Speakers

Biographies

Robert Anderson
Bethany Berger
James J. Brudney
Jennifer Dukart
Richard A. Duncan
Christopher Edley Jr.
James Emmett

William Eskridge, Jr.
Daniel Farber
Elizabeth Garrett
Sarah Krakoff
Goodwin Liu
John F. Manning
Nell Jessup Newton
Daniel Olmos
Frank Pommersheim
Robert C. Post
Pam Siege
David Sklansky
Peter L. Strauss
E. Thomas Sullivan
Gerard Torres
Ernest A. Young

Robert Anderson
Director, Native American Law Center
Associate Professor of Law
University of Washington School of Law

Professor Anderson is an Associate Professor of Law and Director of the Native American Law Center at the University of Washington School of Law. Before joining the law school, he was a Senior Staff Attorney for the Native American Rights Fund in Boulder, Colorado and Anchorage, Alaska for twelve years. He litigated major cases involving Native American sovereignty, hunting and fishing rights, and natural resources. From 1995-2001 he served as an appointee of Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt where he provided legal and policy advice on a wide variety of Indian law and natural resource issues. He teaches Indian Law, Public Land Law, Water Law and first-year Property Law. Professor Anderson was selected by students as a Philip A. Trautman Professor of the Year in 2005 and again in 2007. In 2007 he received the Native Justice Award from the Northwest Indian Bar Association. He is also a co-author and member of the Board of Editors of Cohen's Handbook of Federal Indian Law (2005) and is co-author of American Indian Law: Cases and Commentary, which is now in press. He is an enrolled member of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe (Bois Forte Band).

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Bethany Berger
Professor of Law
University of Connecticut School of Law

Bethany Berger is a Professor at the University of Connecticut School of Law, and is currently the Oneida Indian Nation Visiting Professor of Law at Harvard Law School.  Professor Berger graduated with honors from Wesleyan University, where she was elected to phi beta kappa, and from Yale Law School.  After law school, Professor Berger went to the Navajo and Hopi reservations to serve as the Director of the Native American Youth Law Project of DNA-People's Legal Services.  Professor Berger is a judge with the Southwest Intertribal Court of Appeals, and past chair of the Indian Nations and Indigenous People’s Section of the American Association of Law Schools.  She is an Executive Editor and Co-Author of Felix S. Cohen's Handbook of Federal Indian Law, co-author of a new casebook on American Indian Law with Philip Frickey, Robert Anderson, and Sarah Krakoff.  Her articles on federal Indian law and property have been excerpted and cited in several casebooks, edited collections, and before Congress and the Supreme Court.

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James J. Brudney
Newton D. Baker-Baker & Hostetler Chair in Law
Ohio State University Moritz College of Law

Following graduation from law school Professor Brudney clerked for the Honorable Gerhard A. Gesell of the U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C. and subsequently for Justice Harry A. Blackmun of the United States Supreme Court. He was associated for four years with the firm of Bredhoff & Kaiser in Washington, where he represented individuals and unions in constitutional and statutory matters.

Professor Brudney served for six years as Chief Counsel and Staff Director of the Senate Subcommittee on Labor. He has been Adjunct Professor of Law at the Georgetown Law Center, Visiting Fellow and Visiting Faculty Member at Oxford University, and Visiting Professor of Law at Harvard Law School.  He teaches Employment Law, Labor Law, Legislation, Comparative Labor and Employment Law, Age Discrimination in the Workplace, and Comparative Legislation. His scholarly writing is in the areas of workplace law and statutory interpretation. He also serves as co-chair of the Public Review Board, International Union, United Automobile Workers of America.  Professor Brudney was selected by the Class of 1996 as the Outstanding Law Professor of the Year. He was honored with a Fulbright Distinguished Scholar Award to do research and lecturing at Oxford University in the Fall of 2000. In 2008, he received the Alumni Award for Distinguished Teaching from Ohio State University.

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Jennifer Dukart
Associate
Faegre & Benson LLP

Jennifer Yatskis Dukart served as a research assistant to Phil Frickey for two years while she was a student at University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.  Her student comment appears in volume 93 of the California Law Review following Professor Frickey's article on statutory interpretation.  After her graduation from Berkeley in 2006, order of the coif, Jennifer clerked for the Honorable William Fletcher of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals.  She is currently an associate at Faegre & Benson in Minneapolis, Minnesota.  Jennifer, a former registered nurse, specializes in pharmaceutical and medical device complex litigation and is also a member of Faegre’s appellate practice.  She has contributed to submissions to the Minnesota Supreme Court and the Supreme Court of the United States.

