Speakers

Hal Varian is the Class of 1944 Professor at the School of Information Management and Systems (SIMS) , the Haas School of Business, and the Department of Economics at the University of California, Berkeley. From 1995-2002, he served as the founding dean of SIMS.

He received his S.B. degree from MIT in 1969 and his MA (mathematics) and Ph.D. (economics) from UC Berkeley in 1973. He has taught at MIT, Stanford, Oxford, Michigan and other universities around the world.

Professor Varian is a fellow of the Guggenheim Foundation, the Econometric Society, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has served as Co-Editor of the American Economic Review and is on the editorial boards of several journals.

Professor Varian has published numerous papers in economic theory, industrial organization, financial economics, econometrics and information economics. He is the author of two major economics textbooks which have been translated into 22 languages. His current research has been concerned with the economics of information technology and the information economy. He is the co-author of a bestselling book on business strategy, Information Rules: A Strategic Guide to the Network Economy and writes a monthly column for the The New York Times.


Luis Villarreol Villalon

EDUCATION:

  • Master in Laws, (LLM), "International Legal Studies". 1998; Washington College of Law, American University, Washington D.C., 1998.
  • Post Graduate Diploma in Mining and Water Law , 1995 Instituto de Derecho de Minas y Aguas, Universidad de Atacama, Santiago, 1995.
  • Licenced in Juridical and Social Sciences, University of Chile, Collage of Law , 1990.


PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE:

  • 2003 To Date. Intellectual Property Law Adviser, Ministry of Education, Chile.
  • 2000 to 2003 General Counsel Ministry of Education Chile.
  • 1998 to June 1999 Consultant for the Legal Department, Inter American Development Bank, Washington DC.


Jane Winn joined the faculty of University of Washington School of Law in 2002 to teach commercial and technology law courses, and is also a director of the Shidler Center for Law, Commerce & Technology. From 1989 to 2001, she taught commercial law and comparative law at Southern Methodist University School of Law in Dallas, Texas. In Spring 2002, she was a visiting professor at the University of California, Berkeley School of Law and, since 2001, has been a Visiting Fellow of the University of Melbourne School of Law, for the e-Law program. Professor Winn is a member of the American Law Institute, a board member of CALI (Computer Assisted Legal Instruction) and a faculty associate of the UW Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies. From 1987-89, she practiced law at the New York office of Shearman & Sterling. She is coauthor of the treatise Law of Electronic Commerce (4th ed. 2006) and the casebook Electronic Commerce (2nd ed. 2005). Her current research interests include electronic commerce law developments in the U.S., the European Union, and China.


Victoria Bassetti EMI Music
Stefan Bechtold Max Planck Institute
Andrew Bridges Winston & Strawn LLP
Lynne Brindley The British Library
Dan Burk University of Minnesota Law School
David Carson US Copyright Office
Julie Cohen Georgetown University Law Center
Cindy Cohn Electronic Frontier Foundation
Graeme Dinwoodie Chicago-Kent Law School
Julien Dourgnon Que Choisir
Niva Elkin-Koren University of Haifa Law School
Edward Felten Princeton University
Nic Garnett Interight.com
Natali Helberger University of Amsterdam
Bernt Hugenholtz University of Amsterdam Law School
Justin Hughes Cardozo School of Law
Ian Kerr University of Ottawa
Susan Landau Sun Microsystems, Inc.
Gerard Lewis, Jr. Comcast Communications LLP
Douglas Lichtman University of Chicago
Joseph Liu Boston College Law School
Dean Marks Warner Bros. Entertainment, Inc.
Deirdre Mulligan Boalt Hall School of Law
Richard Owens World Intellectual Property Organization
Jerome Reichman Duke Law School
J. Thomas Rosch Federal Trade Commission
Thomas Rubin Microsoft Corporation
Pamela Samuelson Boalt Hall School of Law Kevin Saul Apple Computer, Inc.
Mitch Singer Sony Pictures Entertainment Inc., Music Group
David Sohn Center for Democracy & Technology
Gigi Sohn Public Knowledge
Peter Swire Ohio State University Law School
René van Buuren Telematica Institute
Molly Van Houweling Boalt Hall School of Law
Hal Varian School of Information, UC Berkeley
Luis Villarroel Villalon Chile Ministry of Education
JaneWinn University of Washington School of Law


VICTORIA BASSETTI is EMI’s Vice President of Legal and Public Policy for North America. Ms. Bassetti, who has nearly a decade of experience working with some of the U.S. government’s most influential legislative and judicial bodies, lends her significant Washington, D.C. experience and legal background to advise the company on government, regulatory and industry matters. Previously, Ms. Bassetti was on the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee, where she was most recently the Democratic Chief Counsel and Staff Director for the Subcommittee on Antitrust, Competition, and Business & Consumer Rights. She holds a Juris Doctor from Columbia Law School and graduated Magna Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Social Studies from Harvard College.

