Current Visiting Scholars

Center for the Study of Law and Society
Visiting Scholars Summer 2010


Daniella Beinisch is an SJD candidate at the University of Pennsylvania Law School where she completed her LLM (with honors). She also holds an LLB from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Daniella worked as a criminal prosecutor in the Israeli State Attorney’s office for several years; she also worked for a few NGOs promoting social programs and human rights. Her research interests include the intersections between civil society organizations and governmental agencies, criminal justice, community justice and the social role of courts. While at the Center, she plans to complete her doctoral dissertation exploring the problem solving courts phenomenon and the challenges that it represent to the traditional criminal justice system.  beinisch@law.upenn.edu

Jennifer Drobac is a tenured professor at the Indiana University-Indianapolis School of Law. She holds her doctoral and J.D. degrees from Stanford Law School and Masters and Bachelors degrees in History from Stanford University. Her recent scholarly work focuses primarily on sexual harassment and juvenile law and has been published in a variety of law reviews and journals.  In 2005, she finished her first textbook, SEXUAL HARASSMENT LAW: HISTORY, CASES AND THEORY. A university video profile of her recent research can be found at http://www.youtube.com/user/indylawchannel.  While in residence, Jennifer will be researching how new information regarding the neurological and psychosocial development of teenagers might influence the modification of civil law pertaining to youth. jdrobac@iupui.edu

William Gallagher is Associate Professor of Law at the Golden Gate University School of Law. Prior to his full-time academic appointment, he was a partner in a San Francisco law firm where he specialized in intellectual property litigation.  He holds a Ph.D. from U.C. Berkeley (Jurisprudence and Social Policy), a J.D. from the UCLA School of Law, an M.A. from the University of Chicago, and a B.A. from U.C. Berkeley.  His research interests include intellectual property law and policy, the legal profession, and the sociology of law.  He is a co-founder of the Law and Society Association Collaborative Research Network (“CRN”) on Culture, Society, and Intellectual Property.  While serving as a visiting scholar at the CSLS, he will be continuing research on (1) two empirical studies of strategic enforcement of intellectual property claims, (2) an empirical study of patent lawyers, (3) an edited book on “law and society” approaches to intellectual property law, and (4) a study of lawyer regulation in California.   wgallagher@ggu.edu

Joseph Gusfield
, Distinguished Affiliate Scholar.  Professor Emeritus, ECSD.  Research: social movements and social problems

Kiyoshi Hasegawa is Professor of Law at Tokyo Metropolitan University. He received a Ph.D. in Law from the University of Tokyo. He specializes in the sociology of law. Hasegawa’s most well-known work is ‘Toshi Komyunitii to Hō’ [The Urban Community and the Law], which received the Research Committee on Sociology of Law (RCSL) Adam Podgorecki Prize in 2006. He is particularly interested in dispute resolutions in neighborhoods, private land-use restrictions, and residential private governments. He also has an interest in the homeless, and in the exclusion from several social sub-systems that is caused by homelessness. While at the Center, he will be conducting a comparative study of homeowners associations in the United States and Japan. The aim of this study is to present an accurate picture of these associations in addition to examining the conditions wherein residents of the two countries take recourse to their respective legal frameworks. At the same time, Hasegawa will be conducting research on the various kinds of exclusion from communities, and on the phenomena of segregation and homelessness. This study aims to focus on the negative side of deliberative or democratic communities, shedding light on the cumulative effects of exclusion from social sub-systems.  k-hase@tmu.ac.jp

Amanda Hollis-Brusky earned her doctorate in Political Science from the University of California, Berkeley in May 2010.  She will begin her appointment as Assistant Professor of Politics at Pomona College in July 2011, where she will teach courses in American Politics, constitutional law, and constitutional theory.  Her current research focuses on the role networks of legal elites play in generating, cultivating, and diffusing legal ideas and strategies to decision-makers in government.  While in residence at the Center, Amanda will be turning her doctoral dissertation (The Federalist Society and the "Structural Constitution:" An Epistemic Community at Work) into a book manuscript that examines, in much greater detail, how and to what extent actors affiliated with the Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy - a conservative and libertarian legal network - shaped and influenced some of the most critical and controversial decisions of the recent "conservative counterrevolution" in American Supreme Court jurisprudence.  She will also be completing an article length manuscript on the origins and impact of the Unitary Executive Theory.  ahollis@berkeley.edu

Takashi Iida is Associate Professor of Law at Seikei University in Tokyo. He received a Master of Laws at the University of Tokyo in 2002, and worked for the University of Tokyo as Research Associate during 2002-2004. He specializes in law & economics and sociology of law. His main published work is Social Norms and Rationality: A Perspective from Law and Economics (in Japanese, 'Ho to Keizaigaku no Shakaikihan-ron', 2004).  He is interested in the impact of social networks on the social functions of the law, especially civil law (including family law), environmental law, and anti-discrimination law.  During his residence at Berkeley, he will write a second book which examines the interrelationships among social norms, social networks, and the law.  iida-t@mug.biglobe.ne.jp

Anna Kirkland is Associate Professor of Women’s Studies and Political Science at the University of Michigan. She earned her J.D. (2001) and Ph.D. (Jurisprudence and Social Policy, 2003) from the University of California, Berkeley. Her research has focused on the construction of the legal categories that receive civil rights protections in various jurisdictions of the United States as well as the ways in which ordinary people understand and negotiate their identities through the law. Her first book, Fat Rights: Dilemmas of Difference and Personhood, was published in 2008 by New York University Press. Prof. Kirkland has also published work on fat acceptance advocates and their perceptions of law, fatness as disability, transgendered plaintiffs who win their cases, transgender discrimination as sex discrimination, the moral, racial, gendered, and political features of the “obesogenic environment” account of population weight gains, and an analysis of the diversity essay on the undergraduate UM application. With Michigan colleague Jonathan Metzl, Prof. Kirkland edited the forthcoming volume Against Health:  How Health Become the New Morality (New York University Press, 2010).  While at Berkeley, she is working on a second book on vaccination law, politics and activism.  The new research focuses on the ongoing Autism Omnibus Proceedings before the federal vaccine compensation court, in which the Special Masters have found that vaccines did not cause autism spectrum disorder in children.  Prof. Kirkland is also studying movement opposition to the rulings, state-level vaccine controversies and regulation, and the interaction between vaccine safety advocates and policymakers at the federal level. She will spend the 2010-2011 academic year as a Fellow in Princeton University’s Law and Public Affairs Program. akirkland@umich.edu

Joe McGrath graduated with a First Class Honours Bachelor of Civil Law (BCL) from University College Cork, Ireland. He was awarded the title ‘College Scholar’ and a Faculty of Law PhD scholarship. He was subsequently awarded the Government of Ireland PhD scholarship by the Irish Research Council for the Humanities and Social Sciences. His doctoral research employs jurisprudential methodologies, enriched by a criminological, penological and sociological analysis of law, to explore the emergence of a new legal regime addressing corporate deviancy and corporate crime in Ireland and it explores the impact of this regulatory regime on traditional criminal law values and the practice of corporate enforcement. He has also undertaken studies in European business regulation in Bilbao, pursuant to a European Commission scholarship. He has presented papers both domestically and internationally on corporate crime and corporate regulation and published in books and journals on these areas. He was also a visiting researcher at Harvard Law School in 2009. jhmcgrath@gmail.com

Christopher Roberts is a Doctoral Candidate at the University of Michigan in the Joint Program in Public Policy and Sociology.  He holds a B.A. from UCLA and a J.D. from the University of Southern California.  While in residence, Christopher will be working on completing his dissertation project, in which he examines the social origins of the modern international human rights concept.  His work shows how the human rights concept became the site for a series of seminal struggles over competing institutional frameworks for organizing social and political relationships, and how the formidable opposition that developed against human rights between 1944 and 1966 has been influential in shaping the modern human rights concept, itself.  His article (co-authored with Margaret Somers), "Toward a New Sociology of Rights: A Genealogy of 'Buried Bodies' of Citizenship and Human Rights", will appear in the next issue of the Annual Review of Law and Social Science. cnrobert@umich.edu .

Antoni Rubi-Puig is a full time Lecturer in Civil Law at Universitat Pompeu Fabra (Barcelona, Spain). His main interests of research lie in the fields of copyright, commercial speech, tort law and products liability. He holds a Ph.D. in Law from Universitat Pompeu Fabra and is the author of the book Advertising and Freedom of Speech (Publicidad y libertad de expresión, Thomson-Civitas, 2008). Antoni has previously been an Invited Researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Private Law in Hamburg (Germany) and a Visiting Scholar at Yale Law School. At the CSLS he will be working on a volume on the limits of private ordering of information by intellectual property rightholders. antonirubi-puig@upf.edu

James B. Rule (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) earned his Ph.D. at Harvard. University.  He has held research and teaching positions at MIT, Nuffield College, Oxford, the Université de Bordeaux, Clare Hall, Cambridge; and SUNY Stony Brook. His research interests include privacy, technology, and social roles of personal information.  He is author of seven books, monographs, and chapters, including Privacy in Peril; How we are Sacrificing a Fundamental Right in Exchange for Security and Convenience (Oxford 2007) and  “The Once and Future Information Society,” (with Yasemin Besen) in Theory and Society (in press).  jrule@notes.cc.sunysb.edu

Jothi Saunthararaja (Jothie Rajah) has just submitted her doctoral dissertation to the Melbourne Law School, University of Melbourne, for examination. Her dissertation applies critical theory on language and power to study the intersections of law, language and politics. She has studied the manner in which the Singapore state has reframed the liberal idea of the rule of law through legislation and public discourse. Jothie also has research interests in the legal professions, the British colonial state’s formulations of law, and Hindu law. Her earlier degrees are from the National University of Singapore  jothie2010@gmail.com

Mark Suchman  mark_suchman@brown.edu

Rob Tennyson received his doctorate in Berkeley's Jurisprudence and Social Policy program in the Fall of 2009, writing a dissertation on the function of private legislative procedure in the eighteenth-century British parliaments.  At the Center, he aims to extend the project, carrying it into the nineteenth century and examining the impact of parliamentary procedures and norms on administrative, corporate and property law.  Prior to obtaining his PhD, Robert worked as a law clerk to the Honorable Robert B. Propst and the Honorable Dean Buttram, Jr., (resigned) in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Alabama.  He obtained his JD from Tulane Law School in 1996.  leytyn@gmail.com 

 

Center for the Study of Law and Society
Visiting Scholars Spring 2010


Megan Allyse is a Wellcome Trust PhD candidate at the Institute for Science and Society in the University of Nottingham. Her doctoral work focuses on the development of models for the political and regulatory stabilization of controversial technologies, with particular emphasis on normative controversy surrounding emerging biotechnologies. Her case study on the stabilization of oocyte contribution to stem cell research compares policy development in the UK, California and China. Other research interests include the emergence of ethical governance structures in developing countries, normative institutionalisation and work in public health ethics. Megan is a member of the UE Framework 6 BIONET project focusing on collaborative development of ethical governance between Europe and China. lbxmaf@nottingham.ac.uk

Daniella Beinisch is an SJD candidate at the University of Pennsylvania Law School where she completed her LLM (with honors). She also holds an LLB from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Daniella worked as a criminal prosecutor in the Israeli State Attorney’s office for several years; she also worked for a few NGOs promoting social programs and human rights. Her research interests include the intersections between civil society organizations and governmental agencies, criminal justice, community justice and the social role of courts. While at the Center, she plans to complete her doctoral dissertation exploring the problem solving courts phenomenon and the challenges that it represent to the traditional criminal justice system.  beinisch@law.upenn.edu

