Visiting Scholars

The Visiting Scholars Program is one of CSLS's most important and fruitful activities, enriching current scholarship and stimulating new research ideas in a "unique interdisciplinary and international research environment," in the words of one recent visitor. In recent years, CSLS has welcomed some 25 visiting scholars annually from the U.S. and many other countries, in a range of disciplines, including law, political science, sociology, criminology, history, public administration and communications.  In 2011-2012, for example, 23 visiting scholars gathered at the Center from the U.S. (9), Europe (7), Middle East (1), Mexico (1) and Asia (5).

CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF LAW AND SOCIETY
VISITING SCHOLARS – Summer 2014

Jason Anastasopoulos is a Democracy Fellow at the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. He received his PhD in Political Science from the University of California, Berkeley in 2013 and his master’s degree in statistics from Harvard University in 2005. His research focuses on political polarization, immigration and race in the late 20th and early 21st century United States. His interests in research methodology include design of experiments, causal inference and machine learning algorithms for text analysis. jason_anastasopoulos@hks.harvard.edu

Jay Borchert is currently a PhD candidate in the Department of Sociology and a Population Studies Center Trainee at the Population Studies Center of the Institute for Social Research, at the University of Michigan Ann Arbor. Recently awarded the Eva L. Mueller New Directions In Economics and Demography Fund Grant to facilitate his research, Jay's dissertation focuses on the philosophies that guide the practice of Corrections in the United States to include how and why these knowledge frameworks may reshape and refine inequality for prisoners, those working in corrections, and communities. Over the last 4 years Jay has worked with professors David Harding and Jeffrey Morenoff, as part of the Michigan Study of Life after Prison research team, to examine the neighborhood context of prisoner reentry. In his current work,Jay is conducting interviews with high-ranking correctional officials nationwide. The goal of the project is to determine the effects of the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003, and its Standards or Final Rule of 2012, upon correctional orthodoxy and praxis, institutional culture, prisoners and correctional staff. Jay is broadly interested in law and social change, citizenship, human rights and macro-level inequality with a sharp focus on prisons and prisoners as objects of legal and social negotiation and conflict. borjay@umich.edu

Peter Burdon is a Senior Lecturer at the Adelaide Law School and deputy chair of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature Ethics Specialist Group. Peter holds a BA (History/Philosophy), LLB (hons) and a PhD from the University of Adelaide. His PhD won the Bonython Prize & the University Research Medal for best original thesis. It will be published as part of the Routledge 'Law, Justice and Ecology' series. Since 2005 Peter has worked with the environment NGO Friends of the Earth. In this role he has engaged in community advocacy, developed submissions in response to mining projects in South Australia, acted as media spokesperson, organized working trips to aboriginal communities in northern South Australia and organized significant public conferences. Peter was a founding member of the Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature and he currently sits on the management committee of the Australian Earth Law Alliance. From 2007-2011 Peter sat on the executive committee of the Conservation Council South Australia and from 2011-2013 he sat on the management committee of the Environmental Defenders Office (SA). Peter’s current research examines the root causes of the current environmental crisis and considers methods for catalysing significant legal and cultural change toward a viable human presence on the Earth. His research uses interdisciplinary materials from political economy, political science, sociology and prefigurative political activism. Peter is also conducting a comparative analysis of the privatization of legal education in Australia and the United States, with a specific focus on academic empowerment and resistance. peter.d.burdon@adelaide.edu.au

Masahiro Fujita is associate professor of social psychology at Kansai University in Osaka, Japan. He received his LL.B. and LL.M. from the University of Tokyo, an M.A. in Human System Science from Hokkaido University, and a Ph.D. in the Basic Science of Law at the University of Tokyo. Working in the interdisciplinary field of law and psychology, he is interested in human behavior within the legal system, and has been engaged in studies of civic participation in the legal system, conducting experiments on group decision making and social surveys on public attitudes towards the legal system. Currently research projects include studying the impact of the introduction of civic participation on public trust and attitudes towards the legitimacy of the legal system, people’s sense of justice, and verifying the validity and reliability of legal knowledge. m.fujita.cf6@gmail.com

Yumiko Fujita is an attorney at law, specializing in divorce and domestic violence in Japan. She graduated from International Christian University in Tokyo and received her Bachelor of Liberal Arts in 2000. Since passing the Japanese Bar Examination in 2004, she has practiced law since 2006. A common issue in her divorce cases has been whether the parent who is not awarded child custody should be permitted to contact the child after the divorce. The effects of contacting on the child are in controversy in Japan, but there is little evidence or data on the effects of those contacts. At the Center, she will study the factors considered in California courts to determine parental contact after a divorce, through interviews with lawyers and judges. yfujita@lawyers.jp

Barbora Hola works as Assistant Professor at the Department of Criminal Law and Criminology, VU University Amsterdam. She is a fellow at the Center for International Criminal Justice and a member of the steering committee of the Africa-Low Countries Network. In her research Barbora focuses on issues of transitional justice, in particular (international) criminal trials, sentencing of international crimes and enforcement of international sentences. In 2013, the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO) awarded Barbora the prestigious Veni grant for a project on vertical (in)consistency of international sentencing. Barbora received her Law degree (JUDr, summa cum laude) at the Faculty of Law, Charles University in Prague. In 2007 she received her LL.M degree in International and European Law at the University of Amsterdam. In 2012, Barbora obtained her PhD in supranational criminology from the VU University Amsterdam where she defended a dissertation on consistency of sentencing of international crimes by international tribunals. At the Center, Barbora will be working on an article analyzing consistency of sentencing of international crimes by the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and domestic courts in the countries of the Former Yugoslavia. b.hola@vu.nl

Sarah E. Igo is Associate Professor of History, with affiliate appointments in Political Science and Sociology, at Vanderbilt University. She received her Ph.D. in History from Princeton University in 2001 and was on the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania from 2001 to 2008. Her primary research interests are in American cultural and intellectual history, the history of the human sciences, the sociology of knowledge, and the history of the public sphere. She is the author of The Averaged American: Surveys, Citizens, and the Making of a Mass Public (2007), which explores the relationship between survey data—opinion polls, sex surveys, consumer research—and modern understandings of self and nation. Professor Igo is at the CSLS on a New Directions Fellowship from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which she is using to pursue training in sociolegal studies and jurisprudence. At the Center she will be working on a cultural history of privacy in the U.S. since the 1890s, examined through legal debates, artistic and architectural movements, technological innovations, professional codes, and shifting social norms. Interested in everyday vocabularies of privacy, her focus is on public debates that had privacy at their core, whether over “instantaneous photographs,” Social Security numbers, suburban home design, reproductive rights, or social media. sarah.igo@vanderbilt.edu

