Visiting Scholars

The Visiting Scholars Program is one of CSLS's most important and fruitful activities, enriching current scholarship and stimulating new research ideas in a "unique interdisciplinary and international research environment," in the words of one recent visitor. In recent years, CSLS has welcomed some 25 visiting scholars annually from the U.S. and many other countries, in a range of disciplines, including law, political science, sociology, criminology, history, public administration and communications.  In 2011-2012, for example, 23 visiting scholars gathered at the Center from the U.S. (9), Europe (7), Middle East (1), Mexico (1) and Asia (5).

 

CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF LAW AND SOCIETY
Visiting Scholars - Fall 2014

Sarah Auspert is currently a PhD candidate at the Center for Law and Justice History of the Catholic University of Louvain (Belgium). She received a Masters in History (2009) and a Masters in Sociology and Anthropology (2010) from the Catholic University of Louvain. Since 2010, she has been a Research Fellow of the Belgian French-speaking Fund for Scientific Research (F.R.S.-FNRS). Under the supervision of Professor Xavier Rousseaux, her doctoral dissertation focuses on prostitutes’ mobility before the 19th-century regulation of prostitution (Belgian area, 1750-1795). At the Center, she will continue her research on prostitution, migration and the social control exerted on prostitutes and migrants at that time when prostitution was prohibited. Sarah is co-editor of Buveurs, voleuses, insensés et prisonniers à Namur au XVIIIe siècle. Déviance, justice et régulation sociale au temps des Lumières, published by the University Press of Namur in 2012. She is more broadly interested in deviance, migration and gender studies. sarah.auspert@uclouvain.be

Avishai Benish is Assistant Professor at the Paul Baerwald School of Social Work and Social Welfare at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His fields of expertise are public law, welfare law and social policy, and his main research is on the impact of welfare state governance reforms (such as privatization and performance management) on accountability, social rights and administrative justice. Avishai graduated with honors from the Hebrew University, receiving an LL.B. in Law and Political Science; he is also an honors graduate of the LL.M. program at Columbia University Law School. He has published in journals such as Law and Policy, Public Administration and Social Service Review, and he currently serves as co-editor (with Professor David Levi-Faur) of the Jerusalem Papers on Regulation & Governance working papers series. While at CSLS, he will continue his research on the regulation of privatized social services through an empirical study of the institutional dynamics of extending public law to private welfare contractors and the impact of marketization on the role and practices of street-level professionals. Avishai is also leading a research study (with Professor Shimon Shpiro) on the inspection of social services and the implications of inspectors' professional background on the goals and style of their regulatory enforcement.     avishai.benish@mail.huji.ac.il

Jay Borchert is pleased to return for a 2nd year at the Center.  Jay is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Sociology at the University of Michigan as well as a Pre-doctoral Trainee at the Population Studies Center of the Institute for Social Research in Ann Arbor. He received his BA in Sociology from DePaul University in 2010 and his MA in Sociology from the University of Michigan in 2012. Jay’s scholarship examines law and social change, citizenship, human rights and macro-level inequality with a sharp focus on prisons and prisoners as objects of both legal and social negotiation and conflict. Forthcoming is a book chapter titled “Denying Rights: The Failure to Extend (the spirit of) Lawrence v. Texas to Prisons and Prisoners,” in Sex & Justice, D. Halperin and T. Hoppe (Eds.) Duke University Press.  During his first year at the Center Jay conducted nationwide interviews with 26 directors of state departments of corrections to better understand their role in the political economy and culture of punishment.  In his 2nd year here at Berkeley, Jay will dive into dissertation work focusing on the logics that support our punishment state and its political economy across time, making prisons seem a natural part of our daily life. As part of this project, Jay will be entering prisons in Kentucky in order to examine the culture of prison workers as the labor power required to make mass or hyper-incarceration efficient. borjay@umich.edu