Françoise Briegel is a recipient of a one-year fellowship for Academic Research from the Swiss National Science Foundation. She earned a Ph.D. at the Faculté des Lettres, University of Geneva. She has conducted research in several areas of the history of law and justice in continental Europe, such as recidivism between the 16th and the 18th century, the legalisation of the defence in the Republic of Geneva at the beginning of the 18th century, the negotiation between judges and accused regarding the defence, the impact of the politicization of public and judicial spaces. While at the Center her main goals are to explore the rhetorical dimension of the plea, the elements (facts, evidence, social values, etc.) which are ignored by the accusation and by the defence. Finally, and more generally, what are the consequences of the right to a spoken defence in "inquisitorial" procedure in which the fair hearing concept was previously non-existent?  Does the defence lawyer bring about changes in terms of evidence, the role of judges or the public body; what about the double classification of the defendant made by the accusation and by the defence regarding the concept of "criminal responsibility"?   francoise.briegel@gmail.com  

Mariavittoria Catanzariti is a PhD student at University of Roma, Roma Tre. Her doctoral work focuses on the topic of secrecy within the public/private dichotomy. More deeply, she analyzes the connections between the management and the access to sensitive data and their influences on democratic systems. This great field includes different issues: trail and secret, secret's vote procedures, the problem of emergence, the international terrorism, the right on privacy. It is devoted to a new elaboration of secret as a concept of General Theory that covers all dimensions of public life and politics. Her research project compares two different models: the European one and the Common Law system, specifically the American one. Depending on the point of view, we have at least two different impacts: the 'secret' is considered as an asset, but it ensures also the protection of private life from the public powers. In this perspective the PhD thesis aims to determine a normative definition of 'secret' within the modern Constitutions. mailto:mariavittoriacat@libera.it

Martin Doris is a full time Lecturer in Private and Commercial Law at the University of Glasgow (UK). He holds a Ph.D. in Law from the European University Institute in Florence and his primary research interests lie in the fields of comparative private law and general consumer law. He has written widely on European private law themes and is the author of Dispute Avoidance and European Contract Law (Europa Law, 2008). Martin has previously  been a Visiting Research Fellow at the Institute of European Law at the University of Birmingham (UK) and at the CSLS he will be working on a series of publications, including a planned new work exploring the future of the CISG Advisory Council.  mailto:m.doris@law.gla.ac.uk

Jennifer Drobac
is a tenured professor at the Indiana University-Indianapolis School of Law. She holds her doctoral and J.D. degrees from Stanford Law School and Masters and Bachelors degrees in History from Stanford University. Her recent scholarly work focuses primarily on sexual harassment and juvenile law and has been published in a variety of law reviews and journals.  In 2005, she finished her first textbook, SEXUAL HARASSMENT LAW: HISTORY, CASES AND THEORY. A university video profile of her recent research can be found at http://www.youtube.com/user/indylawchannel.  While in residence, Jennifer will be researching how new information regarding the neurological and psychosocial development of teenagers might influence the modification of civil law pertaining to youth. jdrobac@iupui.edu

William Gallagher is Associate Professor of Law at the Golden Gate University School of Law. Prior to his full-time academic appointment, he was a partner in a San Francisco law firm where he specialized in intellectual property litigation.  He holds a Ph.D. from U.C. Berkeley (Jurisprudence and Social Policy), a J.D. from the UCLA School of Law, an M.A. from the University of Chicago, and a B.A. from U.C. Berkeley.  His research interests include intellectual property law and policy, the legal profession, and the sociology of law.  He is a co-founder of the Law and Society Association Collaborative Research Network (“CRN”) on Culture,Society, and Intellectual Property.  While serving as a visiting scholar at the CSLS, he will be continuing research on (1) two empirical studies of strategic enforcement of intellectual property claims, (2) an empirical study of patent lawyers, (3) an edited book on “law and society” approaches to intellectual property law, and (4) a study of lawyer regulation in California.  wgallagher@ggu.edu

Kiyoshi Hasegawa is Professor of Law at Tokyo Metropolitan University. He received a Ph.D. in Law from the University of Tokyo. He specializes in the sociology of law. Hasegawa’s most well-known work is ‘Toshi Komyunitii to Hō’ [The Urban Community and the Law], which received the Research Committee on Sociology of Law (RCSL) Adam Podgorecki Prize in 2006. He is particularly interested in dispute resolutions in neighborhoods, private land-use restrictions, and residential private governments. He also has an interest in the homeless, and in the exclusion from several social sub-systems that is caused by homelessness. While at the Center, he will be conducting a comparative study of homeowners associations in the United States and Japan. The aim of this study is to present an accurate picture of these associations in addition to examining the conditions wherein residents of the two countries take recourse to their respective legal frameworks. At the same time, Hasegawa will be conducting research on the various kinds of exclusion from communities, and on the phenomena of segregation and homelessness. This study aims to focus on the negative side of deliberative or democratic communities, shedding light on the cumulative effects of exclusion from social sub-systems.  k-hase@tmu.ac.jp

Antoinette (Toni) Hetzler is Professor of Sociology with emphasis on Social Policy at Lund University, Sweden. She is head of a research group in Sweden studying Social Policy, Working Life and Global Welfare (SWG) and is currently president of the Swedish Sociology Association. Her most recent books include Sick-Sweden (Sjuk-Sverige, 2005) and Rehabilitation and Welfare Politics (Rehabilitering och välfärdspolitik, 2004). She has published extensively on welfare state politics including workers compensation in Sweden as well as the role of law in social policy. Currently she is working on two manuscripts. One is "Women, Work and Well-being" and the other is "Regulating the Financial Market."  Antoinette Hetzler received her PhD from the University of California, Santa Barbara, was Assistant Professor at New York University, and post-doctoral fellow at the Center for the Study of Law and Society before she immigrated to Sweden in the late 1970s.  antoinette.hetzler@soc.lu.se

Takashi Iida is Associate Professor of Law at Seikei University in Tokyo. He received a Master of Laws at the University of Tokyo in 2002, and worked for the University of Tokyo as Research Associate during 2002-2004. He specializes in law & economics and sociology of law. His main published work is Social Norms and Rationality: A Perspective from Law and Economics (in Japanese, 'Ho to Keizaigaku no Shakaikihan-ron', 2004).  He is interested in the impact of social networks on the social functions of the law, especially civil law (including family law), environmental law, and anti-discrimination law.  During my residence at Berkeley, he will write a second book which examines the interrelationships among social norms, social networks, and the law.  iida-t@mug.biglobe.ne.jp

Joe McGrath graduated with a First Class Honours Bachelor of Civil Law (BCL) from University College Cork, Ireland. He was awarded the title ‘College Scholar’ and a Faculty of Law PhD scholarship. He was subsequently awarded the Government of Ireland PhD scholarship by the Irish Research Council for the Humanities and Social Sciences. His doctoral research employs jurisprudential methodologies, enriched by a criminological, penological and sociological analysis of law, to explore the emergence of a new legal regime addressing corporate deviancy and corporate crime in Ireland and it explores the impact of this regulatory regime on traditional criminal law values and the practice of corporate enforcement. He has also undertaken studies in European business regulation in Bilbao, pursuant to a European Commission scholarship. He has presented papers both domestically and internationally on corporate crime and corporate regulation and published in books and journals on these areas. He was also a visiting researcher at Harvard Law School in 2009. jhmcgrath@gmail.com

Michael Musheno (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) earned a Ph.D. at American University. He is currently Professor of Criminal Justice Studies at SFSU and Director of the Program in Criminal Justice Studies at San Francisco State University. Formerly  program director of Law and Society at NSF, his interests are in policing, street law, state frontline workforces (currently US Army reservists serving in Iraq), and interpretive field methods, esp. narratives and storytelling.  His book Deployed: How Reservists Bear the Burden of Iraq (with Susan Ross) was published by the University of Michigan Press in 2008.  mmusheno@sfsu.edu .

Christopher Roberts is a Doctoral Candidate at the University of Michigan in the Joint Program in Public Policy and Sociology.  He holds a B.A. from UCLA and a J.D. from the University of Southern California.  While in residence, Christopher will be working on completing his dissertation project, in which he examines the social origins of the modern international human rights concept.  His work shows how the human rights concept became the site for a series of seminal struggles over competing institutional frameworks for organizing social and political relationships, and how the formidable opposition that developed against human rights between 1944 and 1966 has been influential in shaping the modern human rights concept, itself.  His article (co-authored with Margaret Somers), "Toward a New Sociology of Rights: A Genealogy of 'Buried Bodies' of Citizenship and Human Rights", will appear in the next issue of the Annual Review of Law and Social Science. cnrobert@umich.edu .

James B. Rule (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) earned his Ph.D. at Harvard. University.  He has held research and teaching positions at MIT, Nuffield College, Oxford, the Université de Bordeaux, Clare Hall, Cambridge; and SUNY Stony Brook. His research interests include privacy, technology, and social roles of personal information.  He is author of seven books, monographs, and chapters, including Privacy in Peril; How we are Sacrificing a Fundamental Right in Exchange for Security and Convenience (Oxford 2007) and  “The Once and Future Information Society,” (with Yasemin Besen) in Theory and Society (in press).  jrule@notes.cc.sunysb.edu

Jothi Saunthararaja (Jothie Rajah) has just submitted her doctoral dissertation to the Melbourne Law School, University of Melbourne, for examination. Her dissertation applies critical theory on language and power to study the intersections of law, language and politics. She has studied the manner in which the Singapore state has reframed the liberal idea of the rule of law through legislation and public discourse. Jothie also has research interests in the legal professions, the British colonial state’s formulations of law, and Hindu law. Her earlier degrees are from the National University of Singapore  jothie2010@gmail.com

Jacqueline Stevens' work explores harms wrought by the nation-state, as well as possibilities for post-national governance and post-kinship family. She is the author of States Without Nations: Citizenship for Mortals (Columbia Univeristy Press, 2009) and Reproducing the State (Princeton University Press, 1999). Since 2007 Stevens has been conducting research on the unlawful detention and deportation of thousands of U.S. citizens. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) has no jurisdiction over U.S. citizens; these so-called legal removals are often false arrest or kidnapping.  Stevens is an Associate Professor in Law and Society at UC Santa Barbara. She received her PhD in Political Science from the University of California, Berkeley.  For links to her articles and blog, http://www.jacquelinestevens.org.