Laverne Jacobs is an Associate Professor and the Director of Graduate Studies at the Faculty of Law of the University of Windsor, Canada. She completed her law degrees and an undergraduate degree at McGill University, and her PhD at York University. Professor Jacobs is at Berkeley in 2014 as a Visiting Scholar at the Center for the Study of Law and Society, and as the Fulbright Visiting Research Chair Canadian Studies. She is an administrative law and disability rights scholar. Her research interests include the independence and impartiality of administrative actors; human rights law; disability rights; access to information and privacy; comparative administrative law; and qualitative empirical research methodology. Dr. Jacobs’ research has used ethnography to explore meanings of the concept of tribunal independence within Canadian access to information and privacy commissions, and has examined, through qualitative data analysis, the effectiveness of ombuds oversight for regulating freedom of information. Dr. Jacobs recently co-edited a collection on comparative administrative process, which brings together global perspectives on polyjuralism in the administrative state (The Nature of Inquisitorial Processes in Administrative Regimes: Global Perspectives (Surrey, UK: Ashgate, 2013); see also, L. Jacobs, “Evaluating Ombuds Oversight in the Canadian Access to Information Context: A Theoretical and Empirical Inquiry” ) . At the Center, she will be working on a new multiyear research project that focuses on the efficacy of agency regulation-making processes when they are used to create regulations that affect persons with disabilities. She has a particular interest in the ability of persons with disabilities to have a voice in the regulatory process. ljacobs@uwindsor.ca

Yuan Qiao is currently a doctoral candidate in Peking University (PKU) Law School in China, specializing in both criminal law and international financial law. Prior to her studies in PKU, she received two Master of Law Degrees-a Banking and Financial Services Law Master Degree from the University of Melbourne, and a Chinese Criminal Law Master Degree. Yuan has participated in several research projects supported by the National Social Science Association. In a recently completed project, named ‘Study on Theory of Criminal Law”, she was responsible for examining and analysing the American and British criminal law theories. Further, she has gained deep understanding of banking and financial law not only from study, but also from her previous work experiences. As an assistant attorney, she has provided high quality legal services to key clients, such as the Bank of East Asia (China) and the Bank of China (Linfen Branch, Shanxi). Her current research interests include law of financial crimes, white-collar crimes, economic criminal law, crimes committed against banks and their control and prevention. yuan.qiao@ymail.com

Ashley Rubin is Assistant Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Florida State University. She received her Ph.D. in Jurisprudence and Social Policy from U.C. Berkeley in 2013 and is excited to return. Her research examines punishment through historical and sociological perspectives, relying on qualitative and quantitative data. Her current focus uses organizational theory to better understand penal trends and the administration of punishment on the ground. At the Center, she will continue her research exploring the nineteenth-century diffusion of prison models and reactions to a non-conforming or “deviant” prison. She has on-going quantitative projects that examine penal trends in eighteenth-century British criminal justice and sentencing disparities among nineteenth-century Pennsylvania prisoners, and qualitative projects exploring the theoretical considerations surrounding prisoner resistance. arubin@fsu.edu

Sarah Shourd is an author, prisoner rights advocate and Contributing Editor at Solitary Watch—currently based in Oakland, California. Sarah was held as a political hostage by the Iranian government from 2009-2010. She was captured, along with her two companions, while hiking near the unmarked Iran/Iraq border in semi-autonomous Iraqi Kurdistan while on a weeklong trip from her home in Damascus, Syria, where Sarah taught refugees for the Iraqi Student Project. Sarah was held incommunicado in solitary confinement for 410 days; then suddenly released without ever being tried or charged. Sarah then joined the Free the Hikers campaign to advocate for the release of Josh and Shane, which came to pass a year later. She now writes, speaks and advocates against the use of prolonged solitary confinement in U.S. prisons. Sarah’s written for The New York Times, CNN, SF Chronicle, Newsweek's Daily Beast and has a blog on Huffington Post. Her memoir A Sliver of Light: Three Americans Imprisoned in Iran—co-authored by Shane Bauer and Josh Fattal—will be published by Houghton-Mifflin Harcourt in March 2014. Visit Sarah's webpage at http://www.sarahshourd.com/ email: sarah@sarahshourd.com

Kathleen (Kate) Sullivan is an Associate Professor in the Anthropology Department at California State University Los Angeles. Her work is situated within the legal and political anthropology tradition, and focuses on environmental politics, governance practices, spatial planning, and regulatory regimes in marine and coastal environments. She conducts archival and ethnographic field research in Chile, British Columbia, Canada, and California, U.S.A., where new forms of ocean planning and management have emerged in recent decades. While at the Center, she will be conducting research for her book, which critically explores the concrete ways in which human relationships with marine environments are being reconfigured through a constellation of instrumental logics driven by law and marine science practices in growing efforts to address the problems of balancing development and conservation in the Pacific Ocean. Her recent publications include Reorganizing Indigenous-State Relations in Chile: Programa Origenes and Participatory Governance in Studies in Law, Politics, and Society Vol. 55:101-129 (2011), and (Re)Landscaping Sovereignty in British Columbia, Canada in PoLAR, Political and Legal Anthropology Review 29(1):44-65 (2006), as well as the co-edited symposium (with Sandra Brunnegger) Negotiating Rights between Indigenous Peoples and States in Latin America in Studies in Law, Politics, and Society Vol. 55 (2011). Dr. Sullivan received her Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of California Santa Barbara in 2004. ksulliv4@calstatela.edu 

Lars Tummers is an Assistant Professor of Public Management and Public Policy at the Erasmus University Rotterdam. In 2013, he was awarded the ‘Best Researcher Award' (Erasmus University Rotterdam). In his PhD (which he received with honors/cum laude), he developed a new model of ‘policy alienation’ to examine the problems of professionals with implementing policies set by government. The dissertation laid the foundations of his book "Policy Alienation and the Power of Professionals" (Edward Elgar, 2013). His research continues to focus on public management and public policy issues, specializing in public leadership, public innovation and policy implementation. He has published about these topics in leading public administration journals, such as Public Administration, Public Administration Review and Public Management Review. Together with Prof. Bekkers, he coordinates a research consortium of 12 universities in 11 European countries on innovation in the public sector (sponsored by the European Commission). He received a prestigious Marie Curie Fellowship from the European Commission together with Michael Musheno and others. The project analyses how civil servants cope with stress during public service delivery. He combines the literatures of psychology and public administration, developing a new research line on the ‘psychology of public administration’. As part of this Marie Curie Fellowship, he will be a visiting scholar at the University of California, Berkeley for the full academic year 2013-2014. Tummers@fsw.eur.nl

CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF LAW AND SOCIETY
VISITING SCHOLARS - Spring 2014

Deborah A. Boehm is Associate Professor of Anthropology and Women’s Studies/Gender, Race, and Identity at the University of Nevada, Reno. During 2013-2014, she is on research leave as an American Council of Learned Societies Fellow. She is the author of Intimate Migrations: Gender, Family, and Illegality among Transnational Mexicans (New York University Press, 2012) and co-editor of Everyday Ruptures: Children, Youth, and Migration in Global Perspective (Vanderbilt University Press, 2011). She has served as guest editor for International Migration and Latin American Perspectives and has published in Anthropological Quarterly, Medical Anthropology Quarterly, Refugee Survey Quarterly, and Urban Anthropology, among other journals. She has conducted more than a decade of binational ethnographic research with transnational Mexicans, including a year in Mexico as a Fulbright-García Robles Scholar at the Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas. Her current research projects explore deportation and return migration, cross-border families with mixed U.S. immigration statuses, and citizenship among transnational children and youth. During her residency at the Center for the Study of Law and Society, she is working on a book manuscript, “Return(ed): Going and Coming in an Age of Deportation.” dboehm@unr.edu

Jay Borchert is currently a PhD candidate in the Department of Sociology and a Population Studies Center Trainee at the Population Studies Center of the Institute for Social Research, at the University of Michigan Ann Arbor. Recently awarded the Eva L. Mueller New Directions In Economics and Demography Fund Grant to facilitate his research, Jay's dissertation focuses on the philosophies that guide the practice of Corrections in the United States to include how and why these knowledge frameworks may reshape and refine inequality for prisoners, those working in corrections, and communities. Over the last 4 years Jay has worked with professors David Harding and Jeffrey Morenoff, as part of the Michigan Study of Life after Prison research team, to examine the neighborhood context of prisoner reentry. In his current work,Jay is conducting interviews with high-ranking correctional officials nationwide. The goal of the project is to determine the effects of the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003, and its Standards or Final Rule of 2012, upon correctional orthodoxy and praxis, institutional culture, prisoners and correctional staff. Jay is broadly interested in law and social change, citizenship, human rights and macro-level inequality with a sharp focus on prisons and prisoners as objects of legal and social negotiation and conflict. borjay@umich.edu

Peter Burdon is a Senior Lecturer at the Adelaide Law School and deputy chair of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature Ethics Specialist Group. Peter holds a BA (History/Philosophy), LLB (hons) and a PhD from the University of Adelaide. His PhD won the Bonython Prize & the University Research Medal for best original thesis. It will be published as part of the Routledge 'Law, Justice and Ecology' series. Since 2005 Peter has worked with the environment NGO Friends of the Earth. In this role he has engaged in community advocacy, developed submissions in response to mining projects in South Australia, acted as media spokesperson, organized working trips to aboriginal communities in northern South Australia and organized significant public conferences. Peter was a founding member of the Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature and he currently sits on the management committee of the Australian Earth Law Alliance. From 2007-2011 Peter sat on the executive committee of the Conservation Council South Australia and from 2011-2013 he sat on the management committee of the Environmental Defenders Office (SA). Peter’s current research examines the root causes of the current environmental crisis and considers methods for catalysing significant legal and cultural change toward a viable human presence on the Earth. His research uses interdisciplinary materials from political economy, political science, sociology and prefigurative political activism. Peter is also conducting a comparative analysis of the privatization of legal education in Australia and the United States, with a specific focus on academic empowerment and resistance. peter.d.burdon@adelaide.edu.au

Pedro H. Butelli is a researcher at FGV Sao Paolo Law School. He is a graduate at the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, where he studied Industrial Engineering, and holds an MA in Economics at EPGE - Fundação Getúlio Vargas, where he is a PhD candidate. His MA dissertation was focused on the empirical measurement of the impacts of the UPPs – Unidades de Polícia Pacificadora (Pacifying Police Units) on academic performance of children in the public schools of Rio de Janeiro. This law enforcement/social services policy, which focuses on reclaiming territories which once were dominated by gangs of drug dealers, has the potential of creating significant changes for the share of Rio’s population which live in the favelas. The next step in his research, which will be developed during his stay at CSLS, is the impact evaluation of the UPPs on violence by measuring changes in the temporal and spatial distributions of different types of crimes in Rio de Janeiro. He is also interested in establishing causality and measuring the impacts of legal change and social policies in general, such as evaluating the impact on marriage and separation rates of new divorce laws in Brazil. pedrobutelli@gmail.com

Marinos Diamantides is a Reader in Law and director of LL.M. Constitutional Law, Theory and Politics at Birkbeck College, University of London. His research includes earlier, award-winning, work on the significance for jurisprudence of the ethical philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas, and, currently, investigations into the relationship of religion to public law in monotheistic societies. Recent books include Law, Levinas Politics (Routledge/Cavendish, 2009, second edition) and Law, Islam and Identity (Routledge/Cavendish, 2011, with Adam Gearey). He is currently working on a book on secularization and law and another on religion, crisis and public law in Greece, Israel and Turkey. While on sabbatical leave during 2013-14, he will be visiting the Cardozo School of Law and the Faculty of Law at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, in addition to the Center for the Study of Law and Society. m.diamantides@bbk.ac.uk

Christopher Elmendorf is Professor of Law at the University of California, Davis. A graduate of the Yale Law School and former clerk to Judge Guido Calabresi, Professor Elmendorf writes primarily in the fields of election law and statutory interpretation. In recent and forthcoming papers, he examines the consequences of election law for political party branding and the performance of low-information electorates; the propriety of categorizing "the electorate" as a state actor under the U.S. Constitution and what this implies for judicial interpretation of the Voting Rights Act; the geography of racial discrimination by voters; and the administration of direct democracy. While at Berkeley, Elmendorf will be working on projects that adapt new statistical techniques and experimental methods from political science to answer longstanding questions under the Voting Rights Act. His work has been published in theYale Law Journal, the New York University Law Review, the University of Pennsylvania Law Review, the California Law Review, the Duke Law Journal, the Cornell Law Review, and the Election Law Journal, among other leading journals. cselmendorf@ucdavis.edu