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Richard A. Duncan
Partner
Faegre & Benson LLP

Richard Duncan has practiced at Faegre & Benson since 1988 and has been a litigation partner since 1996. His practice focuses on antitrust law, environmental law, commercial litigation and federal Indian law. Rick heads Faegre & Benson's antitrust and trade regulation working group. He is past-chair of the Antitrust Section of the Minnesota State Bar Association, and he has been an adjunct professor of law at the University of Minnesota Law School.  Richard Duncan received his J.D. from Yale Law School in 1988 and his B.A. from Yale University, summa cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa, in 1985.

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Christopher Edley Jr.
The Honorable William H. Orrick, Jr. Distinguished Chair and Dean
Berkeley Law

Christopher Edley, Jr. assumed the Deanship of U.C. Berkeley Law School in 2004 after 23 years as a Harvard Law professor, where he was founding Co-Director of The Harvard Civil Rights Project. From 1999-2005, he served as a congressional appointee on the bipartisan U.S. Commission on Civil Rights.  He served as the Assistant Director of the White House Domestic Policy Staff during the Carter Administration and as the Associate Director of the Office of Management and Budget during the Clinton Administration. In 2006, he was named to a national nonpartisan commission created to conduct an independent review of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act. Dean Edley’s academic work is primarily in the areas of civil rights and administrative law. His publications include Not All Black and White: Affirmative Action, Race and American Values and Administrative Law: Rethinking Judicial Control of Bureaucracy.  He is currently on the Division Committee on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education of the National Research Council, the research arm of the National Academy of Sciences. He is a trustee of the Russell Sage Foundation and of The Century Foundation, a board director of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), and a fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration, the Council of Foreign Relations, the American Law Institute, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. At UC Berkeley, he is founder and faculty-Co-Director of the Chief Justice Earl Warren Institute on Race, Ethnicity and Diversity, a multidisciplinary think tank. In April 2007, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, which conducts scholarly activities and interdisciplinary research to advance the public good, elected Dean Edley as one of its Fellows.  In December 2008 Dean Edley was appointed to the Bipartisan State Commission on a 21st Century Economy for the state of California.  Dean Edley received his B.A. degree in 1973 from Swarthmore College, his J.D. degree in 1978 from Harvard Law School and his M.P.P. from Harvard University in 1978.

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James Emmett
Barrister, New South Wales, Australia

James Emmett is a lecturer and the course convenor for Statutory Interpretation at the University of New South Wales.  He has also lectured in Private International Law, Equity and Roman Law.  He is a barrister in New South Wales, where his practice includes general commercial litigation and public law.


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William Eskridge, Jr.
John A. Garver Professor of Jurisprudence
Yale Law School

Professor William N. Eskridge, Jr. is the John A. Garver Professor of Jurisprudence at Yale Law School. His primary legal academic interest has been statutory interpretation.  Together with Professor Philip Frickey, he developed an innovative casebook on Legislation. In 1990-95, Professor Eskridge represented a gay couple suing for recognition of their same-sex marriage. Since then, he has published a field-establishing casebook, three monographs, and dozens of law review articles articulating a legal and political framework for proper state treatment of sexual and gender minorities. The historical materials in the book on Gaylaw formed the basis for an amicus brief he drafted for the Cato Institute and for much of the Court's (and the dissenting opinion's) analysis in Lawrence v. Texas (2003), which invalidated consensual sodomy laws. His most recent book is Gay Marriage: For Better or For Worse? (with Darren Spedale).  Professor Eskridge received his B.A., summa cum laude, from Davidson College, his masters in History from Harvard, and his J.D. from Yale.

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Daniel Farber
Sho Sato Professor of Law
Faculty Co-Director, California Center for Law, Energy & the Environment
Berkeley Law

Professor Farber received a B.A. in philosophy with high honors in 1971 and an M.A. in sociology in 1972, both from the University of Illinois. In 1975 he earned his J.D. from the University of Illinois, where he was a member of the Order of the Coif, editor in chief of the "University of Illinois Law Review," a Harno Scholar and class valedictorian.