 

STEFAN BECHTOLD graduated from the University of Tübingen Law School, Germany, in 1999. From 1997 to 2004, he was a research assistant to Professor Wernhard Möschel at the University of Tübingen Law School. In 1999 and 2000, he was a Visiting Scholar at the University of California at Berkeley School of Law. In 2001, he received a Dr. iur. (legal Ph.D.) from the University of Tübingen Law School. Supported by a Fulbright scholarship and supervised by Professor Lawrence Lessig, he received a master's degree (J.S.M.) from Stanford Law School in 2002. Since 2002, he is a non-residential Fellow at the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School. From 2002 to 2004, he was a law clerk ("Referendar") at the regional court ("Landgericht") of Tübingen, which is a mandatory part of German legal education. As part of this training, he spent a three-month internship at a telecommunications law unit of the European Commission's Directorate General Information Society in summer 2004. In 2004, he was appointed to the expert committee on copyright and publishing law of the German professional association for intellectual property law. Since 2005, he is a Senior Research Fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods in Bonn, Germany. At the Max Planck Institute, he is writing his "Habilitation" (post-doctoral thesis). In the fall of 2005, he was a Visiting Scholar at the Institute for Information Law at the University of Amsterdam. Mr. Bechtold’s research interests include cyberlaw, intellectual property law, antitrust law, corporate law as well as law and economics. In addition, he has composed numerous orchestra and chamber music works which have been awarded several composition prizes and have been repeatedly performed and broadcast.

 

ANDREW BRIDGES, a litigation partner in the San Francisco office of Winston & Strawn LLP, focuses his practice on technology, e-commerce, and consumer products companies, particularly with respect to trademark, advertising, copyright, trade secret, consumer protection, and unfair competition issues and other business disputes.

Mr. Bridges is an Early Neutral Evaluator for the U.S. District Court, Northern District of California, and a domain name arbitrator for the World Intellectual Property Organization. He is a frequent speaker at conferences across the United States and Europe and has been invited to teach classes at Stanford Law School, Columbia Law School, University of Michigan Law School, and other institutions. He participates in numerous professional organizations and committees relating to litigation, copyright law, and trademark law.

 

LYNNE BRINDLEY has been the Chief Executive of The British Library since 2000. Since her appointment, Lynne has led a major strategic repositioning and modernisation programme to ensure that the BL continues to provide relevant services to users in the 21st century, and that the library is recognised for its contribution to research, innovation and culture.

Lynne came to the BL from the University of Leeds where she was Pro-Vice-Chancellor and University Librarian. She previously held positions as Librarian & Director of Information Services at the London School of Economics, Principal Consultant at KPMG, and Pro-Vice-Chancellor and Director of Information Services at Aston University. She spent the early part of her career at the British Library.

Lynne is also active in national and international bodies concerned with cultural, library and digital information strategy. Her research and professional interests are in knowledge management and digital preservation.

 

DAN BURK is an internationally prominent authority on the law of intellectual property, who specializes in the areas of cyberlaw and biotechnology. After visiting at the University of Minnesota during the 1999-2000 academic year, Professor Burk joined the Law School faculty in the Fall of 2000 as Professor of Law and Vance K. Opperman Research Scholar. During 2001-2002, he held the Julius Davis Chair in Law. He currently holds the Oppenheimer, Wolff & Donnelly Professorship in Law.

Professor Burk holds appointments at both the Law School and the Center for Bioethics. He has also been closely involved in the development of the Joint Degree Program in Law, Health, and the Life Sciences, and in the creation of the University's Internet Studies Center. He teaches courses in Copyright, Patent, and Biotechnology Law, and is the author of numerous papers on the legal and societal impact of new technologies, including articles on scientific misconduct, on the regulation of biotechnology, and on the intellectual property implications of global computer networks.