Masahiro Fujita is associate professor of social psychology at Kansai University in Osaka, Japan. He received his LL.B. and LL.M. from the University of Tokyo, an M.A. in Human System Science from Hokkaido University, and a Ph.D. in the Basic Science of Law at the University of Tokyo. Working in the interdisciplinary field of law and psychology, he is interested in human behavior within the legal system, and has been engaged in studies of civic participation in the legal system, conducting experiments on group decision making and social surveys on public attitudes towards the legal system. Currently research projects include studying the impact of the introduction of civic participation on public trust and attitudes towards the legitimacy of the legal system, people’s sense of justice, and verifying the validity and reliability of legal knowledge.. m.fujita.cf6@gmail.com

Yumiko Fujita is an attorney at law, specializing in divorce and domestic violence in Japan. She graduated from International Christian University in Tokyo and received her Bachelor of Liberal Arts in 2000. Since passing the Japanese Bar Examination in 2004, she has practiced law since 2006. A common issue in her divorce cases has been whether the parent who is not awarded child custody should be permitted to contact the child after the divorce. The effects of contacting on the child are in controversy in Japan, but there is little evidence or data on the effects of those contacts. At the Center, she will study the factors considered in California courts to determine parental contact after a divorce, through interviews with lawyers and judges. yfujita@lawyers.jp

Mari Hirayama is excited to return to the Center for the Study of Law and Society, where she was a visiting student researcher nine years ago. She is now Associate Professor of Criminal Procedure & Criminology at Hakuoh University Department of Law (Japan). She received her Master of Laws from Kwansei Gakuin University Graduate School of Law. As a Fulbright Scholar from 2002-2004, she received an LL.M. from the University of Minnesota Law School in 2003, and then was a visiting scholar at the Center for the Study of Law and Society. Professor Hirayama’s specialization is in Criminal Procedure & Criminology. She has conducted research on the impact of victims’ rights and viewpoints on criminal procedure, and on criminal justice policy for sex crimes. Recently, she has also focused on the Saiban-in system (the lay judge system in Japan). At the Center, once again the recipient of a Fulbright Scholarship, she will conduct a comparative study of criminal justice policy for sex crimes in the US and Japan. Her recent publications (in Japanese) include: Criminal Procedure Class (Horitsu- Bunka Publication, forthcoming March 2013), Introduction to Criminal Procedure (Yachiyo Publication 2011), and Direction of Criminology: Challenge of Legal Criminology, 2nd Edition (Horitsu Bunka Press 2007). ma07@fc.hakuoh.ac.jp

Barbora Hola works as Assistant Professor at the Department of Criminal Law and Criminology, VU University Amsterdam. She is a fellow at the Center for International Criminal Justice and a member of the steering committee of the Africa-Low Countries Network. In her research Barbora focuses on issues of transitional justice, in particular (international) criminal trials, sentencing of international crimes and enforcement of international sentences. In 2013, the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO) awarded Barbora the prestigious Veni grant for a project on vertical (in)consistency of international sentencing. Barbora received her Law degree (JUDr, summa cum laude) at the Faculty of Law, Charles University in Prague. In 2007 she received her LL.M degree in International and European Law at the University of Amsterdam. In 2012, Barbora obtained her PhD in supranational criminology from the VU University Amsterdam where she defended a dissertation on consistency of sentencing of international crimes by international tribunals. At the Center, Barbora will be working on an article analyzing consistency of sentencing of international crimes by the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and domestic courts in the countries of the Former Yugoslavia. b.hola@vu.nl

Sarah E. Igo is Associate Professor of History, with affiliate appointments in Political Science and Sociology, at Vanderbilt University. She received her Ph.D. in History from Princeton University in 2001 and was on the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania from 2001 to 2008. Her primary research interests are in American cultural and intellectual history, the history of the human sciences, the sociology of knowledge, and the history of the public sphere. She is the author of The Averaged American: Surveys, Citizens, and the Making of a Mass Public (2007), which explores the relationship between survey data—opinion polls, sex surveys, consumer research—and modern understandings of self and nation. Professor Igo is at the CSLS on a New Directions Fellowship from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which she is using to pursue training in sociolegal studies and jurisprudence. At the Center she will be working on a cultural history of privacy in the U.S. since the 1890s, examined through legal debates, artistic and architectural movements, technological innovations, professional codes, and shifting social norms. Interested in everyday vocabularies of privacy, her focus is on public debates that had privacy at their core, whether over “instantaneous photographs,” Social Security numbers, suburban home design, reproductive rights, or social media. sarah.igo@vanderbilt.edu

Laverne Jacobs is an Associate Professor and the Director of Graduate Studies at the Faculty of Law of the University of Windsor, Canada. She completed her law degrees and an undergraduate degree at McGill University, and her PhD at York University. Professor Jacobs is at Berkeley in 2014 as a Visiting Scholar at the Center for the Study of Law and Society, and as the Fulbright Visiting Research Chair Canadian Studies. She is an administrative law and disability rights scholar. Her research interests include the independence and impartiality of administrative actors; human rights law; disability rights; access to information and privacy; comparative administrative law; and qualitative empirical research methodology. Dr. Jacobs’ research has used ethnography to explore meanings of the concept of tribunal independence within Canadian access to information and privacy commissions, and has examined, through qualitative data analysis, the effectiveness of ombuds oversight for regulating freedom of information. Dr. Jacobs recently co-edited a collection on comparative administrative process, which brings together global perspectives on polyjuralism in the administrative state ( The Nature of Inquisitorial Processes in Administrative Regimes: Global Perspectives (Surrey, UK: Ashgate, 2013); see also, L. Jacobs, “Evaluating Ombuds Oversight in the Canadian Access to Information Context: A Theoretical and Empirical Inquiry” ) . At the Center, she will be working on a new multiyear research project that focuses on the efficacy of agency regulation-making processes when they are used to create regulations that affect persons with disabilities. She has a particular interest in the ability of persons with disabilities to have a voice in the regulatory process. ljacobs@uwindsor.ca

