures in China. What are we to make of the recent GlaxoSmithKline bribery scandal in China? It has brought revenue down 60%, mired its executives in a seemingly endless struggle with the authorities and even forced David Cameron to weigh in on the company's behalf on his recent trip to Beijing. This and other recent scandals in China underscore the need for companies doing business there to understand and manage the risks associated with common business practices that are prohibited by US and Chinese law. Mr. Wajnowski took us through some of these risks and common practices and explained what companies are doing to ensure that they can compete effectively while still being compliant with applicable laws. Gregory Wajnowski is currently Managing Director – Mergers & Acquisitions and Chief Supervisor – Joint Ventures for GE Energy in Greater China and Mongolia. His responsibilities include providing legal guidance and support for mergers, acquisitions and joint ventures and for overseeing GE Energy’s numerous joint ventures in China. no 1:02 no http://www.kaltura.com/index.php/extwidget/preview/partner_id/1368891/uiconf_id/23061712/entry_id/0_7l630x8p/embed/auto? Fri, 14 Mar 2014 12:00:00 -0800 feedback@law.berkeley.edu Financial Regulation in the Post-Reform Era Eugene Ludwig/Promontory Financial Group Berkeley Law From the Civil War to the savings & loan meltdown, U.S. financial regulation has been shaped by cycles  of crisis and reform. What do changes like the Dodd-Frank Act mean for the evolution of the American regulatory model, and for global priorities like financial inclusion and development? Eugene Ludwig, founder and CEO of Promontory Financial Group, former U.S. Comptroller of the Currency, and former vice chairman and senior control officer of Bankers Trust/Deutsche Bank, will place these changes in the context of earlier reforms, including the interstate banking, financial holding company, and community reinvestment policy changes of the 1990s. From the Civil War to the savings & loan meltdown, U.S. financial regulation has been shaped by cycles  of crisis and reform. What do changes like the Dodd-Frank Act mean for the evolution of the American regulatory model, and for global priorities like financial inclusion and development? Eugene Ludwig, founder and CEO of Promontory Financial Group, former U.S. Comptroller of the Currency, and former vice chairman and senior control officer of Bankers Trust/Deutsche Bank, will place these changes in the context of earlier reforms, including the interstate banking, financial holding company, and community reinvestment policy changes of the 1990s. no 01:00 no http://www.kaltura.com/tiny/ak8py Mon, 24 Feb 2014 12:00:00 -0800 feedback@law.berkeley.edu Dangerous Liaisons: China's Indirect Investment Structures and the Shaky Foundations of "China Plays" on the Global Capital Markets Nicholas C. Howson, University of Michigan Law School Berkeley Law Nicholas C. Howson, visiting professor from the University of Michigan, analyzed the rise of “Variable Interest Entities,” an indirect method of investing in Chinese companies designed to circumvent Chinese government restrictions on foreign investment. This investment form involves a foreign holding company creating a wholly owned subsidiary in China to effectuate the foreign company’s investment in a Chinese company. The investment form, however, has proven very risky for American investors. Nicholas C. Howson, visiting professor from the University of Michigan, analyzed the rise of “Variable Interest Entities,” an indirect method of investing in Chinese companies designed to circumvent Chinese government restrictions on foreign investment. This investment form involves a foreign holding company creating a wholly owned subsidiary in China to effectuate the foreign company’s investment in a Chinese company. The investment form, however, has proven very risky for American investors. no 1:00 no http://media.law.berkeley.edu/qtmedia/bclbe/20120912_BCLBE.mp4 Wed, 12 Sep 2012 12:00:00 -0800 feedback@law.berkeley.edu The Foreclosure Crisis: Challenges and Solutions to the Mortgage Meltdown Panel 2: Reforming Title Recording and Transfer: Key to a 21st Century Mortgage Market Berkeley Law Most Americans do not know that a single private corporation, the Mortgage Electronic Registration System (MERS), holds the titles to millions of mortgages in this country. The panelists explore how 21st Century technology can satisfy the needs of the securitization market for rapid, high volume mortgage