Rob Tennyson received his doctorate in Berkeley's Jurisprudence and Social Policy program in the Fall of 2009, writing a dissertation on the function of private legislative procedure in the eighteenth-century British parliaments.  At the Center, he aims to extend the project, carrying it into the nineteenth century and examining the impact of parliamentary procedures and norms on administrative, corporate and property law.  Prior to obtaining his PhD, Robert worked as a law clerk to the Honorable Robert B. Propst and the Honorable Dean Buttram, Jr., (resigned) in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Alabama.  He obtained his JD from Tulane Law School in 1996.  leytyn@gmail.com  

Mary Vogel
joined King’s College London School of Law in 2005 and was made Reader in Law and Democratic Transformation in 2007.  She came to King’s from the University of Leicester where she was Postgraduate Tutor and Director of the Master’s Programme in Criminology and Risk Management.  Dr. Vogel’s research focuses on a series of interconnected interests in law, politics, globalization, democracy and governance.  She holds a funded Research Fellowship from the Leverhulme Trust and is Associate Fellow, Rothermere American Institute, University of Oxford and Associate Research Fellow, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, University of London.  Since completing her doctorate at Harvard University in 1988, Dr. Vogel has taught at Northwestern University, the State University of New York, the University of Michigan and the University of California at Santa Barbara, and has been a visiting fellow at a number of institutions.  Dr. Vogel has written Coercion to Compromise:  Plea Bargaining, Courts and the Making of Political Authority (OUP 2007) and edited Crime, Inequality and the State (Routledge 2007).  Coercion to Compromise was a Finalist for the British Society of Criminology Book Prize in 2008.  Her article, “The Social Origins of Plea Bargaining:  Conflict and the Law in the Process of State Formation” (Law and Society Review 1999), won the Law and Society Association’s award for Best Article of 1999 as well as the American Sociological Association, Law Section, Article Prize for 1999-2000.  mary.vogel@kcl.ac.uk

 

Center for the Study of Law and Society
Visiting Scholars FALL 2009


Ely Aharonson is a Candidate for the Ph.D. at London School of Economics and Political Science. He completed his LL.M at NYU, MA (summa cum laude) in philosophy at Tel Aviv University, and LL.B (magna cum laude) at the University of Haifa. His primary areas of scholarship include: historical, sociological, and comparative perspectives on American politics of crime; legal mobilization and social change; sociology and history of racial formations in the US; the dynamics and consequences of the judicialization and juridification of political problems; and sociologically-informed legal theory more broadly.  He has published articles in the Canadian Journal of Law & Technology, Tel Aviv Univ. Law Review, and Law & Government.   In his doctoral dissertation, he explores the genealogy of political and legal discourses on the use of criminalization for protecting Afro-Americans, as they have evolved from the slavery era to the present. He intends to devote his residence at Berkeley to working on two articles based on his doctoral dissertation.  He currently serves on the board of the Israeli Law & Society Association.  E.Aharonson@lse.ac.uk  

Megan Allyse is a Wellcome Trust PhD candidate at the Institute for Science and Society in the University of Nottingham. Her doctoral work focuses on the development of models for the political and regulatory stabilization of controversial technologies, with particular emphasis on normative controversy surrounding emerging biotechnologies. Her case study on the stabilization of oocyte contribution to stem cell research compares policy development in the UK, California and China. Other research interests include the emergence of ethical governance structures in developing countries, normative institutionalisation and work in public health ethics. Megan is a member of the UE Framework 6 BIONET project focusing on collaborative development of ethical governance between Europe and China. lbxmaf@nottingham.ac.uk

Daphne Barak-Erez is Stewart and Judy Colton Chair of Law and Security and Director, Cegla Center for the Interdisciplinary Research of Law, Faculty of Law, Tel Aviv University. Her JSD is from Tel Aviv University. While at the Center she is researching the legal battles surrounding the participation of various social groups in the scheme of mandatory military service in Israel under the Defense Service Law.  barakerz@post.tau.ac.il  

Daniella Beinisch is an SJD candidate at the University of Pennsylvania Law School where she completed her LLM (with honors). She also holds an LLB from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Daniella worked as a criminal prosecutor in the Israeli State Attorney’s office for several years; she also worked for a few NGOs promoting social programs and human rights. Her research interests include the intersections between civil society organizations and governmental agencies, criminal justice, community justice and the social role of courts. While at the Center, she plans to complete her doctoral dissertation exploring the problem solving courts phenomenon and the challenges that it represent to the traditional criminal justice system.  beinisch@law.upenn.eduu  

Françoise Briegel is a recipient of a one-year fellowship for Academic Research from the Swiss National Science Foundation. She earned a Ph.D. at the Faculté des Lettres, University of Geneva. She has conducted research in several areas of the history of law and justice in continental Europe, such as recidivism between the 16th and the 18th century, the legalisation of the defence in the Republic of Geneva at the beginning of the 18th century, the negotiation between judges and accused regarding the defence, the impact of the politicization of public and judicial spaces. While at the Center her main goals are to explore the rhetorical dimension of the plea, the elements (facts, evidence, social values, etc.) which are ignored by the accusation and by the defence. Finally, and more generally, what are the consequences of the right to a spoken defence in "inquisitorial" procedure in which the fair hearing concept was previously non-existent?  Does the defence lawyer bring about changes in terms of evidence, the role of judges or the public body; what about the double classification of the defendant made by the accusation and by the defence regarding the concept of "criminal responsibility"?  fbriegel@aliceadsl.fr

Clare Chambers is University Lecturer in Philosophy and Fellow of Jesus College, University of Cambridge. She specializes in contemporary political and legal philosophy. She is particularly interested in contemporary liberalism, including autonomy, equality, multiculturalism and global justice; feminism, including the body, appearance norms and personal relationship; and theories of social construction, including those of Michel Foucault and Pierre Bourdieu. She is the author of Sex, Culture, and Justice: The Limits of Choice (Penn State UP, 2008). While at CSLS she will be working on a monograph titled Marriage and the State, exploring how marriage should be regulated by the state from liberal and feminist perspectives. cecc66@cam.ac.uk

William Gallagher is Associate Professor of Law at the Golden Gate University School of Law. Prior to his full-time academic appointment, he was a partner in a San Francisco law firm where he specialized in intellectual property litigation.  He holds a Ph.D. from U.C. Berkeley (Jurisprudence and Social Policy), a J.D. from the UCLA School of Law, an M.A. from the University of Chicago, and a B.A. from U.C. Berkeley.  His research interests include intellectual property law and policy, the legal profession, and the sociology of law.  He is a co-founder of the Law and Society Association Collaborative Research Network (“CRN”) on Culture, Society, and Intellectual Property.  While serving as a visiting scholar at the CSLS, he will be continuing research on (1) two empirical studies of strategic enforcement of intellectual property claims, (2) an empirical study of patent lawyers, (3) an edited book on “law and society” approaches to intellectual property law, and (4) a study of lawyer regulation in California.   wgallagher@ggu.edu

Antoinette (Toni) Hetzler is Professor of Sociology with emphasis on Social Policy at Lund University, Sweden. She is head of a research group in Sweden studying Social Policy, Working Life and Global Welfare (SWG) and is currently president of the Swedish Sociology Association. Her most recent books include Sick-Sweden (Sjuk-Sverige, 2005) and Rehabilitation and Welfare Politics (Rehabilitering och välfärdspolitik, 2004). She has published extensively on welfare state politics including workers compensation in Sweden as well as the role of law in social policy. Currently she is working on two manuscripts. One is "Women, Work and Well-being" and the other is "Regulating the Financial Market."  Antoinette Hetzler received her PhD from the University of California, Santa Barbara, was Assistant Professor at New York University, and post-doctoral fellow at the Center for the Study of Law and Society before she immigrated to Sweden in the late 1970s.  antoinette.hetzler@soc.lu.se

Takashi Iida is Associate Professor of Law at Seikei University in Tokyo. He received a Master of Laws at the University of Tokyo in 2002, and worked for the University of Tokyo as Research Associate during 2002-2004. He specializes in law & economics and sociology of law. His main published work is Social Norms and Rationality: A Perspective from Law and Economics (in Japanese, 'Ho to Keizaigaku no Shakaikihan-ron', 2004).  He is interested in the impact of social networks on the social functions of the law, especially civil law (including family law), environmental law, and anti-discrimination law.  During his residence at Berkeley, he will write his second book which examines the interrelationships among social norms, social networks, and the law.  iida-t@law.seikei.ac.jp

Jinee Lokaneeta holds a Ph.D in Political Science from University of Southern California and is currently an Assistant Professor in Political Science at Drew University, New Jersey. Her areas of interest include Political Theory (Postcolonial, Feminist and Marxist theory), Law and Violence, Cultural Studies, and Jurisprudence. Her book manuscript titled Unraveling the Exception: Torture in Liberal Democracies focusing on the legal discourses on torture in the United States and India is currently under review. She has a forthcoming article titled: “A Rose by another Name: Definitions, Sanitized Terms and Imagery of Torture in 24.” in Law, Culture and Humanities. She recently participated in a NEH Summer Institute on the “Rule of Law: Legal Studies and the Liberal Arts” held at the University of New England, Maine. She is presently working on the theoretical implications of the use of brain scan technology by the Indian criminal justice system for the liberal state’s uneasy relationship with excess violence. She is also interested in the relationship of Indian civil liberty groups with the law especially the tension between utilizing law as a site of intervention even while being skeptical about its potential. Broader questions of disciplinarity and interdisciplinarity in legal studies especially the interface between political science and interdisciplinary legal studies are also the focus of her study. jlokanee@drew.edu

Maria Martin Lorenzo earned a Ph.D. in Criminal Law at the Law School, Complutense University, where she is currently Associate Professor of Criminal Law.  She has conducted research in several areas of Criminal Law on some theoretical questions, such as the Foundations of Criminal Law, the differentiation between Justification and Excuse, the legal treatment of the concurrence of offences, and the Theory of Mistakes.  Also, she has worked on more readily practical topics, such as criminal regulation of workplace safety, road safety or the courts’ interpretation and application of drug trafficking offences.  Currently she is part of a research project on the main traits of crime policy in the Western nations in the last few years.  Among other topics, she specializes on child pornography offences.  While at the Center her main goals are to compare the US and Spanish criminal law regulation of child pornography with a special focus on the influence of international documents and to compare the enforcement of said regulations in both countries.  mmlor235@der.ucm.es

Daniel Margolies is Batten Associate Professor of History at Virginia Wesleyan College.  He specializes in the history of United States foreign relations.  He received his Ph.D. and M.A. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and his B.A. from Hampshire College.  He is currently researching extraterritoriality in American empire and migrant transnationalism and globalization in the contemporary South.  In 2007-2008 he was Fulbright Senior Scholar/Lecturer at Sogang University in Seoul, South Korea.  His first book was Henry Watterson and the New South: The Politics of Empire, Free Trade, and Globalization (2006).  He is currently editing the Companion to Harry S. Truman (Blackwell). While at the Center, he will be working on the manuscript of a book examining issues of extraterritorial jurisdiction in American foreign relations through studies of extraterritorial crime, extraterritorial abduction, transboundary incursion, & extradition in the borderlands of the United States. dmargolies@vwc.edu

Michael Musheno (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) earned a Ph.D. at American University. He is currently Professor of Criminal Justice Studies at SFSU and Director of the Program in Criminal Justice Studies at San Francisco State University. Formerly  program director of Law and Society at NSF, his interests are in policing, street law, state frontline workforces (currently US Army reservists serving in Iraq), and interpretive field methods, esp. narratives and storytelling.  His book Deployed: How Reservists Bear the Burden of Iraq (with Susan Ross) was published by the University of Michigan Press in 2008. mmusheno@sfsu.edu .