Genevieve Fuji Johnson is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC. She studies and teaches democratic theory, feminist social and political thought, social and political theories related to sexuality and gender, ancient Greek political thought, and a range of current public policy issues. She is author of Deliberative Democracy for the Future: The Case of Nuclear Waste Management in Canada (2008), which has been translated into Japanese, and has co-edited three volumes: Race, Racialization and Anti-Racism in Canada and Beyond (2007), Nuclear Waste Management in Canada: Critical Issues, Critical Perspective s (2009), and Political Responsibility Refocused: Thinking Justice after Iris Marion Young (2013). She has recently completed a book-length manuscript on the paradoxes of deliberative democratic processes in areas of public policy including social housing in Toronto, energy options in Nova Scotia, official languages in Nunavut, and nuclear waste management in Canada. She is starting new research into the implementation of policies regulating prostitution in jurisdictions in Canada and the US. She is also a new member of a research team based at Penn State University focusing on the Oregon Citizens Initiative Review process. Dr. Johnson is an Associate Faculty Member of the Department of Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies, and a Dialogue Associate and member of the Steering Committee of the Morris J. Wosk Centre for Dialogue, SFU. She has served as a member of the Board of Directors (2009-2011) and Executive (2010-2011) of the Canadian Political Science Association. gfjohnso@sfu.ca

Zakiya Luna is a UC President’s Postdoctoral Fellow hosted by the Center on Reproductive Rights and Justice at Berkeley Law. She is also affiliated with the Departments of Gender and Women's Studies, Sociology and the Center for the Study of Law and Society. She earned a joint PhD in Sociology and Women’s Studies from University of Michigan (2011), where she also earned her Masters of Social Work (2009). Her research was has been funded by multiple sources including the National Science Foundation. She has published in Research in Social Movements, Conflict and Change; Sociological Inquiry; Feminist Studies; Societies without Borders: Social Science and Human Rights and is lead author of a forthcoming article on Reproductive Rights and Justice in the Annual Review of Law and Social Science (with Kristin Luker, 2013). In 2011-2 she was the Mellon Foundation Sawyer Seminar in Human Rights Postdoctoral Fellow at University of Wisconsin, Madison. She is currently working on a book manuscript on the reproductive justice movement entitled Reproductive Justice for All: Identity Politics, Human Rights, and the (Un) Making of a Movement. Starting in Fall 2014, she will be an Assistant Professor of Sociology at University of California, Santa Barbara. zluna@law.berkeley.edu

Yuan Qiao is currently a doctoral candidate in Peking University (PKU) Law School in China, specializing in both criminal law and international financial law. Prior to her studies in PKU, she received two Master of Law Degrees-a Banking and Financial Services Law Master Degree from the University of Melbourne, and a Chinese Criminal Law Master Degree. Yuan has participated in several research projects supported by the National Social Science Association. In a recently completed project, named ‘Study on Theory of Criminal Law”, she was responsible for examining and analysing the American and British criminal law theories. Further, she has gained deep understanding of banking and financial law not only from study, but also from her previous work experiences. As an assistant attorney, she has provided high quality legal services to key clients, such as the Bank of East Asia (China) and the Bank of China (Linfen Branch, Shanxi). Her current research interests include law of financial crimes, white-collar crimes, economic criminal law, crimes committed against banks and their control and prevention. yuan.qiao@ymail.com

Brad R. Roth is a Professor of Political Science and Law at Wayne State University, where he teaches courses at the undergraduate, graduate, and professional levels in international law, human rights, political theory, and legal studies. A graduate of Harvard Law School, he served as a law clerk to the Chief Justice of the New Jersey Supreme Court and then as a practicing lawyer before earning an LL.M. from Columbia University and a Ph.D. from the Jurisprudence and Social Policy Program at the University of California at Berkeley. He is the author of Governmental Illegitimacy in International Law (Oxford University Press, 1999), winner of the 1999 Certificate of Merit from the American Society of International Law as “best work in a specialized area,” and of Sovereign Equality and Moral Disagreement (Oxford University Press, 2011), as well as an array of journal articles and book chapters dealing with questions of sovereignty, constitutionalism, human rights, and democracy. He is co-editor, with Gregory H. Fox, of Democratic Governance and International Law (Cambridge University Press, 2000) and, with Paul Dubinsky and Gregory Fox, of a forthcoming volume (contracted to Cambridge University Press) on the status of treaties in United States law. His current major project addresses tensions between international criminal justice and state sovereignty. brad.roth@wayne.edu

Sarah Shourd is an author, prisoner rights advocate and Contributing Editor at Solitary Watch—currently based in Oakland, California. Sarah was held as a political hostage by the Iranian government from 2009-2010. She was captured, along with her two companions, while hiking near the unmarked Iran/Iraq border in semi-autonomous Iraqi Kurdistan while on a weeklong trip from her home in Damascus, Syria, where Sarah taught refugees for the Iraqi Student Project. Sarah was held incommunicado in solitary confinement for 410 days; then suddenly released without ever being tried or charged. Sarah then joined the Free the Hikers campaign to advocate for the release of Josh and Shane, which came to pass a year later. She now writes, speaks and advocates against the use of prolonged solitary confinement in U.S. prisons. Sarah’s written for The New York Times, CNN, SF Chronicle, Newsweek's Daily Beast and has a blog on Huffington Post. Her memoir A Sliver of Light: Three Americans Imprisoned in Iran—co-authored by Shane Bauer and Josh Fattal—will be published by Houghton-Mifflin Harcourt in March 2014. Visit Sarah's webpage at http://www.sarahshourd.com/ email: sarah@sarahshourd.com

Kathleen (Kate) Sullivan is an Associate Professor in the Anthropology Department at California State University Los Angeles. Her work is situated within the legal and political anthropology tradition, and focuses on environmental politics, governance practices, spatial planning, and regulatory regimes in marine and coastal environments. She conducts archival and ethnographic field research in Chile, British Columbia, Canada, and California, U.S.A., where new forms of ocean planning and management have emerged in recent decades. While at the Center, she will be conducting research for her book, which critically explores the concrete ways in which human relationships with marine environments are being reconfigured through a constellation of instrumental logics driven by law and marine science practices in growing efforts to address the problems of balancing development and conservation in the Pacific Ocean. Her recent publications include "Reorganizing Indigenous-State Relations in Chile: Programa Origenes and Participatory Governance" in Studies in Law, Politics, and Society Vol. 55:101-129 (2011), and "(Re)Landscaping Sovereignty in British Columbia, Canada" in PoLAR, Political and Legal Anthropology Review 29(1):44-65 (2006), as well as the co-edited symposium (with Sandra Brunnegger) Negotiating Rights between Indigenous Peoples and States in Latin America in Studies in Law, Politics, and Society Vol. 55 (2011). Dr. Sullivan received her Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of California Santa Barbara in 2004. ksulliv4@calstatela.edu