transfers, and the public's need for an accurate and transparent system for tracking the status of individual loans and mortgages. Panelists include Laurence Platt (K&L Gates), James Rhyne (Thematix Partners), Nancy Wallace (Haas School of Business), and Benjamin Weber (Office of San Francisco Assessor-Recorder). Most Americans do not know that a single private corporation, the Mortgage Electronic Registration System (MERS), holds the titles to millions of mortgages in this country. The panelists explore how 21st Century technology can satisfy the needs of the securitization market for rapid, high volume mortgage transfers, and the public's need for an accurate and transparent system for tracking the status of individual loans and mortgages. Panelists include Laurence Platt (K&L Gates), James Rhyne (Thematix Partners), Nancy Wallace (Haas School of Business), and Benjamin Weber (Office of San Francisco Assessor-Recorder). no 1:30 no http://media.law.berkeley.edu/qtmedia/bclbe/LAW-20120413-51357-3CAM_H264FS.mp4 Fri, 13 Apr 2012 12:00:00 -0800 feedback@law.berkeley.edu The Foreclosure Crisis: Challenges and Solutions to the Mortgage Meltdown Panel 1: Digging Out: Government and Private Initiatives to Address Mortgages Underwater or in Default Berkeley Law Speakers from UC Berkeley join other scholars, business leaders and policymakers to address what the public and private sectors should and could do to resolve the seemingly endless stream of home foreclosures. Topics include the "robosigning settlement" among all 50 state Attorneys General, the federal government and major loan servicers. Panelists include Dwight Jaffee (Haas School of Business), Paul Leonard (Center for Responsible Lending), and David Moskowitz (Wells Fargo & Company). Speakers from UC Berkeley join other scholars, business leaders and policymakers to address what the public and private sectors should and could do to resolve the seemingly endless stream of home foreclosures. Topics include the "robosigning settlement" among all 50 state Attorneys General, the federal government and major loan servicers. Panelists include Dwight Jaffee (Haas School of Business), Paul Leonard (Center for Responsible Lending), and David Moskowitz (Wells Fargo & Company). no 1:48 no http://media.law.berkeley.edu/qtmedia/bclbe/LAW-20120413-51357-1CAM_H264FS.mp4 Fri, 13 Apr 2012 12:00:00 -0800 feedback@law.berkeley.edu The Foreclosure Crisis: Challenges and Solutions to the Mortgage Meltdown Discussion and Q&A Berkeley Law Q&A session and closing remarks. Q&A session and closing remarks. no 0:45 no http://media.law.berkeley.edu/qtmedia/bclbe/LAW-20120413-51357-2CAM_H264FS.mp4 Fri, 13 Apr 2012 12:00:00 -0800 feedback@law.berkeley.edu Enforcement Without Foundation? China's Illegal Insider Trading Enforcement Regime Nicholas C. Howson, University of Michigan Law School Berkeley Law China’s securities regulator enforces insider trading prohibitions pursuant to self-conceived and non-public guidance. Howson argues that the agency guidance is itself unlawful and unenforceable, leaving a large part of China's contemporary insider trading enforcement regime without foundation. This radical infirmity underlying what many see as the basis of well-governed and investor-attracting capital markets has important implications not only for China’s securities regulation regime and healthy capital markets development, but also for the entirety of China’s legal and administrative law system in the reform era. China’s securities regulator enforces insider trading prohibitions pursuant to self-conceived and non-public guidance. Howson argues that the agency guidance is itself unlawful and unenforceable, leaving a large part of China's contemporary insider trading enforcement regime without foundation. This radical infirmity underlying what many see as the basis of well-governed and investor-attracting capital markets has important implications not only for China’s securities regulation regime and healthy capital markets development, but also for the entirety of China’s legal and administrative law system in the reform era. no 1:03 no http://media.law.berkeley.edu/qtmedia/bclbe/20120208_BCLBE.mp4 Wed, 08 Feb 2012 12:00:00 -0800 feedback@law.berkeley.edu New Corporate Forms: Flexible Purpose Corporations, B Corps and L3Cs Susan H. Mac Cormac, Morrison & Foerster Berkeley Law This talk explores the positive and negative aspects of new corporate forms being tested in California and other states and explains how they differ from traditional corporations, LLCs and partnerships.  