 

DAVID CARSON is General Counsel of the United States Copyright Office at theLibrary of Congress. As General Counsel, Mr. Carson is a principal legal officer of the
Office, with responsibility for the Office’s regulatory activities, litigation, administration of
the copyright law, and providing liaison on legal matters between the Office and Congress,the Department of Justice and other agencies of Government, the courts, the legalcommunity, and other interests affected by the copyright law. Mr. Carson is a graduate of Harvard Law School and a member of the bars ofCalifornia and New York. He received bachelor of arts and master of arts degrees in
history at Stanford University.

 

JULIE COHEN is Professor of Law at the Georgetown University Law Center. She teaches and writes about intellectual property law and information privacy law, with particular focus on digital works and on the intersection of copyright and privacy rights. She is a co-author of Copyright in a Global Information Economy (Aspen Law & Business, 2d ed. 2006), and is a member of the Advisory Board of the Electronic Privacy Information Center and the Advisory Board of Public Knowledge. From 1995 to 1999, Professor Cohen taught at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law. From 1992 to 1995, she practiced with the San Francisco firm of McCutchen, Doyle, Brown & Enersen, where she specialized in intellectual property litigation. Professor Cohen received her A.B. from Harvard University and her J.D. from the Harvard Law School, where she was a Supervising Editor of the Harvard Law Review. She is a former law clerk to Judge Stephen Reinhardt of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.

 

CINDY COHN is the Legal Director for the Electronic Frontier Foundation as well as its General Counsel. She is responsible for overseeing the EFF's overall legal strategy and supervising EFF's 9 staff attorneys. EFF continues to be actively involved wherever freedom and civil liberties are at stake online. Outside the Courts, Ms. Cohn has testified before Congress, been featured in the New York Times, San Francisco Chronicle and elsewhere for her work on cyberspace issues, interviewed on the BBC, NPR, CNN, CBS News and the Newshour, Economist, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post and many other online and offline media outlets. In 2006, Ms. Cohn was named one of the 100 most influential lawyers in America by the National Law Journal. In 2001, Ms. Cohn and the EFF were honored by the Editorial Board of Daily Journal. In 1997, Ms. Cohn was named as one of the "Lawyers of the Year" by California Lawyer magazine.

 

GRAEME DINWOODIE is a Professor of Law, Associate Dean, and Director of the Program in Intellectual Property Law, at Chicago-Kent College of Law. He also holds a Chair in Intellectual Property Law at Queen Mary College, University of London. He teaches and writes in intellectual property law, with an emphasis on the international and comparative aspects of the discipline. Professor Dinwoodie’s articles on various aspects of intellectual property law have appeared in several leading law reviews. He has served as a consultant to the World Intellectual Property Organization on matters of private international law, as an Adviser to the American Law Institute Project on Principles on Jurisdiction and Recognition of Judgments in Intellectual Property Matters, and as a Consultant to the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development on the Protection of Traditional Knowledge. He is a member of the American Law Institute.

 

JULIEN DOURGNON is a Professor of Economics and Public Affairs Director of UFC-Que Choisir. UFC-Que Choisir is the most important French consumer’s association founded in 1951. It has 135 000 members and publishes a monthly magazine “Que Choisir” at 510 000 issues.

 

NIVA ELKIN-KOREN is a Professor of Law and a co-director of the Haifa Center of Law & Technology at the University of Haifa School of Law. Her research focuses on the legal institutions that facilitate private and public control over the production of information. She has written and spoken extensively about the privatization of information policy, copyright law and democratic theory, the ramifications of cyberspace for the economic analysis of law, liability of information intermediaries and the regulation of search engines. She is currently working on emerging strategies for enhancing the public domain. She received her LL.B from Tel-Aviv University School of Law in 1989, her LL.M from Harvard Law School in 1991, and her S.J.D from Stanford Law School in 1995. She was a visiting professor at NYU School of Law (2004-2005), George Washington University Law School (2001), and Villanova School of Law (1997).