Teresa Degenhardt is a Lecturer in Criminology at Queen’s University Belfast, Northern Ireland. She has a PhD from Ulster University (2007), MA from Keele University (2003), and a BA in Law from Bologna University (2000). Her PhD research focused on the war in Afghanistan and Iraq as responses to 9/11 in a theoretical perspective. She is now working on the monograph from her PhD expanding her research to other military interventions as practices of coercion and violence within the international sphere (book contract with Routledge). Her works attempts to bring criminological knowledge to the international sphere, expanding the remit of the discipline. She was also recently co-investigator in a UK Research Council project on the role of risk and uncertainty in the development of security technology (http://www.esrc.ac.uk/my-esrc/grants/ES.K011332.1/read). The work was carried out through ethnographic research (interviews and observations) on how scientists and border guards collaborate in a EU funded project towards the development of a CBRNE (Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosive) detection device for border control. She is currently analyzing the data for the final report and for publication. Previously she had worked on prostitution and crimes against migrants in a European Project called Stop Trafficking in Europe. t.degenhardt@qub.ac.uk

Giulia Fabini is a doctoral candidate in the “Renato Treves” International PhD program in Law and Society at the University of Milan (Italy). She graduated in Political Science from the University of Bologna, where she is an honorary fellow in criminology. Since 2011 she has been a member of the “European Group for the Study of Deviance and Social Control”. Since 2012, she has taken part in the “Center for studies and research on the sociology of criminal law, deviance and social control” at the law school of the University of Bologna. She is currently conducting her doctoral research under the direction of Prof. Dario Melossi about undocumented migration control mechanisms in Bologna (Italy). Her focus is on police and judges’ practices and rationales when implementing the law, as well as strategies of resistance by undocumented migrants. The main argument is that Italian illegal immigration law enforcement rests on continuous, discretionary decisions made by police officers during territory control activity, which is then possibly validated by minor judicial officials (justices of the peace). “Acceptable levels of illegality” are continuously negotiated by the social actors in an ongoing process of informally setting the “rules of the game”. Practices and rationales of police and judges, immigration law, and its symbolic role are considered. The research uses qualitative and quantitative methods and is intended as a foucauldian ascending analysis of power from the micro- to the macro-mechanisms of control. Fabini’s scholarly interests range widely, from the sociology of law to critical criminology to sociology of police to political philosophy to migration studies, with an interest in post-colonial and gender studies. giulia.fabini@unimi.it

Liora Israël is Associate Professor in Sociology at L’Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (EHESS, Paris). Her scholarship focuses on several topics, including political mobilization of law during the XXth Century, legal education, and anti-discrimination law. Professor Israel is the author of two books, and has edited several volumes including Dealing with Wars and Dictatorships: Legal Concepts and Categories in Action (with Mouralis Guillaume, 2014). She was awarded the Adam Podgorecki Prize by the Research Committee on Sociology of Law of the International Sociological Association in 2008. She has served as a member of the Editorial Board of the Canadian Journal of Law and Society and Droit et Société. She was elected trustee of the Law and Society Association (2014-2016). She is currently writing a book on political mobilization of law after 1968, including a comparison between France and the United States (notably in the Bay Area). Liora.Israel@ehess.fr 

Laverne Jacobs is an Associate Professor and the Director of Graduate Studies at the Faculty of Law of the University of Windsor, Canada.  She completed her law degrees and an undergraduate degree at McGill University, and her PhD at York University.  Professor Jacobs is at Berkeley in 2014 as a Visiting Scholar at the Center for the Study of Law and Society, and as the Fulbright Visiting Research Chair Canadian Studies.  She is an administrative law and disability rights scholar.  Her research interests include the independence and impartiality of administrative actors; human rights law; disability rights; access to information and privacy; comparative administrative law; and qualitative empirical research methodology. Dr. Jacobs’ research has used ethnography to explore meanings of the concept of tribunal independence within Canadian access to information and privacy commissions, and has examined, through qualitative data analysis, the effectiveness of ombuds oversight for regulating freedom of information. Dr. Jacobs recently co-edited a collection on comparative administrative process, which brings together global perspectives on polyjuralism in the administrative state (The Nature of Inquisitorial Processes in Administrative Regimes: Global Perspectives (Surrey, UK: Ashgate, 2013); see also, L. Jacobs, “Evaluating Ombuds Oversight in the Canadian Access to Information Context: A Theoretical and Empirical Inquiry” ) . At the Center, she will be working on a new multiyear research project that focuses on the efficacy of agency regulation-making processes when they are used to create regulations that affect persons with disabilities. She has a particular interest in the ability of persons with disabilities to have a voice in the regulatory process. ljacobs@uwindsor.ca  