Ms. Mac Cormac discusses whether a new form is even necessary and which model can best serve to promote environmental sustainability. She also describes limitations resulting from the California and Delaware Corporations Codes and case law beyond the marketing and PR interpretation dominating the press.  This talk explores the positive and negative aspects of new corporate forms being tested in California and other states and explains how they differ from traditional corporations, LLCs and partnerships.  Ms. Mac Cormac discusses whether a new form is even necessary and which model can best serve to promote environmental sustainability. She also describes limitations resulting from the California and Delaware Corporations Codes and case law beyond the marketing and PR interpretation dominating the press.  no 0:59 no http://media.law.berkeley.edu/qtmedia/bclbe/20111108_BCLBE.mp4 Fri, 11 Nov 2011 12:00:00 -0800 feedback@law.berkeley.edu Do China's Stock Markets Matter? Carl E. Walter Berkeley Law This year marks the 20th anniversary of the establishment of China's two stock exchanges in Shenzhen and Shanghai. Over these two decades nearly 2,000 Chinese companies listed domestically in Hong Kong and beyond, raising nearly US $300 billion. There is no doubt  that these markets are important, but in a country with no private property and banks accounting for over 90 percent of all corporate financing, just what role do stock markets play and what is their overall significance? This talk explores these two questions and describes to what degree Western legal, accounting and financial concepts have changed China's economic landscape. This year marks the 20th anniversary of the establishment of China's two stock exchanges in Shenzhen and Shanghai. Over these two decades nearly 2,000 Chinese companies listed domestically in Hong Kong and beyond, raising nearly US $300 billion. There is no doubt  that these markets are important, but in a country with no private property and banks accounting for over 90 percent of all corporate financing, just what role do stock markets play and what is their overall significance? This talk explores these two questions and describes to what degree Western legal, accounting and financial concepts have changed China's economic landscape. no 0:56 no http://media.law.berkeley.edu/qtmedia/bclbe/20111101_BCLBE.mp4 Tue, 01 Nov 2011 12:00:00 -0800 feedback@law.berkeley.edu Corruption & Fraud in China: Challenges for US Companies & Investors Nathan Bush, O'Melveny & Myers Berkeley Law China offers both opportunities and perils for US companies and investors. Official graft and commercial bribery remain pervasive, raising risks of liability under the US Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, other nations’ foreign bribery statutes like the new UK Bribery Act, and Chinese domestic law. Dozens of China-based companies listed on foreign stock exchanges now face regulatory investigations and shareholder litigation stemming from allegations of fraud and other misconduct. Are these symptoms of the same underlying weaknesses in China's corporate governance standards and opaque regulatory climate? Nate Bush assesses current efforts by US companies, investors, and regulators to confront these challenges, and the implications for China's political and economic climate. China offers both opportunities and perils for US companies and investors. Official graft and commercial bribery remain pervasive, raising risks of liability under the US Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, other nations’ foreign bribery statutes like the new UK Bribery Act, and Chinese domestic law. Dozens of China-based companies listed on foreign stock exchanges now face regulatory investigations and shareholder litigation stemming from allegations of fraud and other misconduct. Are these symptoms of the same underlying weaknesses in China's corporate governance standards and opaque regulatory climate? Nate Bush assesses current efforts by US companies, investors, and regulators to confront these challenges, and the implications for China's political and economic climate. no 1:04 no http://media.law.berkeley.edu/qtmedia/bclbe/20110829_BCLBE.mp4 Mon, 29 Aug 2011 12:00:00 -0800 feedback@law.berkeley.edu The Renaissance Life of the Talented Professor Buxbaum Professor Richard M. Buxbaum Berkeley Law Many of you may be familiar with Professor Buxbaum’s leading work in Corporations Law and Comparative Law, and as a pillar of the Berkeley Law’s