 

EDWARD FELTON is a Professor of Computer Science and Public Affairs at Princeton University, and is the founding Director of Princeton's Center for Information Technology Policy. His research interests include computer security and privacy, especially relating to media and consumer products; and technology law and policy. He has published about eighty papers in the research literature, and two books. His research on topics such as web security, copyright and copy protection, and electronic voting has been covered extensively in the popular press. His weblog, at freedom-to-tinker.com, is widely read for its commentary on technology, law, and policy.

He was the lead computer science expert witness for the Department of Justice in the Microsoft antitrust case, and he has testified in other important lawsuits. He has testified before the Senate Commerce Committee on digital television technology and regulation, and before the House Administration Committee on electronic voting. In 2004, Scientific American magazine named him to its list of fifty worldwide science and technology leaders.

 

NIC GARNETT is a UK and French qualified attorney and a leading international authority on intellectual property rights enforcement and digital rights management. He holds law degrees from Cambridge University and, in French private law, from Bordeaux University.

He is a former SVP with InterTrust Technologies of Santa Clara, a leading developer of DRM technologies. His responsibilities included direction of the InterTrust utility system, the standards infrastructure linking the users of the InterTrust technology. He also led the InterTrust public affairs effort, including its participation in the April 2001 congressional hearing on Napster.

Prior to joining InterTrust, Nic Garnett spent 16 years as a senior international lawyer in the recording industry including 7 years as the Director General and CEO of IFPI, the global counterpart of the RIAA. He established and directed the recording industry’s worldwide anti-piracy operations. He chaired a number of audio technology standardization groups. He led the recording industry delegation at the WIPO Diplomatic Conference which delivered the new international copyright treaties in December 1996.

 

NATALI HELBERGER is Associated Professor at the Institute for Information Law. Dr. Helberger specialises in the regulation of converging information- and communications markets, Digital Rights Management and the interface between technique and information law. S he was managing legal partner in the INDICARE project (Informed Dialogue about Consumer Acceptability of Rights Management Solutions in Europe), a project co-funded by the European Commission. The objective of INDICARE is to address issues regarding consumer acceptability of digital rights management solutions; identify obstacles and suggest solutions. Among her present activities are a study about the Recasting of European copyright, and a study for the European Parliament about online services and geographical discrimination. Dr. Helberger was visiting scholar at the University of California, Berkeley in 2005.

 

BERNT HUGENHOLTZ is Professor of Law and Director of the Institute for Information Law (IViR) at the University of Amsterdam, where he teaches courses in copyright law, industrial property law and international copyright law. He also occasionally teaches at the Munich Intellectual Property Law Center (Munich), Fordham Law School (New York) and Monash University (Melbourne). He is the General Editor of the Information Law Series, published by Kluwer Law International. In 1989 he received his doctorate cum laude from the University of Amsterdam. He was a member of the Amsterdam Bar from 1990 to 1998, and has been an advisor to WIPO, the European Commission, the European Parliament, the Ministry of Justice of the Netherlands and various private firms. He is also an adjunct judge at the Court of Appeals in Arnhem (Netherlands). Professor Hugenholtz has written numerous books, studies and articles focussing on topics involving copyright and information technology, notably on the protection of databases, on copyright problems relating to the digital networked environment and on copyright contract law.

 

JUSTIN HUGHES was formerly attorney-advisor at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, where he was at the center of a wide variety of national and international policy debates. His areas of expertise in intellectual property include the Internet, WIPO copyright treaties, database protection, geographic indications, and audiovisual performers' rights. A magna cum laude graduate of both Oberlin College and Harvard Law School, he was articles editor of the Harvard International Law Journal. Immediately after law school, he worked at Coudert Frères in Paris, concentrating on international commercial arbitration. As a Henry Luce Scholar, he clerked for the Lord President of the Supreme Court of Malaysia. Professor Hughes has been a visiting professor at UCLA and the Hosier Distinguished Visiting Professor at DePaul University.

 

IAN KERR holds a unique, three way appointment in the Faculty of Law, the Faculty of Medicine and the Department of Philosophy at the University of Ottawa. His devotion to interdisciplinary teaching has earned six awards and citations, including the Bank of Nova Scotia Award of Excellencein Undergraduate Teaching, the University of Western Ontario’s Faculty of Graduate Studies’ Award of Teaching Excellence, and the University of Ottawa’s AEECLSS Teaching Excellence Award. Professor Kerr currently teaches a graduate seminar in the LLM concentration in law and technology (Technoprudence: Legal Theory in an Information Age), as well as a unique seminar offered each year during the month of January in Puerto Rico that brings students from very different legal traditions together to exchange culture, values, and ideas and to unite in the study of privacy and other technology law issues of global importance. Professor Kerr also teaches in the areas of moral philosophy and applied ethics, internet and ecommerce law, contract law and legal theory.