Lars Tummers is an Assistant Professor of Public Management and Public Policy at the Erasmus University Rotterdam. In 2013, he was awarded the ‘Best Researcher Award' (Erasmus University Rotterdam). In his PhD (which he received with honors/cum laude), he developed a new model of ‘policy alienation’ to examine the problems of professionals with implementing policies set by government. The dissertation laid the foundations of his book " Policy Alienation and the Power of Professionals" (Edward Elgar, 2013). His research continues to focus on public management and public policy issues, specializing in public leadership, public innovation and policy implementation. He has published about these topics in leading public administration journals, such as Public Administration, Public Administration Review and Public Management Review. Together with Prof. Bekkers, he coordinates a research consortium of 12 universities in 11 European countries on innovation in the public sector (sponsored by the European Commission). He received a prestigious Marie Curie Fellowship from the European Commission together with Michael Musheno and others. The project analyses how civil servants cope with stress during public service delivery. He combines the literatures of psychology and public administration, developing a new research line on the ‘psychology of public administration’. As part of this Marie Curie Fellowship, he will be a visiting scholar at the University of California, Berkeley for the full academic year 2013-2014. Tummers@fsw.eur.nl

Marion Vannier is currently reading for a D.Phil at the University of Oxford within the Center for Criminology, Faculty of Law. Her research project, supervised by Professors Mary Bosworth and Carolyn Hoyle, focuses on life without parole (LWOP) as the alternative to the death penalty in California. From January 2014, Marion will serve as the editorial assistant for Theoretical Criminology. Marion completed a joint LLB (King’s College London) and French Maîtrise de droit (Université Paris I Panthéon – La Sorbonne) (with honors), a Research Masters in international private law (Université Paris II Panthéon – Assas) (with honors), an LLM in international legal studies at Georgetown University Law Center (with honors, dean’s list), and an MSc in Criminology and Criminal Justice from the University of Oxford (with distinction). A member of the New York and Paris bars, Marion worked for four years at Linklaters LLP and White & Case LLP on various areas of international law. She then worked as legal officer on a defense team before the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. Upon her return in France, Marion was hired as a refugee judge (Juge assesseur) for the UNHCR within the French Asylum appeals court. Marion decided to build on these international legal experiences to redirect her career towards academia, leading her to start a D.Phil in criminology at Oxford. Marion.vannier@crim.ox.ac.uk

Rose Cuison Villazor is Professor of Law at the University of California, Davis, where she teaches and writes in the areas of property law, immigration law, race, and citizenship. Her articles have been published in the New York University Law Review, Washington University Law Review, andCalifornia Law Review, among other leading law journals. She is co-editor of Loving v. Virginia in a Post-Racial World: Rethinking Race, Sex, and Marriage, published by Cambridge University Press in 2012. Prof. Villazor received the 2011 Derrick A. Bell Award given by the Association of American Law Schools (AALS) Minority Section. She obtained an LL.M from Columbia Law School in 2006 and a J.D. from the American University Washington College of Law in 2000. She clerked for Associate Judge Stephen H. Glickman on the District of Columbia Court of Appeals, received an Equal Justice Works Fellowship to work for New York Lawyers for the Public Interest (2001-2004), and served as a Human Rights Fellow at Columbia Law School (2004-2006). While at the Center (Summer 2013 & Spring 2014) she will be researching the ways in which the federal government, through the US military, prohibited African American soldiers from marrying white European women during and a few years after World War II. Through this exploration, she aims to show that the federal government has played a significant role in regulating and restricting interracial marriages. In so doing, her research challenges the conventional view that the regulation and restriction of marriages and family formation has rested only with the state governments. rcvillazor@ucdavis.edu

 

CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF LAW AND SOCIETY
VISITING SCHOLARS - FALL 2013

Jay Borchert is currently a PhD candidate in the Department of Sociology and a Population Studies Center Trainee at the Population Studies Center of the Institute for Social Research, at the University of Michigan Ann Arbor. Recently awarded the Eva L. Mueller New Directions In Economics and Demography Fund Grant to facilitate his research, Jay's dissertation focuses on the philosophies that guide the practice of Corrections in the United States to include how and why these knowledge frameworks may reshape and refine inequality for prisoners, those working in corrections, and communities. Over the last 4 years Jay has worked with professors David Harding and Jeffrey Morenoff, as part of the Michigan Study of Life after Prison research team, to examine the neighborhood context of prisoner reentry. In his current work,Jay is conducting interviews with high-ranking correctional officials nationwide. The goal of the project is to determine the effects of the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003, and its Standards or Final Rule of 2012, upon correctional orthodoxy and praxis, institutional culture, prisoners and correctional staff. Jay is broadly interested in law and social change, citizenship, human rights and macro-level inequality with a sharp focus on prisons and prisoners as objects of legal and social negotiation and conflict. borjay@umich.edu

Pedro H. Butelli is a researcher at FGV Law School. He is a graduate at the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, where he studied Industrial Engineering, and holds an MA in Economics at EPGE - Fundação Getúlio Vargas, where he is a PhD candidate. His MA dissertation was focused on the empirical measurement of the impacts of the UPPs – Unidades de Polícia Pacificadora (Pacifying Police Units) on academic performance of children in the public schools of Rio de Janeiro. This law enforcement/social services policy, which focuses on reclaiming territories which once were dominated by gangs of drug dealers, has the potential of creating significant changes for the share of Rio’s population which live in the favelas. The next step in his research, which will be developed during his stay at CSLS, is the impact evaluation of the UPPs on violence by measuring changes in the temporal and spatial distributions of different types of crimes in Rio de Janeiro. He is also interested in establishing causality and measuring the impacts of legal change and social policies in general, such as evaluating the impact on marriage and separation rates of new divorce laws in Brazil. pedrobutelli@gmail.com

Ana Carolina da Matta Chasin is a PhD candidate in the Sociology Department of the University of São Paulo (USP) working on a study of the arbitration system in Brazil. The project intends to discuss the way by which this private remedy system is leading to the restructuring of the Brazilian law field. She holds a Law degree from Catholic University of São Paulo (PUC-SP), a Social Sciences degree and a Master in Sociology (both at USP). Her Master thesis was focused on small claims courts in Brazil. She works with sociology of law, focusing on two major topics: alternative dispute resolution and land rights and quilombolas communities (rural black communities formed by descendants of slaves). She also has just finished the Portuguese translation of the paper “Why the “haves” come out ahead: speculations on the limits of legal change” (author Marc Galanter), which will be published at the beginning of 2013. acchasin@usp.br

Francisco Carvalho de Brito Cruz is a master’s degree candidate in Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law and the coordinator of the Internet, Law & Society Nucleus at the University of Sao Paulo Law School. He is a member of Brazil’s Empirical Legal Research Network (REED) and winner of the “Brazil’s Internet Framework Bill & Development Award” (sponsored by Fundacao Getulio Vargas Law School and Google). His research project is a case study about the Brazilian experience to elaborate a draft bill on Internet regulation and user’s rights entirely through an online social media platform. He is also concerned about privacy and freedom of expression in the digital age and Internet governance. fbritocruz@gmail.com.