Kurt Pärli  is Head of Research and Professor of Labour- and Social Law and European Law at the Institute for Economic Law, School of Management and Law, University of applied Sciences Zuerich (Switzerland). He studied social work as well as law and practiced in the field of Social Law before he wrote his PhD and postdoctoral Thesis and became finally a Professor. In his research projects and publications he focused on challenges in the field of social policy and social law (key words: Integration through Activation) on the one hand and on anti-discrimination law and its effectiveness on the other hand (key words: Integration through non-discrimination). For an overview of his projects and publications see: http://project.zhaw.ch/en/management/nondiscrimination/diskriminierung0.html. Currently he is project leader of the Swiss National Research Foundation funded study “Work reintegration of individuals with long term work disability - a micro sociological investigation into the role of law and social environment” (see: http://www.berufliche-wiedereingliederung.ch). In this study we are interested to learn why some employees find it easier to re-integrate into the employment process after a prolonged phase of work incapacity than others. Our research project is running for several years (2008-2011) and will reveal the complex interplay among individuals, social, legal and societal conditions of context and the involved employers and social institutions. kurt.paerli@zhaw.ch

Christopher Roberts is a Doctoral Candidate at the University of Michigan in the Joint Program in Public Policy and Sociology.  He holds a B.A. from UCLA and a J.D. from the University of Southern California.  While in residence, Christopher will be working on completing his dissertation project, in which he examines the social origins of the modern international human rights concept.  His work shows how the human rights concept became the site for a series of seminal struggles over competing institutional frameworks for organizing social and political relationships, and how the formidable opposition that developed against human rights between 1944 and 1966 has been influential in shaping the modern human rights concept, itself.  His article (co-authored with Margaret Somers), "Toward a New Sociology of Rights: A Genealogy of 'Buried Bodies' of Citizenship and Human Rights", will appear in the next issue of the Annual Review of Law and Social Sciencecnrobert@umich.edu.

James B. Rule (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) earned his Ph.D. at Harvard. University.  He has held research and teaching positions at MIT, Nuffield College, Oxford, the Université de Bordeaux, Clare Hall, Cambridge; and SUNY Stony Brook. His research interests include privacy, technology, and social roles of personal information.  He is author of seven books, monographs, and chapters, including Privacy in Peril; How we are Sacrificing a Fundamental Right in Exchange for Security and Convenience (Oxford 2007) and  “The Once and Future Information Society,” (with Yasemin Besen) in Theory and Society (in press).  mailto:jrule@notes.cc.sunysb.edu

Jacqueline Stevens' work explores harms wrought by the nation-state, as well as possibilities for post-national governance and post-kinship family. She is the author of States Without Nations: Citizenship for Mortals (Columbia Univeristy Press, forthcoming November 2009) and Reproducing the State (Princeton University Press, 1999). Since 2007 Stevens has been conducting research on the unlawful detention and deportation of thousands of U.S. citizens. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) has no jurisdiction over U.S. citizens; these so-called legal removals are often false arrest or kidnapping.  Stevens is Professor in Law and Society at UC Santa Barbara. She received her PhD in Political Science from the University of California, Berkeley.  For links to her articles and blog, http://www.jacquelinestevens.org.

Marco Tabarelli earned a PhD in political science at the University of Bologna, with a dissertation project about the recent reforms of the judicial system in the United Kingdom (Constitutional Reform Act 2005) and, at a more abstract level, with the reasons for which political actors decide to increase the political significance or the independence of the courts. He is currently Researcher at the Department of Political Science, University of Bologna, Italy. His areas of scholarship include judicial power, judicial behaviour and organization and judicial policies.  marco.tabarelli@unibo.it

Judith van Erp is Associate Professor of Criminology at Erasmus University of Rotterdam, the Netherlands. She holds a PhD in Public Administration from the Free University of Amsterdam.  Her field of interest is the regulation and governance of corporations and markets. She is currently working on a grant-funded research project (2006-2009) on naming and shaming in the Dutch financial market, that was inspired by the fact that more and more regulatory agencies in Europe actively publish the names of offending companies as a part of their regulatory strategy. The aim of the project was to empirically establish the effects of naming and shaming on consumers, the companies whose names were published, and market parties in general. A main finding was that naming and shaming fails to fulfill the role of moral education in the financial market, while it creates defiance and distrust of the regulator. While in Berkeley, Judith will work on several publications on this research project and think about future research plans. Judith’s office is at 2240 Piedmont Avenue.  vanerp@frg.eur.nl

 

Center for the Study of Law and Society
Visiting Scholars Summer 2009

Ely Aharonson is a Candidate for the Ph.D. at London School of Economics and Political Science. He completed his LL.M at NYU, MA (summa cum laude) in philosophy at Tel Aviv University, and LL.B (magna cum laude) at the University of Haifa. His primary areas of scholarship include: historical, sociological, and comparative perspectives on American politics of crime; legal mobilization and social change; sociology and history of racial formations in the US; the dynamics and consequences of the judicialization and juridification of political problems; and sociologically-informed legal theory more broadly.  He has published articles in the Canadian Journal of Law & Technology, Tel Aviv Univ. Law Review, and Law & Government.   In his doctoral dissertation, he explores the genealogy of political and legal discourses on the use of criminalization for protecting Afro-Americans, as they have evolved from the slavery era to the present. He intends to devote his residence at Berkeley to working on two articles based on his doctoral dissertation.  He currently serves on the board of the Israeli Law & Society Association.  He can be contacted at E.Aharonson@lse.ac.uk

Adam Gearey earned a Ph.D. at Birkbeck College, University of London, where he is currently Reader in Law, Birkbeck College.  He took the Common Professional Examination in Law at the University of Manchester and has held Visiting Professorships in Law at the University of Praetoria, South Africa and at Makarere University in Uganda.  He will be examining law and legal relationships in the European/Anglican traditions that do not reach their final form in the sovereign state, but articulate a "social ontology of plural being." He can be contacted at a.gearey@bbk.ac.uk

Fernando Gascon Inchausti is Professor of procedural law at the Universidad Complutense, Madrid, Spain (Full Professor since 2002). He has published widely on civil and criminal procedure: criminal evidence, the role of under-cover agents in criminal procedure, civil action in criminal procedure, Spain’s recent criminal procedure reforms, judicial cooperation in the European Union in criminal matters. He has also worked as an assistant of the Committee who drafted two important reforms of Spanish criminal procedure in 2002 (fast-track procedure) and in 2003 (new regulation of arrest and detention).  The main researcher of a project dealing with criminal procedure in Spain, which is aimed to raise proposals for its future reform, while at the Center he will analyze 1) the US criminal procedure regulation in behalf of plea bargaining and public prosecutors’ discretionary powers regarding accusation, 2) the social impact of plea bargaining and public prosecutors’ discretionary powers: what influence they have on the social perception of criminal justice’s effectiveness and fairness, and 3) if it is convenient to propose a new regulation of these matters in Spanish law, who could be similar to the US regulation. He can be contacted at fgascon@der.ucm.es .

Sam Kamin is Professor of Law at the University of Denver, Sturm College of Law.  Holding both a J.D. and a Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley, Professor Kamin is active in the Law and Society Association and in the field of law and social science generally. Professor Kamin’s reasearch interests include criminal procedure, death penalty jurisprudence, federal courts, and constitutional remedies. He is the co-author of two books analyzing California’s Three-Strikes-and-You’re-Out Law and has published scholarly articles in the Virginia Law Review, the Indiana Law Journal, the Boston College Law Journal and Law and Contemporary Problems, among others.  He is currently working on three projects:  1. An empirical study of bar pass rates at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law.  2.  Preparing for an empirical study of what public employees know about indemnification.  3. A Criminal Procedure Casebook to be part of the new West Interactive Casebook Series, with co-author Ricardo Bascuas. The book will expose students to the empirical evidence on a number of the questions posed by the law of Constitutional Criminal Procedure. skamin@law.du.edu  

Maria Martin Lorenzo earned a Ph.D. in Criminal Law at the Law School, Complutense University, where she is currently Associate Professor of Criminal Law.  She has conducted research in several areas of Criminal Law on some theoretical questions, such as the Foundations of Criminal Law, the differentiation between Justification and Excuse, the legal treatment of the concurrence of offences, and the Theory of Mistakes.  Also, she has worked on more readily practical topics, such as criminal regulation of workplace safety, road safety or the courts’ interpretation and application of drug trafficking offences.  Currently she is part of a research project on the main traits of crime policy in the Western nations in the last few years.  Among other topics, she specializes on child pornography offences.  While at the Center her main goals are to compare the US and Spanish criminal law regulation of child pornography with a special focus on the influence of international documents and to compare the enforcement of said regulations in both countries. She can be contacted at mmlor235@der.ucm.es

Justin O'Brien is Professor of Corporate Governance at the Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics (An Australian Research Council Special Research Centre and is on the Faculty of Business at Charles Sturt University. He is also Visiting Professor of Law at the School of Law, University of Glasgow (2008-2011). A specialist in the regulation of capital markets, he has written extensively on the global financial crisis. Among his publications are Wall Street on Trial (2003), Redesigning Financial Regulation, The Politics of Enforcement (2007) and Engineering a Financial Bloodbath: How Securitization Destroyed the Legitimacy of Financial Capitalism (forthcoming, 2009). His research at Berkeley will focus on the rise of deferred prosecutions. justin.obrien@anu.edu.au  (April-July 2009)

Christopher Roberts is a Doctoral Candidate at the University of Michigan in the Joint Program in Public Policy and Sociology.  He holds a B.A. from UCLA and a J.D. from the University of Southern California.  While in residence, Christopher will be working on completing his dissertation project, in which he examines the social origins of the modern international human rights concept.  His work shows how the human rights concept became the site for a series of seminal struggles over competing institutional frameworks for organizing social and political relationships, and how the formidable opposition that developed against human rights between 1944 and 1966 has been influential in shaping the modern human rights concept, itself.  His article (co-authored with Margaret Somers), "Toward a New Sociology of Rights: A Genealogy of 'Buried Bodies' of Citizenship and Human Rights", will appear in the next issue of the Annual Review of Law and Social Science. He can be contacted at cnrobert@umich.edu  and at 510-642-0437.

Jodi Short is Associate Professor at Georgetown Law.  Her research is on the nexus of public and private institutions in regulatory governance.  She is currently working on a series of empirical papers examining the effects of corporate internal compliance auditing on regulatory performance.  Her work also addresses theoretical justifications for and critiques of regulation, exploring tensions in the U.S. administrative state between cooperation and coercion, expertise and politics, and public and private interests.  While in residence at the Center for the Study of Law and Society this summer, Professor Short will be working on papers that investigate: (1) whether the voluntary disclosure of legal violations can serve as a reliable signal of effective self-policing; (2) the conditions under which self-policing policies get institutionalized within or decoupled from the actual compliance practices of regulated organizations; (3) how sociological  theories of reason-giving can help us better understand practices of administrative justification.  Professor Short teaches courses on administrative law, the regulatory state, and the role that private organizations play in public governance and law.  She can be contacted at jls272@law.georgetown.edu  

John Stannard is on the staff of the School of Law at the Queen’s University of Belfast, and is visiting the CSLS from March to August 2009 to conduct research in the field of Law and the Emotions.  He graduated from Oxford University in 1973 with a BA in Jurisprudence, and obtained the degree of BCL the following year. From 1974 to 1976 he was a lecturer in Roman Law at the University of Aberdeen, and has been on the staff of Queen's University since 1977.  In 1989 he completed his PhD degree, and in 1992 he was promoted to the rank of Senior Lecturer. He is a member of the Society of Legal Scholars and of the Irish Legal History Society, and a Fellow of the Institute of Teaching and Learning. He is also Past President of the Irish Association of Law Teachers, and has a number of publications to his credit in the fields of Contract and of Criminal Law. j.stannard@qub.ac.uk