business faculty. What you may not know is that his many contributions extend far beyond shaping jurisprudence in the United States and around the world. They are also deeply rooted in public service, affirmative action, free speech, national defense, and reparations issues. He is a true Renaissance man and his service to the Berkeley Law community as well as citizens around the world is without parallel. In his final year of teaching at Boalt, BCLBE hosted a special lunchtime talk where Professor Buxbaum reflected on his experiences in the major social and political events of the 1960s and 1970s. Many of you may be familiar with Professor Buxbaum’s leading work in Corporations Law and Comparative Law, and as a pillar of the Berkeley Law’s business faculty. What you may not know is that his many contributions extend far beyond shaping jurisprudence in the United States and around the world. They are also deeply rooted in public service, affirmative action, free speech, national defense, and reparations issues. He is a true Renaissance man and his service to the Berkeley Law community as well as citizens around the world is without parallel. In his final year of teaching at Boalt, BCLBE hosted a special lunchtime talk where Professor Buxbaum reflected on his experiences in the major social and political events of the 1960s and 1970s. no 00:57 no http://media.law.berkeley.edu/qtmedia/bclbe/20110418_BCLBE.mp4 Mon, 18 Apr 2011 12:00:00 -0800 feedback@law.berkeley.edu Financial Emergency: The Crises that Began and Ended the Decade The Honorable Michael G. Oxley Berkeley Law The co-author of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, one of the most far reaching, and controversial, financial regulation laws in American history, spoke about the fiscal crashes that ended the dot-com bubble and that once again have plunged the economy into recession. A former FBI Agent, Michael G. Oxley was elected to the House of Representatives from Ohio's fourth district in 1981. He eventually went on to serve as Chairman of the House Financial Services Committee from 2001 to 2006, and is best known for his co-authorship of the landmark Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Oxley led the panel through the aftermath of the tech bubble, the difficult post-9/11 period, and the rash of corporate scandals early in the decade that destroyed investor confidence and sent the markets into a tailspin. The co-author of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, one of the most far reaching, and controversial, financial regulation laws in American history, spoke about the fiscal crashes that ended the dot-com bubble and that once again have plunged the economy into recession. A former FBI Agent, Michael G. Oxley was elected to the House of Representatives from Ohio's fourth district in 1981. He eventually went on to serve as Chairman of the House Financial Services Committee from 2001 to 2006, and is best known for his co-authorship of the landmark Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Oxley led the panel through the aftermath of the tech bubble, the difficult post-9/11 period, and the rash of corporate scandals early in the decade that destroyed investor confidence and sent the markets into a tailspin. no 01:20 no http://media.law.berkeley.edu/qtmedia/bclbe/20110406_BCLBE.mp4 Wed, 06 Apr 2011 12:00:00 -0800 feedback@law.berkeley.edu The Top 10 Things You Should Learn in Law School if You Want to Work with Great Entrepreneurs Donna Petkanics, Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati and Robert J. Majteles, Treehouse Capital LLC, BCLBE Director Berkeley Law Donna Petkanics of Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati and Rob Majteles of Treehouse Capital shared their insider experiences with the Boalt community, offering a unique perspective from both sides of the equation. Donna Petkanics of Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati and Rob Majteles of Treehouse Capital shared their insider experiences with the Boalt community, offering a unique perspective from both sides of the equation. no 01:00 no http://media.law.berkeley.edu/qtmedia/bclbe/20110315_BCLBE.mp4 Tue, 15 Mar 2011 12:00:00 -0800 feedback@law.berkeley.edu BBLJ Spring Symposium - Financial Regulatory Reform: Dodd-Frank and Beyond Panel 3 - Consumer Protection Berkeley Law On March 11, 2011 the Berkeley Center for Law, Business and the Economy (BCLBE) and the Berkeley Business Law Journal (BBLJ) co-hosted a spring symposium entitled, "Financial