Meera E. Deo is Associate Professor at Thomas Jefferson School of Law and Visiting Professor (Spring 2014) at UCLA School of Law. Dr. Deo is nationally renowned for her interdisciplinary empirical research on institutional diversity, including studies of law student and law faculty diversity. Her J.D. is from the University of Michigan Law School, where she was a named Intervening-Defendant and a member of the legal team defending affirmative action in Grutter v. Bollinger. While earning her Ph.D. in Sociology at UCLA, she was awarded the UCLA Alumni Association’s Outstanding Graduate Student of the Year, the Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowship for New Americans, and the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. Dr. Deo’s scholarship has been cited in numerous amicus briefs filed before the U.S. Supreme Court in Fisher v. University of Texas and Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action. In 2012, she was appointed to the California Commission on Access to Justice. Her teaching interests include Civil Procedure, Constitutional Law, Education Law, Evidence, and Law & Society. While at Berkeley, Dr. Deo will continue data collection, coding, and analysis for the landmark empirical study, Diversity in Legal Academia, which focuses on unique challenges and opportunities facing faculty from underrepresented groups and seeks to increase recruitment rates and improve the experiences of women of color in legal academia. mdeo@law.berkeley.edu

Chris Elmendorf is Professor of Law at the University of California, Davis. A graduate of the Yale Law School and former clerk to Judge Guido Calabresi, Professor Elmendorf writes primarily in the fields of election law and statutory interpretation. In recent and forthcoming papers, he examines the consequences of election law for political party branding and the performance of low-information electorates; the propriety of categorizing "the electorate" as a state actor under the U.S. Constitution and what this implies for judicial interpretation of the Voting Rights Act; the geography of racial discrimination by voters; and the administration of direct democracy. While at Berkeley, Elmendorf will be working on projects that adapt new statistical techniques and experimental methods from political science to answer longstanding questions under the Voting Rights Act. His work has been published in the Yale Law Journal, the New York University Law Review, the University of Pennsylvania Law Review, the California Law Review, the Duke Law Journal, the Cornell Law Review, and the Election Law Journal, among other leading journals. cselmendorf@ucdavis.edu.

Masahiro Fujita is associate professor of social psychology at Kansai University in Osaka, Japan. Working in the interdisciplinary field of law and psychology for the past 15 years, he has been engaged mainly in jury studies in Japan. While at CSLS, he will study the current state of jury research with respect to personality and decision-making in the United States, along with research methods for those studies, and hopes to conduct a survey addressing the relationship between personality traits of potential jurors and their judicial decision-making. m.fujita.cf6@gmail.com

Yumiko Fujita is an associate lawyer at Veritas Law Office, located in Itami City, Hyogo prefecture, Japan. She will study the factors considered in California courts to determine parental contact after a divorce, through interviews with lawyers and judges. yfujita@lawyers.jp

Mari Hirayama is excited to return to the Center for the Study of Law and Society, where she was a visiting student researcher nine years ago. She is now Associate Professor of Criminal Procedure & Criminology at Hakuoh University Department of Law (Japan). She received her Master of Laws from Kwansei Gakuin University Graduate School of Law. As a Fulbright Scholar from 2002-2004, she received an LL.M. from the University of Minnesota Law School in 2003, and then was a visiting scholar at the Center for the Study of Law and Society. Professor Hirayama’s specialization is in Criminal Procedure & Criminology. She has conducted research on the impact of victims’ rights and viewpoints on criminal procedure, and on criminal justice policy for sex crimes. Recently, she has also focused on the Saiban-in system (the lay judge system in Japan). At the Center, once again the recipient of a Fulbright Scholarship, she will conduct a comparative study of criminal justice policy for sex crimes in the US and Japan. Her recent publications (in Japanese) include: Criminal Procedure Class (Horitsu- Bunka Publication, forthcoming March 2013), Introduction to Criminal Procedure (Yachiyo Publication 2011), and Direction of Criminology: Challenge of Legal Criminology, 2nd Edition (Horitsu Bunka Press 2007). ma07@fc.hakuoh.ac.jp

Sarah E. Igo is Associate Professor of History, with affiliate appointments in Political Science and Sociology, at Vanderbilt University. She received her Ph.D. in History from Princeton University in 2001 and was on the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania from 2001 to 2008. Her primary research interests are in American cultural and intellectual history, the history of the human sciences, the sociology of knowledge, and the history of the public sphere. She is the author of The Averaged American: Surveys, Citizens, and the Making of a Mass Public (2007), which explores the relationship between survey data—opinion polls, sex surveys, consumer research—and modern understandings of self and nation. Professor Igo is at the CSLS on a New Directions Fellowship from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which she is using to pursue training in sociolegal studies and jurisprudence. At the Center she will be working on a cultural history of privacy in the U.S. since the 1890s, examined through legal debates, artistic and architectural movements, technological innovations, professional codes, and shifting social norms. Interested in everyday vocabularies of privacy, her focus is on public debates that had privacy at their core, whether over “instantaneous photographs,” Social Security numbers, suburban home design, reproductive rights, or social media. sarah.igo@vanderbilt.edu

Genevieve Fuji Johnson is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC. She studies and teaches democratic theory, feminist social and political thought, social and political theories related to sexuality and gender, ancient Greek political thought, and a range of current public policy issues. She is author of Deliberative Democracy for the Future: The Case of Nuclear Waste Management in Canada (2008), which has been translated into Japanese, and has co-edited three volumes: Race, Racialization and Anti-Racism in Canada and Beyond (2007), Nuclear Waste Management in Canada: Critical Issues, Critical Perspectives (2009), and Political Responsibility Refocused: Thinking Justice after Iris Marion Young (2013). She has recently completed a book-length manuscript on the paradoxes of deliberative democratic processes in areas of public policy including social housing in Toronto, energy options in Nova Scotia, official languages in Nunavut, and nuclear waste management in Canada. She is starting new research into the implementation of policies regulating prostitution in jurisdictions in Canada and the US. She is also a new member of a research team based at Penn State University focusing on the Oregon Citizens Initiative Review process. Dr. Johnson is an Associate Faculty Member of the Department of Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies, and a Dialogue Associate and member of the Steering Committee of the Morris J. Wosk Centre for Dialogue, SFU. She has served as a member of the Board of Directors (2009-2011) and Executive (2010-2011) of the Canadian Political Science Association. gfjohnso@sfu.ca

Felicia Kornbluh is an Associate Professor of History and Director of the Women’s and Gender Studies Program at the University of Vermont. She is the author of the monograph The Battle over Welfare Rights (University of Pennsylvania, 2007) and numerous articles in academic and non-academic journals on the subjects of poverty, social welfare, activism, disability, LGBT history, and women’s rights. Kornbluh has held fellowships from the American Bar Foundation, N.Y.U. Law School, the American Historical Association, and the Woodrow Wilson Foundation (in Women’s Studies). Before training as an historian, she had a long career as an advocate for women and children, and as a freelance writer.