Jin Sun is currently Associate Professor of Law and Head of the Department of Women's Rights at the Center for the Protection of the Rights of Disadvantage Citizens at Wuhan University, People's Republic of China.  He earned an LL.D. in Civil and Commercial Law and an LL.B. in Economic Law at Wuhan University Law School.  He teaches commercial, corporate, competition, and economic law.  An author of a number of articles, including "The Dilemma of the Reform in China" and "The Historical Mission of Economic Law" in Social Harmony in Economic Law Theories (Wuhan University), the editor of several books, and the sole-author of the forthcoming book China's Competition Law: A Textbook (Wuhan University Press, 2010), Sun's interests focus on antitrust law, commercial law, and women's rights. He can be contacted at fxysj@whu.edu.cn 

Neta Ziv is currently the director of the Elga Cegla Clinical Legal Education Programs at the Tel Aviv University Faculty of Law. She is the academic supervisor of the Community, Housing and Urban Development Clinic  and teaches course on Legal Ethics and Professional Responsibility, Social Rights, Law and Social Change, and Rights of  People with Disabilities.  Ziv received her LL.B. from the Hebrew University Law Faculty in 1983, and her LL.M. from The American University in Washington, DC in 1986. After ten years of practice as a public interest lawyer, she continued her studies and received her J.S.D. from Stanford Law School in 2001. Between 1986-1996 Ziv practiced as a public interest lawyer for the Association for Civil Rights in Israel, and served as a leading attorney in some of Israel’s major human rights cases litigated before the Israeli Supreme Court. She was among the founding members of the Israel Women’s Network Legal Center and was the chair of Bizchut – The Israel Human Rights center for Persons with Disabilities, and now is the board of Itach – Women Lawyers for Social Justice. Ziv is the VP and board member of The New Israel Fund. zneta@post.tau.ac.il


Center for the Study of Law and Society
Visiting Scholars Spring 2009

Kirk Boyd is the executive director of the 2048 Project, a project at Boalt within the Miller Institute for Global Challenges and the Law. The mission of the 2048 Project is to draft an enforceable international framework of human rights that can be in place by the year 2048, the 100th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.  He completed his B.S. in political science at the University of California, Santa Barbara, (1981), followed by his J.D. (1985), LL.M (1996) and J.S.D. (2000) from Boalt Hall. He has been a litigator with Morrison & Forester and a partner in the firm Boyd, Huffman, Williams and Urla, litigating primarily civil rights and environmental law cases. Kirk has taught at U.C. Santa Barbara, including courses on International Human Rights, International Law, Civil Rights and First Amendment, and he has taught International Human Rights, Legal Studies 154, at Berkeley as well.  His research is the evolution of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights into regional Conventions such as the European Convention on Human Rights and the potential for an International Convention on Human Rights, enforceable in the courts of all countries. The 2048 Project is presently working with a major grant to commission 100 papers from scholars throughout the Middle East to discuss and draft a Middle Eastern Convention on Human Rights.  Kirk is also working on a book: 2048: Humanity’s Written Agreement to Live Together. He is at the 3rd floor of JSP every day and can be reached at kboyd@law.berkeley.edu or 642-8469. People are welcome to stop by, as Kirk appreciates questions and suggestions from fellow visiting scholars and others about his work.

Sandra Marco Colino is a Lecturer at the University of Glasgow. She holds a Ph.D. from the European University Institute in Florence (Italy), and focuses mainly on EU law, competition law and antitrust, telecommunications law and the regulation of gambling. During her time at Berkeley, Sandra will be researching on the topic of gambling from the perspective of the consumer from a comparative standpoint. She is currently finishing a monograph on vertical agreements in the EU and the US, and is starting a new research project on margin squeezes and competition law at Stanford University in the summer of 2009. s.marcocolino@law.gla.ac.uk   510-643-8646

Adam Gearey, earned a Ph.D. at Birkbeck College, University of London, where he is currently Reader in Law, Birkbeck College.  He took the Common Professional Examination in Law at the University of Manchester and has held Visiting Professorships in Law at the University of Praetoria, South Africa and at Makarere University in Uganda.  He will be examining law and legal relationships in the European/Anglican traditions that do not reach their final form in the sovereign state, but articulate a "social ontology of plural being." He can be contacted at a.gearey@bbk.ac.uk and at 510-643-5368.

Antoinette (Toni) Hetzler is Professor of Sociology with emphasis on Social Policy at Lund University, Sweden. She is head of a research group in Sweden studying Social Policy, Working Life and Global Welfare (SWG) and is currently president of the Swedish Sociology Association. Her most recent books include Sick-Sweden (Sjuk-Sverige, 2005) and Rehabilitation and Welfare Politics (Rehabilitering och välfärdspolitik, 2004). She has published extensively on welfare state politics including workers compensation in Sweden as well as the role of law in social policy. Currently she is working on two manuscripts. One is "Women, Work and Well-being" and the other is "Regulating the Financial Market."  Antoinette Hetzler received her PhD from the University of California, Santa Barbara, was Assistant Professor at New York University, and post-doctoral fellow at the Center for the Study of Law and Society before she immigrated to Sweden in the late 1970s.  She can be contacted at antoinette.hetzler@soc.lu.se and 510-643-8646. 
 
Barbara Keys is
Lecturer in History at the University of Melbourne.  She received her Ph.D. in International History from Harvard University.  Her research interests lie broadly in intercultural relations and the role of international organizations in global affairs.  Her award-winning first book, Globalizing Sport: National Rivalry and International Community in the 1930s (Harvard University Press, 2006), examined the cultural and political ramifications of the expansion of international sports competitions.  She is current working on two books, one on the international campaign against torture in the 1970s and one on the origins of human-rights diplomacy in the United States. bkeys@unimelb.edu.au  510-643-8269

Michael Musheno (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) earned a Ph.D. at American University. He is currently Professor of Criminal Justice Studies at SFSU and Director of the Program in Criminal Justice Studies at San Francisco State University. Formerly  program director of Law and Society at NSF, his interests are in policing, street law, state frontline workforces (currently US Army reservists serving in Iraq), and interpretive field methods, esp. narratives and storytelling.  His book Deployed: How Reservists Bear the Burden of Iraq (with Susan Ross) was published by the University of Michigan Press in 2008.  He can be contacted at mmusheno@sfsu.edu .

Justin O'Brien, PhD, Political Science, Queen's University, Belfast. Currently Professor of Corporate Governance, Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics, ANU, Canberra, and Faculty of Business, Charles Stuart University. justin.obrien@anu.edu.au  (April-July 2009)

Christopher Roberts is a Doctoral Candidate at the University of Michigan in the Joint Program in Public Policy and Sociology.  He holds a B.A. from UCLA and a J.D. from the University of Southern California.  While in residence, Christopher will be working on completing his dissertation project, in which he examines the social origins of the modern international human rights concept.  His work shows how the human rights concept became the site for a series of seminal struggles over competing institutional frameworks for organizing social and political relationships, and how the formidable opposition that developed against human rights between 1944 and 1966 has been influential in shaping the modern human rights concept, itself.  His article (co-authored with Margaret Somers), "Toward a New Sociology of Rights: A Genealogy of 'Buried Bodies' of Citizenship and Human Rights", will appear in the next issue of the Annual Review of Law and Social Science. He can be contacted at cnrobert@umich.edu  and at 510-642-0437.

James B. Rule (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) earned his Ph.D. at Harvard. University.  He has held research and teaching positions at MIT, Nuffield College, Oxford, the Université de Bordeaux, Clare Hall, Cambridge; and SUNY Stony Brook. His research interests include privacy, technology, and social roles of personal information.  He is author of seven books, monographs, and chapters, including Privacy in Peril; How we are Sacrificing a Fundamental Right in Exchange for Security and Convenience (Oxford 2007) and  “The Once and Future Information Society,” (with Yasemin Besen) in Theory and Society (in press).  He is teaching Law 209.8 (Privacy Seminar) at Boalt this Fall (2008). He can be contacted at jrule@notes.cc.sunysb.edu and at 510-642-9974.

John Stannard is on the staff of the School of Law at the Queen’s University of Belfast, and is visiting the CSLS from March to August 2009 to conduct research in the field of Law and the Emotions.  He graduated from Oxford University in 1973 with a BA in Jurisprudence, and obtained the degree of BCL the following year. From 1974 to 1976 he was a lecturer in Roman Law at the University of Aberdeen, and has been on the staff of Queen's University since 1977.  In 1989 he completed his PhD degree, and in 1992 he was promoted to the rank of Senior Lecturer. He is a member of the Society of Legal Scholars and of the Irish Legal History Society, and a Fellow of the Institute of Teaching and Learning. He is also Past President of the Irish Association of Law Teachers, and has a number of publications to his credit in the fields of Contract and of Criminal Law.

Jin Sun is currently Associate Professor of Law and Head of the Department of Women's Rights at the Center for the Protection of the Rights of Disadvantage Citizens at Wuhan University, People's Republic of China.  He earned an LL.D. in Civil and Commercial Law and an LL.B. in Economic Law at Wuhan University Law School.  He teaches commercial, corporate, competition, and economic law.  An author of a number of articles, including "The Dilemma of the Reform in China" and "The Historical Mission of Economic Law" in Social Harmony in Economic Law Theories (Wuhan University), the editor of several books, and the sole-author of the forthcoming book China's Competition Law: A Textbook (Wuhan University Press, 2010), Sun's interests focus on antitrust law, commercial law, and women's rights. He can be contacted at fxysj@whu.edu.cn and at 510-643-9286.


Center for the Study of Law and Society
Visiting Scholars Fall 2008

Kirk Boyd is the executive director of the 2048 Project, a project at Boalt within the Miller Institute for Global Challenges and the Law. The mission of the 2048 Project is to draft an enforceable international framework of human rights that can be in place by the year 2048, the 100th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.  He completed his B.S. in political science at the University of California, Santa Barbara, (1981), followed by his J.D. (1985), LL.M (1996) and J.S.D. (2000) from Boalt Hall. He has been a litigator with Morrison & Forester and a partner in the firm Boyd, Huffman, Williams and Urla, litigating primarily civil rights and environmental law cases. Kirk has taught at U.C. Santa Barbara, including courses on International Human Rights, International Law, Civil Rights and First Amendment, and he has taught International Human Rights, Legal Studies 154, at Berkeley as well.  His research is the evolution of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights into regional Conventions such as the European Convention on Human Rights and the potential for an International Convention on Human Rights, enforceable in the courts of all countries. The 2048 Project is presently working with a major grant to commission 100 papers from scholars throughout the Middle East to discuss and draft a Middle Eastern Convention on Human Rights.  Kirk is also working on a book: 2048: Humanity’s Written Agreement to Live Together. He is at the 3rd floor of JSP every day and can be reached at kboyd@law.berkeley.edu or 642-8469. People are welcome to stop by, as Kirk appreciates questions and suggestions from fellow visiting scholars and others about his work.

Adam Gearey, earned a Ph.D. at Birkbeck College, University of London, where he is currently Reader in Law, Birkbeck College.  He took the Common Professional Examination in Law at the University of Manchester and has held Visiting Professorships in Law at the University of Praetoria, South Africa and at Makarere University in Uganda.  He will be examining law and legal relationships in the European/Anglican traditions that do not reach their final form in the sovereign state, but articulate a "social ontology of plural being." He can be contacted at a.gearey@bbk.ac.uk and at 510-643-5368.