Regulatory Reform: Dodd-Frank and Beyond." This video features the third panel from the symposium, "Consumer Protection." The panel featured John D. Wright, Wells Fargo & Company, John A.E. Pottow, University of Michigan, School of Law, Thomas Brown, O'Melveny & Myers, and Gail Hillebrand, Consumers Union. Moderated by Prasad Krishnamurthy, UC Berkeley School of Law. On March 11, 2011 the Berkeley Center for Law, Business and the Economy (BCLBE) and the Berkeley Business Law Journal (BBLJ) co-hosted a spring symposium entitled, "Financial Regulatory Reform: Dodd-Frank and Beyond." This video features the third panel from the symposium, "Consumer Protection." The panel featured John D. Wright, Wells Fargo & Company, John A.E. Pottow, University of Michigan, School of Law, Thomas Brown, O'Melveny & Myers, and Gail Hillebrand, Consumers Union. Moderated by Prasad Krishnamurthy, UC Berkeley School of Law. no 01:34 no http://media.law.berkeley.edu/qtmedia/bclbe/LAW-20110311A-4_panel3a.mp4 Fri, 11 Mar 2011 12:00:00 -0800 feedback@law.berkeley.edu BBLJ Spring Symposium - Financial Regulatory Reform: Dodd-Frank and Beyond Panel 1 - Securitization and Governance Berkeley Law On March 11, 2011 the Berkeley Center for Law, Business and the Economy (BCLBE) and the Berkeley Business Law Journal (BBLJ) co-hosted a spring symposium entitled, "Financial Regulatory Reform: Dodd-Frank and Beyond." This video features the first panel from the symposium, "Securitization & Governance." The panel featured Dwight M. Jaffee, Haas School of Business, Nancy E. Wallace, Haas School of Business, BCLBE Faculty Co-Director, Erik Gerding, University of New Mexico, School of Law, and Mark D. Perlow, K&L Gates. Moderated by Stavros E. Gadinis, UC Berkeley School of Law. On March 11, 2011 the Berkeley Center for Law, Business and the Economy (BCLBE) and the Berkeley Business Law Journal (BBLJ) co-hosted a spring symposium entitled, "Financial Regulatory Reform: Dodd-Frank and Beyond." This video features the first panel from the symposium, "Securitization & Governance." The panel featured Dwight M. Jaffee, Haas School of Business, Nancy E. Wallace, Haas School of Business, BCLBE Faculty Co-Director, Erik Gerding, University of New Mexico, School of Law, and Mark D. Perlow, K&L Gates. Moderated by Stavros E. Gadinis, UC Berkeley School of Law. no 01:37 no http://media.law.berkeley.edu/qtmedia/bclbe/LAW-20110311A-2_panel1a.mp4 Fri, 11 Mar 2011 12:00:00 -0800 feedback@law.berkeley.edu BBLJ Spring Symposium - Financial Regulatory Reform: Dodd-Frank and Beyond Panel 2 - Venture Finance Berkeley Law On March 11, 2011 the Berkeley Center for Law, Business and the Economy (BCLBE) and the Berkeley Business Law Journal (BBLJ) co-hosted a spring symposium entitled, "Financial Regulatory Reform: Dodd-Frank and Beyond." This video features the second panel from the symposium, "Venture Finance." The panel featured Steven E. Bochner, Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati, Eric Finseth, BCLBE, and Mary Dent, SVB Financial Group. Moderated by Robert P. Bartlett III, UC Berkeley School of Law. On March 11, 2011 the Berkeley Center for Law, Business and the Economy (BCLBE) and the Berkeley Business Law Journal (BBLJ) co-hosted a spring symposium entitled, "Financial Regulatory Reform: Dodd-Frank and Beyond." This video features the second panel from the symposium, "Venture Finance." The panel featured Steven E. Bochner, Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati, Eric Finseth, BCLBE, and Mary Dent, SVB Financial Group. Moderated by Robert P. Bartlett III, UC Berkeley School of Law. no 01:22 no http://media.law.berkeley.edu/qtmedia/bclbe/LAW-20110311A-3_panel2a.mp4 Fri, 11 Mar 2011 12:00:00 -0800 feedback@law.berkeley.edu BBLJ Spring Symposium - Financial Regulatory Reform: Dodd-Frank and Beyond Welcome, Launch and Keynote Address Berkeley Law On March 11, 2011 the Berkeley Center for Law, Business and the Economy (BCLBE) and the Berkeley Business Law Journal (BBLJ) co-hosted a spring symposium entitled, "Financial Regulatory Reform: Dodd-Frank and Beyond." This video features the welcome address made by representatives from the sponsoring organizations, Eric Talley, BCLBE, Matthew R. DalSanto, BBLJ, and Ken Taymor, BCLBE, followed by a keynote address from William Haraf, Financial Stability Oversight Council and the California Department of Financial Institutions. On March 11, 2011 the Berkeley Center for Law, Business and the Economy (BCLBE) and the Berkeley Business Law Journal (BBLJ) co-hosted