Sarah Morando Lakhani is an Affiliated Scholar at the American Bar Foundation in Chicago.  She was a Law and Social Science Doctoral Fellow at the American Bar Foundation for 2012-2014.  Sarah completed her Ph.D. in Sociology from UCLA in 2013 and plans to begin law school in the fall of 2015.  She studies U.S. immigration and related social inequality issues, including legalization, immigrant incorporation, and immigration lawyering.  While at the Center, Sarah will be working on a book manuscript examining the U Visa legalization process in the context of broader U.S. immigration law and policy approaches.  She will also be conducting research in the San Francisco Immigration Court for a project investigating how the use of videoconferencing technology in immigrants’ deportation and bond hearings impacts judicial substance and outcomes.  Sarah’s research has been funded by diverse interdisciplinary audiences, such as the National Science Foundation, the Law and Society Association, and the American Association of University Women.  She has published her findings in Law & Social Inquiry, Social Problems, Social Forces, and The Sociological Quarterly.  Sarah is an advisory board member of the New Legal Realism Project, an effort to improve interdisciplinary communication between law professors, lawyers, and social scientists. smlakhani@abfn.org

Rhonda V. Magee (J.D./M.A. Sociology) is Professor of Law at the University of San Francisco, School of Law, where she has been a full-time member of the faculty since 1998, and where she teaches Torts, Race, Law and Policy, and Contemplative Lawyering.  She recently served as Interim co-director of the University of San Francisco’s Center for Teaching Excellence.  For Fall 2014, she has appointments as a Visiting Professor of Law at the University of California, Berkeley School of Law, and Senior Fellow with the Berkeley Initiative for Mindfulness and law, and she will be teaching a course on mindfulness and the practice of law. Before joining USF, Professor Magee was a civil litigation associate at a Chicago-based national law firm, primarily representing insurance industry clients in complex insurance coverage litigation.  She has published law review articles and essays in such publications as the Virginia Law Review, the Alabama Law Review, and the San Francisco Chronicle.  Her writing and teaching is inspired by a commitment to education for effective problem-solving and presence-based leadership in a diverse and ever-changing world, and to humanizing legal education.  The author of the article, Educating Lawyers to Meditate? 79 UMKC L. Rev. 535 (2011) (Lead Article), she is a nationally-recognized thought and practice leader in the emerging fields of Contemplative Pedagogy and Contemplative Lawyering.  Among other service commitments, she was a founding member of the Executive Board of the AALS’s Section on Balance in Legal Education, is a founding member of its subsection on Mindfulness in Legal Education, and presently serves as President of the Board of the Center for Contemplative Mind in Society.  rvmagee@usfca.edu

Dario Melossi is Full Professor of Criminology in the School of Law of the University of Bologna. He has done research and taught at the University of California, in Santa Barbara and Davis. He has published:  The Prison and the Factory (1981, together with Massimo Pavarini), The State of Social Control: A Sociological Study of Concepts of State and Social Control in the Making of Democracy (1990), and Controlling Crime, Controlling Society: Thinking About Crime in Europe and America (2008), plus 200 other edited books, chapters, and articles. He is Editor-in-Chief of Punishment and Society. His Crime, Punishment and Migration (SAGE) is coming out in a few months.  dario.melossi@unibo.it

Jérôme Pélisse is Associate Professor in the Sociology Department at the University of Versailles – Saint-Quentin en Yvelines (France). His work is situated within the law and society tradition (notably legal consciousness studies), in relation with the sociology of labor, professions and industrial relations. His PhD dissertation focused on the working time reduction reform in France (2004). He has developed research using quantitative and qualitative methods on labor conflicts in France, as well as diverse studies on a French staff-management union, on policies dedicated to the unemployed, and judicial forensics. Expertise in various fields is a central topic for him. In 2014, he began a new research project on the implementation of health and safety rules in the scientific world in comparative perspective, notably in nanolabs in France and the U.S. While at the Center, he will be writing a  ‘Habilitation à Diriger les Recherches’ (necessary to become a Full professor in France) until November. He will then concentrate on developing exchanges with various colleagues on labor rights and the industrial relations framework and will be conducting research in nanolabos in UC Berkeley to extend and deepen his fieldwork. His recent publications include “Conventions at Work: On Forensic Accountant’s Intermediation”, Economic Sociology- European Electronic Newsletter, vol. 14.1, 2012 (with E. Charrier); Sociologie d’un syndicalisme catégoriel: la CFE-CGC ou la fin d’une exception? Coll. Recherche, Armand Colin, 2013 (with E. Béthoux, G. Desage et A. Mias); Droit et régulations des activités économiques. Perspectives sociologiques et institutionnalistes, coll. Droit et société, LGDJ, 2011 (with C. Bessy and T. Delpeuch). jerome.pelisse@uvsq.fr