Lakshman Guruswamy, Nicholas Doman Professor of International Environmental Law at the University of Colorado at Boulder, was born in Sri Lanka, and is a recognized expert in International Environmental and Energy Law. Lakshman teaches  International Environmental Law  and International Energy Law at CU. He is also the Director of the Center for Energy & Environment Security (CEES) of the University of Colorado. This is an interdisciplinary Center that seeks to find practical renewable energy solutions for the energy deficits confronting the globe, and pursues environmental justice for peoples of the  developing world.   He is widely published in international energy and environmental law in legal and scientific journals. Prior to joining the University of Colorado, he taught in Sri Lanka, the UK, and the Universities of Iowa and Arizona. Guruswamy, is a frequent speaker at scholarly meetings around the country and the world. He is the author of: International Environmental Law in a Nutshell (3d ed. 2007), and the co-author of:  International Environmental Law and World Order (2nd. 1999), Biological Diversity: Converging Strategies (1998), Arms Control and the Environment (2001), and other books. He has also authored over 40 scholarly articles published in law reviews as well as peer reviewed journals.  He can be contacted at Lakshman Guruswamy@colorado.edu  and 510-643-6582.

Antoinette (Toni) Hetzler is Professor of Sociology with emphasis on Social Policy at Lund University, Sweden. She is head of a research group in Sweden studying Social Policy, Working Life and Global Welfare (SWG) and is currently president of the Swedish Sociology Association. Her most recent books include Sick-Sweden (Sjuk-Sverige, 2005) and Rehabilitation and Welfare Politics (Rehabilitering och välfärdspolitik, 2004). She has published extensively on welfare state politics including workers compensation in Sweden as well as the role of law in social policy. Currently she is working on two manuscripts. One is on Women, Work and Well-being and the other is on Regulating the Financial Market. Antoinette Hetzler received her PhD from the University of California, Santa Barbara, was Assistant Professor at New York University, and post-doctoral fellow at the Center for the Study of Law and Society before she immigrated to Sweden in the late 1970s.  She can be contacted at antoinette.hetzler@soc.lu.se and 510-643-8646.
 
Livia Holden (MA and Mphil – Paris X, PhD – School of Oriental and African Studies - London) is Research Fellow at Freie University and Adjunct Research Fellow at Griffith University (Socio-Legal  Research Centre). She teaches legal anthropology at Humboldt University and international human rights at Griffith University.She is interested in the processes of social ordering through structured communication, and especially in the legal discourse of non-institutional networks. Her research focuses on the relationship between state and non-state law, human rights and legal anthropology, law and gender, native conceptualization of law and dominant legal discourse, fieldwork methodology. She carries out qualitative and longitudinal fieldwork in India, in Southern Italy and in Australia with a specific stress on collaborative approaches. Livia’s academic publications extend from family law, criminal law, and lawyers' praxis to traditional jurisdiction and custom. Hindu Divorce: A Legal Anthropology, her monograph on matrimonial remedies among Hindus in South Asia and in the context of the Hindu diaspora will be out in October 2008 (Ashgate).  Among her single-authored essays are "Consommation Rituelle et Consommation Physique" (Paris: CNRS), "Custom and Law Practices in Central India" (South Asia Research), and "Official Custom for (Un)official Customs" (Journal of Legal Pluralism). She co-authored various kinds of collaborative publications including Runaway Wives (documentary – film realized with Marius Holden, filmmaker and anthropologist), “Trial and Error” (paper co-authored with the multi-disciplinary team “Micro-Sociology of Criminal Procedures” at Freie University), Doing Nothing Successfully (documentary-film realized in collaboration with Lionello Manfredonia, defence lawyer), and “Cross-fading defence strategies” (essay co-authored with Giovanni Tortora,  defence lawyer specializing with organized crime). Currently Livia is working on two projects, The first is a comparative and concerns socio-legal expertise as evidence in legal procedures related to migration, asylum, and minority groups. The second project is he edition of a comparative volume focusing on the influence of the cost of legal services on the relationship between lawyers and clients. She can be contacted at 510-643-8646 from mid-November to mid January 2009 and at liviaholden@insightsproduction.net or livia.holden@griffith.edu.au.

John Monahan, a psychologist, is the Shannon Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Virginia. Monahan has been a Guggenheim Fellow and a Fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. He also has been a visiting scholar at Harvard Law School, Stanford Law School, New York University School of Law, All Souls College, Oxford, and the American Academy in Rome. His casebook with Laurens Walker, Social Science in Law, is going into its seventh edition and recently was translated into Chinese. He has twice won the Manfred Guttmacher Award of the American Psychiatric Association, for the books The Clinical Prediction of Violent Behavior (1982) and Rethinking Risk Assessment (2002).  Monahan has been elected to membership in the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, and has served on the Committee on Law and Justice of the National Research Council. He currently directs the MacArthur Foundation's Research Network on Mandated Community Treatment.  He will be at CSLS for six weeks beginning October 6th and can be emailed at jmonahan@virginia.edu and 510-642-4582.

Michael Musheno (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) earned a Ph.D. at American University. He is currently Professor of Criminal Justice Studies at SFSU and Director of the Program in Criminal Justice Studies at San Francisco State University. Formerly  program director of Law and Society at NSF, his interests are in policing, street law, state frontline workforces (currently US Army reservists serving in Iraq), and interpretive field methods, esp. narratives and storytelling.  His book Deployed: How Reservists Bear the Burden of Iraq (with Susan Ross) was published by the University of Michigan Press in 2008.  He can be contacted at mmusheno@sfsu.edu

Christopher Roberts
is a Doctoral Candidate at the University of Michigan in the Joint Program in Public Policy and Sociology.  He holds a B.A. from UCLA and a J.D. from the University of Southern California.  While in residence, Christopher will be working on completing his dissertation project, in which he examines the social origins of the modern international human rights concept.  His work shows how the human rights concept became the site for a series of seminal struggles over competing institutional frameworks for organizing social and political relationships, and how the formidable opposition that developed against human rights between 1944 and 1966 has been influential in shaping the modern human rights concept, itself.  His article (co-authored with Margaret Somers), Toward a New Sociology of Rights: A Genealogy of "Buried Bodies" of Citizenship and Human Rights, will appear in the next issue of the Annual Review of Law and Social Science. He can be contacted at cnrobert@umich.edu  and at 510-642-0437.

James B. Rule (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) earned his Ph.D. at Harvard. University.  He has held research and teaching positions at MIT, Nuffield College, Oxford, the Université de Bordeaux, Clare Hall, Cambridge; and SUNY Stony Brook. His research interests include privacy, technology, and social roles of personal information.  He is author of seven books, monographs, and chapters, including Privacy in Peril; How we are Sacrificing a Fundamental Right in Exchange for Security and Convenience (Oxford 2007) and  “The Once and Future Information Society,” (with Yasemin Besen) in Theory and Society (in press).  He is teaching Law 209.8 (Privacy Seminar) at Boalt this Fall (2008). He can be contacted at jrule@notes.cc.sunysb.edu and at 510-642-9974.

Michele Sapignoli, Doctorate in Methodology of Social and Political Science, University of Rome.  He is currently Professor of Political Science, University of Bologna.  His interests focus on research methodologies, social research statistics, judicial behavior and organization, and Italian politics.  He has written several books and numerous articles, including Processo penale e diritti della difesa [The Criminal Process and the Rights of the Defense] (with G. Di Federico).  His current aim is to develop a study of public attitudes to judicial institutions in Europe in light of the importance of building legitimacy in the ECJ (European Court of Justice) among the populations of  the different countries in the European Union. He can be contacted at michele.sapignoli@cesrog.unibo.it and at 510-642-8269 from mid-September to mid-December 2008.

Jin Sun is currently Associate Professor of Law and Head of the Department of Women's Rights at the Center for the Protection of the Rights of Disadvantage Citizens at Wuhan University, People's Republic of China.  He earned an LL.D. in Civil and Commercial Law and an LL.B. in Economic Law at Wuhan University Law School.  He teaches commercial, corporate, competition, and economic law.  An author of a number of articles, including "The Dilemma of the Reform in China" and "The Historical Mission of Economic Law" in Social Harmony in Economic Law Theories (Wuhan University).the editor of several books, and the sole-author of the forthcoming book China's Competition Law: A Textbook (Wuhan University Press, 2010), Sun's interests focus on antitrust law, commercial law, and women's rights. He can be contacted at fxysj@whu.edu.cn and at 510-643-9286.


Center for the Study of Law and Society
Visiting Scholars Summer 2008

Lisa Blomgren Bingham is the Keller-Runden Professor of Public Service at Indiana University’s School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Bloomington. A graduate of Smith College and the University of Connecticut School of Law, she was a Visiting Professor at UC Hastings College of the Law in Spring 2007. Bingham received the Association for Conflict Resolution’s Abner Award in 2002 for excellence in research for her empirical studies on mediation of discrimination complaints at the USPS, and the Best Book award for The Promise and Performance of Environmental Conflict Resolution from the Natural Resource Administration of the American Society of Public Administration in 2005.  In 2006, she received the Rubin Theory-to-Practice Award from IACM and Harvard Project on Negotiation for research that makes a significant impact on practice. She is an elected fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration. Her current research examines the legal infrastructure for and connections among collaboration, governance, dispute resolution, and public participation.  Her office is in 471 Boalt, tel. 642-8646, email lbingham@indiana.edu.

Kirk Boyd is a co-director of the International Convention on Human Rights Research Project. He completed his B.S. in political science at the University of California, Santa Barbara, (1981), followed by his J.D. (1985), LL.M (1996) and J.S.D. (2000) from Boalt Hall. He has been a litigator with Morrison & Forester and a partner in the firm Boyd, Huffman, Williams and Urla, working mainly in civil rights and environmental law. Boyd has taught at U.C. Santa Barbara, including courses on International Human Rights, International Law, Civil Rights and First Amendment. His research is the evolution of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights into regional Conventions such as the European Convention on Human Rights and the potential for an International Convention on Human Rights, enforceable in the courts of all countries. He is organizing a conference to be held at Boalt Hall, Booth Auditorium, on February 29, 2008, to discuss the future of human rights and is working on a book, Plan for Humanity, which discusses the evolution of social contract into written documents enforceable in courts of law. He can be reached at kboyd@law.berkeley.edu or (415) 690-6687, and welcomes questions from fellow visiting scholars and others about his work.

Fuyong Chen is a Doctoral Candidate at the Law School of Tsinghua University, P. R. China. He received his Masters Degree in Procedural Law from Peking University (2005) and his Bachelor of Law from China University of Political Science and Law (2001). His recent publications include “On Using Vague or Exact Expressions in the Position of China’s Arbitration institutions” (2007); “A New Probe into the Effectiveness of Limitation of Action”(2007); “On the Action Form of Civil Torts Compensation Cases Concerning Negotiable Securities”(2004). During his residency, he will be working on the research entitled "Access to Arbitration: an Empirical Study of China's Practice". Chen’s office is 470 Boalt, 642-4037, email chenfuyong@bjac.org.cn.

Yun-tsai Chen is Professor of Law at Tunghai University in Tunghai, Taiwan.  A graduate of Kobe University in Japan, he received his PhD in Criminal Procedure.  He is a member of the Committee on the Reform of Criminal Procedures at the Judicial Yuan, one of the five branches of government and the highest judicial body of the Republic of China (Taiwan).  Prof Chen is interested in the comparative study of the adoption of the jury system and cultural issues that affect people’s understanding of authority and public expression of opinions.  This summer (08) as a Fulbright Scholar at the Center he will be investigating aspects of jury selection in US criminal courts, such as legal procedures and protections.  Prof. Chen has authored two books, eight chapters, and thirty articles in law journals. He recently spent six months as a visiting scholar studying the introduction of the jury system in Japan.  Prof. Chen’s Office will be in Boalt 470. He can be reached at (510)642-4037 and cwt@thu.edu.tw.
 