After graduating, Professor Farber clerked for Judge Philip W. Tone of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit and for Justice John Paul Stevens of the U.S. Supreme Court. He then practiced law with Sidley & Austin before joining the faculty of the University of Illinois Law School.  In 1981 he became a member of the University of Minnesota Law School faculty. During his years there he became the first Henry J. Fletcher Professor of Law in 1987, served as a visiting professor at Stanford Law School, Harvard Law School and the University of Chicago Law School, and was named McKnight Presidential Professor of Public Law in 2000.   Professor Farber's books include "Desperately Seeking Certainty" (2002), "Eco-Pragmatism: Making Sensible Environmental Decisions in an Uncertain World" (1999), and "The First Amendment and Environment Law in a Nutshell." He has also written many articles on environmental and constitutional law as well as about contracts, jurisprudence and legislation. Most recently, Professor Farber co-authored the book "Disasters and the Law: Katrina and Beyond" (2006). He is a pioneer in the emerging field of Disaster Law, which examines legal issues related to society's ability to deal effectively with the aftermath of catastrophes and the risk of future disasters.

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Elizabeth Garrett
University Vice President for Academic Planning and Budget; Sydney M. Irmas Professor of Public Interest Law, Legal Ethics, Political Science, and Policy, Planning, and Development
University of Southern California Gould School of Law

Elizabeth Garrett is the Vice President for Academic Planning and Budget at the University of Southern California and the Sydney M. Irmas Professor of Public Interest Law, Legal Ethics, Political Science, and Policy, Planning and Development.  She is also the co-Director of the USC-Caltech Center for the Study of Law and Politics (CSLP).  She served as Vice Provost of Academic Affairs for the academic year 2005-06.  She serves on the Board of Directors of the Initiative and Referendum Institute at USC which is affiliated with the CSLP.  President George W. Bush appointed her to serve on the nine-member bipartisan Tax Reform Panel that released its final report in November 2005.  She is the Treasurer and Chair of the Finance Committee of the National Governing Board of Common Cause.  Her primary scholarly interests are legislative process, direct democracy, tax policy and the federal budget process, the study of democratic institutions, statutory interpretation, and administrative law.  She is the co-author of the Fourth Edition of the leading casebook on legislation and statutory interpretation, Cases and Materials on Legislation:  Statutes and the Creation of Public Policy (West Publishing 2007) and the second edition of Legislation and Statutory Interpretation, published by Foundation Press in 2006.  She is a co-editor of Fiscal Challenges:  An Interdisciplinary Approach to Budget Policy (Cambridge University Press 2008).  She is the author of many articles and book chapters, analyzing campaign finance laws, courts and political parties, various congressional procedures, judicial review of regulatory statutes, the initiative process, and the California recall.  Before joining the faculty of USC, she was a Professor of Law at the University of Chicago, where she also served as Deputy Dean for Academic Affairs, and she has been a visiting professor at the California Institute of Technology, Harvard Law School, the University of Virginia Law School, Central European University in Budapest, and the Interdisciplinary Center Law School in Israel.  Before entering academia, she clerked for Justice Thurgood Marshall on the U.S. Supreme Court, and she served as legal counsel and legislative director for Senator David L. Boren (D-Okla.).  She is a fellow of the American Law Institute, the American Bar Foundation and a member of the editorial board of the Election Law Journal.

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Sarah Krakoff
Associate Professor of Law
University of Colorado Law School

Professor Krakoff teaches and is widely published in the areas of American Indian law and natural resources law. Her article examining the effects of federal law on the Navajo Nation’s exercise of sovereignty, A Narrative of Sovereignty: Illuminating the Paradox of the Domestic Dependent Nation, received the Jules Millstein Faculty Writing Award at the University of Colorado Law School in 2006 and has been cited in several federal district court opinions. Professor Krakoff has also written about environmental ethics, public lands, and global warming. Her current projects include a new American Indian law casebook (co-authored by Bob Anderson, Bethany Berger and Phil Frickey) and a book (currently titled Parenting the Planet) about the different stages of the human relationship to nature. When Professor Krakoff first came to the Law School, she was the Director of the American Indian Law Clinic, supervising students in a range of federal Indian and tribal law matters. She succeeded in securing permanent University funding for the Clinic before moving to non-clinical teaching in 1999. Before coming to Colorado, Professor Krakoff was awarded an Equal Justice Works Fellowship to work on the Navajo Nation as Director of the Youth Law Project for DNA-People’s Legal Services. Professor Krakoff clerked on the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals for Judge Warren J. Ferguson from 1992-93, and received her J.D. from Boalt Hall, U.C. Berkeley, in 1991 and her B.A. from Yale University in 1986. 

