2001 Human Rights Fellows

The Human Rights Center has sponsored more than 100 graduate and professional students to work with nongovernmental organizations and human rights agencies in the U.S. and abroad.

2001 HUMAN RIGHTS FELLOWS

Lisa Butler is a graduate student with the School of Public Health. Butler will be participating in a joint fellowship with Ana Maria Xet-Mull. She will be addressing the rise of tuberculosis among immigrant communities in San Francisco. In particular, her work will focus on identifying factors that encourage members of immigrant communities to seek and adhere to treatment. She will be collaborating with the California Department of Health. Read Lisa's final report. View Lisa's community-based Photovoice Project about efforts to treat tuberculosis in Contra Costa county (pdf).

Logan Hennessy is a graduate student in Environmental Science, Policy and Management. This summer, Hennessy will be conducting research among the Amerindians, the indigenous people of Guyana, to evaluate their capacity to secure land rights and natural resources and to explore effective community-building strategies. He will be working with the Center for Amerindian Rights and Environmental Law. Read Logan's final report.

Mark Hunter is a graduate student in the Department of Geography. He intends to return to the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa to study the spread of AIDS and its relationships to material inequities and socially constructed notions of masculinity and femininity. Hunter will conduct his research in conjunction with Gingindlovu AIDS and Health Awareness Group and with the University of Natal Faculty of Community & Development Disciplines. Read Mark's final report.

Mary Beth Kaufman is first year law student at Boalt Hall School of Law. She will be working with OilWatch/Center for Economic and Social Rights in the Ecuadoran Amazon in an attempt to hold Texaco legally responsible for the release of toxic waste in this region. Hoffman intends to videotape interviews with community members, lawyers, nongovernmental organizations, Ecuadoran government officials and Texaco representatives to explore and publicize these issues.

Leena Pendharkar is a graduate student in Journalism. She plans to travel to India under the auspices of International Rivers Network to document the struggle of local communities to maintain their farmlands and way of life in the face of the proposed Sardar Sarovar dam of the Narmada Valley Development Project. Pendharkar will take with her a small digital camera and document not only the protests against the building of this dam but also how the proposed dam will affect individuals and communities. She hopes that her multi-media web site will contribute to the ongoing dialogue about the effects of the Narmada Valley dams on rural communities and help to reach a solution that embraces and recognizes their sustainable way of living.

Vasu Sunkara is an undergraduate student in Development Studies and Molecular and Cell Biology. He is combining interests in his two majors to explore the lack of health care for indigenous children working in factory regions in Mexico. Sunkara will work in Mexico City with a project of the Comision Mexicana de Defensa y Promocion de los Derechos Humanos, "Child Survival: A Human Rights Priority." The goal of Sunkara's project is to increase the awareness of routine governmental healthcare denials for indigenous children as being a leading human rights violation.

Tida Violante is a graduate student with the School of Public Health. Violante has accepted a summer fellowship with UNICEF Ethiopia and its recently launched HIV/AIDS Program. The program has four priority areas: 1) youth prevention; 2) prevention of mother-to-child transmission; 3) caring and support for children affected and orphaned by HIV/AIDS; and, 4) advocacy/breaking the silence. Tida will assist in the evaluation and monitoring of each of the priority areas. She will also provide technical assistance to regional counterparts.

Diana Pei Wu is a graduate student in Environmental Science, Policy & Management. Wu will be working with the Borneo Project on the island of Borneo to help empower the local communities to defend their indigenous land rights and to protect their land from environmental degradation. Specifically, she will help map and train volunteers on GIS-based mapping techniques. She will also be investigating reforestation projects in the Ringgin Forest Reserve.

Ana Maria Xet-Mull is a graduate student with the School of Public Health. Xet-Mull will be participating in a joint fellowship with Lisa Butler. She will be addressing the rise of Tuberculosis among immigrant communities in San Francisco. In particular, her work will focus on the identification of factors that encourage members of immigrant communities to seek and to adhere to treatment. She will be collaborating with the California Department of Health.

Daniela Yanai is first year law student at Boalt Hall School of Law. Yanai will be working in Israel this summer with the Worker's Rights and Globalization Watch Project of the Alternative Information Center to document the plight of Palestinian workers and research the interactions between globalization and the Israeli/Palestinian conflict. She intends to analyze the role globalization has played in shaping Israeli regulation of the Palestinian economy and to examine the impact of international development on the human rights violations that characterize the Israeli occupation of the West Bank and Gaza. Read Daniela's final report.