Yuan Qiao is currently a doctoral candidate in Peking University (PKU) Law School in China, specializing in both criminal law and international financial law. Prior to her studies in PKU, she received two Master of Law Degrees-a Banking and Financial Services Law Master Degree from the University of Melbourne, and a Chinese Criminal Law Master Degree. Yuan has participated in several research projects supported by the National Social Science Association. In a recently completed project, named ‘Study on Theory of Criminal Law”, she was responsible for examining and analysing the American and British criminal law theories. Further, she has gained deep understanding of banking and financial law not only from study, but also from her previous work experiences. As an assistant attorney, she has provided high quality legal services to key clients, such as the Bank of East Asia (China) and the Bank of China (Linfen Branch, Shanxi). Her current research interests include law of financial crimes, white-collar crimes, economic criminal law, crimes committed against banks and their control and prevention. yuan.qiao@ymail.com

Antoine Renglet is a PhD candidate in the Department of History at the University of Namur, Belgium and in the “Institut de Recherches historiques du Septentrion (IRHiS UMR CNRS 8529)” at the University of Lille-3. Antoine received his MA (History) from the University of Louvain-la-Neuve. Antoine’s dissertation focuses on urban police and public order in Belgian territories from 1770 to 1814, analyzing archival material produced by police officers in the context of war and revolutions to ask how and why police in Western Europe moved from a classical police model under the Ancien Régime, understood as city government, to a tool of state repression and security under Napoleon. He is currently a member of the project “BeJust 2.0”, an Interuniversity Attraction Pole (IAP) funded by the Belgian Science Policy that tackles the theme of the relationships between justice and populations from an interdisciplinary, long-term perspective, covering the period from 1795 (end of the Ancien Régime in Belgium) to the present. He recently co-edited (with Axel Tixhon): Un commissaire de Police à Namur sous Napoléon. Le registre de Mathieu de Nantes, 10 vendémiaire an XIII-28 août 1807 (Louvain-la-Neuve, Presses universitaires de Louvain, 2013). His recent publications also deal with police in the French Revolution: “Les comités de surveillance et l’occupation du Brabant, 1794-1795” in Annales historiques de la Révolution française, vol. 368 (2012) and “Antwerp and Namur under State of Siege during the French Directory: Policing Practices and Authorities’ Relationships in Maintaining Order”, in Margo De Koster et al. (eds.), Justice in Wartime and Revolutions, Europe, 1795-1950, Brussels, Archives générales du Royaume, 2012). Antoine.renglet@gmail.com

Alethea Sargent received her Ph.D. from the Departments of Anthropology and American Studies at Yale University and her J.D. from Stanford Law School. Her dissertation, which she is currently revising as a monograph, examines the construction of social identity among older homeless women in Boston-area shelters. It argues that women's identity work was performed in response to shelter structures and in order to resist them, but that this resistance ultimately led to the reproduction of homelessness and poverty. Revision of the manuscript while at CSLS involves research into the legal and administrative structures in which the shelter system is embedded. More broadly, Alethea is interested in the potential role of anthropology in informing lawmaking and policymaking.  alethea@post.harvard.edu

Sarah Shourd is an author, prisoner rights advocate and Contributing Editor at Solitary Watch—currently based in Oakland, California. Sarah was held as a political hostage by the Iranian government from 2009-2010. She was captured, along with her two companions, while hiking near the unmarked Iran/Iraq border in semi-autonomous Iraqi Kurdistan while on a weeklong trip from her home in Damascus, Syria, where Sarah taught refugees for the Iraqi Student Project. Sarah was held incommunicado in solitary confinement for 410 days; then suddenly released without ever being tried or charged. Sarah then joined the Free the Hikers campaign to advocate for the release of Josh and Shane, which came to pass a year later. She now writes, speaks and advocates against the use of prolonged solitary confinement in U.S. prisons. Sarah’s written for The New York Times, CNN, SF Chronicle, Newsweek's Daily Beast and has a blog on Huffington Post. Her memoir A Sliver of Light: Three Americans Imprisoned in Iran—co-authored by Shane Bauer and Josh Fattal—will be published by Houghton-Mifflin Harcourt in March 2014. Visit Sarah's webpage at http://www.sarahshourd.com/  email:  sarah@sarahshourd.com