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Goodwin Liu
Professor of Law; Associate Dean, JD Program & Curriculum Planning
Co-Director, Chief Justice Earl Warren Institute on Race, Ethnicity & Diversity
Berkeley Law

Goodwin Liu joined the Boalt faculty in 2003. His primary areas of expertise are constitutional law, education policy, civil rights, and the Supreme Court. Along with Dean Christopher Edley, Jr., Professor Liu is Co-Director of the Chief Justice Earl Warren Institute on Race, Ethnicity, and Diversity, a multidisciplinary think tank on civil rights law and policy.

Professor Liu's recent work includes "Rethinking Constitutional Welfare Rights" in Stanford Law Review (forthcoming 2008); "History Will Be Heard: An Appraisal of the Seattle/Louisville Decision" in Harvard Law & Policy Review (forthcoming 2008); "Improving Title I Funding Equity Across States, Districts, and Schools," in Iowa Law Review (forthcoming 2008); "Seattle and Louisville" in California Law Review (2007); "Education, Equality, and National Citizenship" in Yale Law Journal (2006); and "Interstate Inequality in Educational Opportunity" in New York University Law Review (2006). In 2007, his work won the Education Law Association's inaugural Steven S. Goldberg Award for Distinguished Scholarship in Education Law.  Professor Liu is also a frequent commentator on constitutional law and education policy in general media including the New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, PBS Newshour with Jim Lehrer, and National Public Radio. In addition, he has testified before the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee and the California Assembly Education Committee.  Before joining the Boalt faculty, Professor Liu was an appellate litigator at O'Melveny & Myers in Washington. He clerked for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg during the October 2000 term and for Judge David Tatel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit from 1998 to 1999. He also served as special assistant to the deputy secretary of the U.S. Department of Education from 1999 to 2000, and as senior program officer for higher education at the Corporation for National Service (AmeriCorps) from 1993 to 1995.  Professor Liu, a Rhodes Scholar, serves on the Board of Trustees of Stanford University and the Board of Directors of the American Constitution Society in Washington, D.C. He also serves on the boards of the ACLU of Northern California, Chinese for Affirmative Action in San Francisco and the Alliance for Excellent Education in Washington, D.C.  Liu received his J.D. from Yale Law School in 1998, M.A. from Oxford University in 1993 and his B.S. from Stanford University in 1993. 

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John F. Manning
Bruce Bromley Professor of Law
Harvard Law School

John Manning received his J.D. magna cum laude from Harvard Law School in 1985, and his A.B. summa cum laude in History from Harvard College in 1982.  His research interests include: Administrative Law, Federal Courts, Separation of Powers and Statutory Interpretation.  Some of his representative publications are:

• Manning, John F. "What Divides Textualists from Purposivists?" 70 Columbia Law Review 106 (2006).
• Manning, John F. "The Eleventh Amendment and the Interpretation of Precise Constitutional Texts," 113 Yale Law Journal (2004).
• Manning, John F. "The Absurdity Doctrine," 116 Harvard Law Review 2387 (2003).
• Manning, John F. "Textualism and the Equity of the Statute," 101 Columbia Law Review 1 (2001).
•  Manning, John F. "The Nondelegation Doctrine as a Canon of Avoidance," 2000 Supreme Court Review 223 (2000).
• Manning, John F. "Constitutional Structure and Judicial Deference to Agency Interpretations of Agency Rules," 96 Columbia Law Review 612 (1996).

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Nell Jessup Newton
Chancellor and Dean, William B. Lockhart Professor of Law
University of California Hastings College of the Law

Nell Jessup Newton became Chancellor and Dean and William B. Lockhart Professor of Law in August, 2006 at UC Hastings College of the Law. She graduated from the University of California at Berkeley in 1973 and from UC Hastings College of the Law in 1976, where she was a member of the Thurston Society and the Order of the Coif and served as Managing Editor of the Hastings Law Journal. After graduation from law school, Dean Newton taught at Catholic University Law School (1976-1992) and then at American University Law School (1992-1998). Prior to joining Hastings, Dean Newton served as dean of the law schools of the University of Connecticut (2000-2006) and the University of Denver (1998-2000).