Sora Y. Han is Assistant Professor in Criminology, Law & Society at UC Irvine.  She received her Ph.D. from the Department of History of Consciousness at UC Santa Cruz, and her J.D. from UCLA School of Law with an emphasis in Critical Race Studies.  She is working on a book manuscript, “The Bonds of Representation: Race, Law, and the Feminine in Post-Civil Rights America,” which examines the intersections of racial jurisprudence and popular culture.  Articles include “The Politics of Race in Asian American Jurisprudence” ( UCLA Asian Pacific American Law Journal ), “Intersectionality and the Shudder” ( Feminist Interpretations of Adorno, and “Strict Scrutiny: Race, Sexuality, and the Tragedy of Constitutional Law” (Stanford Journal of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties , forthcoming).  Research interests include the literary imagination of American constitutional law, psychoanalytic theories of law and visual culture, critical prison studies, and racial and feminist politics. Contact Han in 471A Boalt, 643-9286, shan@law.berkeley.edu.

Joe Hermer is Associate Professor of Sociology and Criminology at the University of Toronto. He holds a doctorate in Socio-Legal Studies from the University of Oxford (2000). His research engages the character of everyday forms of regulation, with a particular emphasis on the governance of poor and vulnerable people. He has conducted research on police reform, homelessness and victimization, street begging, and the criminalization of social assistance recipients through the category of 'welfare fraud' http://dspace.dal.ca/dspace/handle/10222/10299. He is the author of /Regulating Eden: The Nature of Order in North American Parks/, and is co-editor (with Janet Mosher) of /Disorderly People: Law and the Politics of Exclusion in Ontario/. His forthcoming book /Policing Compassion: Begging, Law and Power in Public Spaces/ (Hart) explores the place of street begging within the trajectory of anti-social behaviour governance in Britain. A major focus of his current work is how 'status' offences are constituted in the ordering of homeless populations, with a particular interest in the interplay between 'compassionate' welfarist objectives and more punitive policing programs. He has a continuing interest in legal visualisms and the aesthetics of urban order. (http://www.mcgill.ca/irtsl/art/hermer/) Joe's office will be Boalt 473 at 643-6582, j.hermer@utoronto.ca
 
Antoinette Hetzler is Professor of Sociology with emphasis on Social Policy at Lund University, Sweden. She is head of a research group in Sweden studying Social Policy, Working Life and Global Welfare (SWG) and is currently president of the Swedish Sociology Association. Her most recent books include Sick-Sweden (Sjuk-Sverige,2005) and Rehabilitation and Welfare Politcs (Rehabilitering och välfärdspolitik, 2004). She has published extensively on welfare state politics including workers compensation in Sweden as well as the role of law in social policy. Currently she is working on two manuscripts. One is on Women, Work and Well-being and the other is on Regulating the Financial Market. Antoinette Hetzler received her PhD from the University of California, Santa Barbara, was Assistant Professor at New York University, and post-doctoral fellow at the Center for the Study of Law and Society before she immigrated to Sweden in the late 1970s.  Her office is in 471 Boalt, tel. 643-8646, email antoinette.hetzler@soc.lu.se

Michael Musheno (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) is Professor and Director of the Program in Criminal Justice Studies at San Francisco State University. He is a former program director of Law and the Social Sciences at NSF. His teaching and writing focus on policing, street law, and the state’s frontline workforce, currently US Army reservists serving in Iraq. He draws upon narratives, particularly the storytelling of subjects and agents of the state, and uses interpretive field methods. His book, Cops, Teachers, Counselors: Stories from the Front Lines of Public Service ( University of Michigan Press, 2004) co-authored with Steven Maynard-Moody, is the winner of the American Political Science Association’s 2005 Herbert A. Simon Book Award and winner of the 2005 Best Book of Public Administration Research from the American Society of Public Administration. His book in press, Deployed: How Reservists Bear the Burden of Iraq (University of Michigan Press, 2008) co-authored with Susan Ross, focuses on the life histories of one of the first military police reserve companies deployed after 9.11, including a year running a prison near Baghdad. His email address is mmusheno@sfsu.edu.

Richard Perry is professor of Justice Studies at San Jose State University, where he teaches courses in courts, theory, and cultural studies of law. Before joining the San Jose State faculty, he taught in U.C. Irvine’s Department of Criminology, Law and Society for nine years and also held a two-year research fellowship at the Center for Philosophy of Law of the University of Louvain, Belgium. He has a J.D. from Stanford Law School and B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. in linguistics from U.C. Berkeley. He is co-editor of Globalization under Construction: Law, Identity, and Governmentality ( University of Minnesota Press) and he is currently co-editing a volume on equity and water resources for the MIT Press. In the spring semester, he will present a talk in the CSLS Bag Lunch Speaker Series. His office is in 2240 Piedmont, tel. 3-8269, email rwperry@sbcglobal.net.

James B. Rule (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) was educated at UC Berkeley, Brandeis University, and Harvard, where he completed his Ph.D. in 1969. He has held research and teaching positions at MIT; Nuffield College, Oxford; the Université de Bordeaux; Clare Hall, Cambridge; and the State University of New York Stony Brook.  He has held year-long fellowships from the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford; the J.S. Guggenheim Foundation; the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton; and the Russell Sage Foundation.  His first solely-authored book, Private Lives and Public Surveillance (1973), was co-winner of the C. Wright Mills Award from the Society for the Study of Social Problems.   Since then, he has continued to carry out research and write on subjects relating to privacy, technology, and the social role of information.   He is also author or co-author of seven other books and monographs on diverse subjects.  His latest book is Privacy in Peril; How we are Sacrificing a Fundamental Right in Exchange for Security and Convenience (Oxford University Press, 2007).   This work examines both the forces underling ever-widening collection of and use of personal data by government and private institutions, and the measures adopted around the world to protect people’s interests in use of “their” data.  He continues to do research and writing on the changing social roles of information, particularly personal information.    His most recent article is “The Once and Future Information Society,” with Yasemin Besen, forthcoming in Theory and Society.  He can be e-mailed at: James.Rule@sunysb.edu.

Geir Stenseth is Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Faculty of Law, University of Oslo. He earned his Norwegian Law Degree (Cand. jur., Oslo) in 1990. He practiced law, mainly in the area of real property law. He also appears in court for the Norwegian military prosecuting authority as appointed Judge advocate. In 2001 he returned to academia and earned the Norwegian Doctoral Degree (Dr. juris, Oslo) in 2005, publishing the thesis (in Norwegian, with a English summary) The Janus Face of Common Lands: A comparative legal analysis of common lands and co-ownership in respect of Norwegian outfields. At the Center, he will explore what relevance new advances in such disciplines as psychology, behavioural biology and cognitive neuroscience may have to the understanding of property as a concept. His research is part of a broader project of the Natural Resources Group at the Faculty of Law in Oslo. The project, called Rights to uncultivated land and social change, receives funding from the Research Council of Norway. His office is 473 Boalt, 643-6582, email geir.stenseth@jus.uio.no.

Maartje van der Woude is a PhD-student in the Department of criminal law and criminology of the University of Leyden, the Netherlands. She received both her law degree (2002) and her MSc (2005) at Leyden, specializing in (criminal) law enforcement and safety policies, in particular counterterrorism. Besides teaching various courses, she is currently working on her dissertation with the (working) title “Anti-terrorism legislation in a Culture of Control: An investigation into the Development of the Discourse.” In her research, Maartje focuses on the discrepancy between social/political discourse and legal discourse of counterterrorism. Counter-terrorism legislation shows a tension between the social/political discourse, in which collective security occupies center stage, and the (criminal) legal discourse, where individual legal protection is considered to have the highest value. The prevailing impression of criminal justice scholars is that typical values of criminal law are subordinated to risk control. This research focuses on a comparison of the two discourses in order to establish (a) on which points there is agreement or agreement can be reached, (b) on which points no agreement is possible, so that the legislator must make choices, (c) how – and in which terms – he should substantiate such choices so that they fit in with the present-day culture of control. While in Berkeley, Maartje is working on two chapters of her dissertation as well as on two articles relating to her dissertation.  Her office is in 471A Boalt, tel. 643-9286, email mahvanderwoude@gmail.com.


Center for the Study of Law and Society
Visiting Scholars Spring 2008

Lisa Blomgren Bingham is the Keller-Runden Professor of Public Service at Indiana University’s School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Bloomington. A graduate of Smith College and the University of Connecticut School of Law, she was a Visiting Professor at UC Hastings College of the Law in Spring 2007. Bingham received the Association for Conflict Resolution’s Abner Award in 2002 for excellence in research for her empirical studies on mediation of discrimination complaints at the USPS, and the Best Book award for The Promise and Performance of Environmental Conflict Resolution from the Natural Resource Administration of the American Society of Public Administration in 2005.  In 2006, she received the Rubin Theory-to-Practice Award from IACM and Harvard Project on Negotiation for research that makes a significant impact on practice. She is an elected fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration. Her current research examines the legal infrastructure for and connections among collaboration, governance, dispute resolution, and public participation.  Her office is in 471 Boalt, tel. 642-8646, email lbingham@indiana.edu.

Kirk Boyd is a co-director of the International Convention on Human Rights Research Project. He completed his B.S. in political science at the University of California, Santa Barbara, (1981), followed by his J.D. (1985), LL.M (1996) and J.S.D. (2000) from Boalt Hall. He has been a litigator with Morrison & Forester and a partner in the firm Boyd, Huffman, Williams and Urla, working mainly in civil rights and environmental law. Boyd has taught at U.C. Santa Barbara, including courses on International Human Rights, International Law, Civil Rights and First Amendment. His research is the evolution of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights into regional Conventions such as the European Convention on Human Rights and the potential for an International Convention on Human Rights, enforceable in the courts of all countries. He is organizing a conference to be held at Boalt Hall, Booth Auditorium, on February 29, 2008, to discuss the future of human rights and is working on a book, Plan for Humanity, which discusses the evolution of social contract into written documents enforceable in courts of law. He can be reached at kboyd@law.berkeley.edu or (415) 690-6687, and welcomes questions from fellow visiting scholars and others about his work.

Fuyong Chen is a Doctoral Candidate at the Law School of Tsinghua University, P. R. China. He received his Masters Degree in Procedural Law from Peking University (2005) and his Bachelor of Law from China University of Political Science and Law (2001). His recent publications include “On Using Vague or Exact Expressions in the Position of China’s Arbitration institutions” (2007); “A New Probe into the Effectiveness of Limitation of Action”(2007); “On the Action Form of Civil Torts Compensation Cases Concerning Negotiable Securities”(2004). During his residency, he will be working on the research entitled "Access to Arbitration: an Empirical Study of China's Practice". Chen’s office is 470 Boalt, 642-4037, email chenfuyong@bjac.org.cn.

Yun-tsai Chen is Professor of Law at Tunghai University in Tunghai, Taiwan.  A graduate of Kobe University in Japan, he received his PhD in Criminal Procedure.  He is a member of the Committee on the Reform of Criminal Procedures at the Judicial Yuan, one of the five branches of government and the highest judicial body of the Republic of China (Taiwan).  Prof Chen is interested in the comparative study of the adoption of the jury system and cultural issues that affect people’s understanding of authority and public expression of opinions.  This summer (08) as a Fulbright Scholar at the Center he will be investigating aspects of jury selection in US criminal courts, such as legal procedures and protections.  Prof. Chen has authored two books, eight chapters, and thirty articles in law journals. He recently spent six months as a visiting scholar studying the introduction of the jury system in Japan.  Prof. Chen’s Office will be in Boalt 470. He can be reached at (510)642-4037 and cwt@thu.edu.tw.
 