George Siedel is the Williamson Family Professor of Business Administration and the Thurnau Professor of Business Law at the Ross School of Business, University of Michigan.  He completed his graduate legal studies at Cambridge University and the University of Michigan.  George has served as Visiting Professor at Stanford University and Harvard University and, as a Fulbright Scholar, held a Distinguished Chair in the Humanities and Social Sciences. His current research focuses on proactive law. His work in progress includes the impact of litigation on large corporations and the use of electronic communication as evidence in litigation.  While at Berkeley, George will be working on a comparative law study of corporate bullying. gsiedel@umich.edu

Geir Stenseth is a Professor of Law at Lillehammer University College, Norway, where he was Head of the Department of Law 2011-2014 and Vice Dean at the Faculty of Social Sciences 2013–2014. He is also associated with the Research Group in Natural Resources Law at University of Oslo, of which he was a founding member. Professor Stenseth has also practiced law since 1994 as a partner in a Norwegian law firm.  He is a graduate of the University of Oslo, where he earned his cand. jur. degree and dr. juris degree. While at the Institute of Private Law, University of Oslo, he was a Visiting Scholar at Center for the Study of Law & Society, on a project combining property law and behavioral economics (2007–2008).  Professor Stenseth was granted a Fulbright Fellowship to conduct research in the U.S. during the 2014-15 academic year. He is delighted to be able to do the research as a Visiting Scholar at the Center for the Study of Law & Society. His main project will be “Gain sharing in public and private takings”. He will also try to finish off a textbook on property law (joint with Professor dr. juris Endre Stavang, Faculty of Law, University of Oslo). Geir.Stenseth@hil.no

Anton Symkovych is a Fulbright Scholar from Ukraine. He received his PhD from the University of Cambridge in 2011.  For the past fourteen years his research interest has been in the area of prisons, spanning from Californian juvenile correctional institutions and British medium-security prisons, to a Ukrainian correctional colony for men. He holds degrees from Ukraine, USA, and UK. His PhD thesis, entitled "Power Relations in a Ukrainian Prison", was the first study of the Ukrainian prison in the English language of its kind, and one of the first to examine the dramatic transformations within the prison system following the collapse of the Communist régime. In 2012-2013 Anton was a member of the Ukraine-Council of Europe expert group charged with designing a training course and writing a manual for Ukrainian prison governors and area managers. Since 2011 he has also served as Deputy Head of the regional prison oversight committee in the Transcarpathia region, Ukraine. Last year he was Senior Research Fellow, Center for Sociological Research, Uzhgorod National University.  His current project aims to detail how order is maintained and reproduced in prisons in the countries very different in their history, economy, legal, and political arrangements -- UK, Ukraine, and potentially US (depending on access arrangements). asymkovych@law.berkeley.edu 

Gakuto Takamura is a Professor of Land Use Law and Sociology of Law at Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto, Japan.  He received his Ph.D. from Waseda University.  He was a visiting scholar at Ecole Normale Superieure de Cachan France from 1999 to 2000 and from 2003-2004.  His first book, Historical Sociology of Freedom of Association (in Japanese), received the Shibusawa-Claudel and Louis Vuitton Prize in 2008.  His second book, Urban Commons and City Revitalization (in Japanese) received the Fujita Prize from the Foundation of the Tokyo Institute for Municipal Research in 2013.  His research topic at the Center is Private Urban Governance in the US and Japan. Through participant observations and interviews with Business Improvement Districts and Privately-Owned Public Spaces in San Francisco and other cities, he plans to investigate the social effects of BID and POPS and study how local government can control the privatization of urban spaces.   takamura@sps.ritsumei.ac.jp

 