Zakiya Luna is a UC President’s Postdoctoral Fellow hosted by the Center on Reproductive Rights and Justice at Berkeley Law. She is also affiliated with the Departments of Gender and Women's Studies, Sociology and the Center for the Study of Law and Society. She earned a joint PhD in Sociology and Women’s Studies from University of Michigan (2011), where she also earned her Masters of Social Work (2009). Her research was has been funded by multiple sources including the National Science Foundation. She has published in Research in Social Movements, Conflict and Change; Sociological Inquiry; Feminist Studies; Societies without Borders: Social Science and Human Rights and is lead author of a forthcoming article on Reproductive Rights and Justice in the Annual Review of Law and Social Science (with Kristin Luker, 2013). In 2011-2 she was the Mellon Foundation Sawyer Seminar in Human Rights Postdoctoral Fellow at University of Wisconsin, Madison. She is currently working on a book manuscript on the reproductive justice movement entitled Reproductive Justice for All: Identity Politics, Human Rights, and the (Un) Making of a Movement. Starting in Fall 2014, she will be an Assistant Professor of Sociology at University of California, Santa Barbara. zluna@law.berkeley.edu

Yuan Qiao is currently a doctoral candidate in Peking University (PKU) Law School in China, specializing in both criminal law and international financial law. Prior to her studies in PKU, she received two Master of Law Degrees-a Banking and Financial Services Law Master Degree from the University of Melbourne, and a Chinese Criminal Law Master Degree. Yuan has participated in several research projects supported by the National Social Science Association. In a recently completed project, named ‘Study on Theory of Criminal Law”, she was responsible for examining and analysing the American and British criminal law theories. Further, she has gained deep understanding of banking and financial law not only from study, but also from her previous work experiences. As an assistant attorney, she has provided high quality legal services to key clients, such as the Bank of East Asia (China) and the Bank of China (Linfen Branch, Shanxi). Her current research interests include law of financial crimes, white-collar crimes, economic criminal law, crimes committed against banks and their control and prevention. yuan.qiao@ymail.com

Sarah Shourd is an author, prisoner rights advocate and Contributing Editor at Solitary Watch—currently based in Oakland, California. Sarah was held as a political hostage by the Iranian government from 2009-2010. She was captured, along with her two companions, while hiking near the unmarked Iran/Iraq border in semi-autonomous Iraqi Kurdistan while on a weeklong trip from her home in Damascus, Syria, where Sarah taught refugees for the Iraqi Student Project. Sarah was held incommunicado in solitary confinement for 410 days; then suddenly released without ever being tried or charged. Sarah then joined the Free the Hikers campaign to advocate for the release of Josh and Shane, which came to pass a year later. She now writes, speaks and advocates against the use of prolonged solitary confinement in U.S. prisons. Sarah’s written for The New York Times, CNN, SF Chronicle, Newsweek's Daily Beast and has a blog on Huffington Post. Her memoir A Sliver of Light: Three Americans Imprisoned in Iran—co-authored by Shane Bauer and Josh Fattal—will be published by Houghton-Mifflin Harcourt in March 2014. Visit Sarah's webpage at http://www.sarahshourd.com/ email: sarah@sarahshourd.com

Kathleen (Kate) Sullivan is an Associate Professor in the Anthropology Department at California State University Los Angeles. Her work is situated within the legal and political anthropology tradition, and focuses on environmental politics, governance practices, spatial planning, and regulatory regimes in marine and coastal environments. She conducts archival and ethnographic field research in Chile, British Columbia, Canada, and California, U.S.A., where new forms of ocean planning and management have emerged in recent decades. While at the Center, she will be conducting research for her book, which critically explores the concrete ways in which human relationships with marine environments are being reconfigured through a constellation of instrumental logics driven by law and marine science practices in growing efforts to address the problems of balancing development and conservation in the Pacific Ocean. Her recent publications include Reorganizing Indigenous-State Relations in Chile: Programa Origenes and Participatory Governance in Studies in Law, Politics, and Society Vol. 55:101-129 (2011), and (Re)Landscaping Sovereignty in British Columbia, Canada in PoLAR, Political and Legal Anthropology Review 29(1):44-65 (2006), as well as the co-edited symposium (with Sandra Brunnegger) Negotiating Rights between Indigenous Peoples and States in Latin America in Studies in Law, Politics, and Society Vol. 55 (2011). Dr. Sullivan received her Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of California Santa Barbara in 2004. ksulliv4@calstatela.edu

Lars Tummers is an Assistant Professor of Public Management and Public Policy at the Erasmus University Rotterdam. In 2013, he was awarded the ‘Best Researcher Award' (Erasmus University Rotterdam). In his PhD (which he received with honors/cum laude), he developed a new model of ‘policy alienation’ to examine the problems of professionals with implementing policies set by government. The dissertation laid the foundations of his book "Policy Alienation and the Power of Professionals" (Edward Elgar, 2013). His research continues to focus on public management and public policy issues, specializing in public leadership, public innovation and policy implementation. He has published about these topics in leading public administration journals, such as Public Administration, Public Administration Review and Public Management Review. Together with Prof. Bekkers, he coordinates a research consortium of 12 universities in 11 European countries on innovation in the public sector (sponsored by the European Commission). He received a prestigious Marie Curie Fellowship from the European Commission together with Michael Musheno and others. The project analyses how civil servants cope with stress during public service delivery. He combines the literatures of psychology and public administration, developing a new research line on the ‘psychology of public administration’. As part of this Marie Curie Fellowship, he will be a visiting scholar at the University of California, Berkeley for the full academic year 2013-2014. Tummers@fsw.eur.nl