Dean Newton has taught contracts, property, constitutional law and American Indian law. For 30 years she has focused her scholarship on the intersection of American Indian law with property and constitutional law, writing on tribal property rights and rights to self-government. She was the co-author of the third edition of one of the leading textbooks on Indian Law, Cases & Materials on American Indian Law, and is the editor-in-chief of Cohen's Handbook of Federal Indian Law, the only treatise on the subject. In addition, she is the author of nearly 60 articles, ranging from newspaper editorial opinion articles to law review articles. Her law review articles have been reprinted in scholarly books on Indian law, race law, the law of reparations, and legal philosophy.   Dean Newton is active in national scholarly and educational organizations such as the American Association of Law Schools, the American Bar Association, the Law & Society Association, the Law School Admissions Council, and the National Association of Law Placement (NALP) Foundation and is a life fellow of the American Bar Foundation and the Connecticut Bar Foundation.

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Daniel Olmos
Attorney
Nolan, Armstrong & Barton LLP

Daniel Olmos graduated cum laude from Harvard University in 1999.  He was awarded a Harvard College Scholarship for academic distinction and wrote his honors thesis on providing more effective legal services to the poor.  For two years following his graduation from Harvard, Daniel taught first grade at Roosevelt Elementary School in Compton, California.

Daniel received his J.D. in 2004 from Boalt Hall School of Law at U.C. Berkeley, where he was awarded two American Jurisprudence Awards, in Modern American Legal History and Race and American Law, as well as the Moot Court Advocacy Award. He was active in the La Raza Law Students Association and served as Articles Editor and Executive Editor of the Berkeley La Raza Law Journal.  After graduating from Boalt, Daniel clerked for District Judge Claudia Wilken of the Northern District of California and Circuit Judge Stephen Reinhardt of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals.  Prior to joining Nolan, Armstrong & Barton in 2007, Daniel was a Deputy Public Defender in Contra Costa County.

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Frank Pommersheim
Professor of Law
University of South Dakota School of Law

Frank Pommersheim was born in New York City, but has lived in South Dakota for more than 30 years.  Prior to joining the faculty in 1984, he lived and worked on the Rosebud Sioux Reservation for ten years.  He currently serves on a number of tribal appellate courts throughout Indian country including as Chief Justice for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal Court of Appeals and as Associate Justice for the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Supreme Court.

Professor Pommersheim writes extensively in the field of Indian law.  He is the author of Braid of Feathers (American Indian Law and Contemporary Tribal Life) and numerous scholarly articles.  Frank is also a poet.  His most recent book is East of the River:  Poems Both Ancient and New.  He has also received the University of South Dakota Belbas-Larson Award for Excellence in Teaching and the South Dakota Peace and Justice Center Reconciliation Award.  Frank is also a contributor to the 2005 edition of Felix Cohen’s Handbook of Federal Indian Law and received the 2006 John Wesley Jackson Award as the Outstanding Professor of Law.  He recently completed a book entitled Broken Landscape: Indians, Indian Tribes and the Constitution, which is due out early in 2009.  Professor Pommersheim received his J.D. from Columbia University, M.P.A. from Harvard University and his B.A. from Colgate University.

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Robert C. Post
David Boies Professor of Law (on leave: spring term)
Yale Law School

Robert Post is the David Boies Professor of Law at Yale Law School. Before coming to Yale, he taught at Berkeley Law at the University of California at Berkeley. Professor Post’s subject areas are constitutional law, First Amendment, legal history, and affirmative action. His books include Civil Society and Government (ed. with N. Rosenblum). He has a B.A. and Ph.D. in History of American Civilization from Harvard and a J.D. from Yale.

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Pam Siege
Director of Publishing for the Academic Segment
Thomson Reuters

Pam Siege Chandler is the Director of Publishing for the Academic Segment at Thomson Reuters, where she oversees editorial strategy and operations for West Academic Publishing and Foundation Press.  Pam began her career in 1995 as a clerk for the Iowa Court of Appeals and the following year joined West's Law School Division as an Account Manager.  She has since held a variety of positions with increasing levels of responsibility across the company's Law School Publishing organization.   In addition to her work at West, Pam is also an adjunct instructor at the University of Minnesota Law School where she teaches Legal Writing.

Pam received her BA from Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa and her JD from the University of Minnesota Law School.  As Phil Frickey's research assistant, Pam spent countless hours reading aloud Hart and Sacks' Legal Process manuscript which, now published under the Foundation Press imprint, sits prominently on her desk today.