VISITING SCHOLARS – Summer 2014

Jason Anastasopoulos is a Democracy Fellow at the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. He received his PhD in Political Science from the University of California, Berkeley in 2013 and his master’s degree in statistics from Harvard University in 2005. His research focuses on political polarization, immigration and race in the late 20th and early 21st century United States. His interests in research methodology include design of experiments, causal inference and machine learning algorithms for text analysis. jason_anastasopoulos@hks.harvard.edu

Jay Borchert is currently a PhD candidate in the Department of Sociology and a Population Studies Center Trainee at the Population Studies Center of the Institute for Social Research, at the University of Michigan Ann Arbor. Recently awarded the Eva L. Mueller New Directions In Economics and Demography Fund Grant to facilitate his research, Jay's dissertation focuses on the philosophies that guide the practice of Corrections in the United States to include how and why these knowledge frameworks may reshape and refine inequality for prisoners, those working in corrections, and communities. Over the last 4 years Jay has worked with professors David Harding and Jeffrey Morenoff, as part of the Michigan Study of Life after Prison research team, to examine the neighborhood context of prisoner reentry. In his current work,Jay is conducting interviews with high-ranking correctional officials nationwide. The goal of the project is to determine the effects of the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003, and its Standards or Final Rule of 2012, upon correctional orthodoxy and praxis, institutional culture, prisoners and correctional staff. Jay is broadly interested in law and social change, citizenship, human rights and macro-level inequality with a sharp focus on prisons and prisoners as objects of legal and social negotiation and conflict. borjay@umich.edu

Peter Burdon is a Senior Lecturer at the Adelaide Law School and deputy chair of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature Ethics Specialist Group. Peter holds a BA (History/Philosophy), LLB (hons) and a PhD from the University of Adelaide. His PhD won the Bonython Prize & the University Research Medal for best original thesis. It will be published as part of the Routledge 'Law, Justice and Ecology' series. Since 2005 Peter has worked with the environment NGO Friends of the Earth. In this role he has engaged in community advocacy, developed submissions in response to mining projects in South Australia, acted as media spokesperson, organized working trips to aboriginal communities in northern South Australia and organized significant public conferences. Peter was a founding member of the Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature and he currently sits on the management committee of the Australian Earth Law Alliance. From 2007-2011 Peter sat on the executive committee of the Conservation Council South Australia and from 2011-2013 he sat on the management committee of the Environmental Defenders Office (SA). Peter’s current research examines the root causes of the current environmental crisis and considers methods for catalysing significant legal and cultural change toward a viable human presence on the Earth. His research uses interdisciplinary materials from political economy, political science, sociology and prefigurative political activism. Peter is also conducting a comparative analysis of the privatization of legal education in Australia and the United States, with a specific focus on academic empowerment and resistance. peter.d.burdon@adelaide.edu.au

Masahiro Fujita is associate professor of social psychology at Kansai University in Osaka, Japan. He received his LL.B. and LL.M. from the University of Tokyo, an M.A. in Human System Science from Hokkaido University, and a Ph.D. in the Basic Science of Law at the University of Tokyo. Working in the interdisciplinary field of law and psychology, he is interested in human behavior within the legal system, and has been engaged in studies of civic participation in the legal system, conducting experiments on group decision making and social surveys on public attitudes towards the legal system. Currently research projects include studying the impact of the introduction of civic participation on public trust and attitudes towards the legitimacy of the legal system, people’s sense of justice, and verifying the validity and reliability of legal knowledge. m.fujita.cf6@gmail.com

Yumiko Fujita is an attorney at law, specializing in divorce and domestic violence in Japan. She graduated from International Christian University in Tokyo and received her Bachelor of Liberal Arts in 2000. Since passing the Japanese Bar Examination in 2004, she has practiced law since 2006. A common issue in her divorce cases has been whether the parent who is not awarded child custody should be permitted to contact the child after the divorce. The effects of contacting on the child are in controversy in Japan, but there is little evidence or data on the effects of those contacts. At the Center, she will study the factors considered in California courts to determine parental contact after a divorce, through interviews with lawyers and judges. yfujita@lawyers.jp