a spring symposium entitled, "Financial Regulatory Reform: Dodd-Frank and Beyond." This video features the welcome address made by representatives from the sponsoring organizations, Eric Talley, BCLBE, Matthew R. DalSanto, BBLJ, and Ken Taymor, BCLBE, followed by a keynote address from William Haraf, Financial Stability Oversight Council and the California Department of Financial Institutions. no 00:29 no http://media.law.berkeley.edu/qtmedia/bclbe/LAW-20110311A-1_welcome2.mp4 Fri, 11 Mar 2011 12:00:00 -0800 feedback@law.berkeley.edu Law, Policy, and Practice on China's Periphery: Minority Areas and Implications for Hong Kong and Taiwan Pitman Potter, University of British Columbia Berkeley Law Professor Potter's talk focused on his recently published book "Law, Policy, and Practice on China's Periphery: Selective Adaptation and Institutional Capacity." He examined the Chinese government's policies and practices in relationship to the Inner Periphery areas, defined as Tibet, Xinjiang, and Inner Mongolia, and the Outer Periphery areas of Hong Kong and Taiwan, focusing on political authority, socio-cultural relations, and economic development. Successive imperial, republican, and communist governments have struggled to maintain sovereignty over the regions surrounding the great river valleys of China. Professor Potter's talk focused on his recently published book "Law, Policy, and Practice on China's Periphery: Selective Adaptation and Institutional Capacity." He examined the Chinese government's policies and practices in relationship to the Inner Periphery areas, defined as Tibet, Xinjiang, and Inner Mongolia, and the Outer Periphery areas of Hong Kong and Taiwan, focusing on political authority, socio-cultural relations, and economic development. Successive imperial, republican, and communist governments have struggled to maintain sovereignty over the regions surrounding the great river valleys of China. no 01:11 no http://media.law.berkeley.edu/qtmedia/bclbe/20110215_BCLBE.mp4 Tue, 15 Feb 2011 12:00:00 -0800 feedback@law.berkeley.edu The Evolution of Business Law in California and at Boalt Hall Professor Richard Buxbaum Berkeley Law Professor Richard Buxbaum '53 has been a keen observer of the business law terrain for five decades. BCLBE and the Berkeley Business Law Journal hosted a talk were Professor Buxbaum shared his perspective on the development of business law in California and the role played by Boalt Hall in that evolution. Three generations of Boalt Hall faculty members were and continue to be instrumental in reshaping many aspects of corporate law and securities regulation in California, across the United States and around the world. At this special lunchtime talk, Professor Buxbaum provided insights into the interplay among the legal academy, policymakers and the commercial world that will help us better understand the current legal and regulatory environment governing the business community and our collective efforts to emerge from the Great Recession. Professor Richard Buxbaum '53 has been a keen observer of the business law terrain for five decades. BCLBE and the Berkeley Business Law Journal hosted a talk were Professor Buxbaum shared his perspective on the development of business law in California and the role played by Boalt Hall in that evolution. Three generations of Boalt Hall faculty members were and continue to be instrumental in reshaping many aspects of corporate law and securities regulation in California, across the United States and around the world. At this special lunchtime talk, Professor Buxbaum provided insights into the interplay among the legal academy, policymakers and the commercial world that will help us better understand the current legal and regulatory environment governing the business community and our collective efforts to emerge from the Great Recession. no 00:58 no http://media.law.berkeley.edu/qtmedia/bclbe/20101115_BCLBE.mp4 Mon, 15 Nov 2010 12:00:00 -0800 feedback@law.berkeley.edu America's Broken Retirement Plans and Pension System: Another "Gift" From Wall Street William Lerach Berkeley Law William Lerach discussed his perspectives on the relationship between the deregulation of our financial markets and several wealth destruction events that resulted in massive losses to the nation's public, private and individual pension systems and plans. These losses have gravely impaired the finances of these retirement plans -- leaving many of them, he argued, with unfunded obligations that are so pervasive that they now constitute