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David Sklansky
Professor of Law, Faculty Co-Chair, Berkeley Center for Criminal Justice
Berkeley Law

David A. Sklansky joined the Boalt faculty in 2005 following a decade at UCLA School of Law, where he won the campuswide Distinguished Teaching Award and was twice voted the law school's professor of the year. He teaches courses on criminal law, criminal procedure and evidence. Sklansky serves as faculty chair of the Berkeley Center for Criminal Justice.  After graduating from Harvard Law School in 1984, Sklansky clerked for Judge Abner Mikva of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit and for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Harry Blackmun. He briefly practiced labor law at the Washington, D.C., firm of Bredhoff & Kaiser. From 1987 to 1994, Sklansky served as an assistant U.S. attorney in Los Angeles, where he specialized in white-collar fraud prosecutions. While at UCLA, he served as special counsel to the independent review panel appointed to investigate the Los Angeles Police Department's Rampart Division scandal.  Sklansky is the author of Democracy and the Police (Stanford University Press, 2008) and a well-regarded evidence casebook, Evidence: Cases, Commentary, and Problems (Aspen Publishers, 2d ed. 2008). He has written extensively about criminal procedure and policing. Prof Sklansky received his J.D. from Harvard University in 1984 and his A.B. from UC Berkeley in 1981. 

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Peter L. Strauss
Betts Professor of Law
Columbia Law School

Peter L. Strauss is the Betts Professor of Law at Columbia Law School, where he has taught Administrative Law and related courses since 1971. During 1975-77, Professor Strauss was on leave from Columbia as the first General Counsel of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission.  His published works include Administrative Justice in the United States (1989 and 2002); Gellhorn’s & Byse’s Administrative Law: Cases and Comments (most recently, 2003, with Rakoff and Farina); Legal Methods: Understanding and Using Cases and Statutes (most recently 2008); Legislation: Understanding and Using Statutes (2006); Administrative Law Stories (Ed., 2006); and numerous law review articles, generally focusing on issues of rulemak¬ing, separation of powers, and statutory interpretation.  In 1992-93, he served as Chair of the American Bar Association’s Section of Administrative Law and Regula¬tory Practice, which in 1987 awarded him its third annual award for distinguished scholarship in administrative law.  Twice Vice Dean at Columbia, he has visited at Harvard and NYU, and lectured widely on American administra¬tive law abroad.  In 2008, the American Constitution Society awarded him its first Richard Cudahy prize for scholarship in administrative law, citing his essay “Overseer or ‘The Decider’? The President in Administrative Law.”  In the fall of 2008 he was Fernand Braudel Senior Fellow at the European University Institute in Florence, Italy, and he is currently Parsons Fellow at the University of Sydney, pursuing comparative research on political controls over regulation ostensibly based on scientific judgment.

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E. Thomas Sullivan
Sr. Vice President and Provost; Julius E. Davis Chair in Law
University of Minnesota Law School

Provost E. Thomas Sullivan was named Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost of the University of Minnesota on July 1, 2004. Prior to this appointment, he served as the eighth Dean of the University of Minnesota Law School from 1995 to 2002. He finished his term as Dean in July 2002 and was named the Irving Younger Professor of Law, which he held until July 2005. Previously, he served for six years as the Dean of the University of Arizona College of Law, and as Associate Dean at Washington University in St. Louis.  Provost Sullivan's teaching areas include antitrust, civil procedure, regulation of business, complex litigation, and trial practice. He is a nationally recognized authority on antitrust law and complex litigation, having authored or co-authored 9 books and more than 50 articles and essays on antitrust. At the Law School, he has received the Stanley V. Kinyon Teacher of the Year Award for Excellence in Teaching.  Provost Sullivan graduated magna cum laude from law school at Indiana University in 1973, where he served as Articles Editor of the Indiana Law Review. He then served as a law clerk to a federal district judge in Miami, was a trial attorney in the Criminal Division of the United States Department of Justice in Washington, D.C. (Attorney General's Honors Program), and was a senior associate at Donovan Leisure, Newton, and Irvine's Washington, D.C., office. He began his teaching career in 1979 at the University of Missouri, Columbia. On two occasions he has been a visiting faculty member at Georgetown University Law Center in Washington, D.C. He also has twice been a visiting scholar at Cambridge University in England. During the fall semester of 2002, he was a visiting professor of law at the University of California, Berkeley (Boalt Hall).