Barbora Hola works as Assistant Professor at the Department of Criminal Law and Criminology, VU University Amsterdam. She is a fellow at the Center for International Criminal Justice and a member of the steering committee of the Africa-Low Countries Network. In her research Barbora focuses on issues of transitional justice, in particular (international) criminal trials, sentencing of international crimes and enforcement of international sentences. In 2013, the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO) awarded Barbora the prestigious Veni grant for a project on vertical (in)consistency of international sentencing. Barbora received her Law degree (JUDr, summa cum laude) at the Faculty of Law, Charles University in Prague. In 2007 she received her LL.M degree in International and European Law at the University of Amsterdam. In 2012, Barbora obtained her PhD in supranational criminology from the VU University Amsterdam where she defended a dissertation on consistency of sentencing of international crimes by international tribunals. At the Center, Barbora will be working on an article analyzing consistency of sentencing of international crimes by the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and domestic courts in the countries of the Former Yugoslavia. b.hola@vu.nl

Sarah E. Igo is Associate Professor of History, with affiliate appointments in Political Science and Sociology, at Vanderbilt University. She received her Ph.D. in History from Princeton University in 2001 and was on the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania from 2001 to 2008. Her primary research interests are in American cultural and intellectual history, the history of the human sciences, the sociology of knowledge, and the history of the public sphere. She is the author of The Averaged American: Surveys, Citizens, and the Making of a Mass Public (2007), which explores the relationship between survey data—opinion polls, sex surveys, consumer research—and modern understandings of self and nation. Professor Igo is at the CSLS on a New Directions Fellowship from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which she is using to pursue training in sociolegal studies and jurisprudence. At the Center she will be working on a cultural history of privacy in the U.S. since the 1890s, examined through legal debates, artistic and architectural movements, technological innovations, professional codes, and shifting social norms. Interested in everyday vocabularies of privacy, her focus is on public debates that had privacy at their core, whether over “instantaneous photographs,” Social Security numbers, suburban home design, reproductive rights, or social media. sarah.igo@vanderbilt.edu

Laverne Jacobs is an Associate Professor and the Director of Graduate Studies at the Faculty of Law of the University of Windsor, Canada. She completed her law degrees and an undergraduate degree at McGill University, and her PhD at York University. Professor Jacobs is at Berkeley in 2014 as a Visiting Scholar at the Center for the Study of Law and Society, and as the Fulbright Visiting Research Chair Canadian Studies. She is an administrative law and disability rights scholar. Her research interests include the independence and impartiality of administrative actors; human rights law; disability rights; access to information and privacy; comparative administrative law; and qualitative empirical research methodology. Dr. Jacobs’ research has used ethnography to explore meanings of the concept of tribunal independence within Canadian access to information and privacy commissions, and has examined, through qualitative data analysis, the effectiveness of ombuds oversight for regulating freedom of information. Dr. Jacobs recently co-edited a collection on comparative administrative process, which brings together global perspectives on polyjuralism in the administrative state (The Nature of Inquisitorial Processes in Administrative Regimes: Global Perspectives (Surrey, UK: Ashgate, 2013); see also, L. Jacobs, “Evaluating Ombuds Oversight in the Canadian Access to Information Context: A Theoretical and Empirical Inquiry” ) . At the Center, she will be working on a new multiyear research project that focuses on the efficacy of agency regulation-making processes when they are used to create regulations that affect persons with disabilities. She has a particular interest in the ability of persons with disabilities to have a voice in the regulatory process. ljacobs@uwindsor.ca

Yuan Qiao is currently a doctoral candidate in Peking University (PKU) Law School in China, specializing in both criminal law and international financial law. Prior to her studies in PKU, she received two Master of Law Degrees-a Banking and Financial Services Law Master Degree from the University of Melbourne, and a Chinese Criminal Law Master Degree. Yuan has participated in several research projects supported by the National Social Science Association. In a recently completed project, named ‘Study on Theory of Criminal Law”, she was responsible for examining and analysing the American and British criminal law theories. Further, she has gained deep understanding of banking and financial law not only from study, but also from her previous work experiences. As an assistant attorney, she has provided high quality legal services to key clients, such as the Bank of East Asia (China) and the Bank of China (Linfen Branch, Shanxi). Her current research interests include law of financial crimes, white-collar crimes, economic criminal law, crimes committed against banks and their control and prevention. yuan.qiao@ymail.com