 

SUSAN LANDAU is a Distinguished Engineer at Sun Microsystems Laboratories, where she works on security, cryptography, and policy, including digital-rights management and surveillance issues. Landau had previously been a faculty member at the University of Massachusetts and Wesleyan University, where she worked in algebraic algorithms. She is coauthor, with Whitfield Diffie, of ``Privacy on the Line: the Politics of Wiretapping and Encryption'' (MIT Press, original edition: 1998; updated and expanded edition: 2007). She is a member of the National Institute of Standards and Technology's Information Security and Privacy Advisory Board, a member of the editorial board of IEEE Security and Privacy, and she moderates the ``researcHers'' list, an international mailing list for women computer science researchers. Landau is an AAAS Fellow and an ACM Distinguished Engineer. She received her BA from Princeton, her MS from Cornell, and her PhD from MIT.

 

GERARD J. LEWIS, JR is currently Vice President, Deputy General Counsel & Chief Privacy Officer for Comcast Cable Communications, LLC in Philadelphia where he advises company management and the business units on privacy, security, intellectual property, technology, and Internet law matters. He also leads the group within the Comcast Cable Law Department responsible for content, business information, technology, and licensing matters. Prior to joining Comcast, Mr. Lewis served as Acting General Counsel for Half.com, Inc., an eBay Inc. company. Before that, he was Vice President & General Counsel for Infonautics, Inc., a publicly-traded Internet information company, where he was responsible for all legal matters for over five years. Mr. Lewis began his legal career in the intellectual property and technology law group of the Reed Smith firm in Philadelphia. Before becoming a lawyer, Mr. Lewis worked in software product development as a senior technical writer and project team leader in California’s Silicon Valley. He graduated with honors from the University of Pittsburgh School of Law where he earned his J.D. degree and served as Executive Editor of the Law Review; he earned his B.A. degree from Haverford College. Mr. Lewis is an Adjunct Professor of Law at Temple University’s James E. Beasley School of Law where he has taught Computer Law and an advanced Copyright course. He is a member of the International Association of Privacy Professionals, the Copyright Society of the U.S.A., and the Association of Corporate Counsel. Mr. Lewis is a frequent speaker on privacy, copyright, and e-commerce law at industry and professional events.

 

DOUG LICHTMAN earned undergraduate degrees in electrical engineering and computer science from Duke University in 1994. He next attended Yale Law School, where he completed his J.D. in 1997. He joined the law faculty in 1998 and was tenured in 2001.

Mr. Lichtman's research considers how technology will challenge, reinforce, and redefine traditional legal rules. Specific areas of expertise include patent, copyright, and trademark law; telecommunications regulation; information economics; and a variety of issues related to technology startups and the Internet.

Lichtman's work has been featured in the Journal of Law & Economics, the Journal of Legal Studies, and the Harvard Business Review. He is co-author of Telecommunications Law and Policy, a textbook that investigates the federal regulatory regime applicable to broadcast television, cable television, radio, telephony, and advanced services like the provision of Internet access over the cable infrastructure. He is also an Editor at the Journal of Law & Economics.

 

JOSPEH LIU is an Associate Professor at Boston College Law School. Professor Liu writes and teaches in the areas of copyright, trademark, and internet law, with a particular focus on how digital technology is changing the way consumers interact with copyrighted works. His publications include Copyright and Time: A Proposal, 101 Mich. L. Rev. 409 (2002), and Legitimacy and Authority in Internet Coordination, 74 Ind. L.J. 587 (1999). Prior to Boston College, Professor Liu served as V.P. and General Counsel to a venture-backed internet startup. He clerked for the Honorable Levin H. Campbell of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit. He is a graduate of Yale College and Columbia Law School, where he was Editor-in-Chief of the Columbia Law Review.