Provost Sullivan has served as a consultant to the American Law Institute's Project on Complex Litigation and its Federal Code Revision Project, the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee, the U.S. Senate Commerce Committee, as project director and editor for the ABA Antitrust Monograph Project on Nonprice Predation, and as chair of the Association of American Law Schools Section on Antitrust and Economic Regulation. He is also a Fellow of the American Bar Foundation and a member of its Board of Directors. He has been an Adjunct Research Fellow at the Center for the Study of American Business at Washington University. In August 2002, he became chair of the Council of the Section of Legal Education of the ABA, and has served as chair of the Section's Law School Development Committee. In 2000, he was appointed by the President of the ABA to the Committee on the Future of the Legal Profession. In June of 2003, he received the J. William Elwin Jr. Award from the ABA Section of Legal Education for leadership and contributions to law school development.  A review of his deanship at Minnesota is published at 88 Minnesota Law Review 1 (2003). A symposium in honor of him, entitled "Global Antitrust Law & Policy," is published in three volumes in 48 Antitrust Bulletin 299-1078 (2003).  Provost Sullivan received his J.D. from Indiana University and his B.A. from Drake University.

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Gerard Torres
Bryant Smith Chair in Law, LLM
University of Texas at Austin Law School

Professor Torres is former president of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS). A leading figure in critical race theory, Torres is also an expert in agricultural and environmental law. He came to UT Law in 1993 after teaching at The University of Minnesota Law School, where he also served as associate dean. Torres has served as deputy assistant attorney general for the Environment and Natural Resources Division of the U.S. Department of Justice in Washington, D.C., and as counsel to then U.S. attorney general Janet Reno.

His latest book, The Miner's Canary: Enlisting Race, Resisting Power, Transforming Democracy (Harvard University Press, 2002) with Harvard law professor Lani Guinier, was described by Publisher's Weekly as "one of the most provocative and challenging books on race produced in years." Torres' many articles include "Translation and Stories" (Harvard Law Review, 2002), "Who Owns the Sky?" (Pace Law Review, 2001) (Garrison Lecture), "Taking and Giving: Police Power, Public Value, and Private Right" (Environmental Law, 1996), and "Translating Yonnondio by Precedent and Evidence: The Mashpee Indian Case" (Duke Law Journal, 1990).  Torres has served on the board of the Environmental Law Institute, the National Petroleum Council and on EPA's National Environmental Justice Advisory Council. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the American Law Institute. Torres was honored with the 2004 Legal Service Award from the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF) for his work to advance the legal rights of Latinos. He has been a visiting professor at Harvard and Stanford law schools.   Torres received his J.D. from Yale University in 1977, LLM from University of Michigan-Ann Arbor in 1980 and his A.B. from Stanford University in 1974. 

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Ernest A. Young
Professor of Law
Duke University School of Law

Professor Young teaches constitutional law, federal courts, and foreign relations law. He is one of the nation's leading authorities on the constitutional law of federalism, having written extensively on the Rehnquist Court's "Federalist Revival" and the difficulties confronting courts as they seek to draw lines between national and state authority. He also is an active commentator on foreign relations law, where he focuses on the interaction between domestic and supranational courts and the application of international law by domestic courts. Professor Young also writes on constitutional interpretation and constitutional theory. He has been known to dabble in maritime law and comparative constitutional law.

A native of Abilene, Texas, Professor Young joined the Duke Law faculty in 2008, after serving as the Charles Alan Wright Chair in Federal Courts at the University of Texas at Austin School of Law, where he had taught since 1999. He graduated from Dartmouth College in 1990 and Harvard Law School in 1993. After law school, he served as a law clerk to Judge Michael Boudin of the 1st U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals (1993-94) and to Justice David Souter of the U.S. Supreme Court (1995-96). Professor Young practiced law at Cohan, Simpson, Cowlishaw, & Wulff in Dallas, Texas (1994-95) and at Covington & Burling in Washington, D.C. (1996-98), where he specialized in appellate litigation. He has also been a visiting professor at Harvard Law School (2004-05) and Villanova University School of Law (1998-99), as well as an adjunct professor at Georgetown University Law Center (1997).  Elected to the American Law Institute in 2006, Professor Young is an active participant in both public and private litigation in his areas of interest. He has been the principal author of amicus briefs on behalf of leading constitutional scholars in several recent Supreme Court cases, including Medellin v. Texas (concerning presidential power and the authority of the International Court of Justice over domestic courts) and Gonzales v. Raich (concerning federal power to regulate medical marijuana).

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