Ashley Rubin is Assistant Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Florida State University. She received her Ph.D. in Jurisprudence and Social Policy from U.C. Berkeley in 2013 and is excited to return. Her research examines punishment through historical and sociological perspectives, relying on qualitative and quantitative data. Her current focus uses organizational theory to better understand penal trends and the administration of punishment on the ground. At the Center, she will continue her research exploring the nineteenth-century diffusion of prison models and reactions to a non-conforming or “deviant” prison. She has on-going quantitative projects that examine penal trends in eighteenth-century British criminal justice and sentencing disparities among nineteenth-century Pennsylvania prisoners, and qualitative projects exploring the theoretical considerations surrounding prisoner resistance. arubin@fsu.edu

Sarah Shourd is an author, prisoner rights advocate and Contributing Editor at Solitary Watch—currently based in Oakland, California. Sarah was held as a political hostage by the Iranian government from 2009-2010. She was captured, along with her two companions, while hiking near the unmarked Iran/Iraq border in semi-autonomous Iraqi Kurdistan while on a weeklong trip from her home in Damascus, Syria, where Sarah taught refugees for the Iraqi Student Project. Sarah was held incommunicado in solitary confinement for 410 days; then suddenly released without ever being tried or charged. Sarah then joined the Free the Hikers campaign to advocate for the release of Josh and Shane, which came to pass a year later. She now writes, speaks and advocates against the use of prolonged solitary confinement in U.S. prisons. Sarah’s written for The New York Times, CNN, SF Chronicle, Newsweek's Daily Beast and has a blog on Huffington Post. Her memoir A Sliver of Light: Three Americans Imprisoned in Iran—co-authored by Shane Bauer and Josh Fattal—will be published by Houghton-Mifflin Harcourt in March 2014. Visit Sarah's webpage at http://www.sarahshourd.com/ email: sarah@sarahshourd.com

Kathleen (Kate) Sullivan is an Associate Professor in the Anthropology Department at California State University Los Angeles. Her work is situated within the legal and political anthropology tradition, and focuses on environmental politics, governance practices, spatial planning, and regulatory regimes in marine and coastal environments. She conducts archival and ethnographic field research in Chile, British Columbia, Canada, and California, U.S.A., where new forms of ocean planning and management have emerged in recent decades. While at the Center, she will be conducting research for her book, which critically explores the concrete ways in which human relationships with marine environments are being reconfigured through a constellation of instrumental logics driven by law and marine science practices in growing efforts to address the problems of balancing development and conservation in the Pacific Ocean. Her recent publications include Reorganizing Indigenous-State Relations in Chile: Programa Origenes and Participatory Governance in Studies in Law, Politics, and Society Vol. 55:101-129 (2011), and (Re)Landscaping Sovereignty in British Columbia, Canada in PoLAR, Political and Legal Anthropology Review 29(1):44-65 (2006), as well as the co-edited symposium (with Sandra Brunnegger) Negotiating Rights between Indigenous Peoples and States in Latin America in Studies in Law, Politics, and Society Vol. 55 (2011). Dr. Sullivan received her Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of California Santa Barbara in 2004. ksulliv4@calstatela.edu 

Lars Tummers is an Assistant Professor of Public Management and Public Policy at the Erasmus University Rotterdam. In 2013, he was awarded the ‘Best Researcher Award' (Erasmus University Rotterdam). In his PhD (which he received with honors/cum laude), he developed a new model of ‘policy alienation’ to examine the problems of professionals with implementing policies set by government. The dissertation laid the foundations of his book "Policy Alienation and the Power of Professionals" (Edward Elgar, 2013). His research continues to focus on public management and public policy issues, specializing in public leadership, public innovation and policy implementation. He has published about these topics in leading public administration journals, such as Public Administration, Public Administration Review and Public Management Review. Together with Prof. Bekkers, he coordinates a research consortium of 12 universities in 11 European countries on innovation in the public sector (sponsored by the European Commission). He received a prestigious Marie Curie Fellowship from the European Commission together with Michael Musheno and others. The project analyses how civil servants cope with stress during public service delivery. He combines the literatures of psychology and public administration, developing a new research line on the ‘psychology of public administration’. As part of this Marie Curie Fellowship, he will be a visiting scholar at the University of California, Berkeley for the full academic year 2013-2014. Tummers@fsw.eur.nl