2012


PII 2.0

TAP

http://www.techpolicy.com/Schwartz_PII20.aspx

On January 5, 2012, we presented our paper, The PII Problem, as part of the speaker’s series, @Microsoft: Conversations on Privacy. Personally identifiable information (PII) is one of the most central concepts in information privacy regulation.  The scope of privacy laws typically turns on whether PII is involved. The basic assumption behind the applicable laws is that if PII is not involved, then there can be no privacy harm. At the same time, there is no uniform definition of PII in information privacy law.  Moreover, computer science has shown that in many circumstances non-PII can be linked to individuals, and that de-identified data can be re-identified. PII and non-PII are thus not immutable categories, and there is a risk that information deemed non-PII at one time can be transformed into PII at a later juncture.
 
In our presentation, we argued that although the current approaches to PII are flawed, the concept of PII should not be abandoned. We develop a new approach called “PII 2.0,” which accounts for PII’s malleability. Based upon a standard rather than a rule, PII 2.0 utilizes a continuum of risk of identification. PII 2.0 regulates information that relates to either an “identified” or “identifiable” individual, and it establishes different requirements for each category. 1/16/2012