 

DEAN MARKS is Senior Vice President, Intellectual Property, Corporate Business Development and Strategy for Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. He is responsible for establishing and guiding many of Warner Bros.’ business practices with respect to copyright related issues as well as helping to formulate the company’s position on domestic and international intellectual property legislation. He also works extensively on content protection technology issues.

 

DEIRDRE MULLIGAN is the director of the Samuelson Law, Technology & Public Policy Clinic and a clinical professor of law at the UC Berkeley School of Law (Boalt Hall). Before coming to Boalt, she was staff counsel at the Center for Democracy & Technology in Washington. Through the clinic, Mulligan and her students foster the public’s interest in new computer and communication technology by engaging in client advocacy and interdisciplinary research, and by participating in developing technical standards and protocols. The clinic’s work has advanced and protected the public’s interest in free expression, individual privacy, balanced intellectual property rules, and secure, reliable, open communication networks.

 

RICHARD OWENS is Director of the Copyright E-Commerce, Technology and Management Division at the World Intellectual Property Organization in Geneva, Switzerland. His current work lies at the intersection of copyright, digital technologies and the Internet. Before rejoining WIPO in 2002, Mr. Owens was International IPR Adviser for British Music Rights (BMR), London, the lobbying and public affairs voice of UK composers, songwriters and music publishers. While in London he contributed to UK implementation of the EC Copyright and E-Commerce Directives, and participated in RightsWatch, which developed self-regulatory notice-and-takedown procedures for the European Union. At WIPO from 1991 to 2000, Mr. Owens took part in the preparatory work and negotiations that produced the 1996 WIPO Copyright Treaty (WCT) and WIPO Performances and Phonograms Treaty (WPPT). He also spearheaded WIPO’s work program on IP aspects of traditional knowledge and folklore. A national of the United States of America, Mr. Owens received a Bachelor of Arts degree (Phi Beta Kappa) from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and received his Juris Doctor degree from the George Washington University National Law Center, Washington DC.

 

JEROME REICHMAN is Bunyan S. Womble Professor of Law at Duke Law School. He has written and lectured widely on diverse aspects of intellectual property law, including comparative and international intellectual property law and the connections between intellectual property and international trade law. His articles in this area have particularly addressed the problems that developing countries face in implementing the World Trade Organization's Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS Agreement). On this and related themes, he and Keith Maskus have recently published a book entitled International Public Goods and Transfer of Technology Under a Globalized Intellectual Property Regime

Other recent writings have focused on intellectual property rights in data; the appropriate contractual regime for online delivery of computer programs and other information goods; and on the use of liability rules to stimulate investment in innovation. His most recent articles are: “The Globalization of Private Knowledge Goods and the Privatization of Global Public Goods” (co-authored with Keith Maskus), 7 Journal of International Economic Law 279-320 (2004); “A Contractually Reconstructed Research Commons for Scientific Data in a Highly Protectionist Intellectual Property Environment” (co-authored with Paul Uhlir), 66 Law and Contemporary Problems 315-462 (2003); and Using Liability Rules to Stimulate Local Innovation in Developing Countries: Application to Traditional Knowledge (with Tracy Lewis) in International Public Goods and Transfer of Technology Under a Globalized Intellectual Property Regime (2005).

Professor Reichman serves as special advisor to the United States National Academies and the International Council for Science (ICSU) on the subject of legal protection for databases. He is a consultant to numerous intergovernmental and nongovernmental organizations; a member of the Board of Editors, Journal of International Economic Law; and on the Scientific Advisory Board of il Diritto di Autore (Rome).

 

J. THOMAS ROSCH was sworn in as a Commissioner of the Federal Trade Commission January 5, 2006, to a term that expires in September 2012.

Rosch joined the FTC from the San Francisco office of Latham & Watkins, where he was the former managing partner and most recently a partner, working in the firm’s antitrust and health care and life sciences divisions. Rosch served as chair of the American Bar Association’s Antitrust Section in 1990, and he has chaired the California Bar Association’s Antitrust Section. He served as the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection director from 1973 to 1975, and in 1989 was a member of the Special Committee to Study the Role of the FTC.

Nationally regarded for his antitrust and trade regulation law expertise, he has been lead counsel in more than 100 federal and state court antitrust cases and has more than 40 years experience before the Bar. In 2003, Rosch was honored as Antitrust Lawyer of the Year by the California State Bar Antitrust Section. He obtained his LLB from Harvard University in 1965 and was a Knox Fellow at Cambridge in 1962.