David Glick is a fourth year PhD Candidate in the Politics Department at Princeton University focusing on Public Law and American Politics. His dissertation investigates the important role that private organizations play in shaping legal impact by analyzing empirically how they actually learn about the law and decide which concrete internal polices (if any) to enact in the implementation process. He treats these organizations as actors trying to make difficult policy decisions in response to complex and ambiguous laws by building on more general theories of decision making in complex tasks, and finds that legal changes are often turned into concrete policy by organizations which learn from and copy each other's responses to it. He is also the author of the working paper, "Strategic Retreat and the 1935 Gold Clause Cases." David was an undergraduate at Williams College. His office is 470 Boalt, 642-0437, dglick@Princeton.edu.
 
Sora Y. Han is Assistant Professor in Criminology, Law & Society at UC Irvine.  She received her Ph.D. from the Department of History of Consciousness at UC Santa Cruz, and her J.D. from UCLA School of Law with an emphasis in Critical Race Studies.  She is working on a book manuscript, “The Bonds of Representation: Race, Law, and the Feminine in Post-Civil Rights America,” which examines the intersections of racial jurisprudence and popular culture.  Articles include “The Politics of Race in Asian American Jurisprudence” ( UCLA Asian Pacific American Law Journal ), “Intersectionality and the Shudder” ( Feminist Interpretations of Adorno, and “Strict Scrutiny: Race, Sexuality, and the Tragedy of Constitutional Law” (Stanford Journal of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties , forthcoming).  Research interests include the literary imagination of American constitutional law, psychoanalytic theories of law and visual culture, critical prison studies, and racial and feminist politics. Contact Han in 471A Boalt, 643-9286, shan@law.berkeley.edu.
 
Antoinette Hetzler is Professor of Sociology with emphasis on Social Policy at Lund University, Sweden. She is head of a research group in Sweden studying Social Policy, Working Life and Global Welfare (SWG) and is currently president of the Swedish Sociology Association. Her most recent books include Sick-Sweden (Sjuk-Sverige,2005) and Rehabilitation and Welfare Politcs (Rehabilitering och välfärdspolitik, 2004). She has published extensively on welfare state politics including workers compensation in Sweden as well as the role of law in social policy. Currently she is working on two manuscripts. One is on Women, Work and Well-being and the other is on Regulating the Financial Market. Antoinette Hetzler received her PhD from the University of California, Santa Barbara, was Assistant Professor at New York University, and post-doctoral fellow at the Center for the Study of Law and Society before she immigrated to Sweden in the late 1970s.  Her office is in 471 Boalt, tel. 643-8646, email antoinette.hetzler@soc.lu.se .

Nick Huls is Professor and Chair of Sociolegal Studies at Erasmus University Rotterdam and the University of Leyden, and Head of the Erasmus Center for Law & Society. He received his law degree at Utrecht University in 1973 and his PhD, on consumer protection law, in 1981. From 1982 -1990 he was project leader of the Consumer Credit Act at the Netherlands Department of Economic Affairs; his recommendations led to the adoption of a new bankruptcy act based on US law. In 1990 Nick returned to academia, initially as Director of the Leyden Institute for Law and Public Policy. While at Berkeley, Nick is working on two books -- an introduction to sociolegal studies and the editing of the papers and proceedings of an international conference in Rotterdam in January 2007 (in English) entitled The Legitimacy of Supreme Courts' Rulings. He will present a paper on judicial power in the Netherlands in the CSLS Sawyer Seminar on October 18 th. His office is in 2240 Piedmont, 642-4038, email huls@frg.eur.nl.
 
Timothy Kaufman-Osborn received his B.A. from Oberlin College and his Ph.D. from Princeton University. He is the Baker Ferguson Professor of Politics and Leadership at Whitman College. He is the author of three books as well as over twenty articles on topics including capital punishment, the discipline of political science, feminist theory, and American pragmatism. Kaufman-Osborn has served as president of the Western Political Science Association as well as the American Civil Liberties Union of Washington, and he recently completed a term on the Executive Council of the American Political Science Association. He is the recipient of several awards for his scholarship and teaching, including the Western Political Science Association’s Pi Sigma Alpha and Betty Nesvold Women and Politics Awards as well as the Robert Fluno Award for Distinguished Teaching in the Social Sciences. While at the Center, he will be working on various aspects of the political and legal regulation of death in the United States. His office is at 2240 Piedmont, Program in Criminal Justice, Law and Society, 642-4038, kaufmatv@whitman.edu.

Philip Lewis was a Research Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford from 1965 to 1988, and since 1996 has been at the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, Oxford. He has visited Berkeley on two previous occasions, and has also been a Senior Scholar at Stanford. His research interest is in the legal profession, and with Rick Abel, of UCLA, he started the Working Group on Legal Professions, out of which came the three volumes they edited, Lawyers in Society (1988-9). While at Berkeley he will be looking back at research projects he has previously carried out on groups of lawyers in the USA and the UK , and studying the relevance to them of some general themes in legal professions research, such as competition, expertise, ideologies, independence, trust and "communities of practice". Dr. Lewis's office is in 470 Boalt, tel. 642-0437, email philip.lewis@csls.ox.ac.uk .

Michael Musheno (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) is Professor and Director of the Program in Criminal Justice Studies at San Francisco State University. He is a former program director of Law and the Social Sciences at NSF. His teaching and writing focus on policing, street law, and the state’s frontline workforce, currently US Army reservists serving in Iraq. He draws upon narratives, particularly the storytelling of subjects and agents of the state, and uses interpretive field methods. His book, Cops, Teachers, Counselors: Stories from the Front Lines of Public Service ( University of Michigan Press, 2004) co-authored with Steven Maynard-Moody, is the winner of the American Political Science Association’s 2005 Herbert A. Simon Book Award and winner of the 2005 Best Book of Public Administration Research from the American Society of Public Administration. His book in press, Deployed: How Reservists Bear the Burden of Iraq (University of Michigan Press, 2008) co-authored with Susan Ross, focuses on the life histories of one of the first military police reserve companies deployed after 9.11, including a year running a prison near Baghdad. His email address is mmusheno@sfsu.edu.

Richard Perry is professor of Justice Studies at San Jose State University, where he teaches courses in courts, theory, and cultural studies of law. Before joining the San Jose State faculty, he taught in U.C. Irvine’s Department of Criminology, Law and Society for nine years and also held a two-year research fellowship at the Center for Philosophy of Law of the University of Louvain, Belgium. He has a J.D. from Stanford Law School and B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. in linguistics from U.C. Berkeley. He is co-editor of Globalization under Construction: Law, Identity, and Governmentality ( University of Minnesota Press) and he is currently co-editing a volume on equity and water resources for the MIT Press. In the spring semester, he will present a talk in the CSLS Bag Lunch Speaker Series. His office is in 2240 Piedmont, tel. 3-8269, email rwperry@sbcglobal.net.

Daniela Piana , PhD in sociology, Master degree in Philosophy, is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Florence. Visiting Fellow at the College of Natolin in Warsaw, at the University of Marseille III, at the Institute for Sociology of Law in Onati and at the Institute des Hautes Etudes sur la Justice in Paris, she is currently involved in two international research projects, on judicial education and judicial cooperation in Europe. Her research interests include constitutionalism and the constitutional courts of the Central and Eastern European Countries, judicial cooperation in the European Union, the quality of justice and the transnationalization of legal culture. She is author of several articles and essays published in Italian and Foreign reviews and recently of the volumes “The Institutions In Mind, Anchors of Legitimacy of Political Power” and “Building Democracy: Beyond the Borders of the European Public Space”. Her office is 472 Boalt, 643-5368, email danielapiana@hotmail.com.

James B. Rule (Distinguished Affiliated Scholar) was educated at UC Berkeley, Brandeis University, and Harvard, where he completed his Ph.D. in 1969. He has held research and teaching positions at MIT; Nuffield College, Oxford; the Université de Bordeaux; Clare Hall, Cambridge; and the State University of New York Stony Brook.  He has held year-long fellowships from the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford; the J.S. Guggenheim Foundation; the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton; and the Russell Sage Foundation.  His first solely-authored book, Private Lives and Public Surveillance (1973), was co-winner of the C. Wright Mills Award from the Society for the Study of Social Problems.   Since then, he has continued to carry out research and write on subjects relating to privacy, technology, and the social role of information.   He is also author or co-author of seven other books and monographs on diverse subjects.  His latest book is Privacy in Peril; How we are Sacrificing a Fundamental Right in Exchange for Security and Convenience (Oxford University Press, 2007).   This work examines both the forces underling ever-widening collection of and use of personal data by government and private institutions, and the measures adopted around the world to protect people’s interests in use of “their” data.  He continues to do research and writing on the changing social roles of information, particularly personal information.    His most recent article is “The Once and Future Information Society,” with Yasemin Besen, forthcoming in Theory and Society.  He can be e-mailed at: James.Rule@sunysb.edu.

Geir Stenseth is Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Faculty of Law, University of Oslo. He earned his Norwegian Law Degree (Cand. jur., Oslo) in 1990. He practiced law, mainly in the area of real property law. He also appears in court for the Norwegian military prosecuting authority as appointed Judge advocate. In 2001 he returned to academia and earned the Norwegian Doctoral Degree (Dr. juris, Oslo) in 2005, publishing the thesis (in Norwegian, with a English summary) The Janus Face of Common Lands: A comparative legal analysis of common lands and co-ownership in respect of Norwegian outfields. At the Center, he will explore what relevance new advances in such disciplines as psychology, behavioural biology and cognitive neuroscience may have to the understanding of property as a concept. His research is part of a broader project of the Natural Resources Group at the Faculty of Law in Oslo. The project, called Rights to uncultivated land and social change, receives funding from the Research Council of Norway. His office is 473 Boalt, 643-6582, email geir.stenseth@jus.uio.no.

Maartje van der Woude is a PhD-student in the Department of criminal law and criminology of the University of Leyden, the Netherlands. She received both her law degree (2002) and her MSc (2005) at Leyden, specializing in (criminal) law enforcement and safety policies, in particular counterterrorism. Besides teaching various courses, she is currently working on her dissertation with the (working) title “Anti-terrorism legislation in a Culture of Control: An investigation into the Development of the Discourse.” In her research, Maartje focuses on the discrepancy between social/political discourse and legal discourse of counterterrorism. Counter-terrorism legislation shows a tension between the social/political discourse, in which collective security occupies center stage, and the (criminal) legal discourse, where individual legal protection is considered to have the highest value. The prevailing impression of criminal justice scholars is that typical values of criminal law are subordinated to risk control. This research focuses on a comparison of the two discourses in order to establish (a) on which points there is agreement or agreement can be reached, (b) on which points no agreement is possible, so that the legislator must make choices, (c) how – and in which terms – he should substantiate such choices so that they fit in with the present-day culture of control. While in Berkeley, Maartje is working on two chapters of her dissertation as well as on two articles relating to her dissertation.  Her office is in 471A Boalt, tel. 643-9286, email mahvanderwoude@gmail.com.