a major threat to the financial future of our country. Mr. Lerach also discussed what, if anything, he believes can be done to avoid or ameliorate the crisis that would arise from the financial collapse of our pension systems. William Lerach discussed his perspectives on the relationship between the deregulation of our financial markets and several wealth destruction events that resulted in massive losses to the nation's public, private and individual pension systems and plans. These losses have gravely impaired the finances of these retirement plans -- leaving many of them, he argued, with unfunded obligations that are so pervasive that they now constitute a major threat to the financial future of our country. Mr. Lerach also discussed what, if anything, he believes can be done to avoid or ameliorate the crisis that would arise from the financial collapse of our pension systems. no 00:58 no http://media.law.berkeley.edu/qtmedia/bclbe/20101026_BCLBE.mp4 Tue, 26 Oct 2010 12:00:00 -0800 feedback@law.berkeley.edu Changes in the World’s Workshop: How new laws, more demanding workers, and activist trade unions are transforming the Chinese workplace Mary Gallagher Berkeley Law In 2008, the Chinese government passed three ambitious labor laws to improve working conditions at Chinese companies and the employment security of Chinese workers. Employers criticized these laws as a return to the age of the “iron rice bowl” under socialism, which guaranteed lifetime employment and extensive welfare benefits for all urban workers. Labor activists hoped that the new laws would help close the gap between the high standards of Chinese “law-on-the-books” with its implementation and enforcement in reality. These protective measures coincided with the onset of the global financial crisis and a rapid decline in China’s export markets. The combination of more protective laws and greater economic volatility led to a rapid and unprecedented increase in labor conflict, including legal filings and large-scale strikes and demonstrations. In the wake of China’s recovery from the crisis, this conflict has continued. Workers are more aware of their new rights; trade unions have been encouraged by the government to do more to protect workers; and a labor shortage in manufacturing has emboldened workers to press for higher wages and better conditions. This event was co-sponsored by the Center for Chinese Studies. In 2008, the Chinese government passed three ambitious labor laws to improve working conditions at Chinese companies and the employment security of Chinese workers. Employers criticized these laws as a return to the age of the “iron rice bowl” under socialism, which guaranteed lifetime employment and extensive welfare benefits for all urban workers. Labor activists hoped that the new laws would help close the gap between the high standards of Chinese “law-on-the-books” with its implementation and enforcement in reality. These protective measures coincided with the onset of the global financial crisis and a rapid decline in China’s export markets. The combination of more protective laws and greater economic volatility led to a rapid and unprecedented increase in labor conflict, including legal filings and large-scale strikes and demonstrations. In the wake of China’s recovery from the crisis, this conflict has continued. Workers are more aware of their new rights; trade unions have been encouraged by the government to do more to protect workers; and a labor shortage in manufacturing has emboldened workers to press for higher wages and better conditions. This event was co-sponsored by the Center for Chinese Studies. no 00:55 no http://media.law.berkeley.edu/qtmedia/bclbe/20101018_BCLBE.mp4 Mon, 18 Oct 2010 12:00:00 -0800 feedback@law.berkeley.edu Business and Ethics: Lessons from the Global Economic Crisis Berkeley Law A panel discussion featuring: John Quigley, Goldman School of Public Policy; Richard Buxbaum, Berkeley Law; Ernesto Dal Bo, Haas School of Business; David Vogel, Haas School of Business; Christopher Kutz, Berkeley Law. A panel discussion featuring: John Quigley, Goldman School of Public Policy; Richard Buxbaum, Berkeley Law; Ernesto Dal Bo, Haas School of Business; David Vogel, Haas School of Business; Christopher Kutz, Berkeley Law. no 01:08 no http://media.law.berkeley.edu/qtmedia/bclbe/20091201_BCLBE.mp4 Tue, 01 Dec 2009 12:00:00 -0800 feedback@law.berkeley.edu Video List 13523 Berkeley Law no no 12:00:00 -0800 feedback@law.berkeley.edu test Berkeley Law no no 12:00:00 -0800