 

THOMAS RUBIN is Associate General Counsel and Assistant Secretary at Microsoft, where he heads the Copyright, Trademark and Trade Secret Group. He leads a 30-member team and strategically manages several of the most successful copyrighted works, most highly-valued brands and most valuable trade secrets in the world. At Microsoft since 1998, Tom spearheads complex product development, licensing, marketing and enforcement strategies across Microsoft’s business divisions for products including Windows, MSN/Windows Live, Microsoft Office and Xbox. He is also responsible for creating and promoting Microsoft’s positions on a broad range of intellectual property public policy issues such as fair use, peer-to-peer and digital rights management. Tom was an architect of Microsoft’s corporate compliance program and has had broad experience in a wide range of Internet, open source, network security and First Amendment issues.

 

PAMELA SAMUELSON is recognized as a pioneer in digital copyright law, intellectual property, cyberlaw and information policy. Since 1996, she has held a joint appointment with Boalt Hall and UC Berkeley's School of Information. In addition, Samuelson is director of the internationally-renowned Berkeley Center for Law & Technology. She serves on the board of directors of the Electronic Frontier Foundation (since 2000) and on the board of directors of the Open Source Application Foundation (since 2002).

Since 1990, Samuelson has been a contributing editor of Communications of the ACM, a journal is respected for its coverage of existing and emerging technologies. From 1997 through 2002, Samuelson was a fellow of the John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. From 2001 to 2006, she held a UC Berkeley Chancellor's Professorship for distinguished research, teaching and service for her contributions to both Boalt Hall and the School of Information. In 2002, she was named an honorary professor at the University of Amsterdam. Samuelson is the first Boalt faculty member to hold the Richard M. Sherman '74 Distinguished Professorship which was given to her in 2006. She is also a fellow of the Association of Computing Machinery.

 

MITCH SINGER is the Executive Vice President of the Digital Policy Group of Sony Pictures Entertainment Inc. The Digital Policy Group was formed to coordinate digital policy across all Sony Pictures' businesses. Mitch focuses on emerging and disruptive technologies and evaluates and develops adaptive business models to stay ahead of the technological curve. Mitch has been involved in digital rights management from the launch of DVD and has been the lead negotiator for Sony Pictures in content protection technology licensing such as Digital Transmission Copy Protection (5C), Copy Protection for Pre-Recorded and Recordable Media (4C), High Definition Content Protection (HDCP), Blu-Ray Recordable and many others."

 

DAVID SOHN joined the Center for Democracy and Technology as Staff Counsel in April 2005. He is focusing initially on CDT's digital copyright project, which seeks to promote reasonable pro-consumer approaches to copyright and related policy issues raised by the emergence of the Internet, new digital media, and digital rights management (DRM) technology.

Prior to joining CDT, Mr. Sohn worked for nearly five years as Commerce Counsel for Senator Ron Wyden, where he advised the Senator on technology and telecommunications issues coming before the Senate Commerce Committee. In that capacity, Mr. Sohn worked on legislation relating to such matters as spyware, digital copyright, and online privacy, and played a major role in enactment of the first federal anti-spam law. Before joining Senator Wyden's office, Mr. Sohn practiced law in Washington, D.C. at Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering, with a focus on telecommunications law and regulation.

 

GIGI SOHN is an internationally known communications attorney. In September 2001, she founded Public Knowledge with Laurie Racine (then President of the Center for the Public Domain) and activist/author David Bollier.

Gigi serves as PK’s chief strategist, fundraiser and public face. She is frequently quoted in the New York Times, Washington Post and Wall Street Journal, as well as in trade and local press. Gigi has been published in the Washington Post, Variety, CNET and Legal Times. In addition, she has appeared on numerous television and radio programs, including the Today Show, The McNeil-Lehrer Report, C-SPAN’s Washington Journal and National Public Radio’s All Things Considered and Morning Edition.

Gigi is a Non-Resident Fellow at the University of Southern California Annenberg Center, and a Senior Fellow at the University of Melbourne Faculty of Law. She has been an Adjunct Professor at Georgetown University and at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, Yeshiva University.

Mr. Sohn received his B.A. degree from Amherst College (magna cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa) and his J.D. from Stanford Law School. He also received an M.Sc. degree from the London School of Economics.

 

PETER SWIRE is the C. William O'Neill Professor of Law at the Moritz College of Law of the Ohio State University. He lives in the Washington, D.C. area. Swire is a Visiting Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress and a consultant to Morrison & Foerster, LLP. He is director of the Moritz summer program in D.C. From March, 1999 until January, 2001 Swire served as the Clinton Administration's Chief Counselor for Privacy, in the U.S. Office of Management and Budget.

 

RENÉ VAN BUUREN is a member of the scientific staff of the Telematica Instituut since 2001. Currently, he is the project leader of MESEC and he is the vice-president of a large scale national research programm: Freeband Communication. Within, the Telematica Instituut he has worked as a researcher in the field of e-business, enterprise architecture modelling and virtual laboratory modeling. Before, he worked as a researcher at The Royal Dutch Telecom research lab (KPN) and led a research department of KPN in Enschede. He holds a PhD. degree in Mathematical Physics.

 

MOLLY VAN HOUWELING joined the Boalt faculty in fall 2005 from the University of Michigan Law School, where she had been an assistant professor since 2002. Van Houweling's teaching and research interests include intellectual property, law and technology, property, and constitutional law. She was a visiting professor at Boalt in 2004-05.

Before joining the Michigan faculty, Van Houweling was president of Creative Commons, a nonprofit group that facilitates sharing of intellectual property. Van Houweling has served as senior adviser to the president and board of directors of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, the entity that oversees the Internet Domain Name System. She has been a research fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard Law School and at the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School. Van Houweling clerked for Judge Michael Boudin of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 1st Circuit and Justice David H. Souter of the U.S. Supreme Court.

 

HAL VARIAN is the Class of 1944 Professor at the School of Information Management and Systems (SIMS) , the Haas School of Business, and the Department of Economics at the University of California, Berkeley. From 1995-2002, he served as the founding dean of SIMS.

He received his S.B. degree from MIT in 1969 and his MA (mathematics) and Ph.D. (economics) from UC Berkeley in 1973. He has taught at MIT, Stanford, Oxford, Michigan and other universities around the world.

Professor Varian is a fellow of the Guggenheim Foundation, the Econometric Society, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has served as Co-Editor of the American Economic Review and is on the editorial boards of several journals.

Professor Varian has published numerous papers in economic theory, industrial organization, financial economics, econometrics and information economics. He is the author of two major economics textbooks which have been translated into 22 languages. His current research has been concerned with the economics of information technology and the information economy. He is the co-author of a bestselling book on business strategy, Information Rules: A Strategic Guide to the Network Economy and writes a monthly column for the The New York Times.

 

LUIS VILLARREOL VILLALON

EDUCATION:

  • Master in Laws, (LLM), "International Legal Studies". 1998; Washington College of Law, American University, Washington D.C., 1998.
  • Post Graduate Diploma in Mining and Water Law , 1995 Instituto de Derecho de Minas y Aguas, Universidad de Atacama, Santiago, 1995.
  • Licenced in Juridical and Social Sciences, University of Chile, Collage of Law , 1990.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE:

  • 2003 To Date. Intellectual Property Law Adviser, Ministry of Education, Chile.
  • 2000 to 2003 General Counsel Ministry of Education Chile.
  • 1998 to June 1999 Consultant for the Legal Department, Inter American Development Bank, Washington DC.


JANE WINN joined the faculty of University of Washington School of Law in 2002 to teach commercial and technology law courses, and is also a director of the Shidler Center for Law, Commerce & Technology. From 1989 to 2001, she taught commercial law and comparative law at Southern Methodist University School of Law in Dallas, Texas. In Spring 2002, she was a visiting professor at the University of California, Berkeley School of Law and, since 2001, has been a Visiting Fellow of the University of Melbourne School of Law, for the e-Law program. Professor Winn is a member of the American Law Institute, a board member of CALI (Computer Assisted Legal Instruction) and a faculty associate of the UW Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies. From 1987-89, she practiced law at the New York office of Shearman & Sterling. She is coauthor of the treatise Law of Electronic Commerce (4th ed. 2006) and the casebook Electronic Commerce (2nd ed. 2005). Her current research interests include electronic commerce law developments in the U.S., the European Union, and China.